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Journal Cover Biomedical Research and Therapy
  [1 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 2198-4093 - ISSN (Online) 2198-4093
   Published by Vietnam National University Homepage  [1 journal]
  • Current status of stem cell transplantation in Vietnam

    • Authors: Phuc Van Pham
      Pages: 578 - 587
      Abstract: Stem cell therapy is promising for treatment of degenerative diseases. In Vietnam, stem cell applications have been performed since the 1990s. In addition to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for malignant hematologic diseases and disorders, mesenchymal stem cells have also been clinically approved for treatment of diseases such as knee osteoarthritis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, autism, cerebral palsy and more in recent years. Unlike countries that only permit use of non-expanded stem cells, the Vietnamese government has permitted use of both non-expanded and expanded stem cells for both local and systemic transfusion in some diseases. After 20 years of stem cell development, the market has finally established stem cell banks and some stem cell clinical services. Although some regulations or guidelines regarding stem cell applications have yet to be published by the government, present breakthroughs in stem cell transplantation may facilitate Vietnam’s recognition as a key player in stem cell application in Asia and, in the near future, the world.
      PubDate: 2016-04-15
      Issue No: Vol. 3, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Adoptive immunotherapy via CD4+ versus CD8+ T cells

    • Authors: Vy Phan-Lai
      Pages: 588 - 595
      Abstract: The goal of cancer immunotherapy is to induce specific and durable antitumor immunity. Adoptive T cell therapy (ACT) has garnered wide interest, particularly in regard to strategies to improve T cell efficacy in trials. There are many types of T cells (and subsets) which can be selected for use in ACT. CD4+ T cells are critical for the regulation, activation and aid of host defense mechanisms and, importantly, for enhancing the function of tumor-specific CD8+ T cells. To date, much research in cancer immunotherapy has focused on CD8+ T cells, in melanoma and other cancers. Both CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells have been evaluated as ACT in mice and humans, and both are effective at eliciting antitumor responses. IL-17 producing CD4+ T cells are a new subset of CD4+ T cells to be evaluated in ACT models. This review discusses the benefits of adoptive immunotherapy mediated by CD8+ and CD4+ cells. It also discusses the various type of T cells, source of T cells, and ex vivo cytokine growth factors for augmenting clinical efficacy of ACT. 
      PubDate: 2016-04-15
      Issue No: Vol. 3, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • The ornithine decarboxylase, NO-synthase activities and phospho-c-Jun
           content under experimental gastric mucosa malignancy

    • Authors: Mariia Tymoshenko, Olha Kravchenko, Olesya Sokur, Liudmila Gaida, Yulia Omelchenko, Liudmila Ostapchenko
      Pages: 596 - 604
      Abstract: Ornithine decarboxylase is the first and key regulatory enzyme in synthesis of polyamines, which are essential for cell proliferation and differentiation, so its aberrant regulation is reported to play a role in neoplastic transformation and tumours growth. That’s why, there were analysed some major links of metabolic pathways that are closely related to tumorigenesis: ornithine decarboxylase, and the NADPH-dependent enzyme nitric oxide synthase, the nuclear phosphoprotein c-Jun, that could play an important role in the development of gastric cancer malignancy.The gastric carcinogenesis was initiated in rats by 10-week replacement of drinking water by 0.01% N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine solution, at the same time they were redefined on the diet containing 5% NaCl. After this period expiry the animals were fed with standard diet till the end of the 24th week. The gastric mucosa cells were extracted at the end of the 4th, 6th, 8th, 10th, 12th, 18th and 24th week and underwent biochemical examinations. It was established the elevated phospho-c-Jun content, ornithine decarboxylase and inducible nitric oxide synthase activities from 6th to 24th week of gastric cancer development compared to the control references. The increasing of ornithine decarboxylase activity could probably be caused by the growth of phospho-c-Jun, it is also belonging to an ornithine decarboxylase transactivation effects. Thus, it was shown that the increase of ornithine decarboxylase and inducible nitric oxide synthase activities, phospho-c-Jun and nitrite-ions accumulation in gastric mucosa epithelial cells were associated with the gastric malignant progression. The complex relationships between the examined enzymes and transcription activator that pointed to an aggravation of pathological disturbances due to reciprocal action between ornithine decarboxylase and c-Jun and nitric oxide synthase participation.
      PubDate: 2016-04-15
      Issue No: Vol. 3, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Comparison of molecular signatures in large scale protein interaction
           networks in normal and cancer conditions of brain, cervix, lung, ovary and
           prostate

    • Authors: Rajat Suvra Banik, Md Shaifur Rahman, K M Taufiqur Rahman, Md Fahmid Islam, Sheikh Md Enayetul Babar
      Pages: 605 - 615
      Abstract: Background Cancer, the disease of intricateness, has remained beyond our complete perception so far. Network systems biology (termed NSB) is one of the most recent approaches to understand the unsolved problems of cancer development. From this perspective, differential protein networks (PINs) have been developed based on the expression and interaction data of brain, cervix, lung, ovary and prostate for normal and cancer conditions.MethodsDifferential expression database GeneHub-GEPIS and interaction database STRING were applied for primary data retrieval. Cytoscape platform and related plugins named network analyzer; MCODE and ModuLand were used for visualization of complex networks and subsequent analysis.ResultsSignificant differences were observedamong different common network parameters between normal and cancer states. Moreover, molecular complex numbers and overlapping modularization found to be varying significantly between normal and cancerous tissues. The number of the ranked molecular complex and the nodes involved in the overlapping modules were meaningfully higher in cancer condition.We identified79 commonly up regulated and 6 down regulated proteins in all five tissues. Number of nodes, edges; multi edge node pair, and average number of neighbor are found with significant fluctuations in case of cervix and ovarian tissues.Cluster analysis showed that the association of Myc and Cdk4 proteins is very close with other proteins within the network.Cervix and ovarian tissue showed higher increment of the molecular complex number and overlapping module network during cancer in comparison to normal state.ConclusionsThe differential molecular signatures identified from the work can be studied further to understand the cancer signaling process, and potential therapeutic and detection approach.
      PubDate: 2016-04-15
      Issue No: Vol. 3, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Autologous bone marrow stem cells combined with allograft cancellous bone
           in treatment of non-union (Correction)

    • Authors: Trung Hau Le Thua, Duc Phu Bui, Duy Thang Nguyen, Dang Nhat Pham, Quy Bao Le, Phan Huy Nguyen, Ngoc Vu Tran, Phuoc Quang Le, Willy D. Boeckx, Albert De Mey
      First page: 616
      Abstract: Page 417, Acknowledgments section, the text “We acknowledge colleagues at Center. of Haematology, Hue Central Hospital. I special thanks to Dr. PHAN Thi Thuy Hoa, Dr. PHAN Hoang Duy, and Dr. Paul LUU for their excellent support. I also thank you Dr. NGUYEN Van Hoa from Hue University of Medicine and Pharmacy for the help in statistical analysis.” Should read “We acknowledge colleagues at Center. of Haematology, Hue Central Hospital. I special thanks to Dr. PHAN Thi Thuy Hoa, Dr. PHAN Hoang Duy, and Dr. Paul LUU for their excellent support. I also thank you Dr. NGUYEN Van Hoa from Hue University of Medicine and Pharmacy for the help in statistical analysis. This work was sponsored by Thua Thien - Hue Foundation for Science and Technology Development  (TTH.2014-KC.16)”.
      PubDate: 2016-04-15
      Issue No: Vol. 3, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Mini-invasive treatment for delayed or nonunion: the use of percutaneous
           autologous bone marrow injection (Correction)

    • Authors: Trung Hau Le Thua, Dang Nhat Pham, Quy Ngoc Bao Le, Phan Huy Nguyen, Thi Thuy Hoa Phan, Hoang Duy Phan, Phuoc Quang Le, Willy Denis Boeckx, Albert De Mey
      First page: 617
      Abstract: Page 394, Acknowledgments section, the text “We acknowledge colleagues at Center. of Haematology, Hue Central Hospital. I also special thanks to Prof. BUI Duc Phu, Prof. NGUYEN Duy Thang, Dr. TRAN Ngoc Vu, and Dr. Paul LUU, as well as Mr. NGUYEN Ngoc Luong from Dept. of Biology, Hue University for their excellent help and support. Should read “We acknowledge colleagues at Center. of Haematology, Hue Central Hospital. I also special thanks to Prof. BUI Duc Phu, Prof. NGUYEN Duy Thang, Dr. TRAN Ngoc Vu, and Dr. Paul LUU, as well as Mr. NGUYEN Ngoc Luong from Dept. of Biology, Hue University for their excellent help and support. This work was sponsored by Thua Thien - Hue Foundation for Science and Technology Development  (TTH.2014-KC.16)”.
      PubDate: 2016-04-15
      Issue No: Vol. 3, No. 4 (2016)
       
 
 
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