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Journal Cover Horticulture Research
  [10 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Online) 2052-7276
   Published by NPG Homepage  [136 journals]
  • Breeding next generation tree fruits: technical and legal challenges
    • Breeding next generation tree fruits: technical and legal challenges

      Breeding next generation tree fruits: technical and legal challenges, Published online: 06 December 2017; doi:10.1038/hortres.2017.67

      A new generation of genetic techniques could revolutionise crop breeding, but also poses technical and legal challenges. Traditional crop breeding is a slow and relatively unpredictable process. Genetic modification overcomes these problems but, especially in Europe, raises consumer concerns surrounding cross-contamination and unintended genetic effects. An Italian team led by Lorenza Dalla Costa at the Fondazione Edmund Mach, San Michele all'Adige, reviews two cutting-edge techniques that may avoid these issues. ‘Cisgenesis’ is the transfer of genes between very closely related plants, mimicking the process of traditional crop breeding. ‘Genome editing’ uses targeted enzymes to switch off specific genes, such as those conferring susceptibility to pathogens. In high-value perennial crops such as grapevine, these techniques could prove invaluable; however, education, improved legislation, and further technical development are all required before they can be used in practice.Breeding next generation tree fruits: technical and legal challenges, Published online: 2017-12-06; doi:10.1038/hortres.2017.672017-12-06
      DOI: 10.1038/hortres.2017.67
       
  • Characterization of physiological and molecular processes associated with
           potato response to Zebra chip disease
    • Characterization of physiological and molecular processes associated with potato response to Zebra chip disease

      Characterization of physiological and molecular processes associated with potato response to Zebra chip disease, Published online: 06 December 2017; doi:10.1038/hortres.2017.69

      Characterizing the response of potatoes to newly emerging ‘Zebra chip’ disease may boost efforts to combat this and other similar infections. Several devastating crop diseases are attributed to enigmatic and unculturable bacteria of the genus ‘Candidatus Liberibacter’. One such, Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum (Lso), is thought to cause Zebra chip disease, which causes dark striping of potato tubers and other debilitating symptoms. A US team, led by Hong Lin at the USDA-ARS, Parlier, studied the molecular mechanisms invoked in the roots and leaves of potatoes infected with Lso. Using advanced sequencing techniques, Lin and colleagues identified genes (including many defense-related genes) that were switched on or off during Lso infection. Knowledge of these genetic changes could be used to breed less susceptible varieties of potato, and to explain the pathogenesis of Candidatus Liberibacter in other crops.Characterization of physiological and molecular processes associated with potato response to Zebra chip disease, Published online: 2017-12-06; doi:10.1038/hortres.2017.692017-12-06
      DOI: 10.1038/hortres.2017.69
       
  • Reprogramming of a defense signaling pathway in rough lemon and sweet
           orange is a critical element of the early response to ‘Candidatus
           Liberibacter asiaticus’
    • Reprogramming of a defense signaling pathway in rough lemon and sweet orange is a critical element of the early response to ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’

      Reprogramming of a defense signaling pathway in rough lemon and sweet orange is a critical element of the early response to ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’, Published online: 29 November 2017; doi:10.1038/hortres.2017.63

      Researchers in the USA have identified genes which help citrus trees cope with the disease Huanglongbing (HLB), or citrus greening. A team led by Frederick Gmitter of the University of Florida, Lake Alfred, sequenced RNA from rough lemon and sweet orange trees seven weeks after infection with HLB. Although no citrus species resistant to HLB are known, rough lemon is tolerant, showing higher survival rates and growing new symptom-free shoots. The team compared the sequence data with a baseline taken at the time of infection to measure how the plants responded to HLB. Many of the same genes were activated in both species, but genetic regulation shifted towards defense in lemon, together with an increase in expression levels, particularly of defense-related genes. These findings offer an overview of an effective early response to HLB.Reprogramming of a defense signaling pathway in rough lemon and sweet orange is a critical element of the early response to ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’, Published online: 2017-11-29; doi:10.1038/hortres.2017.632017-11-29
      DOI: 10.1038/hortres.2017.63
       
  • Genome resequencing and transcriptome profiling reveal structural
           diversity and expression patterns of constitutive disease resistance genes
           in Huanglongbing-tolerant Poncirus trifoliata and its hybrids
    • Genome resequencing and transcriptome profiling reveal structural diversity and expression patterns of constitutive disease resistance genes in Huanglongbing-tolerant Poncirus trifoliata and its hybrids

      Genome resequencing and transcriptome profiling reveal structural diversity and expression patterns of constitutive disease resistance genes in Huanglongbing-tolerant Poncirus trifoliata and its hybrids, Published online: 15 November 2017; doi:10.1038/hortres.2017.64

      Genome resequencing and transcriptome profiling reveal structural diversity and expression patterns of constitutive disease resistance genes in Huanglongbing-tolerant Poncirus trifoliata and its hybrids, Published online: 2017-11-15; doi:10.1038/hortres.2017.642017-11-15
      DOI: 10.1038/hortres.2017.64
       
  • Clarifying sub-genomic positions of QTLs for flowering habit and fruit
           quality in U.S. strawberry (Fragaria×ananassa) breeding populations using
           pedigree-based QTL analysis
    • Clarifying sub-genomic positions of QTLs for flowering habit and fruit quality in U.S. strawberry (Fragaria×ananassa) breeding populations using pedigree-based QTL analysis

      Clarifying sub-genomic positions of QTLs for flowering habit and fruit quality in U.S. strawberry (Fragaria×ananassa) breeding populations using pedigree-based QTL analysis, Published online: 08 November 2017; doi:10.1038/hortres.2017.62

      Clarifying sub-genomic positions of QTLs for flowering habit and fruit quality in U.S. strawberry (Fragaria×ananassa) breeding populations using pedigree-based QTL analysis, Published online: 2017-11-08; doi:10.1038/hortres.2017.622017-11-08
      DOI: 10.1038/hortres.2017.62
       
  • Pro-inflammatory effects of a litchi protein extract in murine RAW264.7
           macrophages
    • Pro-inflammatory effects of a litchi protein extract in murine RAW264.7 macrophages

      Pro-inflammatory effects of a litchi protein extract in murine RAW264.7 macrophages, Published online: 25 October 2017; doi:10.1038/hortres.2017.59

      Pro-inflammatory effects of a litchi protein extract in murine RAW264.7 macrophages, Published online: 2017-10-25; doi:10.1038/hortres.2017.592017-10-25
      DOI: 10.1038/hortres.2017.59
       
  • VqMAPKKK38 is essential for stilbene accumulation in grapevine
    • VqMAPKKK38 is essential for stilbene accumulation in grapevine

      VqMAPKKK38 is essential for stilbene accumulation in grapevine, Published online: 18 October 2017; doi:10.1038/hortres.2017.58

      VqMAPKKK38 is essential for stilbene accumulation in grapevine, Published online: 2017-10-18; doi:10.1038/hortres.2017.582017-10-18
      DOI: 10.1038/hortres.2017.58
       
  • Interval mapping for red/green skin color in Asian pears using a modified
           QTL-seq method
    • Interval mapping for red/green skin color in Asian pears using a modified QTL-seq method

      Interval mapping for red/green skin color in Asian pears using a modified QTL-seq method, Published online: 04 October 2017; doi:10.1038/hortres.2017.53

      Interval mapping for red/green skin color in Asian pears using a modified QTL-seq method, Published online: 2017-10-04; doi:10.1038/hortres.2017.532017-10-04
      DOI: 10.1038/hortres.2017.53
       
 
 
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