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Journal Cover Horticulture Research
  [11 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Online) 2052-7276
   Published by NPG Homepage  [141 journals]
  • Identification and substrate prediction of new Fragaria x ananassa
           aquaporins and expression in different tissues and during strawberry fruit
           development
    • Identification and substrate prediction of new Fragaria x ananassa aquaporins and expression in different tissues and during strawberry fruit development

      Identification and substrate prediction of new Fragaria x ananassa aquaporins and expression in different tissues and during strawberry fruit development, Published online: 01 April 2018; doi:10.1038/s41438-018-0019-0

      Insights into the mechanisms behind cellular water transport within strawberry plants could help optimize crop management and yields. Strawberry plants have shallow root systems, large leaves and produce fruit with a high water content, and so good water management is essential for optimizing commercial strawberry crops. However, the precise mechanisms inherent in cellular water management in strawberries are not clear. Marie-Christine Van Labeke at Ghent University in Belgium, and co-workers identified and coded three sub-classes of cellular water channels called aquaporins in the commercial strawberry, Fragaria x ananassa. Aquaporins form gated pores in cellular membranes, which open and close to control water transport within the plant. The researchers found that aquaporin sub-classes are expressed differently in stalks, leaves and fruits dependent on ripening stage, and, even within the same sub-class, they have individual specialized functions.Identification and substrate prediction of new Fragaria x ananassa aquaporins and expression in different tissues and during strawberry fruit development, Published online: 2018-04-01; doi:10.1038/s41438-018-0019-02018-04-01
      DOI: 10.1038/s41438-018-0019-0
       
  • Molecular markers reliably predict post-harvest deterioration of fresh-cut
           lettuce in modified atmosphere packaging
    • Molecular markers reliably predict post-harvest deterioration of fresh-cut lettuce in modified atmosphere packaging

      Molecular markers reliably predict post-harvest deterioration of fresh-cut lettuce in modified atmosphere packaging, Published online: 01 April 2018; doi:10.1038/s41438-018-0022-5

      Genetic studies have shown that the rate of deterioration of cut lettuce leaves in pre-packaged salads is a highly heritable trait, governed by gene regions that could be used to breed longer-lasting varieties. Many genetic studies have aimed at breeding better varieties of lettuce (Lactuca sativa), but most have focused upon those grown for whole heads, rather than the cut leaves that are becoming increasingly popular with consumers. An international team led by Ivan Simko, of the USDA in Salinas, California, have developed a genetic assay to distinguish fast- from slow-deteriorating lettuce varieties based on a single DNA region identified in a previous study. Their marker-based test may be useful in developing lettuces that show both disease resistance during cultivation, and a longer shelf life once leaves are cut for sale.Molecular markers reliably predict post-harvest deterioration of fresh-cut lettuce in modified atmosphere packaging, Published online: 2018-04-01; doi:10.1038/s41438-018-0022-52018-04-01
      DOI: 10.1038/s41438-018-0022-5
       
  • Genotyping-by-sequencing application on diploid rose and a resulting
           high-density SNP-based consensus map
    • Genotyping-by-sequencing application on diploid rose and a resulting high-density SNP-based consensus map

      Genotyping-by-sequencing application on diploid rose and a resulting high-density SNP-based consensus map, Published online: 01 April 2018; doi:10.1038/s41438-018-0021-6

      A genetic map of rose DNA could help flower breeders develop ornamental crops that are more resistant to disease or have other desirable traits. Rose breeder, David Byrne and molecular geneticist, Patricia Klein along with their colleagues from Texas A&M University in College Station, USA, bred five different strains of ‘diploid’ rose, each with two full sets of chromosomes, to create 234 offspring plants. Using the full genome from strawberry, a closely related species, as a reference, the researchers then looked for sites in the genome where either single DNA letters differed between individual offspring or where short sequences of DNA repeated themselves to create easily identifiable genetic markers. They created genetic maps of each parental cross, and then formed a consensus map that can now serve as a tool for future genetically guided breeding efforts of horticulturally important traits.Genotyping-by-sequencing application on diploid rose and a resulting high-density SNP-based consensus map, Published online: 2018-04-01; doi:10.1038/s41438-018-0021-62018-04-01
      DOI: 10.1038/s41438-018-0021-6
       
  • The grapevine kinome: annotation, classification and expression patterns
           in developmental processes and stress responses
    • The grapevine kinome: annotation, classification and expression patterns in developmental processes and stress responses

      The grapevine kinome: annotation, classification and expression patterns in developmental processes and stress responses, Published online: 01 April 2018; doi:10.1038/s41438-018-0027-0

      A comprehensive map of all the protein kinases (PKs) in grape is now available. PKs switch other proteins on or off by adding or removing a phosphate group. They regulate many cellular processes, coordinate plant growth, and trigger responses to various stresses. However, the number, relationships, and functions of PKs remain uncharacterized in most plants. Zong-Ming Cheng at Nanjing Agricultural University and the University of Tennessee mapped all the PKs in grape. Using the most up-to-date version of the genome, Cheng and coworkers identified over 1000 PKs, traced their evolutionary relationships, and identified which PKs are active in key growth phases. They also identified many PKs involved in response to stresses such as heat and drought. These results may help to improve stress tolerance in one of the world’s most economically important fruits.The grapevine kinome: annotation, classification and expression patterns in developmental processes and stress responses, Published online: 2018-04-01; doi:10.1038/s41438-018-0027-02018-04-01
      DOI: 10.1038/s41438-018-0027-0
       
  • Transcriptome profiling reveals regulatory mechanisms underlying corolla
           senescence in petunia
    • Transcriptome profiling reveals regulatory mechanisms underlying corolla senescence in petunia

      Transcriptome profiling reveals regulatory mechanisms underlying corolla senescence in petunia, Published online: 01 April 2018; doi:10.1038/s41438-018-0018-1

      How long flowers bloom is determined by genes that alter levels of the plant hormones ethylene and auxin. When flowers are no longer needed, plants signal them to die; the underlying genetic mechanisms are not well understood. Cai-Zhong Jiang at the University of California, Davis and co-workers used genetic analysis to determine how the signals for petal death are encoded. They studied petunia flowers at four stages: opening, pollen release, onset of wilting, and fully wilted, and identified over 5000 genes that were turned up or down. The master switches for petal death were found to be genes controlling ethylene and auxin levels. Using a virus to artificially switch off several genes, the researchers identified genes that shorten or extend flower life by up to three days. These results may be useful in plant breeding.Transcriptome profiling reveals regulatory mechanisms underlying corolla senescence in petunia, Published online: 2018-04-01; doi:10.1038/s41438-018-0018-12018-04-01
      DOI: 10.1038/s41438-018-0018-1
       
  • Transcriptional analysis and histochemistry reveal that hypersensitive
           cell death and H2O2 have crucial roles in the resistance of tea plant
           (Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze) to anthracnose
    • Transcriptional analysis and histochemistry reveal that hypersensitive cell death and H2O2 have crucial roles in the resistance of tea plant (Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze) to anthracnose

      Transcriptional analysis and histochemistry reveal that hypersensitive cell death and H2O2 have crucial roles in the resistance of tea plant (Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze) to anthracnose, Published online: 01 April 2018; doi:10.1038/s41438-018-0025-2

      A comparison of gene activity in resistant and susceptible tea cultivars provides insights into mechanisms of defence against one of the most devastating tea diseases: anthracnose. Tea (Camellia sinensis) is an important crop in many tropical countries; however, yields can be devastated by the fungus Colletotrichum, the causal agent of anthracnose. Xinchao Wang and Yajun Yang, of the Chinese Academy of Sciences’ Tea Research Institute in Hangzhou, explored the defence response in tea cultivars infected with Colletotrichum. Discrepancies in the genes activated in resistant and susceptible cultivars suggest resistance is mediated by specific molecular signalling pathways, known resistance (R) genes, and involves the production of hydrogen peroxide and initiation of programmed cell death around sites of infection. These mechanisms could be harnessed to develop tea cultivars with greater resistance to anthracnose.Transcriptional analysis and histochemistry reveal that hypersensitive cell death and H2O2 have crucial roles in the resistance of tea plant (Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze) to anthracnose, Published online: 2018-04-01; doi:10.1038/s41438-018-0025-22018-04-01
      DOI: 10.1038/s41438-018-0025-2
       
  • NPR1 as a transgenic crop protection strategy in horticultural
           species
    • NPR1 as a transgenic crop protection strategy in horticultural species

      NPR1 as a transgenic crop protection strategy in horticultural species, Published online: 20 March 2018; doi:10.1038/s41438-018-0026-1

      Introducing the plant immunity gene NPR1 into fruits and vegetables may help to protect them against diseases and pests, which are emerging and migrating faster than resistance can be developed using traditional breeding methods. Pandemics currently threaten crops such as banana, cacao, citrus, and avocado, and genetic engineering may offer a rapid, low-input alternative for crop protection. Kevin Folta at the University of Florida and co-workers reviewed the use of NPR1 to boost immunity in horticultural plants. NPR1 was first tested in high-acreage crops such as rice, and it is now being tested in strawberry, grapevine, tomato, carrot, cotton, citrus, tobacco, and many others. Introducing NPR1 usually improves resistance, and researchers are testing ways to minimize undesirable side effects, such as reduced yield. Transgenic approaches show promise for helping plants adapt to modern stresses. NPR1 as a transgenic crop protection strategy in horticultural species, Published online: 2018-03-20; doi:10.1038/s41438-018-0026-12018-03-20
      DOI: 10.1038/s41438-018-0026-1
       
  • Developing gene-tagged molecular markers for evaluation of genetic
           association of apple SWEET genes with fruit sugar accumulation
    • Developing gene-tagged molecular markers for evaluation of genetic association of apple SWEET genes with fruit sugar accumulation

      Developing gene-tagged molecular markers for evaluation of genetic association of apple SWEET genes with fruit sugar accumulation, Published online: 20 March 2018; doi:10.1038/s41438-018-0024-3

      Insights into the mechanisms that drive fruit sugar content in apples could help develop and breed apple trees with improved fruit quality. The transportation of sugars throughout fruit plants plays a vital role both in healthy plant development and in the quality of the fruit produced. However, the mechanisms inherent in fruit sugar accumulation are not yet fully understood. Yuepeng Han at the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Wuhan, China, and co-workers sought to clarify the role of genes encoding SWEET sugar transporters in the cultivated apple, Malus x domestica Borkh. They identified 25 SWEET genes in the apple genome, with 9 of these highly expressed during fruit development. Han’s team narrowed these genes down to two that were highly associated with the regulation of sugar content in the fruit.Developing gene-tagged molecular markers for evaluation of genetic association of apple SWEET genes with fruit sugar accumulation, Published online: 2018-03-20; doi:10.1038/s41438-018-0024-32018-03-20
      DOI: 10.1038/s41438-018-0024-3
       
 
 
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