Journal Cover Horticulture Research
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  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Online) 2052-7276
   Published by NPG Homepage  [135 journals]
  • Genomic and transcriptomic alterations following intergeneric
           hybridization and polyploidization in the Chrysanthemum
           nankingenseƗTanacetum vulgare hybrid and allopolyploid (Asteraceae)
    • Genomic and transcriptomic alterations following intergeneric hybridization and polyploidization in the Chrysanthemum nankingense×Tanacetum vulgare hybrid and allopolyploid (Asteraceae)

      Genomic and transcriptomic alterations following intergeneric hybridization and polyploidization in the Chrysanthemum nankingense×Tanacetum vulgare hybrid and allopolyploid (Asteraceae), Published online: 07 February 2018; doi:10.1038/s41438-017-0003-0

      Two drivers of plant speciation – hybridization and polyploidization – may interact to cause significant genetic and genomic changes. The creation of new species and varieties of plant, both in nature and in artificial breeding, commonly employs the processes of hybridization (breeding two different species together) and polyploidization (multiplication of the entire genome). When the two processes occur together, an ‘allopolyploid’ is created. A team at Nanjing Agricultural University, led by Fadi Chen, explored the genomic changes associated with allopolyploidization in a hybrid of two species of composites (Asteraceae, the daisy family), chrysanthemum and tansy. Using a combination of modern genetic approaches, they found that differences in genetic makeup, gene activity, and molecular modification of the genome were associated with both hybridization and polyploidization and, potentially, with an interaction between the two.Genomic and transcriptomic alterations following intergeneric hybridization and polyploidization in the Chrysanthemum nankingense×Tanacetum vulgare hybrid and allopolyploid (Asteraceae), Published online: 2018-02-07; doi:10.1038/s41438-017-0003-02018-02-07
      DOI: 10.1038/s41438-017-0003-0
       
  • Metabolic analyses reveal different mechanisms of leaf color change in two
           purple-leaf tea plant (Camellia sinensis L.) cultivars
    • Metabolic analyses reveal different mechanisms of leaf color change in two purple-leaf tea plant (Camellia sinensis L.) cultivars

      Metabolic analyses reveal different mechanisms of leaf color change in two purple-leaf tea plant (Camellia sinensis L.) cultivars, Published online: 07 February 2018; doi:10.1038/s41438-017-0010-1

      Researchers in China have uncovered how the leaves of purple-leaf tea varieties acquire their color. Wanping Fang and Xujun Zhu of Nanjing Agricultural University analyzed the biochemical profile and gene expression patterns in the young purple leaves and older green leaves of two purple tea varieties, one new and one previously studied. The purple leaves of both varieties had higher levels of red/purple pigments known as flavonoids, as well as increased expression of genes related to their synthesis. However, only the new variety also had increased chlorophyll levels in green leaves. Both varieties are purple because flavonoids mask the color of chlorophyll, but the process is driven by different mechanisms in each. These findings clarify how tea varieties develop different levels of flavonoids, which affect tea quality due to their antioxidant and antimicrobial activity.Metabolic analyses reveal different mechanisms of leaf color change in two purple-leaf tea plant (Camellia sinensis L.) cultivars, Published online: 2018-02-07; doi:10.1038/s41438-017-0010-12018-02-07
      DOI: 10.1038/s41438-017-0010-1
       
  • Chromosome-scale scaffolding of the black raspberry (Rubus occidentalis
           L.) genome based on chromatin interaction data
    • Chromosome-scale scaffolding of the black raspberry (Rubus occidentalis L.) genome based on chromatin interaction data

      Chromosome-scale scaffolding of the black raspberry (Rubus occidentalis L.) genome based on chromatin interaction data, Published online: 07 February 2018; doi:10.1038/s41438-017-0013-y

      Assembly of a high-quality reference genome for the black raspberry plant will inform future crop improvements. Sequencing the genomes of widely-grown, profitable fruit crops can help researchers identify the DNA markers linked to desirable traits, potentially improving crop health and yields. David Chagné at the New Zealand Institute for Plant and Food Research Limited and co-workers combined new techniques to significantly improve on an existing genome for the black raspberry (Rubus occidentalis L.). The researchers used Hi-C analysis to create a map identifying the interactions between chromatin fragments – macromolecules made from DNA, proteins and RNA – and the three-dimensional structure of chromosomes inside the cell nucleus. Then, they used a bioinformatics assembly method to construct the genome from this data. The new genome showed high accuracy when compared to another genome from the same family.Chromosome-scale scaffolding of the black raspberry (Rubus occidentalis L.) genome based on chromatin interaction data, Published online: 2018-02-07; doi:10.1038/s41438-017-0013-y2018-02-07
      DOI: 10.1038/s41438-017-0013-y
       
  • A comprehensive proteomic analysis of elaioplasts from citrus fruits
           reveals insights into elaioplast biogenesis and function
    • A comprehensive proteomic analysis of elaioplasts from citrus fruits reveals insights into elaioplast biogenesis and function

      A comprehensive proteomic analysis of elaioplasts from citrus fruits reveals insights into elaioplast biogenesis and function, Published online: 07 February 2018; doi:10.1038/s41438-017-0014-x

      A study of the proteins in bodies called elaioplasts in citrus fruit cells will help to clarify elaioplast formation and functions. Plant cells contain several types of membrane-bound bodies called plastids, with elaioplasts being an incompletely characterized type. They are known to store oils in the cells, especially molecules called terpenes that influence the fragrances and flavors of citrus fruits. Researchers in China, led by Yunliu Zeng at Huazhong Agricultural University, analyzed the protein molecules in elaioplasts of kumquat peel to investigate possible roles for elaioplasts other than oil storage. They identified more than 600 proteins and assigned likely functions to many. The results suggest the proteins are involved in chemical energy transactions and the manufacture of various categories of biomolecules. This will guide research to fully characterize the activities and significance of elaioplasts.A comprehensive proteomic analysis of elaioplasts from citrus fruits reveals insights into elaioplast biogenesis and function, Published online: 2018-02-07; doi:10.1038/s41438-017-0014-x2018-02-07
      DOI: 10.1038/s41438-017-0014-x
       
  • Reference quality assembly of the 3.5-Gb genome of Capsicum annuum from a
           single linked-read library
    • Reference quality assembly of the 3.5-Gb genome of Capsicum annuum from a single linked-read library

      Reference quality assembly of the 3.5-Gb genome of Capsicum annuum from a single linked-read library, Published online: 12 January 2018; doi:10.1038/s41438-017-0011-0

      Reference quality assembly of the 3.5-Gb genome of Capsicum annuum from a single linked-read libraryReference quality assembly of the 3.5-Gb genome of Capsicum annuum from a single linked-read library, Published online: 2018-01-12; doi:10.1038/s41438-017-0011-02018-01-12
      DOI: 10.1038/s41438-017-0011-0
       
  • Organellar genome assembly methods and comparative analysis of
           horticultural plants
    • Organellar genome assembly methods and comparative analysis of horticultural plants

      Organellar genome assembly methods and comparative analysis of horticultural plants, Published online: 10 January 2018; doi:10.1038/s41438-017-0002-1

      A new method makes it easier to assemble the DNA sequences of mitochondrial and chloroplast genomes for horticultural plants. Most strategies for assembling the genomes of chloroplasts (which conduct photosynthesis) and mitochondria (which supply cellular energy) require the isolation of organellar DNA from total DNA. However, using bioinformatics software, a team led by Tongming Yin and Ning Ye from Nanjing Forestry University, China, identified a way to pull out all the DNA sequence reads for these organelles from complete next-generation sequencing data, without the need for specialized sample preparation. As a proof-of-principle, the researchers used the protocol to decode the mitochondrial and chloroplast genomes of the ornamental plant Salix suchowensis and the fruit tree Ziziphus jujube. Comparative analyses of mitochondrial and chloroplast genomes assembled in this way could reveal new insights into plant evolutionary relationships.Organellar genome assembly methods and comparative analysis of horticultural plants, Published online: 2018-01-10; doi:10.1038/s41438-017-0002-12018-01-10
      DOI: 10.1038/s41438-017-0002-1
       
  • A roadmap for breeding orphan leafy vegetable species: a case study of
           Gynandropsis gynandra (Cleomaceae)
    • A roadmap for breeding orphan leafy vegetable species: a case study of Gynandropsis gynandra (Cleomaceae)

      A roadmap for breeding orphan leafy vegetable species: a case study of Gynandropsis gynandra (Cleomaceae), Published online: 10 January 2018; doi:10.1038/s41438-017-0001-2

      Developing the potential of neglected crops can improve food security and economic stability of impoverished farmers. Orphan crops are local, often indigenous, crop species which have been overlooked by research and underutilized as an agricultural resource. Eric Schranz of Wageningen University and his colleagues around the world have reviewed what is known about orphan leafy vegetables and provided guidelines to coordinate research into their breeding and cultivation. The guidelines include increasing awareness of orphan crop potential, collecting and characterizing wild varieties, implementing a breeding program based on modern genetics and genomics, and integrating the needs of key players throughout the process. Orphan leafy vegetables offer an excellent opportunity for small-scale farmers to feed and support themselves, but properly developing this resource requires a concerted effort from researchers, seed companies, policy-makers, farmers, and consumers.A roadmap for breeding orphan leafy vegetable species: a case study of Gynandropsis gynandra (Cleomaceae), Published online: 2018-01-10; doi:10.1038/s41438-017-0001-22018-01-10
      DOI: 10.1038/s41438-017-0001-2
       
  • Histological, hormonal and transcriptomic reveal the changes upon
           gibberellin-induced parthenocarpy in pear fruit
    • Histological, hormonal and transcriptomic reveal the changes upon gibberellin-induced parthenocarpy in pear fruit

      Histological, hormonal and transcriptomic reveal the changes upon gibberellin-induced parthenocarpy in pear fruit, Published online: 03 January 2018; doi:10.1038/s41438-017-0012-z

      Various hormonal, anatomical and genetic changes explain how a plant hormone can induce pears to make seedless fruit without fertilization. Lingfei Xu and colleagues from Northwest A&F University in Yangling, China, studied the effect of plant growth hormones known as gibberellins on fruit development in the Dangshansuli pear, Pyrus bretschneideri Rehd. They found that spraying a mixture of two gibberellins, known as GA4+7, on unpollinated flowers produced seedless mature fruits of a normal size, whereas treatment with another gibberellin, GA3, yielded fruit that died before harvest. Analyses of gene expression, hormone levels and cell growth in the developing pear fruits showed that applying GA4+7 to unpollinated flowers generated many of the same effects as pollination. The findings could aid in future commercial production of this popular Asian fruit.Histological, hormonal and transcriptomic reveal the changes upon gibberellin-induced parthenocarpy in pear fruit, Published online: 2018-01-03; doi:10.1038/s41438-017-0012-z2018-01-03
      DOI: 10.1038/s41438-017-0012-z
       
 
 
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