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Journal Cover Libellarium : journal for the history of writing, books and memory institutions
  [10 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 1846-8527 - ISSN (Online) 1846-9213
   Published by U of Zadar Homepage  [1 journal]
  • Education for digital libraries: from European perspective

    • Authors: Tatjana Aparac Jelušić
      Abstract: In the last two decades higher education in Europe has been going through deep changes, based on the vision of united educational space and educational reform as a consequence of many social and technological changes. Although many discussions have been held, many conferences organised, and serious research papers published on the topic of changes, internationalization and Europeanisation of education of information experts, there are still debates on conceptual issues and an urge for a new, innovative approach to structure and organisation of higher education institutions, including information sciences field. The aim of this paper is to point out to new trends in European higher education that have taken place in information sciences as well. These trends have stimulated search for solutions that would, starting from traditional competences and critically approaching new possibilities, enable the offer of attractive and sustainable study programmes that would be flexible enough to react on labour market needs for experts in the digital environment and new educational profiles.
      PubDate: 2017-03-06
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • International mobility in Library and Information Science

    • Authors: Vera Hillebrand, Elke Greifeneder
      Abstract: This study examines whether a brain drain exists in LIS and explores the patterns of geographical mobility of researchers. Brain drain or brain gain describes the migration of scientists from their home country to another. The results are based on a quantitative dataset of 877 active LIS researchers who have been involved in the 2014 to 2016 iConferences. The study reveals two alarming trends: the American LIS researchers rarely ever leave their continent and might lack international exposure. On the other hand, researchers from Asia and Europe show a high rate of mobility towards North America. In particular, the next generation of LIS researchers are currently receiving their education in North America. 94.3 % of all PhD students in the sample currently live in the US and may never return. One important pull factor seems to be the possibility of studying in English. If foreign students decide to come to Europe, they go to Ireland or the United Kingdom.
      PubDate: 2017-03-02
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Understanding roles and responsibilities of data curators: an
           international perspective

    • Authors: Anna Maria Tammaro, Krystyna Matusiak, Frank Andreas Sposito, Vittore Casarosa, Ana Pervan
      Abstract: Data curation has emerged as a new area of responsibility for researchers, librarians, and information professionals in the digital library environment. This paper presents the preliminary findings of a large research project sponsored by the International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA), under the auspices of its Library Theory and Research (LTR) Section. The primary objective of the project is to identify the characteristic tasks and responsibilities of data curators in both international and interdisciplinary contexts. The ultimate objective, however, is to develop a “data curation ontology” that will better define the profession and support the development of educational curricula to train future data curators.
      PubDate: 2017-03-02
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Leveraging exceptions and limitations for digital curation and online
           collections: the U.S. case

    • Authors: Patricia Aufderheide
      Abstract: Librarians wanting to use digital affordances for their patron’s and public benefit have increasingly found themselves frustrated by copyright law designed for a pre-digital era. In the U.S., this frustration has driven the nation’s most prestigious library group, the Association of Research Libraries, to explore the utility of the major exception to copyright monopoly rights, fair use, in order to accomplish basic curation and collection goals in a digital era. The ARL’s efforts to clarify how libraries can employ fair use has resulted in sometimes-dramatic changes in how work is done, and has permitted innovation at some universities. Its approach demonstrates the power of consensus in a professional field to permit innovation within the law.
      PubDate: 2017-03-02
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Social science research data curation: issues of reuse

    • Authors: Guangyuan Sun, Christopher Soo Guan Khoo
      Abstract: Data curation is attracting a growing interest in the library and information science community. The main purpose of data curation is to support data reuse. This paper discusses the issues of reusing quantitative social science data from three perspectives of searching and browsing for datasets, evaluating the reusability of datasets (including evaluating topical relevance, utility and data quality), and integrating datasets, by comparing dataset searching with online database searching. The paper also discusses using knowledge representation techniques of metadata and ontology, and a graphical visualization interface to support users in browsing, assessing and integrating datasets.
      PubDate: 2017-03-02
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Statistical analyses of digital collections: using a large corpus of
           systematic reviews to study non-citations

    • Authors: Tove Faber Frandsen, Jeppe Nicolaisen
      Abstract: Using statistical methods to analyse digital material for patterns makes it possible to detect patterns in big data that we would otherwise not be able to detect. This paper seeks to exemplify this fact by statistically analysing a large corpus of references in systematic reviews. The aim of the analysis is to study the phenomenon of non-citation: Situations where just one (or some) document(s) are cited from a pool of otherwise equally citable documents. The study is based on more than 120,000 cited studies, and a total number of non-cited studies of more than 1.6 million. The number of cited studies is found to be much smaller than the number of non-cited. Also, the cited and non-cited studies are found to differ in age. Very recent studies tend to be non-cited whereas the cited studies are rarely of recent age (e.g. within the same year). The greatest differences are found within the first 10 years. After 10 years the cited and non-cited studies tend to be more similar in terms of age. Separating the data set into different sub-disciplines reveals that the sub-disciplines vary in terms of age of cited vs. non-cited references. Some fields may be expanding and the number of published studies is thus growing. Consequently, cited and non-cited studies tend to be younger. Other fields may be more slowly progressing fields that use a greater proportion of the older literature within the field. These field differences manifest themselves in the average age of references.
      PubDate: 2017-03-02
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • A Decision Support System to Facilitate File Format Selection for Digital
           Preservation

    • Authors: Roman Graf, Heather M. Ryan, Tibaut Houzanme, Sergiu Gordea
      Abstract: This paper presents a method to facilitate decision making for the preservation of digital content in libraries and archives using institutional risk profiles that highlight endangered files formats (in danger of becoming inaccessible or unusable). The primary contribution of this work is the combined use of both machine-mined data and human-expert input to select and configure institution-specific preservation risk profiles. The machine-mined data used the developed File Format Metadata Aggregator (FFMA), and the crowdsourced expert input was collected via two surveys of digital preservation practitioners. A by-product of this endeavor is the ability to visualize risk factors for analysis. The underlying decision support system used the Cosine Similarity algorithm to provide recommendations for matching risk profiles to selected institutional risk settings. This method improves the interpretability of risk factor values and the quality of a digital preservation process. The aggregated information about the risk factors is presented as a multidimensional vector that shows a particular analysis focus and its resulting impact on selected file formats. Sample risk profile calculations and the visualization of risk factor dimensions are shared in the evaluation section.
      PubDate: 2017-03-02
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Data organization and preservation in the context of digital and networked
           media: public’s attitudes, habits and practices in relation to digital
           curation of personal digital data

    • Authors: Milijana Mičunović, Hana Marčetić, Maja Krtalić
      Abstract: This paper presents the results of a small scale survey on attitudes, habits and practices of Croatian working population in relation to digital curation of personal digital data. The survey was driven by the following research questions: What are the attitudes of working population towards organizing and safekeeping digital documents that they create in everyday life? To what extent is personal digital archiving among working population a planned activity or just a side-effect of generating content in the digital environment? How do they organize and preserve digital data and documents, both offline and online? What are their attitudes to digital afterlife and digital legacy? Data has been collected in the period from November 2015 to January 2016 through an online questionnaire distributed through online social networks and e-mails aiming to reach the employed population in the age group from 18 to 65 in Croatia. The analysis of the results shows detailed behaviour patterns when it comes to preservation practices as well as attitudes towards taking responsibility for safekeeping personal digital data and documents. The results are also discussed in the light of the implication that these issues may have on user studies and services in libraries and archives.
      PubDate: 2017-03-02
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Scholarly reference trees

    • Authors: Kristina Kocijan, Marko Požega, Dario Poljak
      Abstract: In this paper, we propose, explain and implement bibliometric data analysis and visualization model in a web environment. We use NLP syntactic grammars for pattern recognition of references used in scholarly publications. The extracted information is used for visualizing author egocentric data via tree like structure. The ultimate goal of this work is to use the egocentric trees for comparisons of two authors and to build networks or forests of different trees depending on the forest’s attributes. We have stumbled upon many different problems ranging from exceptions in citation style structures to optimization of visualization model in order to achieve an optimal user experience. We will give a summary of our grammars’ restrictions and will provide some ideas for possible future work that could improve the overall user experience. The proposed trees can function by themselves, or they can be implemented in digital repositories of libraries and different types of citation databases.
      PubDate: 2017-03-02
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • An analysis of characteristics and structures embedded in data papers: a
           preliminary study

    • Authors: Ya-Ning Chen
      Abstract: Research data or datasets can be regarded as a catalyst to inspire new research by repurposing or combining existing research data, and grant applicants have been requested by funding institutions to include a data management plan as part of research project proposals. In addition to the metadata approach, data papers may mirror the scientific publication model as an alternative means of description and management of research data. However, there is not a common standard for all data papers across various communities. This study aimed to build up a common structural framework to investigate the embedded characteristics and structures of the content of data papers by using a content analysis approach, and 26 data journals from 16 publishers were selected as subject in this study. This study has proposed a common framework and further embodied a concept map (Candela et al. 2015) into more concrete components for the structure of data papers.
      PubDate: 2017-03-02
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Digital repository of Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts - new modul

    • Authors: Dina Mašina, Kristijan Crnković
      Abstract: Digital repository of Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts is a constantly developing platform. Currently, three new modules are being created to further upgrade customer service. One of them is
      DOI module, which will be able to assign Digital Object Identifier (
      DOI ) number to any data type preserved in the repository. Another two new modules are closely connected. The first of them concerns the definition of documents and data publishing, while the other one relates to defining rules of data download directly from the repository. These two modules will enable electronic publication exchange, which will be unique in Croatia.
      DOI is assigned by publishers to articles or book chapters to provide a permanent link, assuring that the document can be discovered, even if the URL for the journal article changes. Therefore, the
      DOI guarantees scholars that readers will always be able to find their work, although the content on the internet is prone to being moved, restructured, or deleted. Assigning
      DOI is also a way to increase the visibility and citation in international databases and to provide one additional point when applying for financial support from the Croatian Ministry of Science, Education and Sports.
      DOI will be assigned to all the Academy’s journals. The procedure will be automatic, concerning the Academy’s large publication production. The Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts has a long tradition of publication exchange with other world’s academies. The Academy’s library has collaborated with about 450 libraries around the globe for over 130 years. The tradition was established with the Academy’s first Rules of Procedure from 1867. Nowadays, publication exchange has severely dropped, due to financial situation. Postage costs have become problematic, and the exchange, which was one of the main sources of book supply, has become marginal. The list of partners in 2015 was shorter by half compared to the previous year. In 2015, 650 publications were sent to 100 locations in Croatia and to about 20 different addresses worldwide. Due to high shipping rates and lack of space in library buildings and similar institutions, as well as increased use of e-publications, the Management Board of the Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts has approved the development of the new module which will enable electronic exchange of the Academy’s publications. The Publishing module should resolve the problems of publishing each of the Academy’s publications separately, including serials and monographs. The suggested delay period is 6 to 12 months after the final print publication date. In the meantime, these publications would only be available to institutions which are the Academy’s exchange partners. The Download module will allow users to download documents directly from the repository. These new modules should give a new life to this valuable but neglected tradition, which has enhanced library collections by providing publications which bypass the book trade network, including unique monographs of research institutes, proceedings of scientific conferences and symposiums, scholarly papers, and other publications on the latest research results.
      PubDate: 2017-03-02
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Semantic web developments in Hungarian public collections in an
           international perspective

    • Authors: Marton Nemeth
      Abstract: In my paper after describing the international context of the Hungarian semantic web projects, I would like to introduce the semantic web project of the Hungarian National Széchényi Library. They built up an ontology published their catalogue and authority data as linked open data on the semantic web (by the help of an own name space, SKOS and VIAF). They also generated a SPARQL-endpoint in order to put their semantic datasets to the cloud. A recent project of the Petőfi Literary Museum focusing on name authority record. They are converting around 620000 authority record into RDF-XML format. They would like to publish their data in VIAF (worldwide semantic virtual authority file database) and make them accessible on the OCLC WorldCat semantic environment. This database will be the second database followed by the Hungarian National Library that will appear in VIAF. They are planning also to build up an own triple-store in collaboration with other Hungarian libraries and museums in order to enrich their own semantic datasets with external semantic links. In this context I would like to introduce the tools developed by the framework of the ALIADA project with an international collaboration in order to offer a complete environment to public collection to help them appearing on the semantic web with their own triple-store and datasets. I would like to describe some major projects in semantic field in Hungary that can be implemented possibly in the future. I will mainly highlight the concept of the Hungarian National Namespace that can set all the institutional efforts from public collections to a common framework. Last but not least I would like to describe the use of microformats (based on HTML 5 standard) to put semantic markup data elements into full-text online content resources. That can be also really relevant for public collections (especially for libraries) in order to provide new semantic datasets based on their existing full-text online resources.
      PubDate: 2017-03-02
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Art and design as linked data: the LODZ project (Linked Open Data Zurich)

    • Authors: Nicolas Prongué, Fabio Ricci, René Schneider, René Schurte
      Abstract: The project LODZ (Linked Open Data Zurich) adopts an experimental approach to merge data and develop a semantic web infrastructure to enable its discovery. For this purpose, three institutions in the field of art and design provided their metadata. The project cycle followed six steps: team building, gathering and cleaning of the original data, modelling, transforming, interlinking and exploration of the Linked Data set. The resulting pilot application offers innovative and attractive features based on the capability of the Linked Data, with the aim to provide a better user experience. The major challenge of this project was the creation of links between the internal datasets, and with external sources. An important lesson learnt is therefore to focus more on the interoperability of data at the time of cataloguing in the original databases, for example by integrating external identifiers rather than just terms in the form of strings.
      PubDate: 2017-03-02
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Do we need better online book review organisation?

    • Authors: Tjaša Jug, Maja Žumer
      Abstract: Introduction. Online customer reviews present one of the most important factors in book purchasing or borrowing decisions. Given that only well-organized reviews are useful, Amazon has already started linking multiple formats and editions of the same book. Nevertheless, this method is not suitable for books that have appeared in many formats and editions as some attributes do not apply to all versions. Research questions. In our study we were interested in the aspects of a book users perceive as important and the extent to which these attributes match FRBR entities. We were also interested in the relation between specific attributes in the reviews and the numeric rating of the book. Methods. We used content analysis on two random samples of Amazon customer reviews. The sample included a total of 600 reviews of three well-known fiction book titles that have many formats and editions that accommodate the different preferences of readers. Results. The results show that readers take into consideration book information at various abstraction levels that match those in the FRBR model. Most reviewers comment on the book content while review readers consider reviews that comment on different aspects of a book as more helpful. Conclusions. Given that subjective opinion is an important factor in the users’ book selection decision, it would be reasonable to rethink the presentation and organisation of online book reviews.
      PubDate: 2017-03-02
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Using mobile application in foreign language learning: a case study

    • Authors: Vlatka Ivić, Tomislav Jakopec
      Abstract: The Department of English Language and Literature and the Department of Information Sciences cooperatively, for the purpose of providing additional foreign language training for their students, developed application FFOS Test Your Knowledge (FFOS TYK). TYK was realized as a mobile application for the hybrid development model which allows deployment on multiple platforms. The application is intended primarily for the students of the English language and literature, but it can also be used by other students. The application is available on mobile devices, tablets, laptops and personal computers, and via wireless internet at the faculty students have the free access to it. Each user is given the option for registration and login so that their work can be statistically monitored and ranked. Research data shows that students choose the tests dealing with problem areas, but they prefer shorter tasks when it comes to typing the words. We can conclude that the overall success is rather well distributed with the majority of students scoring around 50% or above with just a few being excellent, and also not many failing to solve the tasks well. The application gives feedback to students and ranks them anonymously. It also offers teachers the possibility to increase the number of questions in the tests and to create the new tests and monitor the success of their students.
      PubDate: 2017-03-02
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • How to build better participative digital libraries and their user
           communities – Insights from the user study of the Facebook heritage
           group “Zagreb kakav je bio nekada” (Zagreb as it used to be)

    • Authors: Mirko Duić
      Abstract: This study has provided insights into the activities of members of the Facebook heritage group “Zagreb kakav je bio nekada” that can support the creation of the old Zagreb image collection and the building of the user community around this collection. We have used historical and content analysis to examine the relationships between the characteristics of images posted in this group and activities of its members. Based on the findings from this research, we have made recommendations to the creators of digital libraries which could help them plan and build better participative digital libraries and their user communities. We hope that the insights obtained by this research as well as the novel methodological approach used in this study will be valuable as a foundation for further research.
      PubDate: 2017-03-02
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Digitization of older Croatian dictionaries: a possible substratum for
           terminological neologisms?

    • Authors: Tihomir Zivic, Marina Vinaj, Dina Koprolčec
      Abstract: Considering that the present-day Croatian still frequently fails to have the exact translational equivalents for the novel ideas developed and disseminated via metalinguistic Eurospeak, the paper adopts and employs an unorthodox scientific method to refer to an articulated correlation between a conceptual framework theorized (i.e., the noninvasive library digitization projects pertaining to the select Croatian bi- and trilingual lexicography from the 17th to the 20th century) and the hypothetical questions addressed (i.e., their applicability to the coinage of Croatian neologisms that formationally imitate the previous paragons), with a pronounced tendency to signify a progressive replacement of the perplexingly anglicized language registers by the more decipherable formality levels. Consequently, such a succinct analysis results in a revalorization of the computerized conversion efforts and a permanent appraisal of the Croatian thesauri, which are neither antiquated nor obsolescent but may be incentively put into service for further similar studies in the subject matter.
      PubDate: 2017-03-02
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Rich Collections, Scarce Resources: Conundrum of Digital Curation in the
           Caribbean

    • Authors: Paulette Angela Kerr
      Abstract: Digital archiving presents a ready solution to the problem of hidden special collections. The availability of information and communication technology solutions provide libraries, archives and museums with a way forward. However, cost constraints present a real challenge to institutions, especially in the developing world where digitization projects must compete for scarce resources with many other pressing services. In the competition for resources special collections sometimes play second fiddle to immediate services, for example user facilities. The Library of the University of the West Indies (UWI), Mona, faced with limited and declining financial resources, yet recognizing the value of its growing but hidden special collections especially to scholarship at the university, as well as to the cultural and historical significance of the Caribbean region, sought cost-effective and innovative solutions to address the situation and to go ‘global’ with these collections. This paper uses a case study approach and details the strategies employed by a Team at the University of the West Indies, Mona Library, including the acquisition of equipment, selection of collections to be included, digitization of thirty collections of varied formats as well as deliberate collaborative initiatives at training of staff to ensure sustainability. It discusses challenges in the ongoing process, and complications alluded to by Prochaska (2009) especially those of legal issues, politics, ownership, and values involved in stewardship of the collections. The paper posits solutions against a background of scarce resources as well as opportunities for far reaching and effective services.
      PubDate: 2017-03-02
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Information seeking behavior for decision making in everyday life: a pilot
           study on adolescents

    • Authors: Alica Kolarić, Ivanka Stričević
      Abstract: The pilot study investigates adolescents’ information-seeking behavior for decision-making purposes. The aim of the study is to explore adolescents’ information-seeking behavior in everyday life decision-making situations. In this research we use a survey method with a questionnaire comprised of hypothetical decision-making situations which allows respondents to elaborate on their answers. The research aims to reveal whether adolescents engage in deliberate information seeking when facing everyday life decisions and if so, which information sources they use. Moreover, the research explores the importance attached by adolescents to information in making decisions. In addition, the results will be used for developing a methodology for a large-scale research project.
      PubDate: 2017-03-02
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Comparing information literacy of student beginners among different
           branches of study

    • Authors: Angela Maurer, Christian Schloegl, Stefan Dreisiebner
      Abstract: In our paper we present a study in which we investigated the level of information literacy of first-year students across different studies offered by faculties at the University of Graz. Data were collected by means of a multiple-choice questionnaire. In total we analyzed 232 questionnaires completed by first-year students from six studies (faculties). The results show that the overall level of information literacy is mediocre. However, the difference in the level of information literacy across the studies is not as big as originally expected. The type of high school completed has a strong effect at least in the beginning of the studies. Another interesting result shows that the students rated their information literacy skills much higher than the test indicated. It can be concluded that multiple-choice questionnaires are an efficient and objective test instrument to inform the students that they are much less information literate than they believe themselves to be.
      PubDate: 2017-03-02
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Information horizons of Croatian experts in different professions

    • Authors: Ivana Turk, Kornelija Petr Balog
      Abstract: This paper presents findings of a study based on the concept of information horizons, which was proposed in 1999 by Diane Sonnenwald with purpose of exploration human information behaviour. Sonnenwald suggests in her framework that certain types of data, which have not been traditionally included in studies of information behaviour, are important. These data include when and why people access (or why they do not access) information resources and channels, relationships and interconnectedness among information resources, individual preferences and evaluation of information resources and the impact of contexts and situations on the information seeking process. Since the concept of information horizons includes a mixture of data collection methodologies, this paper brings only the data obtained through information horizon maps. The research described in the paper was conducted in May 2015 in Osijek, Croatia and included ten respondents – five teachers of Croatian language and literature and five physicians. The purpose of the research was to learn how information horizons and information sources they are comprised of differ between observed professions and between two age groups in which we divided the respondents. For the purpose of this research, we used semi-structured interviews using the critical incident technique, map drawing technique, but also a short questionnaire we created. Maps consisted of three concentric circles named Zone 1, 2 and 3 and the sources listed in the maps were weighed accordingly. Our results show that although online and printed sources are widely used by all our respondents, physicians show slight preference for online, whereas teachers for printed resources. Younger respondents tend to use a wider variety of information sources whereas older respondents tend to prefer online sources. This is the first research of information horizons in Croatia, and one of few researches in general that deal with information horizons of members of different professions.
      PubDate: 2017-03-02
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2017)
       
  • Editorial

    • Authors: Martina Dragija Ivanović, Sanjica Faletar Tanacković
      Abstract: This issue of Libellarium fetaures papers based on the presentations from the 14th international conference Libraries In the Digital Age (LIDA) which took place in Zadar, Croatia, on June 13-17 2016. All papers were subject to evaluation and classification by two independent reviewers, according to the journal’s editorial policy. The conference gathered 134 participants from 22 countries (Austria, Belgium, Brasil, Denmark, France, Croatia, Irland, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, South African Republic, Canada, Germany, Hungary, Netherlands, USA, Singapore, Slovenia, Switzerland, Taiwan, Thailand and Great Britain. The papers published in this volume concentrate on three main conference topics: education of information professionals, digital curation and user studies. The first part features three papers. Tatjana Aparac-Jelušić in Education for digital libraries: A European perspective addresses the trends in the European Higher Education Space which influence the education in information sciences. Vera Hillebrand and Elke Greifeneder (International mobility in Library and Information Science) present the results of the quantitative study that examined whether a brain drain exists in LIS and explored the patterns of geographical mobility of researchers. Interestingly, the study revealed two alarming trends: the American LIS researchers rarely ever leave their continent and might lack international exposure. On the other hand, researchers from Asia and Europe show a high rate of mobility towards North America. In Understanding roles and responsibilities of data curators: An international perspective Anna Maria Tammaro, Krystyna Matusiak, Frank Andreas Sposito, Vittore Casarosa and Ana Pervan present the preliminary findings of a large research project whose primary objective is to identify the tasks and responsibilities of data curators and ultimately to develop a “data curation ontology” that will better define the profession and support the development of educational curricula to train future data curators. In the section two authors focus on digital curation and related topics. Patricia Aufderheide (Leveraging exceptions and limitations for digital curation and online collections: The U.S. Case) discusess the utility of the major exception to copyright monopoly rights, fair use, and addresses the efforts of the Association of Research Libraries to clarify how it can be employed by libraries. In Social science research data curation: Issues of reuse Guangyuan Sun and Christopher Soo Guan Khoo discuss the issues of reusing quantitative social science data from three perspectives of searching and browsing for datasets, evaluating the reusability of datasets, and integrating datasets, by comparing dataset searching with online database searching. Tove Faber Frandsen and Jeppe Nicolaisen (Statistical analyses of digital collections: Using a large corpus of systematic reviews to study non-citations) indicate that the use of statistical methods to analyse digital material for patterns makes it possible to detect patterns in big data that we would otherwise not be able to detect and they try to exemplify that fact by statistically analysing a large corpus of references in systematic reviews. Frances Salmon, Maureen Kerr-Campbell and Paulette A. Kerr in Managing a digital archiving project at the University of the West Indies Library: A case study address the strategies employed by a team at the University of the West Indies, Mona Library, including the acquisition of equipment, selection of collections to be included, and digitization of thirty collections of varied formats as well as deliberate collaborative initiatives at training of staff to ensure sustainability. They also discusses challenges, such as legal issues, politics, ownership, and values involved in stewardship of the collections. Milijana Mičunović, Hana Marčetić and Maja Krtalić in Data organization and preservation in the context of digital and networked media: public’s attitudes, habits and practices in relation to digital curation of personal digital data present the results of their small scale survey which was driven by the following research questions: What are the attitudes of working population towards organizing and safekeeping digital documents that they create in everyday life? To what extent is personal digital archiving among working population a planned activity or just a side-effect of generating content in the digital environment? How do they organize and preserve digital data and documents, both offline and online? What are their attitudes to digital afterlife and digital legacy? In Scholarly reference trees Kristina Kocijan, Marko Požega and Dario Poljak propose, explain and implement bibliometric data analysis and visualization model in a web environment. Ya-Ning Chen (An Analysis of Characteristics and Structures Embedded in Data Papers: A Preliminary Study) presents the results of the study that aimed to build up a common structural framework to investigate the embedded characteristics and structures of the content of data papers by using a content analysis approach. In their paper Dina Mašina and Kristijan Crnković present new modules of the Digital repository of Croatian Academy of Sciences and Arts. A number of papers focus on user experience in digital libraries. Marton Nemeth in Semantic web developments in Hungarian public collections in an international perspective describes international context of Hungarian semantic web projects. Nicolas Prongué, Fabio Ricci, René Schneider and René Schurte present results of the project LODZ (Linked Open Data Zurich). The aim of the project was to merge data from three institutions in the field of art and design and develop a semantic web infrastructure to enable data discovery. Based on the results of his study that used historical and content analysis, Mirko Duić ...
      PubDate: 2016-12-31
      Issue No: Vol. 9, No. 2 (2016)
       
 
 
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