for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help
Followed Journals
Journal you Follow: 0
 
Sign Up to follow journals, search in your chosen journals and, optionally, receive Email Alerts when new issues of your Followed Jurnals are published.
Already have an account? Sign In to see the journals you follow.
  Libellarium : journal for the history of writing, books and memory institutions
  [7 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 1846-8527 - ISSN (Online) 1846-8527
   Published by University of Zadar Homepage  [1 journal]
  • Editorial

    • Authors: Zoran Velagić
      Pages: 1 - 3
      Abstract: This issue of Libellarium features papers based on the presentations from the 2nd Publishing trends and contexts conference which took place in Pula, Croatia, on 8-9 December 2014. All papers were subject to evaluation and classification by two independent reviewers, according to the journal’s editorial policy. The conference gathered a group of experts from prominent European universities from England, France, Germany, Lithuania, Netherlands, Poland, Scotland, Sweden, Slovenia and Croatia–the details are available on the conference web site: http://epubconf.unizd.hr/hr/index.php. The papers published in this volume concentrate on four main problems: new possibilities for publishers, booksellers and authors caused by the introduction of digital technologies in the publishing processes, models used in the digital environment, teaching publishing at the university level, and finally, the status of publishing studies as an emerging scholarly discipline. The first part features five papers. Tom D. Wilson in E-books: the publishers’ dilemma reports on a study of publishers’ attitudes towards e-books in three countries: Sweden, Lithuania and Croatia, showing a great contrast between the rise of the e-book in English speaking countries and those of small languages. Elena Maceviciute, Birgitta Wallin and Kersti Nilsson (Book selling and e-books in Sweden) address the issue of the understanding of the book-selling situation in Sweden, by answering three crucial questions: how Swedish booksellers see the impact of e-books on their business, how and why they adopt and develop e-book sales, and what they perceive as barriers to e-book selling. Interestingly, the results have shown that the Swedish booksellers do not feel their business is threatened by e-books. In E-book aggregators: new services in electronic publishing Tomislav Jakopec investigates e-book aggregators as new services in electronic publishing, showing that e-book aggregation exists as a business model and that its further development will show the extent to which it is sustainable. Arūnas Gudinavičius (Is self-publishing a salvation for authors? The case of Lithuanian printed bestseller in the digital environment) deals with the possibilities of self-publishing, taking a case from a small language market (Andrius Tapinas’ book Hour of the Wolf) and analyzing the attempts of the author to translate it into English and sell it through the Amazon.com services. Asta Urbanaviciute (Self-publishing of Lithuanian cultural periodicals in Soviet and contemporary times) compares self-publishing in historical and modern contexts, demonstrating that contemporary self-publishing emerged under favourable circumstances, and that modern self-publishers associate this model with digital texts only, which, due to favourable conditions, spread easily through social networks and blogs. A completely different, historical self-publishing could have had serious political consequences, as summarized in the Russian description “I write it myself, censor myself, publish it myself and sit in jail myself”. Section two, models used in the digital environment, is comprised of three papers. Maja Krtalić and Damir Hasenay (Long-term accessibility of e-books: challenges, obstacles, responsibilities) ask how specific characteristics of e-books influence their preservation possibilities and who is responsible for the long-term accessibility of e-books? They concentrate on issues concerning the preservation and archiving of published authors’ works in the digital environment for the purpose of their long-term accessibility, and give an overview of relevant legal, technical, societal and organisational issues from which challenges, obstacles and responsibilities in ensuring long-term accessibility of e-books arise. Ivona Despot, Ivana Ljevak Lebeda and Nives Tomašević in the paper ’Freemium’ business models in publishing. New packaging for the needs of readers in the digital age explore how the emergence of subscription models influences the development of new publishing products which bring together the author and the publisher in a joint effort to reach a larger number of readers; and Ivana Hebrang Grgić (Publishing Croatian scientific journals: to e- or not to e-?) discusses the extent to which Croatian journal publishers adapted to the electronic environment. In section three, dedicated to the teaching of publishing at the university level, Aušra Navickienė (Third Level Publishing Studies: Lithuania, a Case Study), Ewa Jabłońska-Stefanowicz (Three R’s in publishing education), and Josipa Selthofer (What comes first? Publishing business or publishing studies?) provide examples of publishing studies programmes in Lithuania (focusing on the Institute of Book Science and Documentation of Vilnius University), Poland (focusing on the LIS Institute of the University of Wroclaw) and Croatia, in comparison with relevant programmes in Europe and the United States. Finally, section four presents three papers which petition for the status of publishing studies as an emerging scientific discipline. Sophie Noël in Publishing studies: the search for an elusive academic object questions the validity of publishing studies as an academic discipline, while trying to situate them within the field of social sciences. She argues that a more appropriate frame could be adopted to describe what people studying the transformations of book publishing do – or should do – both at a theoretical and methodological levels. Christoph Bläsi (Publishing studies: being part of a cultural practice pl...
      PubDate: 2015-06-10
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • E-books: the publishers’ dilemma

    • Authors: Tom D. Wilson
      Pages: 5 - 13
      Abstract: This paper reports on a study of publishers’ attitudes towards e-books in the context of the global situation of e-book publishing. Comparative data are drawn from a replication of a survey carried out in Sweden, in Lithuania and in Croatia. The great contrast between the rise of the e-book in English speaking countries (and those with significant English speaking readers) is shown and contrasted with that in ‘small language markets’. This three country survey reveals a number of similar responses from publishers on several key issues, i.e., self-publishing, the future role of bookshops, and relationships with public libraries. The results also reveal that publishers have certain ambivalence on these issues. The overall conclusion is that there is a marked difference in the growth of e-book publishing in small language markets compared with the English language market.
      PubDate: 2015-07-01
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • Book selling and e-books in Sweden

    • Authors: Elena Maceviciute, Birgitta Wallin, Kersti Nilsson
      Pages: 15 - 29
      Abstract: This paper addresses the issue of the understanding of the book-selling situation as Swedish booksellers see it. It pursues the answers to the following questions: 1. What are the perceptions of Swedish booksellers of the impact of e-books on their business? 2. What drivers are important for Swedish booksellers for adopting and developing e-book sales through their own sales channels? 3. What do they perceive as barriers to e-book selling through their own channels? The authors have employed the analysis of the secondary statistical data and a survey of Swedish booksellers to answer their questions. The results of the investigation have shown that the Swedish booksellers do not feel their bookshops, or business in general, are threatened by e-books. The opinions on e-books do not differ between the few selling e-books and others who do not offer this product. The reasons for selling e-books are well-functioning routines and personal interest in the product. The reasons for not selling the books are the lack of demand and technical resources as well as contractual agreements with e-book publishers or vendors. So, technical resources for e-book sales, routines, and contracts with publishers are the main premises for this activity. The biggest barriers to e-book sales are: a) the price as one can see not only in the answers of the booksellers, but also in the drop of sales obviously related to the rise of prices during 2014; b) lack of demand from customers who do not enquire about e-books in bookshops. This leads to the belief that e-books will be sold mostly online either directly from publishers and authors or through online booksellers. However, an equal number of booksellers believe that physical bookshops will be selling printed books and e-books in the future. The future of e-books seems to be quite secure and non-threatening to printed books from the point of view of booksellers. The growth of e-book sales is quite slow and the respondents believe that it will increase at a moderate rate.
      PubDate: 2015-07-01
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • E-book aggregators: new services in electronic publishing

    • Authors: Tomislav Jakopec
      Pages: 31 - 46
      Abstract: This paper provides the results of the case study conducted on a sample of 17 websites that identify themselves as e-book aggregators, five platforms for content publishing and 16 websites that present themselves as e-book distributors. While conducting the case study, the answers were sought to the questions about location of website, its owners, activities, distribution channels, services, partners, languages, content protection, scope of activities, number of authors and books, publishing areas, formats, etc. Based on the case studies, the results presented focus on the geographical distribution of the analyzed companies, distribution of companies according to the year in which they were established, distribution of companies by activity, the number of different input formats supported by aggregation companies, a separate service of conversion, output formats supported by aggregation companies, distribution on platforms and in bookstores, content protection options, possibilities of editing content in the cloud, models of payment for services, and other identified services. Based on the results of the study, a conclusion is made that e-book aggregation as a business model exists and that its further development will show the extent to which it is sustainable.
      PubDate: 2015-07-01
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • Is self-publishing a salvation for authors? The case of Lithuanian
           printed bestseller in the digital environment

    • Authors: Arūnas Gudinavičius
      Pages: 47 - 57
      Abstract: There has been much speculation in the past years about self-publishing. Some argue that publishing houses do not have a future as publishing service providers. Others claim that it is very easy to publish a book as an e-book. There are many success stories of self-publishers. More and more authors are wondering if they actually need a publisher and a retailer knowing they always take the biggest cut of the pie. The paper looks at the case of a Lithuanian author bestseller (in print). This book has also received the Lithuanian Book of the Year Award in the Fiction category. The author had the book published in Lithuanian by a traditional publishing house. It was quite successful so he decided to self-publish a digital version in English. The steps taken by the author to publish his e-book on Amazon are described and analyzed. Finally, the paper presents the results of selling and promoting his e-book on Amazon platform and provides some insights into facing the market without professional help.
      PubDate: 2015-07-01
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • Self-publishing of Lithuanian cultural periodicals in Soviet and
           contemporary times

    • Authors: Asta Urbanaviciute
      Pages: 59 - 72
      Abstract: The aim of this article is to analyse self-publishing trends of Lithuanian cultural periodicals focusing on the historical and contemporary contexts. The article provides an overview of the reasons for historical cultural periodical self-published texts, known as samizdats, to appear, as well as their publishing and circulation trends in Lithuania. It also analyses what contemporary cultural self-publishing is: whether it is a completely independent, logical consequence of the digital age, which emerged under favourable circumstances, or if it can be characterized as having something in common with the past experiences. The most active years of the periodical underground press publishing in Soviet Lithuanian self-publishing development were between 1975 and 1981. Self-published texts ideologically diverged into three main directions: religious, civic, and cultural-artistic. A total of 22 publications were being published for a longer or shorter period of time. While analysing contemporary cultural self-publishing topics, the report focuses only on online cultural texts, irrespective of the printed ones. Survey method was used to find out how much and in what aspect modern Internet users perceive historical periodical self-publishing, and how and in what aspect they value modern cultural self-published texts. The results show that 18-35-year-old respondents have not acquired the skills necessary to analyse samizdat publishing. They associate the word self-publishing with digital texts only, which due to favourable conditions spread easily through social networks and blogs. In the era of advancing computer technologies and the Internet, every person who has the time and desire may become a developer, an author, or at least a disseminator of information: this tradition is becoming more and more topical and quite frequently – an almost self-evident phenomenon.
      PubDate: 2015-07-01
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • Long-term accessibility of e-books: challenges, obstacles,
           responsibilities

    • Authors: Maja Krtalić, Damir Hasenay
      Pages: 73 - 81
      Abstract: The traditional life cycle of books has gone through many changes in the digital environment - enough to start questioning the effects of such changes on the process of creating, publishing, distributing, reading and preserving books. This paper focuses on issues concerning the preservation and archiving of published authors’ works in the digital environment for the purpose of their long-term accessibility. The aim of this paper is to give an overview of relevant legal, technical, societal and organisational issues from which challenges, obstacles and responsibilities in ensuring long-term accessibility of e-books arise. Issues related to authorship, editions, changes in content, copyright and digital rights management, selection criteria for preservation, and preservation responsibility will be discussed, specifically focusing on libraries’ and publishers’ roles in this process. The paper is based on a literature review and content analysis aiming to answer two basic research questions: What specific characteristics of e-books influence their preservation possibilities? Who is responsible for long-term accessibility of e-books?
      PubDate: 2015-07-01
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • “Freemium” business models in publishing. New packaging for
           the needs of readers in the digital age

    • Authors: Ivona Despot, Ivana Ljevak Lebeda, Nives Tomašević
      Pages: 81 - 89
      Abstract: In a digital environment, the traditional roles of authors and publishers change. The shift of power from authors, publishers and/or content to the platform affects the development of new business models, and shaping the content in the digital environment becomes a major challenge for publishers. The subscription models of the content sale have long been present in other media industries. Editing, design and marketing are the key features that a publisher develops and adapts to changes. The traditional skills of publishers are no longer sufficient. Instead, a continued integration of innovative solutions is needed. The aim of this paper is to explore how the emergence of subscription models influences the development of new publishing products which bring together the author and the publisher in a joint effort to reach a larger number of readers.
      PubDate: 2015-07-01
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • Publishing Croatian scientific journals: to e- or not to e-?

    • Authors: Ivana Hebrang Grgić
      Pages: 93 - 100
      Abstract: Electronic environment offers new possibilities for publishing research results in scientific journals – linking to other digital documents; connecting documents with their newer (or older) versions; publishing video/audio recordings, high resolution photos or 3D models; publishing in open access; controlling quality by open peer-review, etc. The results of research on Croatian scientific journals (from all scientific fields, all published in open access on Hrčak, the central portal of Croatian scientific journals) show that all journals, except one, publish articles as PDF files. Approximately one fourth of the journals use automated publishing systems. Majority of the journals publish active links to authors’ e-mail addresses and some of them publish active links to online sources in the reference lists. Linking higher resolution photographs, tables or charts is not common practice in Croatian journals. In spite of the significant number of Croatian scientific electronic journals, their content is still static, not enriched by various possibilities offered by new technologies.
      PubDate: 2015-07-01
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • Third Level Publishing Studies: Lithuania, a Case Study

    • Authors: Aušra Navickienė
      Pages: 101 - 112
      Abstract: Under the umbrella of Book Science, research in publishing has a long tradition in Lithuania and is today perceived as an independent branch of scholarship within the Communication and Information Sciences. On the basis of original sources, the aim of this article is to analyse the work conducted by the Institute of Book Science and Documentation of Vilnius University in implementing third level publishing studies (meaning PhD level) and to outline the merits, weak points, opportunities and threats in the planning of further training of scholars within this particular branch. The key research sources are documentation governing doctoral studies in Lithuania, at Vilnius University and the field of Communication and Information Sciences, as well as Communication and Information Sciences doctoral study programmes and descriptions of disciplines, PhD student lists, students’ publication indexes and different archival documents of doctoral studies at the Institute of Book Science and Documentation of the Faculty of Communication of Vilnius University.
      PubDate: 2015-07-01
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • Three Rs in publishing education

    • Authors: Ewa Jabłońska-Stefanowicz
      Pages: 113 - 123
      Abstract: Contemporary teaching should be real, rich and relevant. Changes in this direction that can be observed in higher education in Poland result from the requirements of the job market, students’ expectations, the need to adapt to the goals of the Bologna Process, as well as demands by educators. Considering the declining interest in studying (which is seen especially in the humanities), universities try to present their educational offer in the most attractive way to compete successfully with other universities. All of these changes can be seen on several levels: the decisions of the government, of the universities, faculties and institutes, and in the everyday work of the teachers. The paper describes these problems in relation to publishing education. Websites of universities offering courses on publishing are analyzed and the educational offer of the LIS Institute of the University of Wroclaw is presented in details. Examples of proven methods and useful educational resources and new allies are proposed.
      PubDate: 2015-07-01
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • What comes first? Publishing business or publishing studies?

    • Authors: Josipa Selthofer
      Pages: 125 - 137
      Abstract: The aim of this paper is to analyze and compare publishing studies, their programmes at the undergraduate and graduate levels and scholars involved in the teaching of publishing courses at the top universities around the world and in Croatia. Since traditional publishing business is rapidly changing, new skills and new jobs are involved in it. The main research question is: Can modern publishing studies produce a modern publisher? Or, is it the other way around? The hypothesis of the paper is that scholars involved in the teaching of publishing courses at the top universities around the world have a background in publishing business. So, can they prepare their students for the future and can their students gain competencies they need to compete in a confusing world of digital authors and electronic books? The research methods used were content analysis and comparison. Research sample included 36 university publishing programmes at the undergraduate and graduate level worldwide (24 MA, 12 BA). The research sample was limited mainly to the English-speaking countries. In most non-English-speaking countries, it was difficult to analyse the programme curriculum in the native language because the programme and course description did not exit. In the data gathering phase, a customized web application was used for content analysis. The application has three main sections: a list of websites to evaluate, a visual representation of the uploaded website and a list of characteristics grouped by categories for quantifying data. About twenty years ago, publishing was not considered a separate scientific branch in Croatia. Publishing studies are therefore a new phenomenon to both scholars and publishers in Croatia. To create a new, ideal publishing course, can we simply copy global trends or is it better to create something of our own?
      PubDate: 2015-07-01
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • Publishing studies: the search for an elusive academic object

    • Authors: Sophie Noël
      Pages: 139 - 145
      Abstract: This paper questions the validity of the so-called “publishing studies” as an academic discipline, while trying to situate them within the field of social sciences and to contextualize their success. It argues that a more appropriate frame could be adopted to describe what people studying the transformations of book publishing do – or should do – both at a theoretical and methodological level. The paper begins by providing an overview of the scholarly and academic context in France as far as book publishing is concerned, highlighting its genesis and current development. It goes on to underline the main pitfalls that such a sub-field as publishing studies is faced with, before making suggestions as to the bases for a stimulating analysis of publishing, making a case for an interdisciplinary approach nurtured by social sciences. The paper is based on a long-term field study on independent presses in France, together with a survey of literature on the subject.
      PubDate: 2015-07-01
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • Publishing studies: being part of a cultural practice plus x ?

    • Authors: Christoph Bläsi
      Pages: 147 - 156
      Abstract: In some parts of the world, Publishing Studies are a fairly well-established field of research as well as of higher education. Not least since this is not so much the case in continental Europe, the Publishing Studies community increasingly sees a more elaborated self-concept as an important prerequisite for a prosperous further development of the field in research as well as in teaching. This paper starts off by relating the question for an advanced self-concept of Publishing Studies to the question what criteria have to be fulfilled to call a field (like Publishing Studies) a scholarly discipline. As the second source for the possible formation of a more elaborate self-concept, the paper presents the first results of an ongoing empirical research project. In this projects, extensive expert interviews with representatives of UK Publishing Studies study programs and research institutions are evaluated to shed light on the core questions related to Publishing Studies as a discipline / „discipline“ in a bottom-up manner. After presenting a very clear and differentiated North American view as an additional point of reference, a contribution to the discussion on Publishing Studies is proposed.
      PubDate: 2015-07-01
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • Publishing studies: what else?

    • Authors: Bertrand Legendre
      Pages: 157 - 160
      Abstract: This paper intends to reposition “publishing studies” in the long process that goes from the beginning of book history to the current research on cultural industries. It raises questions about interdisciplinarity and the possibility of considering publishing independently of other sectors of the media and cultural offerings. Publishing is now included in a large range of industries and, at the same time, analyses tend to become more and more segmented according to production sectors and scientific fields. In addition to the problems created, from the professional point of view, by this double movement, this one requires a questioning of the concept of “publishing studies”.
      PubDate: 2015-07-01
      Issue No: Vol. 8, No. 1 (2015)
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-2015