for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help
Followed Journals
Journal you Follow: 0
 
Sign Up to follow journals, search in your chosen journals and, optionally, receive Email Alerts when new issues of your Followed Jurnals are published.
Already have an account? Sign In to see the journals you follow.
Jonathan Edwards Studies
   Follow    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
     ISSN (Print) 2159-6875
     Published by Yale University Homepage  [8 journals]
  • REDEMPTIVE HISTORY AS A PARADIGM FOR JONATHAN EDWARDS’ EXPOSITION OF
           MIRACLES

    • Authors: Corné Blaauw
      Abstract: With the rise of deism in the eighteenth-century many theologians produced defenses of supernatural religion. At the same time many in the Reformed Scholastic tradition explained miracles as part of their overall theological system, without regard for apologetic questions. Unfortunately, these two discussions rarely converged. In Jonathan Edwards (1703-1758) we find one of the few Reformed theologians of his day who fully developed a defense and theology of miracles. Even so his contribution has gone largely unnoticed. This can be accounted for by the fact that his entire corpus has only recently been made available, and that his thoughts on miracles are scattered throughout his writings. In this essay we will mainly explore two components of Edwards’ understanding of miracles.
      Issue No: Vol. 4
       
  • Editorial guidelines WJE and WJEO

    • Authors: The Editors
      Abstract: Volumes in The Works of Jonathan Edwards and Works of Jonathan Edwards Online Archive are referred to in Jonathan Edwards Studies by “WJE” or “WJEO” followed by the volume number and page number. Readers can use the following guide to identify the volumes...
      Issue No: Vol. 4
       
  • Editorial

    • Authors: The Editors
      Abstract: We are pleased to present the Spring 2014 issue of Jonathan Edwards Studies. It is the continuing mission of this journal to present all aspects of Edwards Studies, and more, to encourage inquiry and engagement of Edwards and his context
      Issue No: Vol. 4
       
  • NEW PERSPECTICES ON THE NORTHAMPTON COMMUNION CONTROVERSY II: RELATIONS,
           PROFESSIONS, & EXPERIENCES, 1748-1760

    • Authors: Douglas L. Winiarski
      Abstract: The second installment of a five-part series presenting documents relating to the “Qualifications Controversy” that led to Edwards’ dismissal at Northampton, this article presents a series of “relations,” or lay spiritual autobiographies presented for church membership. These relations come from other Massachusetts churches, many of whose pastors were aligned with Edwards, and yet reveal some significant differences from the form and content that Edwards came to advocate for such relations.
      Issue No: Vol. 4
       
  • RECENT PUBLICATIONS

    • Authors: The Editors
      Abstract: The list below is by no means exhaustive. Our readers are encouraged to contact the editors with bibliographical information...This list include also publications in Portuguese.

      Issue No: Vol. 4
       
  • WHAT EVER HAPPENED TO MARTHA ROOT'

    • Authors: Mary M. Lane
      Abstract: The family name of Root is one most scholars of Jonathan Edwards might recognize Cousins Timothy and Simeon were notorious ringleaders in the “Bad Book” affair of spring 1744, while Martha Root (c. 1720-1805) is a name that arises briefly late in Edwards’ ministry in Northampton for her part in a controversial paternity case. Fortunately, some tantalizing conclusions can be coaxed from the historic records about her.
      Issue No: Vol. 4
       
  • JONATHAN EDWARDS’ ARGUMENT THAT GOD’S END IN CREATION MUST
           MANIFEST HIS SUPREME SELF-REGARD

    • Authors: Walter J. Schultz
      Abstract: In his dissertation Concerning the End for which God created the World Jonathan Edwards’ argumentation includes the claim that God’s end in creation must manifest God’s supreme regard for himself.
      Establishing this claim is required by Edwards’ stated goals in writing the dissertation. His constructive goal was to provide—on shared assumptions—a logically consistent account of Christian
      religious experience as a “work” of God. His polemical goal was to refute contrary accounts. These accounts were influenced in part by British rational intuitionism. They served as the conceptual
      foundations of what Edwards and others referred to as “fashionable schemes of divinity,” which were being promoted by clerics in the New England colonies. Edwards’ opponents held that there
      are “eternal and immutable” moral rules, that these are discerned by one’s natural faculty of reason, that the freedom of the will enables compliance with them, and that even God (somehow) encounters them and complies. So, God’s end in creation—whatever it is—will also be so informed and directed,
      fully subordinate to “reason’s dictates.” Edwards argues that, since God is self-sufficient and creation is ex nihilo, nothing outside of God directs God or motivates God. In spite of the appearance
      of inappropriate self-centeredness, only God can be God’s original ultimate end in creation.
      Therefore, while the end for which God created the world is God and—whatever form this end takes as something to be achieved by divine action—it will manifest God’s supreme regard for himself.
      Issue No: Vol. 4
       
  • THE GREAT AWAKENING AS AN “OUTPOURING OF THE SPIRIT” IN THE
           WORK OF REDEMPTION ACCORDING TO JONATHAN EDWARDS: A NEW INTERPRETATIVE
           FRAMEWORK

    • Authors: Cheryl M. Peterson
      Abstract: Edwards’ magisterial work, The History of the Work of Redemption, offers a better interpretive framework in which to understand Edwards’ often quoted remarks in his Great Awakening writings, rather than the reverse, the method used by Goen and others to argue for Edwards’ postmillennialism. Rather, an analysis of History supports the claim made by McDermott and Smith that the revivals were seen by Edwards as forerunners of the millennium, and not descriptions of the millennium itself. Edwards’ revival writings clearly fit into the pattern of redemption that he laid out in History, a pattern which includes a typological, dispensational reading of history punctuated by outpourings of the Spirit amidst suffering and opposition in the church. Thus, the purpose in this essay was to question the use of Edwards’ revival writings as the basis for Goen’s thesis, by showing that Edwards understood the revivals to be another in the long progression of outpourings of the Spirit to prepare and revitalize the people of God for the final dispensation, not as events which themselves would inaugurate the millennial reign of Christ.
      Issue No: Vol. 4
       
  • JONATHAN EDWARDS ON THE TRINITY

    • Authors: Oliver D. Crisp
      Abstract: There was a time in the mid-nineteenth century when Jonathan Edwards was rumored to have held an Arian or even incipient Sabellian view of the doctrine of God. Now, he is lauded as a Trinitarian theologian, a divine for whom the persons of the Godhead were a touchstone for all other doctrines. Yet, although his orthodoxy is endorsed by almost all scholars at work on his corpus the form of his doctrine of the Trinity is the subject of an ongoing scholarly debate. Much of this depends on whether his views were commensurate with standard models of the Trinity, or whether he developed his own ideas in such a way as to move beyond perorations of the doctrine to which theologians have historically been held accountable.
      Issue No: Vol. 4
       
  • JONATHAN EDWARDS AND THE PARTING OF THE WAYS'

    • Authors: Paul Helm
      Abstract: In an article on the significance of Jonathan Edwards’ determinism, “Jonathan Edwards and the Absence of Free Choice; A Parting of Ways in the Reformed Tradition,”[1] Richard A. Muller has argued that the publication of Edwards’ work on the will signalled a sea-change in the Reformed tradition’s understanding of the nature of human agency. Far from being a champion of confessional Reformed theology on the will, as he has been thought to be in modern times, Muller claims that Edwards was in fact a novel and divisive influence. He proceeds to identify and analyze instances of such division in eighteenth-century England and nineteenth-century Scotland. Interspersed within his account of these divisions he makes various theological claims. He maintains that behind these divisions is one fairly precise claim: that prior to Edwards the Reformed view of human nature was that mankind has the liberty of indifference and not merely the freedom from constraint associated with compatibilist determinism, which Edwards espoused.
      [1] Richard A. Muller, “Jonathan Edwards and the Absence of Free Choice: A Parting of Ways in the Reformed Tradition,” Jonathan Edwards Studies 1, no. 1 (2011).
      Issue No: Vol. 4
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-2014