Journal Cover Scottish Literary Review
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   ISSN (Print) 1756-5634 - ISSN (Online) 2050-6678
   Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [294 journals]
  • Editorial
    • Abstract: Issue 9:2 of Scottish Literary Review is a part-special Antipodean issue (see introduction below by Professor Liam McIlvanney, Guest-Editor). It also carries Richard Hillman's essay on the strange sixteenth-century concatenation between Robert Greene's play, James the Fourth, and David Lyndsay's Ane Satyre of the Thrie Estaitis. Included too are three other areas that seem currently to proliferate, alongside the sixteenth century, as submission-areas to SLR. A shorter piece by Craig Lamont and David Weir sheds light on an obscure Robert Burns manuscript. Elizabeth Weston on the 'comic uncanny' in Muriel Spark's Memento Mori is a timely opportunity to advertise the twoday 'Muriel Spark Centenary Symposium' at the ... Read More
      Keywords: Scottish Gaelic literature; Scotland; Burns, Robert, 1759-1796; Antipodes Islands (N.Z.); New Zealand; Burns, Robert,; Linklater, Eric,; Brown, George Mackay; Joyce, James,; English literature; Muir, Thomas,; Scott, Walter,; Macpherson, James,; Dunca
      PubDate: 2018-01-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Kangaroos and Cockatoos: Gaelic Literature in the Nineteenth-Century
           Antipodes
    • Abstract: The impact of the nineteenth-century Highland diaspora on Gaelic literary output has been considered almost exclusively to date in terms of literature produced in the Scottish Lowlands, particularly in Glasgow, and in Canada and, to a lesser extent, in the United States.1 This focus is completely understandable given the relative burgeoning of Gaelic publishing in Glasgow in the course of the nineteenth century and the gradual emergence of Gaelic publishing in North America among settled communities of Gaelic speakers. There does, however, exist a corpus of Gaelic literature, albeit significantly smaller and more fragmented, produced by Gaelic speakers who emigrated to Australia and New Zealand from the 1830s ... Read More
      Keywords: Scottish Gaelic literature; Scotland; Burns, Robert, 1759-1796; Antipodes Islands (N.Z.); New Zealand; Burns, Robert,; Linklater, Eric,; Brown, George Mackay; Joyce, James,; English literature; Muir, Thomas,; Scott, Walter,; Macpherson, James,; Dunca
      PubDate: 2018-01-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Bobby Burns on the Wallaby: Scottish Literature and Antipodean Labour
    • Abstract: What sights will greet the socialist era '[w]hen the morning waketh, / [w]hen the noon is high''1 The view, for at least two generations of Australasian working-class reformers and revolutionaries in the opening decades of the last century, had been anticipated in a Scottish song from the 1790s:Then let us pray that come it may,    As come it will for a' that,That sense and worth, o'er a' the earth,    May bear the gree, and a' that.For a' that, and a' that,    Its comin yet for a' that,That man to man, the warld o'er,    Shall brothers be for a' that.2Burns's poem was ubiquitous in the nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Australasian labour movement. It was circulated, reprinted, sung, rewritten ... Read More
      Keywords: Scottish Gaelic literature; Scotland; Burns, Robert, 1759-1796; Antipodes Islands (N.Z.); New Zealand; Burns, Robert,; Linklater, Eric,; Brown, George Mackay; Joyce, James,; English literature; Muir, Thomas,; Scott, Walter,; Macpherson, James,; Dunca
      PubDate: 2018-01-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • To Mary in Aotearoa: Burns's 'Thou Ling'ring Star' and Scottish Identity
           in New Zealand
    • Abstract: On Burns Night 1913, the Wellington Scottish Society gathered to listen for a lecture on the poet and an evening of song and dance. After Miss Betty Purdom had given a recitation of 'The Little Scotch Martyrs', she was 'loudly recalled' by the audience to perform an encore. According to the Evening Post, Purdom 'responded with "To Mary in Heaven" '.1 Burns, as Tanja Bueltmann has argued, was an important site of cultural memory in New Zealand, but the specific version of the poet and the specific texts that appealed to early New Zealand settlers have not been considered in any detail.2 'To Mary in Heaven' (sometimes called 'Thou Ling'ring Star') was once immensely popular within the colonial Scottish diaspora. In ... Read More
      Keywords: Scottish Gaelic literature; Scotland; Burns, Robert, 1759-1796; Antipodes Islands (N.Z.); New Zealand; Burns, Robert,; Linklater, Eric,; Brown, George Mackay; Joyce, James,; English literature; Muir, Thomas,; Scott, Walter,; Macpherson, James,; Dunca
      PubDate: 2018-01-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Scottish Histories: Robert Greene's James the Fourth (c. 1590) in the
           Light (and Shadow) of David Lyndsay's Ane Satyre of the Thrie Estaitis
           (1552)
    • Abstract: The approach of this essay is frankly intertextual, not only because the English and Scottish plays at its centre are inextricable from large political issues and their multiple discursive expression, but also because the question of direct influence must finally remain indeterminate. Robert Greene would seem unlikely, on the face of it, to have had access to a text of the Satyre. It was partly (but not wholly) on textual grounds that Douglas Hamer, the editor in the 1930s of David Lyndsay's Works, dismissed any idea that the Satyre influenced English drama at all, although he did not pursue the question as far as Greene.2 In any case, the argument for inaccessibility depends strictly on negative evidence: the fact ... Read More
      Keywords: Scottish Gaelic literature; Scotland; Burns, Robert, 1759-1796; Antipodes Islands (N.Z.); New Zealand; Burns, Robert,; Linklater, Eric,; Brown, George Mackay; Joyce, James,; English literature; Muir, Thomas,; Scott, Walter,; Macpherson, James,; Dunca
      PubDate: 2018-01-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • 'Sir, Yours this moment I unseal': A Burns Manuscript Rediscovered in
           Paisley
    • Abstract: The world came to terms with the death of Robert Burns by establishing hundreds of Clubs in his honour, many of which can boast some claim of pre-eminence. The first, in Greenock (1801), calls itself 'The Mother Club'. Paisley Burns Club was founded in 1805, claiming precedence as the 'first formally constituted' club in the world. Robert Tannahill (1774–1810) was its first secretary, and William Motherwell (1797–1835) served as its president. There is, however, a substantial gap in the records of the Club – from 1837 until 1873 – whereas other Clubs such as Irvine (1826) maintain a long, unbroken history since their foundation. In healthy competition with one another, Burns Clubs, with their relics and ... Read More
      Keywords: Scottish Gaelic literature; Scotland; Burns, Robert, 1759-1796; Antipodes Islands (N.Z.); New Zealand; Burns, Robert,; Linklater, Eric,; Brown, George Mackay; Joyce, James,; English literature; Muir, Thomas,; Scott, Walter,; Macpherson, James,; Dunca
      PubDate: 2018-01-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Scotland and Beyond: Eric Linklater's Cosmopolitan Imagination
    • Abstract: The last thirty years have witnessed a remarkable blossoming of individual literary talents in Scotland. Alasdair Gray, Janice Galloway, James Kelman, A. L. Kennedy, James Robertson are some of the novelists whose works are shaping a new Scottish literary revival. However, without belittling the exceptional quality of the above-mentioned authors, it is often rewarding to bear in mind what came before as Allan Massie did recently when, during the independence debate, he invited his readers not to underrate post-war writers. 'There were at least as many good Scottish poets and novelists fifty or sixty years ago as there are today.' he wrote,1 and, among them, he mentioned Eric Linklater (1899–1974), a writer who, as ... Read More
      Keywords: Scottish Gaelic literature; Scotland; Burns, Robert, 1759-1796; Antipodes Islands (N.Z.); New Zealand; Burns, Robert,; Linklater, Eric,; Brown, George Mackay; Joyce, James,; English literature; Muir, Thomas,; Scott, Walter,; Macpherson, James,; Dunca
      PubDate: 2018-01-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Comic Uncanny in Muriel Spark's Memento Mori
    • Abstract: In Memento Mori, Muriel Spark literalises the traditional memento mori image, rendering the concept in the contemporary medium of telecommunications: a disembodied voice calls characters on the telephone to remind them that they must die. In recounting the investigation into these calls, the narrative deploys elements of the detective novel, yet withholds the customary resolution in favor of maintaining the mystery.1 The untraceability of the calls opens up space for the characters and readers to focus on the message itself, instead of merely upon the calls' provenance or intent. Rather than a purely rational explanation, the detective Henry Mortimer espouses a supernatural one: that Death itself is making the ... Read More
      Keywords: Scottish Gaelic literature; Scotland; Burns, Robert, 1759-1796; Antipodes Islands (N.Z.); New Zealand; Burns, Robert,; Linklater, Eric,; Brown, George Mackay; Joyce, James,; English literature; Muir, Thomas,; Scott, Walter,; Macpherson, James,; Dunca
      PubDate: 2018-01-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Construction and Demolition: Dissecting the Concept of Home in Three
           Devolutionary Plays
    • Abstract: David Greig's The Architect (1996), Stephen Greenhorn's Passing Places (1997) and David Harrower's Kill the Old Torture Their Young (1998) premièred at Edinburgh's Traverse Theatre in the immediate context of the Scottish devolution campaign. As a consequence, one expects them to engage with a crucial question that surfaced in the years surrounding the campaign for home-rule and its establishment through the reopening of the Scottish Parliament: what does 'home' mean for the Scots on the eve of the new millennium' This article will analyse the ways in which these three plays question existing notions of home, dissect the semantic structure of the concept and problematise the possibility of its physical ... Read More
      Keywords: Scottish Gaelic literature; Scotland; Burns, Robert, 1759-1796; Antipodes Islands (N.Z.); New Zealand; Burns, Robert,; Linklater, Eric,; Brown, George Mackay; Joyce, James,; English literature; Muir, Thomas,; Scott, Walter,; Macpherson, James,; Dunca
      PubDate: 2018-01-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • George Mackay Brown and the Scottish Catholic Imagination by Linden Bicket
           (review)
    • Abstract: Few writers are as closely associated with a particular place as George Mackay Brown. For many readers he remains, as Eric Linklater wrote in 1971, 'essentially a poet of Orkney'. As such, the majority of critical responses to Brown's work have either explored Brown's connection with Orkney or attempted, in various ways, to challenge the centrality of Orkney to his writing. Linden Bicket's excellent new volume, however, sidesteps the question almost entirely, persuasively placing Brown in a larger context of Scottish Catholic writing. Through extensive use of letters and unpublished manuscripts, as well as more canonical texts, Bicket convincingly demonstrates the centrality of Catholic material to Brown's corpus. ... Read More
      Keywords: Scottish Gaelic literature; Scotland; Burns, Robert, 1759-1796; Antipodes Islands (N.Z.); New Zealand; Burns, Robert,; Linklater, Eric,; Brown, George Mackay; Joyce, James,; English literature; Muir, Thomas,; Scott, Walter,; Macpherson, James,; Dunca
      PubDate: 2018-01-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Celtic Unconscious: Joyce and Scottish Culture by Richard Barlow
           (review)
    • Abstract: Richard Barlow's The Celtic Unconscious: Joyce and Scottish Culture is the most sustained and detailed treatment to date of James Joyce's engagement with Scottish history, culture, and literature. Whereas Willy Maley in his seminal essay on Joyce and Scotland had suggested a largely negative depiction of Scotland and Scottishness, Barlow's book explores a more productive view, especially in relation to Finnegans Wake. The Celtic Unconscious takes its cue from recent archipelagic criticism to make the case for 'a "devolved" and unpacked reading of Joyce and Scottish culture' (p. 3). Barlow cites the growth in recent years of Irish-Scottish Studies in particular, and more generally the burgeoning confidence of ... Read More
      Keywords: Scottish Gaelic literature; Scotland; Burns, Robert, 1759-1796; Antipodes Islands (N.Z.); New Zealand; Burns, Robert,; Linklater, Eric,; Brown, George Mackay; Joyce, James,; English literature; Muir, Thomas,; Scott, Walter,; Macpherson, James,; Dunca
      PubDate: 2018-01-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Scottish Enlightenment and Literary Culture ed. by Ralph McLean,
           Ronnie Young and Kenneth Simpson (review)
    • Abstract: This collection of thirteen essays brings into sharp focus the critical turn – gathering momentum over the last couple of decades – against the longstanding consensus that set the philosophical achievements of the Scottish Enlightenment in opposition to the development of Scottish poetry and fiction. Formalised in G. Gregory Smith's 'Caledonian Antisyzygy', hardened into twentieth-century dogma, the consensus had its roots in J. G. Lockhart's partisan attack (in Peter's Letters to his Kinsfolk, 1819) on David Hume and his contemporaries as proxies for the Whig literati of the Edinburgh Review: the arid cosmopolitan rationalism of Enlightenment thought, Lockhart claimed, stifled an authentically national literature ... Read More
      Keywords: Scottish Gaelic literature; Scotland; Burns, Robert, 1759-1796; Antipodes Islands (N.Z.); New Zealand; Burns, Robert,; Linklater, Eric,; Brown, George Mackay; Joyce, James,; English literature; Muir, Thomas,; Scott, Walter,; Macpherson, James,; Dunca
      PubDate: 2018-01-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Gaelic Scotland in the Colonial Imagination: Anglophone Writing from 1600
           to 1900 by Silke Stroh (review)
    • Abstract: The number of questions posed by Silke Stroh in the introduction to Gaelic Scotland in the Colonial Imagination leaves the reader in no doubt of the complexity of her chosen subject: 'Can Scotland and the "Celtic fringe" be considered as English colonies' Is their experience and literature comparable to that of overseas postcolonial countries' Can international postcolonial theory help us to understand the Scottish predicament' Is Scottish political and cultural nationalism similar to anticolonial resistance overseas' Or are such comparisons no more than Scottish patriotic victimology''At the present time, when the examination of identity, whether selfassumed or imposed from the 'outside', is inherent in Scotland ... Read More
      Keywords: Scottish Gaelic literature; Scotland; Burns, Robert, 1759-1796; Antipodes Islands (N.Z.); New Zealand; Burns, Robert,; Linklater, Eric,; Brown, George Mackay; Joyce, James,; English literature; Muir, Thomas,; Scott, Walter,; Macpherson, James,; Dunca
      PubDate: 2018-01-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Community in Modern Scottish Literature ed. by Scott Lyall (review)
    • Abstract: 'Community has not only been a key thematic concern in Scottish literary representations […] it has also been a bulwark of the Scottish tradition, helping to form Scottish literature as a subject-area'. Volume 25 of Brill/Rodopi's SCROLL series unfolds from this proposition, and explores an admirably wide range of Scottish texts from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. A strong editorial anchoring to this proposition holds the following chapters to this founding proposition extremely well, and the introduction itself provides an important overview.After this there are a few historical sweeps, like H. Gustav Klaus's fascinating story of a body of popular but often half-forgotten inter-war working-class ... Read More
      Keywords: Scottish Gaelic literature; Scotland; Burns, Robert, 1759-1796; Antipodes Islands (N.Z.); New Zealand; Burns, Robert,; Linklater, Eric,; Brown, George Mackay; Joyce, James,; English literature; Muir, Thomas,; Scott, Walter,; Macpherson, James,; Dunca
      PubDate: 2018-01-09T00:00:00-05:00
      Issue No: Vol. 25 (2018)
       
  • Thomas Muir of Huntershill: Essays for the Twenty-First Century ed. by
           Gerard Carruthers and Don Martin (review)
    • Abstract: Thomas Muir (1765-99) occupies a liminal space in Scotland's national memory. He is widely recognised as an icon of the Left and is securely lodged in the canons of nationalism and radicalism; yet he is not a familiar household name like his contemporary Robert Burns. The volume under review, which emerges out of a series of public events held in 2015 to commemorate the two hundred and fiftieth anniversary of Muir's birth, is a sign that his reputation is on the rise. Wider name-recognition will surely follow. After all, Muir's spectacular career is ripe for cinematic treatment: it features his trial for sedition, transportation to Australia, a dramatic escape across the Pacific to Spanish California, and eventual ... Read More
      Keywords: Scottish Gaelic literature; Scotland; Burns, Robert, 1759-1796; Antipodes Islands (N.Z.); New Zealand; Burns, Robert,; Linklater, Eric,; Brown, George Mackay; Joyce, James,; English literature; Muir, Thomas,; Scott, Walter,; Macpherson, James,; Dunca
      PubDate: 2018-01-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Sir Walter Scott: A Life in Story by Eileen Dunlop (review)
    • Abstract: Any biographer of Walter Scott has to grapple with the shadow of J. G. Lockhart's seven volume Memoirs of the Life of Sir Walter Scott, Bart., published in 1837–38. Although long recognised as much as an attempt to create a version of Scott for posterity as a frank biography, it remains the definitive study of Scott's life. Eileen Dunlop confronts this head on, writing in her final chapter that 'a work once seen as too candid is now regarded as hagiography, its presentation of Scott evasive and unreliable', but she also acknowledges that 'we love the stories' in it, 'not exactly as they were but as Lockhart wanted to remember them' (p. 231). The rather slippery relationship between biography and truth is, moreover ... Read More
      Keywords: Scottish Gaelic literature; Scotland; Burns, Robert, 1759-1796; Antipodes Islands (N.Z.); New Zealand; Burns, Robert,; Linklater, Eric,; Brown, George Mackay; Joyce, James,; English literature; Muir, Thomas,; Scott, Walter,; Macpherson, James,; Dunca
      PubDate: 2018-01-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Fiction of Robin Jenkins: Some Kind of Grace ed. by Douglas Gifford
           and Linden Bicket (review)
    • Abstract: This collection of critical essays is a fitting tribute to a Scottish writer who, as Gavin Wallace and Douglas Gifford state in their 'Introductory Overview', was 'established as one of the best novelists in Scotland and Britain' (p. 3) by the late 1950s, and who kept adding quality fiction to his output well into the first decade of the twenty-first century. Most of the fifteen contributions to this collection – including the aforementioned overview – deal with distinctive themes, motifs and techniques either as they range across Jenkins's oeuvre, or as they are exemplified in selected novels. Such themes and techniques are likewise foregrounded in two essays respectively dealing with his earliest and his latest ... Read More
      Keywords: Scottish Gaelic literature; Scotland; Burns, Robert, 1759-1796; Antipodes Islands (N.Z.); New Zealand; Burns, Robert,; Linklater, Eric,; Brown, George Mackay; Joyce, James,; English literature; Muir, Thomas,; Scott, Walter,; Macpherson, James,; Dunca
      PubDate: 2018-01-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Voice of the People: Hamish Henderson and Scottish Cultural Politics
           by Corey Gibson (review)
    • Abstract: At the start of this excellent study, Corey Gibson states his intention: 'The purpose of this book is to consider what Henderson's legacy might be if it is to be drawn solely from his writings' (p. 5). He does not wish to dismiss the anecdotal or overlook the range of interests Henderson opens to his readers, but his priority is to evaluate and contextualise his writing in the current of Henderson's 'ambitious moral-intellectual programme to reconnect and reintegrate the artist within modern society'.Gibson's intention is admirable and the outcome is impressive. This is the most scholarly comprehensive assessment of Henderson's work as a poet, songwriter, cultural agent, protector and provocateur. The critical ... Read More
      Keywords: Scottish Gaelic literature; Scotland; Burns, Robert, 1759-1796; Antipodes Islands (N.Z.); New Zealand; Burns, Robert,; Linklater, Eric,; Brown, George Mackay; Joyce, James,; English literature; Muir, Thomas,; Scott, Walter,; Macpherson, James,; Dunca
      PubDate: 2018-01-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The International Companion to James Macpherson and The Poems of Ossian
           ed. by Dafydd Moore (review)
    • Abstract: Ossian has been in need of a companion for as long as he has been telling the tales of other times. Thanks to Dafydd Moore, he now has a very congenial one: slim, engaging and wonderfully sympathetic. It is not that the ancient Celtic bard has been entirely neglected in the centuries since James Macpherson revealed him to the reading world, but his reputation has soared and plummeted, sunk, risen and ricocheted, often (but not always) in tandem with that of his translator-creator. As an established authority on Ossian, Dafydd Moore is ideally placed to guide a new generation of readers through the bewildering mists that have continued to hang about this elusive figure and to encourage those who think they know the ... Read More
      Keywords: Scottish Gaelic literature; Scotland; Burns, Robert, 1759-1796; Antipodes Islands (N.Z.); New Zealand; Burns, Robert,; Linklater, Eric,; Brown, George Mackay; Joyce, James,; English literature; Muir, Thomas,; Scott, Walter,; Macpherson, James,; Dunca
      PubDate: 2018-01-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Inspiring Views from "a' the airts'' on Scottish Literatures, Art &
           Cinema: The First World Congress of Scottish Literatures in Glasgow 2014
           ed. by Klaus Peter Müller, Ilka Schwittlinsky, and Ron Walker (review)
    • Abstract: This collection presents selected proceedings of the first World Congress of Scottish Literatures which took place at Glasgow University in 2014. While conference proceedings are usually edited by the local organisers, this particular volume was not edited from Glasgow, but by a team based at the Scottish Studies Centre at the Germersheim campus of Mainz University, Germany – a combination of forces which is in itself a fitting reflection of the truly international nature of the congress. That said, the size and scope of the conference made it impossible for a proceedings book to give more than a sample of the range of papers presented. The congress had around two hundred and fifty participants from five ... Read More
      Keywords: Scottish Gaelic literature; Scotland; Burns, Robert, 1759-1796; Antipodes Islands (N.Z.); New Zealand; Burns, Robert,; Linklater, Eric,; Brown, George Mackay; Joyce, James,; English literature; Muir, Thomas,; Scott, Walter,; Macpherson, James,; Dunca
      PubDate: 2018-01-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Reappraising Jane Duncan: Sexuality, Race and Colonialism in the My
           Friends Novels by Rita Rippetoe (review)
    • Abstract: Sexuality, race and colonialism are significant personal and political issues for contemporary society and culture, and hence, a concern for literary interrogation. Rita Rippetoe's monograph contextualises the works of Jane Duncan, an author neglected in many accounts of the overlapping genres of Scottish, literary, women's, and popular writing, against these key themes.Jane Duncan (1910–1976) wrote a series of nineteen novels, the 'My Friend' series, published by Macmillan between 1959 and 1976. The series is a Künstlerroman that depicts, not always chronologically, the life of the narrator, Janet Sandison, in Scotland, England, and the West Indies. This representation of Janet's life strongly corresponds with ... Read More
      Keywords: Scottish Gaelic literature; Scotland; Burns, Robert, 1759-1796; Antipodes Islands (N.Z.); New Zealand; Burns, Robert,; Linklater, Eric,; Brown, George Mackay; Joyce, James,; English literature; Muir, Thomas,; Scott, Walter,; Macpherson, James,; Dunca
      PubDate: 2018-01-09T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
 
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