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Journal Cover Scottish Literary Review
  [SJR: 0.101]   [H-I: 4]   [1 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1756-5634 - ISSN (Online) 2050-6678
   Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [294 journals]
  • Scottish Literary Review
    • Abstract: SCOTTISH LITERARY REVIEW is the leading international journal for Scottish literary studies, committed to approaching Scottish literature in an expansive way through exploration of its various social, cultural, historical and philosophical contexts, and of literary forms, both traditional and new. We are interested in comparative work with literatures from beyond Scotland, the interaction of literature with expressive media such as theatre and film, and in encouraging debate on issues of contemporary significance related to Scottish literary studies, so that SLR is both responsive to, and creative of, new readings and approaches. The journal is listed in the MLA International Bibliography and issues from 2013 ... Read More
      Keywords: Religious poetry; Bellenden, John,; Booksellers and bookselling; English poetry; Lynch, James,; Luby, John,; Philosophy, Modern; Kennedy, A. L.; Crumey, Andrew,; Gillies, Valerie,; Wilson, Alexander,
      PubDate: 2017-05-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Searching for True Felicity: Some Masterpieces of Early Scottish Religious
           Poetry
    • Abstract: A convenient starting-point for a discussion of Scottish religious poetry would be the interesting collection—called Scottish Religious Poetry: An Anthology—edited by Meg Bateman, Robert Crawford and James McGonigal (Edinburgh, 2000). This volume, published at the dawn of the new millennium, takes in no less than 1500 years in its purview, and includes religious poetry written in most of the languages ever used in Scotland (Latin, Gaelic, Anglo-Saxon, Old Norse, Older Scots, Modern Scots, Modern English). Inevitably, the book also demonstrates how the subject of religious verse has itself changed, through the many centuries between St Columba and Don Paterson.A useful feature of the book is the provision of ... Read More
      Keywords: Religious poetry; Bellenden, John,; Booksellers and bookselling; English poetry; Lynch, James,; Luby, John,; Philosophy, Modern; Kennedy, A. L.; Crumey, Andrew,; Gillies, Valerie,; Wilson, Alexander,
      PubDate: 2017-05-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • John Bellenden's Livy and the Tools of Translation
    • Abstract: In around 1533, John Bellenden (c. 1495–1545x8), archdeacon of Moray, completed the earliest extant translation of Livy into English.1 The translation, commissioned by James V (1512–1542), reworked the first five books of Livy's Ab Urbe Condita (hereafter AUC,) a period of Roman history spanning from the city's legendary foundation by Romulus and Remus to its sack by the Gauls in 390 bc.2 The Livy project followed fast on the heels of Bellenden's translation (also commissioned by James) of Hector Boece's (c. 1465–1536) Scotorum Historia (1527), a history of the Scots which was itself drawing on Livy's history of Rome. Though some critical attention has been paid to the Boece translation, Bellenden's Livy remains ... Read More
      Keywords: Religious poetry; Bellenden, John,; Booksellers and bookselling; English poetry; Lynch, James,; Luby, John,; Philosophy, Modern; Kennedy, A. L.; Crumey, Andrew,; Gillies, Valerie,; Wilson, Alexander,
      PubDate: 2017-05-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Chapmen in Eighteenth-Century Scotland
    • Abstract: From a historical research perspective, chapmen and their customers are extremely difficult to trace. They are often missing from the historical record, or glimpsed only briefly. It is easier to trace more established traders such as booksellers and shopkeepers, especially because such traders appear in published trade directories.1Yet chapmen were vital for many people's access to books and reading, both for carrying print trade into the countryside in particular, and for selling low-cost books to people. As a result they are worth investigating, and particularly useful for providing a glimpse into popular print traditions for the masses, at a time when many scholars still focus on the elite, or otherwise more ... Read More
      Keywords: Religious poetry; Bellenden, John,; Booksellers and bookselling; English poetry; Lynch, James,; Luby, John,; Philosophy, Modern; Kennedy, A. L.; Crumey, Andrew,; Gillies, Valerie,; Wilson, Alexander,
      PubDate: 2017-05-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Two Neglected Poets of Late Victorian Scotland: John Luby and James Lynch
    • Abstract: The growth and development of the Catholic community in Scotland in the Victorian era has not been without its historians. Indeed, there continues to be real excitement generated as scholars have in recent years begun to explore new themes and avenues in seeking to throw more light on the far-from-monochrome experience of the community as the nineteenth century moved towards its conclusion.1 What had once been a depleted community, rooted mainly in remote areas in the north-east and the western isles, grew exponentially throughout the nineteenth century in the burgeoning urban centres of the central belt and lowlands, largely as a result of Irish migration in search of work and new opportunities.2 However, this ... Read More
      Keywords: Religious poetry; Bellenden, John,; Booksellers and bookselling; English poetry; Lynch, James,; Luby, John,; Philosophy, Modern; Kennedy, A. L.; Crumey, Andrew,; Gillies, Valerie,; Wilson, Alexander,
      PubDate: 2017-05-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Chandeliers of the Metropole: A Vivid Glow Upon the Just and the
           Unjust in Muriel Spark's The Driver's Seat
    • Abstract: She will be found tomorrow morning dead from multiple wounds, her wrists bound with a silk scarf and her ankles bound with a man's necktie, in the grounds of an empty villa, in a park of the foreign city to which she is traveling on the flight now boarding at Gate 14.This sinuously elegant first sentence from Chapter Three of Muriel Spark's tenth novel, The Driver's Seat (1970), stopped some readers in their tracks. One critic asked, 'what can you say about a writer who does things like this to a reader?'3 then he lapsed into a little plot summary before ending with an acknowledgement of being 'mystified' by the novel. He was not alone. Another confessed 'I have to admit that I could not make head or tail of it, it ... Read More
      Keywords: Religious poetry; Bellenden, John,; Booksellers and bookselling; English poetry; Lynch, James,; Luby, John,; Philosophy, Modern; Kennedy, A. L.; Crumey, Andrew,; Gillies, Valerie,; Wilson, Alexander,
      PubDate: 2017-05-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Harmonic Monads: Reading Contemporary Scottish Fiction through the
           Enlightenment
    • Abstract: Over a series of influential articles in recent years, Franco Moretti has proposed a dual model of world literature that is simultaneously grounded in an evolutionary model that 'foregrounds the diversification of existing forms' and a 'world-systems analysis' that foregrounds their sameness. As he writes, these two models are clearly and necessarily incompatible; they can only be true if literature functions in two completely distinct ways.1 As Moretti freely admits, the concept of world literature is a problem. Not only is the potential material vast, but no single methodology is adequate; there is no commonly-agreed object to which the term 'world literature' applies. Similar discourses surrounding ... Read More
      Keywords: Religious poetry; Bellenden, John,; Booksellers and bookselling; English poetry; Lynch, James,; Luby, John,; Philosophy, Modern; Kennedy, A. L.; Crumey, Andrew,; Gillies, Valerie,; Wilson, Alexander,
      PubDate: 2017-05-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Locating Valerie Gillies's The Cream of the Well: A Critical Introduction
           to the Poems and an Interview with the Poet
    • Abstract: From the first pages of Valerie Gillies's The Cream of the Well: New and Selected Poems, it becomes clear that she is a poet for whom location matters. One of the earliest poems in the volume, 'Mountain Blaw', introduces the importance of place through a child's attachment to a neighbour's moorland farm: '—the farm itself—rose sudden as mercury / through a vein, a sense of place saturating / me.'1 To be 'saturated' by a place is to have a landscape enter one's being, in a way that alters, and even determines, what one becomes. Gillies is of the lineage of other noted Scottish poets of place, Norman MacCaig, Iain Crichton Smith, Sorley MacLean, and George Mackay Brown, whom she memorialises in the three-line poem ... Read More
      Keywords: Religious poetry; Bellenden, John,; Booksellers and bookselling; English poetry; Lynch, James,; Luby, John,; Philosophy, Modern; Kennedy, A. L.; Crumey, Andrew,; Gillies, Valerie,; Wilson, Alexander,
      PubDate: 2017-05-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Alexander Wilson's Manuscript Notebook: A Scottish Poet in America,
           1801-1803
    • Abstract: Glasgow University Library has recently acquired a manuscript notebook by Paisley poet-in-exile, Alexander Wilson (1766–1813). In the notebook he is compiling his American poems and songs both in holograph manuscript and in printed type, in the latter form extracted from newspapers and journals.1 The notebook, with buff card covers measuring 5 inches (12.7 cm) by 3.5 inches (8.89 cm), contains twenty-six pages, two of which consist of an additional card end-cover. It is bound by buff-coloured thread and is in a fragile but intact state. The notebook was exhibited in Paisley Museum during 1966 to mark the two hundredth anniversary of Wilson's birth and then it came into the possession of a private individual, after ... Read More
      Keywords: Religious poetry; Bellenden, John,; Booksellers and bookselling; English poetry; Lynch, James,; Luby, John,; Philosophy, Modern; Kennedy, A. L.; Crumey, Andrew,; Gillies, Valerie,; Wilson, Alexander,
      PubDate: 2017-05-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Ronald Dyce Sadler Jack: 3 April 1941-14 December 2016
    • Abstract: Ronald Dyce Sadler Jack, Professor of Scottish and Medieval Literature at the University of Edinburgh from 1987–2004, died on 14 December 2016 at the age of 75.Ronnie was a native of Ayr, where he was born on 3 April 1941. He was educated at Ayr Academy and the Universities of Glasgow (where he first studied Law, then switched to English) and Edinburgh. As a schoolboy he met the legendary Samuil Marshak, translator of Burns into Russian for Stalin, visiting from the USSR to get a sense of the birthplace of the heroic Scottish peasant, and recited Burns to him so that Marshak could get the feel of Burns's Scots. Ronnie remained an enthusiastic Burnsian all his life, and a welcome speaker at Burns events and suppers: ... Read More
      Keywords: Religious poetry; Bellenden, John,; Booksellers and bookselling; English poetry; Lynch, James,; Luby, John,; Philosophy, Modern; Kennedy, A. L.; Crumey, Andrew,; Gillies, Valerie,; Wilson, Alexander,
      PubDate: 2017-05-21T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
 
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