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Journal Cover   Scottish Literary Review
  [SJR: 0.1]   [H-I: 3]   Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1756-5634 - ISSN (Online) 2050-6678
   Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [364 journals]
  • The Year’s Publications for 2014: A Selected List
    • Abstract: Christopher McMillan, University of Glasgow Jonathan Henderson, University of Glasgow Stewart Alexander ... <a href="https://muse.jhu.edu/journals/scottish_literary_review/v007/7.1.article.html">Read More</a>
      Keywords: Scottish literature
      PubDate: 2015-05-22T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Illustrated Glasgow Editions of Robert Burns’s Poems,
           1800–1802
    • Abstract: <p>By Sandro Jung</p> In the late 1790s, booksellers and printsellers throughout Scotland commissioned engraved illustrations to capitalise on the growing demand for new editions of Robert Burns’s poems. While some of Burns’s poems had been illustrated before 1800, the illustration of Burns’s poetry in Scotland would start on an ambitious scale only with James Morison’s illustrated 1812 edition featuring twenty-four engraved designs by John Burnet, Andrew Geddes and Thomas Clerk.1 Yet, even before that edition, booksellers and printsellers issued smaller-scale ventures which promoted the burgeoning field of Scottish book illustration. This note is a contribution to the charting of early illustrated Scottish editions. It will focus on ... <a href="https://muse.jhu.edu/journals/scottish_literary_review/v007/7.1.jung.html">Read More</a>
      Keywords: Booksellers and bookselling
      PubDate: 2015-05-22T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Ecology of Iain Crichton Smith’s ‘High Hills’
    • Abstract: <p>By Jon Sanders</p> Parts of Deer on the High Hills invite almost cursory reading. Natural elements are pushed towards superlative matter-of-factness: sand is categorical and stone unchangeable, the ‘thorn’ is sharp and the waters unsurprising in their characteristic rumble. We learn little about them over and above their presence; their properties lean towards redundancy, the lines towards tautology. There is an absence of the numinous and the liminal. There are, though, obscure exchanges between, among, the inanimate and animate. The ‘thrust of thorn’ carries traces of the ‘honest thrust’ of the ‘horns’ of the poem’s deer so that the prickly barb is shadowed by cervine weaponry (VII, ll.13–16). The waters ‘roar’ like a stag, and ... <a href="https://muse.jhu.edu/journals/scottish_literary_review/v007/7.1.sanders.html">Read More</a>
      PubDate: 2015-05-22T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • James Kelman’s Melancholic Politics
    • Abstract: <p>By Carole Jones</p> ‘Also I am a man, a human man. Frailty is inherent in me. But what do we mean by “frailty” in a context that is utterly and only human? I do confess that I hold many weaknesses of a personal nature.’ ‘The violence of social regulation is not to be found in its unilateral action, but in the circuitous route by which the psyche accuses itself of its own worthlessness.’ This essay seeks to place James Kelman’s novels in relation to contemporary discourses of precariousness which challenge dominant neoliberal models of the self and their privileging of the autonomous individual. I contend that Kelman’s fictions are propelled by a gendered melancholia which opens out to a radical critique of autonomy ... <a href="https://muse.jhu.edu/journals/scottish_literary_review/v007/7.1.jones.html">Read More</a>
      Keywords: Kelman, James,
      PubDate: 2015-05-22T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • ‘Daughter of an Outcast Queen’ – Defying State
           Expectations in Jenni Fagan’s The Panopticon
    • Abstract: <p>By Fiona McCulloch</p> Jenni Fagan’s The Panopticon (2012) is a contemporary Scottish gothic tale that portrays the experience of a teenage girl’s journey through the care system as a struggle to maintain her own selfhood against the destructive forces of state control. To keep hold of one’s identity becomes an embattled protest against hegemonic norms that attempt to define and control the subject through constant observation. Rather than allow herself to succumb to state interpellation, Anais Hendricks, a socially marginalised Scottish fifteenyear- old orphan in care, is determined not to ‘disappear’1 under the weight of the state’s controlling and defining stare, despite her uncertainty regarding her culpability of putting a police ... <a href="https://muse.jhu.edu/journals/scottish_literary_review/v007/7.1.mcculloch.html">Read More</a>
      Keywords: Scotland
      PubDate: 2015-05-22T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Better Dead: J. M. Barrie’s First Book and the Shilling Fiction
           Market
    • Abstract: <p>By Andrew Nash</p> J. M. Barrie’s first Book, Better Dead, published by Swan Sonnenschein, Lowrey & Co. in 1887, has never been much admired, least of all by its author who in his maturity was known to suggest that its claim to posterity – or lack of it – was answered by its title.1 As early as 1896, in a preface to the American collected edition of his works, he wrote of it disparagingly: This juvenile effort is a field of prickles, into which none may be advised to penetrate – I made the attempt lately in cold blood, and came back shuddering, but I had read enough to have the profoundest reason for declining to tell what the book is about.2 Characteristically, however, Barrie immediately qualified that ... <a href="https://muse.jhu.edu/journals/scottish_literary_review/v007/7.1.nash.html">Read More</a>
      Keywords: Publishers and publishing
      PubDate: 2015-05-22T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The place of history, literature and politics in the 1911 Scottish
           Exhibition
    • Abstract: <p>By Neil G. W. Curtis</p> Although there had been fairs to promote industry and design from the late eighteenth century, ‘great exhibitions’ can more properly be seen as having their origin in the Great Exhibition of 1851 in London.1 Glasgow was fairly late following this trend, with its first International Exhibition in 1888. Greenhalgh has regarded the Glasgow Exhibitions of 1888, 1901 and 1911 as being among the eleven ‘major events of the first order’ in Britain between 1871 and 1914.2 Given Glasgow’s industrial prominence and the important role that Scots played in the British Empire,3 it is not surprising that the twin themes of Industry and Empire that were first seen in the 1851 Great Exhibition dominated those in Glasgow. Unlike ... <a href="https://muse.jhu.edu/journals/scottish_literary_review/v007/7.1.curtis.html">Read More</a>
      Keywords: Exhibitions
      PubDate: 2015-05-22T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The First Publication of ‘Holy Willie’s Prayer’
    • Abstract: <p>By Patrick Scott</p> One of the major themes in recent Burns criticism has been the distinction between the poems Burns included in his first book, Poems, Chiefly in the Scottish Dialect (Kilmarnock, 1786) and those he chose to exclude.1 ‘Holy Willie’s Prayer’, arguably the greatest of Burns’s religious satires, is also arguably the most important example of this ‘reserved canon’, because Burns not only omitted it in 1786 but continued to exclude it from successive editions of his poetry throughout his lifetime.2 In F. B. Snyder’s representative summary: ‘the stanzas which the world knows as “Holy Willie’s Prayer” Burns himself never printed’.3 Even after Burns’s death, the poem was still excluded from the 1800 collected works, as ... <a href="https://muse.jhu.edu/journals/scottish_literary_review/v007/7.1.scott.html">Read More</a>
      Keywords: Chapbooks, Scottish
      PubDate: 2015-05-22T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Scottish Literary Review
    • Abstract: <p>By Gerard Carruthers</p> SCOTTISH LITERARY REVIEW is the leading international journal for Scottish literary studies, committed to approaching Scottish literature in an expansive way through exploration of its various social, cultural, historical and philosophical contexts, and of literary forms, both traditional and new. We are interested in comparative work with literatures from beyond Scotland, the interaction of literature with expressive media such as theatre and film, and in encouraging debate on issues of contemporary significance related to Scottish literary studies, so that SLR is both responsive to, and creative of, new readings and approaches. The journal is listed in the MLA International Bibliography and issues from 2013 ... <a href="https://muse.jhu.edu/journals/scottish_literary_review/v007/7.1.carruthers.html">Read More</a>
      PubDate: 2015-05-22T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Scottish Literary Review
    • Abstract: <p>By Gerard Carruthers</p> SCOTTISH LITERARY REVIEW is the leading international journal for Scottish literary studies, committed to approaching Scottish literature in an expansive way through exploration of its various social, cultural, historical and philosophical contexts, and of literary forms, both traditional and new. We are interested in comparative work with literatures from beyond Scotland, the interaction of literature with expressive media such as theatre and film, and in encouraging debate on issues of contemporary significance related to Scottish literary studies, so that SLR is both responsive to, and creative of, new readings and approaches. The journal is listed in the MLA International Bibliography and from 2013 onwards is ... <a href="https://muse.jhu.edu/journals/scottish_literary_review/v006/6.2.carruthers.html">Read More</a>
      PubDate: 2014-12-03T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
 
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