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Journal Cover Scottish Literary Review
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   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1756-5634 - ISSN (Online) 2050-6678
   Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [296 journals]
  • The Bard and The Minstrel
    • Abstract: James Beattie has been recognised as an important figure in the evolution of romantic poetry but less has been said about his influence on Robert Burns. This may be due to the dominance in literary genealogy of Beattie’s signature poem The Minstrel,1 a significant, if not the significant, protoromantic poem, with a fundamental importance for Wordsworth and others. However, Beattie was far from being a one-poem poet. Roger Robinson2 ascribes as many as eighty-five works to him, written in a variety of themes and genres and Burns gives us evidence that he had read Beattie’s published poetry3 and some of his philosophical works.Beattie and Burns lived in the same country at the same time4 and yet they wrote their ... Read More
      Keywords: British literature; Scottish literature; English literature; Nationalism; Reformation; Dove, Patrick Edward,; English-speaking countries; Scotland; Gibbon, Lewis Grassic,; Davies, Terence,; Music and literature; Beattie, James,
      PubDate: 2016-06-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Words as Music/Music as Words: The Bagpipe and Kirsty Gunn’s The Big
           Music (2012)
    • Abstract: The bagpipe for centuries has been seen as the voice of Scotland. In 1549 Jean de Beaugué, a French military officer, wrote that “the savage Scots incited themselves into battle with the sound of their bagpipes”;1 the use of the possessive adjective “their” indicates that the bagpipe was perceived as belonging to the country. In fact it went on to symbolise patriotism, and Jacobite sentiment, in Anglophone and Gaelic literature;2 it has represented Scotland in satires,3 poems and novels, often in critical juxtaposition to foreign, ‘unauthentic’ sounds.4Right through to modern times “bagpipe music” has constituted the subject-matter and/or title for evocative poems – some criticising, or exploring notions of the ... Read More
      Keywords: British literature; Scottish literature; English literature; Nationalism; Reformation; Dove, Patrick Edward,; English-speaking countries; Scotland; Gibbon, Lewis Grassic,; Davies, Terence,; Music and literature; Beattie, James,
      PubDate: 2016-06-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Exportation of Lewis Grassic Gibbon
    • Abstract: Over the last decade, highly acclaimed British auteur film director Terence Davies has regularly declared his love for Sunset Song, Lewis Grassic Gibbon’s groundbreaking modernist novel from 1932.1 The prospect of Davies bringing his fifteen-year-long ambition to realise Gibbon’s novel cinematically has been particularly eagerly awaited in Scotland, where Pharic Maclaren’s BBC television serialisation – which sparked Davies’s interest in Gibbon’s book on its transmission in 1971 – is popularly remembered with great warmth as a production that set down a firm marker indicating the capacity of Gibbon’s novel to effect the exportation to the visual medium.2Following seemingly interminable delays with funding and ... Read More
      Keywords: British literature; Scottish literature; English literature; Nationalism; Reformation; Dove, Patrick Edward,; English-speaking countries; Scotland; Gibbon, Lewis Grassic,; Davies, Terence,; Music and literature; Beattie, James,
      PubDate: 2016-06-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Scotland, ‘Greater Britain’, and the Kailyardic
           Contra(-)diction
    • Abstract: In May 1904 the New Zealand newspaper the Otago Witness printed the comically-intended tale of the ‘Canny Scot, or Guttural German’.1 Within the brief, apocryphal anecdote a ‘particularly sharp-looking tramp’ of unspecified nationality spies a ‘Scottish fancy name on the pillar post of a suburban villa’. Peering through the window of the stately residence and noticing a ‘big, fair-bearded man wearing a Tam-o-Shanter’, the wily tramp resolves to try his luck. ‘ “A Scottie for a pension!”’ he exclaims, ‘ “I must assume the kailyard brogue!”’Striding up to the grand house and ringing the doorbell, the tramp is coolly received by ‘the big beard and Tam-o-shanter’. Undeterred, the tramp addresses the resident of the ... Read More
      Keywords: British literature; Scottish literature; English literature; Nationalism; Reformation; Dove, Patrick Edward,; English-speaking countries; Scotland; Gibbon, Lewis Grassic,; Davies, Terence,; Music and literature; Beattie, James,
      PubDate: 2016-06-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • It’s Not About 1707: Patrick Edward Dove and the Scottish Sonderweg
    • Abstract: In 1860, the three-hundredth anniversary of the Scottish Reformation was commemorated across Scotland. Three significant commemorations took place: in May, the various Assemblies and Synods of Scottish Presbyterianism held their own denominational commemorations; in August, an international convocation was held in Edinburgh, culminating in the founding of a new ‘Protestant Institute’ on George IV Bridge; and in December, sermons and speeches were delivered in parishes and lecture halls across Scotland.1 These events drew deep from Scotland’s Presbyterian past, remembering the Reformation as means of supporting the demands of the present and emphasising not only the distinctiveness of the Scottish Presbyterian ... Read More
      Keywords: British literature; Scottish literature; English literature; Nationalism; Reformation; Dove, Patrick Edward,; English-speaking countries; Scotland; Gibbon, Lewis Grassic,; Davies, Terence,; Music and literature; Beattie, James,
      PubDate: 2016-06-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Scottish Literary Review
    • Abstract: SCOTTISH LITERARY REVIEW is the leading international journal for Scottish literary studies, committed to approaching Scottish literature in an expansive way through exploration of its various social, cultural, historical and philosophical contexts, and of literary forms, both traditional and new. We are interested in comparative work with literatures from beyond Scotland, the interaction of literature with expressive media such as theatre and film, and in encouraging debate on issues of contemporary significance related to Scottish literary studies, so that SLR is both responsive to, and creative of, new readings and approaches. The journal is listed in the MLA International Bibliography and issues from 2013 ... Read More
      Keywords: British literature; Scottish literature; English literature; Nationalism; Reformation; Dove, Patrick Edward,; English-speaking countries; Scotland; Gibbon, Lewis Grassic,; Davies, Terence,; Music and literature; Beattie, James,
      PubDate: 2016-06-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • British Literature: The Career of a Concept
    • Abstract: ‘British literature’: the very formulation carries an aura of unfamiliarity and strangeness. It does not trip off the tongue in quite the same way as ‘Scottish literature’, or ‘English literature’, though the latter term is baggy and capacious, and is sometimes understood to contain ‘Scottish literature’ and, by extension, what we might imagine to be the matter of British literature. Nevertheless, as we know from everyday experience, the terminology of place, ethnicity and identity in ‘these islands’ is far from straightforward. Scots are, of course, much more keenly attuned than their fellow Britons south of the border to the problem of disentangling England from Great Britain; but the people of Northern Ireland ... Read More
      Keywords: British literature; Scottish literature; English literature; Nationalism; Reformation; Dove, Patrick Edward,; English-speaking countries; Scotland; Gibbon, Lewis Grassic,; Davies, Terence,; Music and literature; Beattie, James,
      PubDate: 2016-06-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Scots and English Across the Union: Linguistic Connexions and Contrast
    • Abstract: One widespread narrative of Scottish cultural history holds that the Scots language was suppressed, as part of a general and incrementally severe attack on a Scottish vernacular culture, during the period after the Unions of Crowns and Parliaments: A Language Suppressed, to quote the somewhat misleading title of Charles Jones’s otherwise excellent book on eighteenth-century Scots and English in Scotland.1It is certainly true that the ‘cultural capital’ of Scots vernacular expression has been frequently contested, but the true story is more complex. When we go behind a simple narrative of distinctively oppressed victim-hood, we find something rather more interesting: a trans-border cultural engagement, projected ... Read More
      Keywords: British literature; Scottish literature; English literature; Nationalism; Reformation; Dove, Patrick Edward,; English-speaking countries; Scotland; Gibbon, Lewis Grassic,; Davies, Terence,; Music and literature; Beattie, James,
      PubDate: 2016-06-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Untrammelled by Theory: Susan Ferrier’s Polyphonic Vision of
           Scotland and the Union in Marriage
    • Abstract: Marriage was a common trope in both pro and anti-union tracts published before and in the aftermath of the Act of Union. However, Juliet Shields reminds us that Daniel Defoe – who had himself made use of this very trope in earlier texts – argued in The Scots Union and Nation Vindicated that it was a rather unhappy choice of metaphor for the Union since the political union between England and Scotland was based on an egalitarian partnership while ‘in a Marriage the Woman is a subject, an inferior; Promises Obedience, and is call’d by the Name of her husband’.1 In spite of this warning against the potentially disastrous political impact of the conjugal metaphor, many authors continued to use it throughout the ... Read More
      Keywords: British literature; Scottish literature; English literature; Nationalism; Reformation; Dove, Patrick Edward,; English-speaking countries; Scotland; Gibbon, Lewis Grassic,; Davies, Terence,; Music and literature; Beattie, James,
      PubDate: 2016-06-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
 
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