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Journal Cover Scottish Literary Review
  [SJR: 0.101]   [H-I: 4]   [0 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1756-5634 - ISSN (Online) 2050-6678
   Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [295 journals]
  • A Man of Many Depths – Hugh Miller and The Cruise of the Betsey
    • Abstract: Hugh Miller (1802–1856) was in his time a stonemason, geologist, journalist, lay churchman, historian, social campaigner and folklorist. He was also a palaeontologist whose work on fossilised sea life was of great significance, and this was but one of many examples where he addressed the sea in his writing. To examine this aspect of his life, then, is to appreciate his work in its proper context – yet to what extent did the sea influence and resonate through it?Miller certainly provided plentiful material on the subject; during his time editing the Witness newspaper, Miller would write over ten thousand words a week1 and such prodigious output explored the oceans in depth, amongst a myriad of other subjects. One ... Read More
      Keywords: English drama; Short stories, Scottish; Burns, Robert,; English drama (Tragedy); English literature; Glasgow (Scotland); Aesthetics; Douglas, O.; Gibbon, Lewis Grassic,; English fiction; Mitchell, James Leslie,; Scottish poetry; Scottish literature; Orr, James,; M
      PubDate: 2016-12-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Mother’s Word: Maternity and Writing in Walter Scott
    • Abstract: ‘What an expression I have suffered to escape my pen!’1 Julia Mannering writes to Matilda Marchmont, the young lady with whom she has a so-called ‘eternal friendship’ (GM, p. 91). By describing her writing in this self-deprecating way, Julia positions herself in a literary tradition of female writers who manifest guilt (either explicit or internalised) about their written productivity. Despite her consternation, and the implicit mockery of the friendship of young female correspondents, what does escape Julia’s pen is testament to her good sense and her lively imagination. Almost all the reader knows about Julia is expressed through letters, particularly her own, and she resultantly becomes one of the most ... Read More
      Keywords: English drama; Short stories, Scottish; Burns, Robert,; English drama (Tragedy); English literature; Glasgow (Scotland); Aesthetics; Douglas, O.; Gibbon, Lewis Grassic,; English fiction; Mitchell, James Leslie,; Scottish poetry; Scottish literature; Orr, James,; M
      PubDate: 2016-12-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • James Hogg’s The Profligate Princes: An unconventional treatment of
           Scottish female sexuality in Romantic writing for the theatre
    • Abstract: Hoping to benefit from the recent success with his anonymous imitations of Romantic poets, in 1817 Hogg advertised his collection of Dramatic Tales as ‘by the Author of “The Poetic Mirror”’. Nevertheless, Hogg’s experimental attempt at writing for the theatre1 was received unenthusiastically: the Monthly Review judged it as ‘a poor school-boy’s performance, – a coarse and unenlightened commixture of Allan Ramsay, Robert Burns, and Walter Scott, into an irregular fairy tale, dramatized and colloquized for the occasion’.2The Profligate Princes is one of Hogg’s Dramatic Tales, the plot of which focuses on a group of four Scots noblemen in disguise, wandering through the Scottish Borders, with the double purpose of ... Read More
      Keywords: English drama; Short stories, Scottish; Burns, Robert,; English drama (Tragedy); English literature; Glasgow (Scotland); Aesthetics; Douglas, O.; Gibbon, Lewis Grassic,; English fiction; Mitchell, James Leslie,; Scottish poetry; Scottish literature; Orr, James,; M
      PubDate: 2016-12-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Burns’s Tales of ‘Aloway Kirk’ and Romantic Short
           Fiction
    • Abstract: In a letter to Alexander Cunningham, Robert Burns describes ‘Tam o’ Shanter’ as ‘my first essay in the way of tales’. It is a suggestive statement, yet not quite accurate. For the poem grew from an earlier trilogy of ‘Aloway-kirk Stories’, one of which, Burns commented, he had revisited and ‘done in verse’.1 These preliminary efforts, then, apparently did not qualify as true attempts at the tale form. Certainly while ‘Tam’ has been the subject of more critical discourse than perhaps any other work of Scottish literature, few scholars have paid any attention to these earlier prose fictions.2 Yet new work on the development of short fictional forms across the Romantic period, alongside our expanded understanding of ... Read More
      Keywords: English drama; Short stories, Scottish; Burns, Robert,; English drama (Tragedy); English literature; Glasgow (Scotland); Aesthetics; Douglas, O.; Gibbon, Lewis Grassic,; English fiction; Mitchell, James Leslie,; Scottish poetry; Scottish literature; Orr, James,; M
      PubDate: 2016-12-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • James Orr, Poet and Irish Radical by Carol Baraniuk (review)
    • Abstract: Carol Baraniuk’s new study of James Orr, Poet and Irish Radical is the most important recent contribution to the historical study and criticism of Ulster Scots writing. Emerging slowly from the cultural twilight, in a movement led by John Hewitt and most significantly encouraged by Liam McIl-vanney’s pioneering work on the early Irish reception of Robert Burns, Ulster Scots writing has recently been engaging the attention of a number of significant scholars. As this important new study attests, Baraniuk is among the most distinguished of this group. Her book, a revised version of her University of Glasgow PhD thesis, builds upon her earlier publications in this field, including an article in Scottish Studies Review ... Read More
      Keywords: English drama; Short stories, Scottish; Burns, Robert,; English drama (Tragedy); English literature; Glasgow (Scotland); Aesthetics; Douglas, O.; Gibbon, Lewis Grassic,; English fiction; Mitchell, James Leslie,; Scottish poetry; Scottish literature; Orr, James,; M
      PubDate: 2016-12-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Literature After Euclid: The Geometric Imagination in the Long Scottish
           Enlightenment by Matthew Wickman (review)
    • Abstract: This is a work of great erudition, setting Scottish literary history from The Seasons to MacDiarmid within the intellectual history of this period. It makes a very interesting and original claim: that literary innovation in the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries can be understood in terms of the adoption and distortion of contemporary mathematical ideas, and geometrical ideas in particular. However, it does not construct an argument which uses that erudition to justify that claim. The starting point for this book seems to be the connection sometimes made between modernist art and the non-Euclidean geometries of the nineteenth century, combined with Thomas Reid’s apparent anticipation of those geometries in a ... Read More
      Keywords: English drama; Short stories, Scottish; Burns, Robert,; English drama (Tragedy); English literature; Glasgow (Scotland); Aesthetics; Douglas, O.; Gibbon, Lewis Grassic,; English fiction; Mitchell, James Leslie,; Scottish poetry; Scottish literature; Orr, James,; M
      PubDate: 2016-12-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Playing Games of Sense in Edwin Morgan’s Writing by Monika Kocot
           (review)
    • Abstract: This rather awkwardly titled study is a welcome addition to the small but growing number of scholarly monographs on one of Scotland’s greatest modern poets. It flags its principal merits early in the introduction when Kocot notes how little real attention has been paid by critics to Morgan’s concrete poetry and it is this aspect of his work that is the main focus of her study and where she contributes most to our understanding of his work. Certainly no study of Morgan omits reference to the concrete poetry but often they shy away from in-depth examination and a thoroughgoing consideration is lacking. Reading Kocot one understands just why this may be so as her comparative approach – setting this work in the context ... Read More
      Keywords: English drama; Short stories, Scottish; Burns, Robert,; English drama (Tragedy); English literature; Glasgow (Scotland); Aesthetics; Douglas, O.; Gibbon, Lewis Grassic,; English fiction; Mitchell, James Leslie,; Scottish poetry; Scottish literature; Orr, James,; M
      PubDate: 2016-12-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The International Companion to Lewis Grassic Gibbon ed. by Scott Lyall
           (review)
    • Abstract: Lewis Grassic Gibbon exemplifies the problems and possibilities of any international approach to Scottish literary studies. His Sunset Song is routinely taught in Scottish schools and has been voted the ‘best book’ in various contests, while the Quair enjoys widespread critical attention and popular appreciation. Its significance, for readers in Scotland, can be assumed in any discussion. Outside Scotland, however, Gibbon remains a stubbornly marginal figure, under-read, under-discussed, under-theorised. (Terence Davies’ heart-breakingly dismal film last year may well make matters worse). In ‘the wider space of Modern Studies’, a natural home for his work, he remains, as Morag Shiach observes in the volume under ... Read More
      Keywords: English drama; Short stories, Scottish; Burns, Robert,; English drama (Tragedy); English literature; Glasgow (Scotland); Aesthetics; Douglas, O.; Gibbon, Lewis Grassic,; English fiction; Mitchell, James Leslie,; Scottish poetry; Scottish literature; Orr, James,; M
      PubDate: 2016-12-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Maitland Quarto: A New Edition of Cambridge, Magdalene College, Pepys
           Library MS 1408 ed. by Joanna M. Martin (review)
    • Abstract: The recent years have seen a flowering of new scholarship pertaining to late medieval and early modern Scotland. Works such as Sebastiaan Verweij’s The Literary Culture of Early Modern Scotland (2016), also reviewed in this volume, and Emily Wingfield’s Trojan Legend in Medieval Scottish Literature (2014) take Scottish material as their focus and are monographs of exceptional critical importance in framing the concerns of contemporary critical discourse. Yet what has let scholars in this field down consistently is the unavoidable reliance on arguably outdated editions of crucial texts such as The Bannatyne Manuscript and The Maitland Quarto. While the Scottish Text Society supplies an extensive and unparalleled ... Read More
      Keywords: English drama; Short stories, Scottish; Burns, Robert,; English drama (Tragedy); English literature; Glasgow (Scotland); Aesthetics; Douglas, O.; Gibbon, Lewis Grassic,; English fiction; Mitchell, James Leslie,; Scottish poetry; Scottish literature; Orr, James,; M
      PubDate: 2016-12-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Literary Culture of Early Modern Scotland: Manuscript Production and
           Transmission, 1560–1625 by Sebastiaan Verweij (review)
    • Abstract: Scotland’s Renaissance is still something of a recent discovery. Although movements in literary criticism tend to have only very arbitrary starting points, a new era in the study of early-modern Scottish literature may be said to have opened in 1997 with the Mercat Anthology of Early Scottish Literature, 1375–1707, and in particular, the critical introduction by R. D. S. Jack. He argued for a reconceptualising of Scottish writing in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, and in doing so, reclaimed a Renaissance, with all of the cultural implications of the word, for a period of time which had typically been understood as a long and flourishing Middle Ages followed immediately by a dour Reformation. In the twenty ... Read More
      Keywords: English drama; Short stories, Scottish; Burns, Robert,; English drama (Tragedy); English literature; Glasgow (Scotland); Aesthetics; Douglas, O.; Gibbon, Lewis Grassic,; English fiction; Mitchell, James Leslie,; Scottish poetry; Scottish literature; Orr, James,; M
      PubDate: 2016-12-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Looking Both Ways – A Lefebvrian Investigation of Catherine
           Carswell’s Open the Door!
    • Abstract: Catherine Carswell’s novel Open the Door! (1920), drawing to an extent on her own experiences growing up in Glasgow at the turn of the century, is generally considered a ‘strong novel of a woman’s life and emotions’.1 D. H. Lawrence, a close friend of Carswell’s, commented extensively on the work in progress. He wrote, for example, in 1914 that ‘[n]early all of it is marvellously good. […] My good heart, there’s some honest work here, real.’2 A few years later he indicated of a revised version that it was ‘much improved. – But it shakes me badly – with a kind of nerve-racking pain.’3 The emotional power of Carswell’s first book is conventionally attributed to her uncompromising treatment of female sexuality,4 but ... Read More
      Keywords: English drama; Short stories, Scottish; Burns, Robert,; English drama (Tragedy); English literature; Glasgow (Scotland); Aesthetics; Douglas, O.; Gibbon, Lewis Grassic,; English fiction; Mitchell, James Leslie,; Scottish poetry; Scottish literature; Orr, James,; M
      PubDate: 2016-12-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • O. Douglas and the Aesthetics of the Ordinary
    • Abstract: Anna Buchan (1877–1948), author of twelve novels, was one of the publishing house Hodder and Stoughton’s top-selling writers between the First and Second World Wars.1 Yet Buchan’s name is all but absent from major surveys of Scottish literary history, and not simply because she published her novels under the pseudonym O. Douglas.2 In her autobiography, Unforgettable, Unforgotten (1945), Buchan explains that she chose to use this pseudonym – borrowed from the protagonist and narrator of her first novel Olivia in India (1912) – because her eldest brother John ‘had given lustre to the name of Buchan which any efforts of mine would not be likely to add to’.3 Ironically, when O. Douglas is mentioned by literary ... Read More
      Keywords: English drama; Short stories, Scottish; Burns, Robert,; English drama (Tragedy); English literature; Glasgow (Scotland); Aesthetics; Douglas, O.; Gibbon, Lewis Grassic,; English fiction; Mitchell, James Leslie,; Scottish poetry; Scottish literature; Orr, James,; M
      PubDate: 2016-12-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The First Irish Edition of Robert Burns: A Reexamination
    • Abstract: For the past one hundred and fifty years, bibliographers, collectors, and literary scholars seem to have been unanimous in recording the first Irish book publication of Robert Burns’s Poems under two separate editions, published in the summer of 1787 in Belfast and Dublin. The still-standard Burns bibliography by J. W. Egerer lists these as Egerer 3 and Egerer 4.1 As is well-known, Burns’s Poems, Chiefly in the Scottish Dialect had first appeared the previous year in the Kilmarnock edition (Kilmarnock: J. Wilson, 1786: Egerer 1), to be followed by the expanded edition, published in Edinburgh in April 1787 by William Creech (Egerer 2), then publication in Belfast and Dublin, and then a separate London edition ... Read More
      Keywords: English drama; Short stories, Scottish; Burns, Robert,; English drama (Tragedy); English literature; Glasgow (Scotland); Aesthetics; Douglas, O.; Gibbon, Lewis Grassic,; English fiction; Mitchell, James Leslie,; Scottish poetry; Scottish literature; Orr, James,; M
      PubDate: 2016-12-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Lewis Grassic Gibbon: Revolutionary Writer by William K. Malcolm, and:
           Lewis Grassic Gibbon: The Reader by ed. William K. Malcolm (review)
    • Abstract: Lewis Grassic Gibbon’s Sunset Song of 1932 regularly appears as one of the top choices in surveys of Scotland’s favourite books, but not all readers who nominate the novel realise that it is one of a trilogy titled A Scots Quair or that its author had a companion identity as a writer of English-language diffusionist and dystopian fiction under his family name of J. Leslie Mitchell. William Malcolm’s current companion volumes – a sequential critical study of the Mitchell and Gibbon work and an accompanying collection of textual excerpts – may help to remedy this situation.Malcolm’s Revolutionary Writer builds on his Blasphemer and Reformer of 1984 and is supplemented by his continued research over subsequent ... Read More
      Keywords: English drama; Short stories, Scottish; Burns, Robert,; English drama (Tragedy); English literature; Glasgow (Scotland); Aesthetics; Douglas, O.; Gibbon, Lewis Grassic,; English fiction; Mitchell, James Leslie,; Scottish poetry; Scottish literature; Orr, James,; M
      PubDate: 2016-12-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Culloden by Murray Pittock (review)
    • Abstract: Though it was a small, brief battle by contemporary standards, Culloden is certainly an appropriate subject for the Great Battles series from which this book stems. The essential remit of the authors in the series is that they should consider not just the military event, but the memory and subsequent uses made of the battle and its significance by posterity; in effect, the creation and evolution of collective memory and myth-history. As Murray Pittock convincingly demonstrates, Culloden definitely qualifies as one of the ‘great battles’ on this score. For that rainy, blustery day near Inverness has come to be seen as the iconic moment when civilisation and modernity triumphed in the British Isles.Yet this belies ... Read More
      Keywords: English drama; Short stories, Scottish; Burns, Robert,; English drama (Tragedy); English literature; Glasgow (Scotland); Aesthetics; Douglas, O.; Gibbon, Lewis Grassic,; English fiction; Mitchell, James Leslie,; Scottish poetry; Scottish literature; Orr, James,; M
      PubDate: 2016-12-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Scottish Culture: Dialogue and Self-Expression ed. by Aniela Korzeniowska
           and Izabela Szymañska (review)
    • Abstract: Scottish Culture: Dialogue and Self-Expression, edited by Aniela Korzeniowska and Izabela Szymañska, and published under Wydawnictwo Naukowe brings together a range of highly perceptive essays on a wide scope of topics that approach the subject of Scottish culture, particularly as it is produced through various dialogues with European cultures, and those further afield. This collection continues the project that was begun by the collections Scotland in Europe / Europe in Scotland: Links – Dialogues – Analogies and Facets of Scottish Identity, both edited by Korzeniowska and Szymañska and published in 2013. These publications also took the form of a collection of essays that brought together scholars from across ... Read More
      Keywords: English drama; Short stories, Scottish; Burns, Robert,; English drama (Tragedy); English literature; Glasgow (Scotland); Aesthetics; Douglas, O.; Gibbon, Lewis Grassic,; English fiction; Mitchell, James Leslie,; Scottish poetry; Scottish literature; Orr, James,; M
      PubDate: 2016-12-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The International Companion to Edwin Morgan ed. by Alan Riach, and: The
           Midnight Letterbox: Selected Correspondence, 1950–2010 Edwin Morgan
           (review)
    • Abstract: Called ‘a companion to a life’s achievement’ in its introduction, The International Companion to Edwin Morgan is a superb collection of essays, one that readers and scholars of his poetry will be glad to read and read again. The word ‘international’ in its title convinces us that Morgan, as has been said, ‘belongs to the world’, and indicates that its contributors enjoy world-wide reputation in their fields. However, a third possible implication of the term becomes devoid of meaning: the lack of foreign contributors tips the scales in favour of the export of ideas, and readers with an interest in international perspectives on Morgan’s work should look elsewhere.Alasdair Gray’s likeable portrait of a likeable man ... Read More
      Keywords: English drama; Short stories, Scottish; Burns, Robert,; English drama (Tragedy); English literature; Glasgow (Scotland); Aesthetics; Douglas, O.; Gibbon, Lewis Grassic,; English fiction; Mitchell, James Leslie,; Scottish poetry; Scottish literature; Orr, James,; M
      PubDate: 2016-12-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Robert Louis Stevenson by David Robb (review)
    • Abstract: In this concise yet extensive volume, David Robb provides an overview of what is described as the ‘whole range’ of Stevenson’s bibliography in prose fiction. The book is structured chronologically rather than thematically, systematically progressing through Stevenson’s work, both major and minor. The equal attention given to both the well-trodden territory of Stevenson’s better-known fiction and to lesser-known obscurities such as ‘The Misadventures of John Nicholson’ offers a far clearer perspective on Stevenson’s writing career than is usually afforded by such studies, whose selectiveness tends to obscure the diversity and eclecticism of Stevenson’s writing.Robb’s study can best be described as a summary of ... Read More
      Keywords: English drama; Short stories, Scottish; Burns, Robert,; English drama (Tragedy); English literature; Glasgow (Scotland); Aesthetics; Douglas, O.; Gibbon, Lewis Grassic,; English fiction; Mitchell, James Leslie,; Scottish poetry; Scottish literature; Orr, James,; M
      PubDate: 2016-12-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Crimelights: Scottish Crime Writing – Then and Now ed. by Frauke
           Reitemeier and Kirsten Sandrock (review)
    • Abstract: At a moment when the future relationship between Britain, Scotland and continental Europe is marked by uncertainty, it is gratifying to see that Scottish Studies on the continent are thriving. The majority of Reitemeier and Sandrock’s collection consists of papers presented at the Society for Scottish Studies in Europe’s second conference ‘Crime Scotland – Then and Now’ at the University of Göttingen, Germany, in 2012. As is often the case with conference proceedings, the fifteen contributions encompass a spectrum in length, rigour and originality. While the collection deals with Scottish Crime writing, or ‘Tartan Noir’, covering subjects from the sixteenth century to the present day, the editors begin with the ... Read More
      Keywords: English drama; Short stories, Scottish; Burns, Robert,; English drama (Tragedy); English literature; Glasgow (Scotland); Aesthetics; Douglas, O.; Gibbon, Lewis Grassic,; English fiction; Mitchell, James Leslie,; Scottish poetry; Scottish literature; Orr, James,; M
      PubDate: 2016-12-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Écrire la frontière, Walter Scott, ou les chemins de I’errance by
           Céline Sabiron (review)
    • Abstract: Écrire la frontière is an intricate yet well-directed intellectual journey across both physical and abstract ‘frontiers’ in Walter Scott’s Scottish novels. It demonstrates both the many and changing faces of Scott’s frontiers and the writer’s desire to find a middle way between extremes, be they intellectual, psychological, cultural, political, historical or social, essential to a strict Calvinist education that would exclude extremism and immoderation. It is suggested that Scott’s frontier enjoys a dialectical quality marking a point of passage both open and closed, limited and unlimited, finite and infinite. Scott’s principal characters move across frontiers during an important detour (‘Grand Détour’), a voyage ... Read More
      Keywords: English drama; Short stories, Scottish; Burns, Robert,; English drama (Tragedy); English literature; Glasgow (Scotland); Aesthetics; Douglas, O.; Gibbon, Lewis Grassic,; English fiction; Mitchell, James Leslie,; Scottish poetry; Scottish literature; Orr, James,; M
      PubDate: 2016-12-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • James Hogg and British Romanticism. A Kaleidoscopic Art by Meiko
           O’Halloran (review)
    • Abstract: There are (at least) two ways in which the kaleidoscope can provide an analogy for literature: on the one hand, the symmetrical arrangements which each turn of its cell produces may suggest the carefully balanced surfaces and structures of literary texts. On the other hand, as these symmetrical arrangements are ever-changing, making the objects placed in the cell collide unpredictably, the kaleidoscope can be aligned with a type of literature which is anything but carefully balanced: rather, it features generic juxtapositions and abrupt changes of narrative directions, thus opening up a plethora of interpretative possibilities. It is in this latter respect, as O’Halloran demonstrates convincingly, that James Hogg’s ... Read More
      Keywords: English drama; Short stories, Scottish; Burns, Robert,; English drama (Tragedy); English literature; Glasgow (Scotland); Aesthetics; Douglas, O.; Gibbon, Lewis Grassic,; English fiction; Mitchell, James Leslie,; Scottish poetry; Scottish literature; Orr, James,; M
      PubDate: 2016-12-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Barbour’s Bruce and its Cultural Contexts: Politics, Chivalry and
           Literature in Late Medieval Scotland ed. by Steve Boardman and Susan Foran
           (review)
    • Abstract: As the title and subtitle indicate, Barbour’s Bruce and its Cultural Contexts: Politics, Chivalry and Literature in Late Medieval Scotland offers interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary approaches to Barbour’s Bruce (c. 1375), the first fully preserved literary text in Scots. The volume successfully explores new perspectives and also elaborates on existing ideas on the poem. The book is proficiently edited by historians Steve Boardman and Susan Foran, who have skilfully managed to give unity and coherence to a collection which drinks from many different sources.The editors’ introduction is an excellent preamble to the collection. As well as introducing the chapters, the editors contextualise the contemporary ... Read More
      Keywords: English drama; Short stories, Scottish; Burns, Robert,; English drama (Tragedy); English literature; Glasgow (Scotland); Aesthetics; Douglas, O.; Gibbon, Lewis Grassic,; English fiction; Mitchell, James Leslie,; Scottish poetry; Scottish literature; Orr, James,; M
      PubDate: 2016-12-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Culture Series of Iain M. Banks: A Critical Introduction by Simone
           Caroti (review)
    • Abstract: With Iain Banks’s novel-writing career finished, it is tempting to look back on his works and ponder whether they were also concluded. Did he say everything he wished to say? Simone Caroti’s book, focused on the Culture series of science fiction novels, offers a chance to take stock.Just two years after Banks’s untimely demise, it is difficult to be dispassionate about the author or his works. Caroti remembers meeting Banks through the science fiction at a time of loss in his own life, and remains grateful to the fullness of experience offered by the Culture novels. Still, Caroti, a creative writer and a critic of science fiction, has an ear for authorship. He begins with an introduction premised on meeting Banks ... Read More
      Keywords: English drama; Short stories, Scottish; Burns, Robert,; English drama (Tragedy); English literature; Glasgow (Scotland); Aesthetics; Douglas, O.; Gibbon, Lewis Grassic,; English fiction; Mitchell, James Leslie,; Scottish poetry; Scottish literature; Orr, James,; M
      PubDate: 2016-12-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Counselling the Counsellors: Sir David Lyndsay’s Ane Satyre of the
           Thrie Estaitis
    • Abstract: Near the end of the first part of Sir David Lyndsay’s political morality play Ane Satyre of the Thrie Estaitis, Divine Correction, the divine agent sent by God to chasten the tyrant Rex Humanitas, declares:This moment, in which God’s emissary, having successfully chastised God’s anointed, defers to the political will of the representative body of the populace of Scotland before taking further political action, is unique within the genre of early sixteenth-century political moralities – most of which are concerned with the divine punishment of tyranny. For the first and only time within the genre, Lyndsay’s play depicts the convention of a full parliament, and documents, in great detail, the legislative procedures ... Read More
      Keywords: English drama; Short stories, Scottish; Burns, Robert,; English drama (Tragedy); English literature; Glasgow (Scotland); Aesthetics; Douglas, O.; Gibbon, Lewis Grassic,; English fiction; Mitchell, James Leslie,; Scottish poetry; Scottish literature; Orr, James,; M
      PubDate: 2016-12-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Scottish Literary Review
    • Abstract: SCOTTISH LITERARY REVIEW is the leading international journal for Scottish literary studies, committed to approaching Scottish literature in an expansive way through exploration of its various social, cultural, historical and philosophical contexts, and of literary forms, both traditional and new. We are interested in comparative work with literatures from beyond Scotland, the interaction of literature with expressive media such as theatre and film, and in encouraging debate on issues of contemporary significance related to Scottish literary studies, so that SLR is both responsive to, and creative of, new readings and approaches. The journal is listed in the MLA International Bibliography and issues from 2013 ... Read More
      Keywords: English drama; Short stories, Scottish; Burns, Robert,; English drama (Tragedy); English literature; Glasgow (Scotland); Aesthetics; Douglas, O.; Gibbon, Lewis Grassic,; English fiction; Mitchell, James Leslie,; Scottish poetry; Scottish literature; Orr, James,; M
      PubDate: 2016-12-06T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
 
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