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Journal Cover Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
  [SJR: 0.321]   [H-I: 3]   [30 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 2050-8824
   Published by Emerald Homepage  [335 journals]
  • Editorial
    • Pages: 57 - 58
      Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 8, Issue 2, Page 57-58, June 2017.

      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2017-06-21T06:45:26Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-05-2017-0006
       
  • Disability and the criminal justice system in Zambia
    • First page: 59
      Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 8, Issue 2, June 2017.
      Purpose Drawing on multi-method research conducted in 2013-2014, this paper considers the extent and nature of disadvantage experienced by individuals with psychosocial and intellectual disabilities (PID) who come into contact with criminal justice system in Zambia. The research was conducted as part of a wider project aiming to bring about improvements in how people with PID are dealt with by criminal justice services. Design/methodology/approach The research activities included interviews with 29individuals with PID who had experienced the criminal justice system as suspects, defendants or prisoners (‘self-advocates’). A focus group and interviews were also conducted with family members of people with PID who had criminal justice experience. Findings People with PID in contact with criminal justice services in Zambia are disadvantaged and discriminated against routinely and systematically. Like all detainees, they experience harsh and at times brutal conditions of detention. However, because of their disabilities, such experiences can be more keenly felt: their disabilities may be exacerbated by detention or by limited or non-existent health care; and they are likely to be less resourceful than other detainees and, therefore, less able to cope with the privations of detention. Originality/value In drawing on the self-advocate interviews, this paper presents direct, vivid accounts of what it means to be a suspect, defendant or prisoner with disabilities in Zambia. These are extremely marginalised and multiply disadvantaged individuals whose voices are rarely heard.
      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2017-05-12T11:09:01Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-12-2016-0023
       
  • Rare instances of individuals with autism supporting or engaging in
           terrorism
    • First page: 70
      Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 8, Issue 2, June 2017.
      Purpose The prevalence of individuals with an Autism Spectrum Disorder being associated with terroristic threats, lone wolf terrorism or affiliating with terroristic groups is rare. Design/methodology/approach However, several cases are presented, where individuals with autism are involved in making a naïve, empty terroristic threat, or uttering serious serial terroristic threats. Other cases are also presented of individuals being at risk for an abduction or being used by a terrorist group, and finally committing an act of domestic lone wolf terrorism. Findings Essential to the analysis was establishing a functional connection between autism-based deficits and the terroristic threats, terrorism, and when to not criminalize naïve, empty terroristic threats or acts. Originality/value Currently, tools available to law enforcement and prosecutors exploit the vulnerabilities and liabilities which arise as a result of group interactions, a “preventive” approach to terrorism that is not applicable to the solitary, “lone wolf” terrorist (Barnes, 2012; Zierhoffer, 2014).There has been relatively little research (including case studies) examining individuals with ASD who engage in terrorism. For instance, when dealing with an individual with ASD who is charged with terrorism, it is crucial to consider how the diagnosis of autism may have presented as a contextual vulnerability, and to make sure that justice, rehabilitation and management, are informed by an understanding of the person’s diagnosis of ASD (Al-Attar, 2016).
      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2017-05-12T11:09:00Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-11-2016-0022
       
  • The Inventory of Legal Knowledge (ILK) and adults with intellectual
           disabilities
    • First page: 83
      Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 8, Issue 2, June 2017.
      Purpose Adults with intellectual disabilities (ID) entering the legal system in the United States are at heightened risk of being incorrectly labeled as malingering. The Inventory of Legal Knowledge (ILK) was recently developed to assess response style of individuals undergoing competency to stand trial evaluations. This paper presents preliminary data on the utility of the ILK with adults with ID. Design/methodology/approach Thirty-two adults were recruited from an American day program for adults with ID. Using a simulation design, the first twenty-four participants were assigned to the honest responding group and the remaining eight were assigned to the fake bad group. The normative performance of the honest responding group was compared to established norms for adults without ID, the most efficient ILK cut-off score was examined, and convergent validity of the ILK and other malingering measures tested. Findings Compared to the established mean score, the recommended cut-off score, and two independent published samples of non-ID adults, the normative performance of the honest responding ID group was significantly lower. Analyses of area under the curve (AUC) revealed that the ILK lacked sufficient ability to discriminate adults with ID instructed to respond honestly from those instructed to feign incompetence, and correlational analyses failed to support the convergent validity of the ILK in this sample. Research limitations/implications The present findings do not support the use of the ILK with adults with ID, even with adjusted cut scores. The development of novel malingering measures that can be used in the context of CST evaluations with adults with ID is needed. Originality/value The present study is the first to examine the psychometric properties of the ILK with adults diagnosed with ID and without concomitant psychiatric symptomatology.
      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2017-05-12T11:09:00Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-10-2016-0018
       
  • ASD and offending: reflections of practice in from a New Zealand
           perspective
    • First page: 90
      Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 8, Issue 2, June 2017.
      Purpose There is growing awareness in New Zealand of the impact that Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) has on individuals and their families and the ability to engage in health services. Although it is a relatively rare condition, approximately one percent of the population will have ASD, directly affecting approximately 40,000 individuals in New Zealand. The purpose this paper is to provide some reflections and questions on what we can learn from a New Zealand perspective. This is based on an overview of the limited literature around ASD and offending and my experience in the UK working in a medium secure unit. Design/methodology/approach Through a past site visit as part of the annual international conference on the Care and Treatment of Offenders with an Intellectual and/or Developmental Disability in the UK I became aware of the medium secure forensic unit for male patients with ASD at Roseberry Park Hospital (UK’s Tees, Esk and Wear Valleys NHS Foundation Trust). During my advanced training in forensic psychiatry with the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists I was privileged to be able to apply and be accepted for a 4-month sabbatical training position at this hospital Findings Outlined is background information about ASD and review findings from the limited literature on ASD and offending. Also outlined is my learning as a trainee working in medium secure unit for people with ASD who have offended, and finally how this experience may help in the development of services in New Zealand, given that at this stage such services are under-developed Originality/value To able to share the valuable experience and learning opportunity I was able to have, as well as raise the awareness of ASD generally, and specifically the need for specialist services for the small number of people with ASD who come into contact with justice services
      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2017-05-12T11:09:00Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-07-2016-0012
       
  • Obituary
    • Pages: 99 - 100
      Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 8, Issue 2, Page 99-100, June 2017.

      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2017-06-21T06:45:26Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-05-2017-0005
       
 
 
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