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Journal Cover Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
  [24 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 2050-8824
   Published by Emerald Homepage  [312 journals]
  • Liaison and diversion services: embedding the role of learning disability
           nurses
    • Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 7, Issue 2, June 2016.
      Purpose The aim of liaison and diversion services is to improve the health and criminal justice outcomes for people who come into contact with the criminal justice system. People with learning disabilities (LD) are particularly vulnerable to health and social inequalities within the criminal justice system. Design/methodology/approach Using examples from practice, this paper discusses some of the challenges and achievements experienced by a LD nurse employed within a liaison and diversion service within the North-West of England. Findings Whilst the specific functions of liaison and diversion practitioners are detailed by National Health Service (NHS) England (2014), complexities in communication, multi-disciplinary working and role recognition affect the embedment of the role in practice. Research limitations/implications The implications for practice are identified and recommendations for further research made. These seek to evaluate the impact of liaison and diversion services from the perspectives of LD nurses within liaison and diversion services, people with LD, their families and the wider multi-disciplinary team. Originality/value NHS England (2015) are in the process of evaluating of liaison and diversion services. This paper adds to the evaluation by discussing the experiences of a LD nurse within a liaison and diversion service through the inclusion of activity data and illustrative examples.
      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2016-04-28T11:51:41Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-09-2015-0039
       
  • Coping with stress: the experiences of service-users with intellectual
           disabilities in forensic services
    • Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 7, Issue 2, June 2016.
      Purpose It is now widely acknowledged that stress negatively impacts holistic and well-being and has been identified as a major global concern. This article reports on a qualitative research study which sought to explore the experiences of stress and the use of coping strategies from the perspective of people with intellectual disabilities (ID) currently residing within the forensic in-patient services of one NHS Trust. Design/methodology/approach Data were gathered via focus group discussions involving 20 service-users with an ID. The data was subject to thematic analysis. Findings Data analysis produced three key themes: Experiencing stress; Sources of stress and Coping with stress. Practical implications The findings of the research study have implications for practice. These include the need to utilise appropriate stress assessment measures and implement effective stress reduction and management programmes to address the holistic needs of people with ID, to ensure forensic services are truly high quality, person-centred and recovery focused. Originality/value Whilst stress experienced by people with ID residing in community settings has been explored, no studies have focused on how stress is experienced by people with ID residing in forensic services. This paper seeks to address this gap in the literature.
      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2016-04-28T11:51:39Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-09-2015-0031
       
  • Development of the community based individual risk mitigation profile
           (IRMP) for people who have intellectually disability and at risk of
           offending
    • Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 7, Issue 2, June 2016.
      Purpose The aim of this paper is to discuss the development of the community-based Individual Risk Mitigation Profile and to examine its effectiveness for people who have an intellectual disability, and are at risk of offending, through the use of a case study. Design/methodology/approach Case Study and literature review Findings The tool has been found to be useful and accessible by clinicians. It has a particular focus on joint sharing of opinion on risk and decision making in a structured and contained Multi-disciplinary forum, that is evidence based and defensible. This multi-disciplinary approach meets recommendations in best practice in relation to risk. Research limitations/implications A current limitation to the IRMP has not been evaluated for reliability and validity, though a research study is being planned.. Originality/value The Paper highlights the usefulness of a community based risk profile assessment and linked risk mitigation process.
      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2016-04-28T11:51:37Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-09-2015-0033
       
  • The support needs of learning disability nurse facilitators of sex
           offender treatment programmes: a discussion
    • Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 7, Issue 2, June 2016.
      Purpose The role of the learning disability [LD] nurse has developed and expanded significantly within recent years, especially their responsibility for delivering a variety of specialist treatment programmes. This paper discusses the facilitation of Sex Offender Treatment Programmes [SOTP] and the issues this raises in providing support for LD nurses. Design/methodology/approach This is an opinion paper and the views and opinions expressed are solely those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of any organisation or group with which the author is affiliated. The aims of this paper are: 1) to explore the support needs of the LD nurse facilitators of SOTPs; 2) to consider the practical implications of providing clinical supervision and support for LD nurse facilitators of SOTPs; and 3) to highlight the need for further research in this area. Findings Findings: This paper does not contain original research findings but offers a discussion of the support needs of the LD nurse who facilitate SOTP, concentrating on the specific themes of training, clinical supervision and support. Practical implications Implications for clinical practice are identified and recommendations for further research are made. Originality/value Originality/value: Whilst this is not the first consideration of the support needs of facilitators of SOTPs, it offers a contribution to the discussion of how best to support the LD nurse to continue to deliver the high-quality, specialist care for people with learning disabilities.
      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2016-04-28T11:51:36Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-09-2015-0035
       
  • Journeys into dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT): capturing the staff and
           service-user experience
    • Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 7, Issue 2, June 2016.
      Purpose This paper will explore the lived experiences of staff and service-users regarding the introduction of Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT) into an NHS forensic learning disability (LD) service. Design/methodology/approach Drawing on data from two recent qualitative research studies,the research team used a case- oriented approach to see beyond original findings to capture the shared experiences of the participants’ journeys, thus giving a deeper insight to the commonalities of the participants’ voices which is rarely reported in the literature (Sandelowski, 2011). Findings A common set of phenomena became apparent when the cases were analysed, these included; Trust, Intensity and Worthwhile. It is intended this paper gives some opportunity for reflection and shared empathetic responses to the similar experiences discussed. Originality/value The case orientated analysis adds value to the evidence base by highlighting the importance of the qualitative voice of both the staff and service user. This is important because most available literature reflects the process of setting up a team or DBT service, rather than describing the team experience. Equally, most published literature regarding the effectiveness of DBT is not written from the perspective of the people who receive the therapy.
      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2016-04-28T11:51:34Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-09-2015-0027
       
  • Editorial
    • Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 7, Issue 2, June 2016.

      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2016-04-28T11:51:33Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-01-2016-0002
       
  • Editorial
    • Authors: Colin Dale
      Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 7, Issue 1, March 2016.

      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2016-01-27T01:10:26Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-01-2016-0001
       
  • Geographic information system analysis of developmentally disabled adult
           offenders
    • Authors: George Steve Tsagaris, Mamadou Mansor Seck, Janet Keeler, Robert Rowe
      First page: 4
      Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 7, Issue 1, March 2016.
      Purpose Adult offenders diagnosed with developmental disabilities have been referred for services to a Northeast Ohio county agency. The purpose of this study was to examine their repartition in the three areas of the county as determined by zip codes, their involvement with the criminal justice system, types of offenses they committed, their indictment, and the court outcomes. Design/methodology/approach This study used a Geographic Information System mapping based on secondary data collected from the 2008-2012 American Community Survey and a random sample of 160 participants selected from an agency database including 850 clients. Findings We found that the concentrations of offenders in the core city, inner, and outer suburbs of the county were respectively 71.7%, 19.6%, and 8.7%. The largest racial groups included African Americans (112; 70%) and Whites (33; 20.6%). Male offenders (155; 96.9%) outnumbered female offenders. Of the offenses committed, 42.9% were crimes against persons including kidnapping, abduction, assault, followed by crimes against property (22.2%), and crimes against society (26.4%). As they appeared before Mental Health Court or Non Mental Health Court judges, the court outcome evolved from community control for 6 months to prison sentence of 120 months. Research limitations/implications These findings will enable agency professionals to look for protective as well as risk factors that are prevalent in each area of this NEO County and make plans for more effective, preventative, and clinical service provision. Originality/value The use of GIS for data analysis represents an innovation in the research field involving adult offenders with DD as it allows professionals to look for protective as well as risk factors that are prevalent in their clients’ immediate environment.
      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2016-01-27T01:10:23Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-09-2015-0028
       
  • The realistic evaluation of an adapted thinking skills programme
    • Authors: Peter Oakes, Glynis Murphy, Alison Giraud-Saunders, Nzinga Akinshegun
      First page: 14
      Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 7, Issue 1, March 2016.
      Purpose A project reporting the evaluation of an adapted form of the Thinking Skills Programme (TSP) with prisoners with intellectual disabilities is described. In particular, the utility of Realistic Evaluation is explored as a response to the difficulties in applying research-based interventions in practice and rolling out pilot projects that have been evaluated under specific conditions. Design/methodology/approach Realistic evaluation involves the identification of context, mechanism and outcome as a structure for programme evaluation and this was applied to the development and implementation of Adapted TSP (ATSP) in three English prisons. Findings Findings are reported in respect of the three aspects of context, mechanism and outcome to demonstrate the utility of realistic evaluation. Contextual findings suggested that ATSP is effective with male prisoners representing a range of intellectual disabilities, who would otherwise be excluded from mainstream programmes. The programme did not establish effectiveness with women or in community settings. The prisons involved were of different levels of security, but all three prisons were actively involved in positive approaches to difference and diversity and support for people with intellectual disabilities. For mechanism it was noted that all involved in the pilot sites were highly motivated to participate in the project and they were also achieving high scores for general quality in programme delivery. The realistic evaluation framework suggests that, where these factors are not present, some caution about possible effectiveness should be exercised. The evaluation approach proved to be helpful in identifying relevant factors to be considered in the wider implementation of ATSP. Originality/value This is a novel approach to programme evaluation in psychological therapies that was shown to be of value in identifying conditions under which pilot schemes can be extended to other parts of a service, and research on interventions for offenders with intellectual disabilities applied in practice.
      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2016-01-27T01:10:25Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-05-2014-0006
       
  • Intellectual disability and substance use/misuse: a narrative review
    • Authors: Christine Jodie Day, Alexandra Lampraki, Dean Ridings, Karen Currell
      First page: 25
      Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 7, Issue 1, March 2016.
      Purpose The current paper provides a narrative review of the literature on substance use/misuse within an intellectual disability (ID) population. The paper is focused on the prevalence, motivation and implications of substance use as well as the interventions for misuse. Design/methodology/approach research focused on substance use and ID (IQ of 70 or less with onset in the developmental period) were considered. Findings Our findings indicate a disparity between research findings regarding the prevalence of substance use/misuse within ID populations. Previous research indicates that individuals with ID may use/misuse substances as a form of relief or respite from negative experiences. Although is a clear need for intervention, many of the ID population do not engage with generic interventions for substance misuse. Additionally, professionals responsible for the provision of interventions identify a lack of training and support to meet the needs of ID populations. Research limitations/implications Minimal research in this areas, barriers to language and demographics being underreported Practical implications Highlights problems with the current evidence base and barriers this poses Indicates a need for further research and intervention Originality/value In order to build a greater understanding of this issue, a shared universal language and definition of ID must be implemented. Further research to improve our understanding of why those with ID misuse substances is imperative before designing and implementing useful interventions.
      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2016-01-27T01:10:21Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-10-2015-0041
       
  • Sexual offending and autism spectrum disorders
    • Authors: Clare Sarah Allely, Ann Creaby-Attwood
      First page: 35
      Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 7, Issue 1, March 2016.
      Purpose Studies have found innate vulnerabilities which potentially may increase the risk of an individual with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) finding themselves involved with the criminal justice system as a result of being charged with a sexual offence. The purpose of the present review is to evaluate the literature which has explored sexual offending in individuals with ASD. Design/methodology/approach A systematic PRISMA review (PRISMA, Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) was conducted using internet-based bibliographic databases (PsycINFO, MEDLINE, Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection and PsycARTICLES) in order to access studies which investigated to any degree the association between ASD and sexual offending. Findings Only a small number of case reports (N = 7) on sexual offending in individuals with ASD and a small number of prevalence studies (N = 7) were identified. Research limitations/implications Research is urgently required to identify the specific requirements and needs of sexual offenders with ASD in order to inform an appropriate treatment strategy for successful outcomes. Originality/value Relatively few studies and reviews have investigated the area of ASD and sexual offending specifically.
      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2016-01-27T01:10:19Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-09-2015-0029
       
 
 
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