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Journal Cover Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
  [SJR: 0.321]   [H-I: 3]   [31 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 2050-8824
   Published by Emerald Homepage  [335 journals]
  • ASAP-ID: substance abuse programme for a forensic ID population
    • Pages: 157 - 165
      Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 8, Issue 4, Page 157-165, December 2017.
      Purpose There are a lack of recourses for substance abuse (SA) treatment for forensic clients with intellectual disabilities (ID). Many complexities arise when treating this population, calling for the creation of comprehensive resources which not only address the SA, but also account for the risk and offending issues. The purpose of this paper is to detail a pilot programme which aims to provide treatment for forensic ID clients with substance abuse issues as well as a significant risk of reoffending. Design/methodology/approach Six participants completed a 27-week SA treatment programme (the Alcohol and Substance Abuse Programme-Intellectual Disability) which incorporated the use of dialectical behavioural therapy (DBT) and the Good Lives Model concepts. Pre- and post-measures aimed to assess readiness for change and confidence in ability to stay clean and sober. Findings Preliminary findings showed a marked improvement in confidence of the participants’ ability to stay clean and sober in risk-related situations as well as an increase in overall readiness for change. Originality/value This research paper addresses a gap in the current forensic ID research and clinical treatment options pertaining to SA, by focussing on supporting forensic ID clients in their recovery journey from SA. Being at the forefront of SA treatment for forensic ID, further research in this domain should attempt to consolidate the findings of this programme.
      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2017-11-28T12:58:04Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-07-2017-0014
       
  • A review of the pharmacological management of sexually offending behaviour
           in learning disabled offenders
    • Pages: 166 - 175
      Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 8, Issue 4, Page 166-175, December 2017.
      Purpose The management of sexual offending is a major challenge, particularly in men who have an intellectual disability. Psychological therapies have been shown beneficial, and programmes designed for use in the general population have been adapted for use in offenders who have an intellectual disability. There is also a role for pharmacological management, although the quality of evidence for this is noticeably lacking, most likely associated with the ethical and legal issues encountered in conducting well designed and controlled trials in this area. The purpose of this paper is to look at the pharmacological management options available. Design/methodology/approach A literature search of electronic databases was undertaken. Additionally, the references lists for identified papers were examined for any further relevant publications. Findings The two main categories of drugs used in the management of inappropriate sexual behaviour are the testosterone-lowering drugs and the psychotropic drugs. Most trials were open and utilised self-report measures of drug effectiveness, limiting their usefulness. Most trials noted beneficial effect. Side effect profiles and patient adherence can limit the effectiveness of anti-libidinal medication in practice. Originality/value There is very limited evidence available for the use of pharmacological agents in the management of inappropriate sexual behaviour, owing to the lack of adequately controlled clinical trials. New studies are therefore required, particularly of larger sample sizes, longer durations, and examining characteristics of those who benefit from pharmacological treatment, although the ethical issues of conducting such studies is duly acknowledged.
      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2017-11-28T12:58:15Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-06-2017-0010
       
  • Revealing the training on intellectual and developmental disabilities
           among forensic mental health professionals: a survey report
    • Pages: 176 - 187
      Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 8, Issue 4, Page 176-187, December 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to assess the training forensic mental health professionals in the USA receive on intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). Given the difficulties obtaining accurate prevalence rates of these disabilities in criminal justice settings, it is important to understand how these disabilities are being evaluated and the level of understanding about these disabilities evaluators hold. Design/methodology/approach An online survey was distributed to forensic mental health professionals in the USA that included questions on training opportunities in graduate education, post-graduate forensic training, and professional training opportunities. Participants were also asked about their current work, how they assess I/DD, and their estimates on the percentage of cases they see with I/DD. Findings Respondents reported some training that focused heavily on assessment methods. Most respondents estimated between 5 and 25 percent of their cases involving I/DD and reported using a wide range of assessment methods. Finally, many respondents reporting more training needed in this area. Practical implications More training is needed for forensic mental health professionals on identifying I/DD. Additionally, professional guidelines on what tools and methods to rely on to identify these disabilities is paramount to ensure homogeneity of methods and, thus, better estimates of overall prevalence in criminal justice settings. Originality/value This is the first assessment focused on how forensic mental health professionals are trained to identify I/DD and can be used to improve identification of I/DD in forensic settings.
      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2017-11-28T12:58:00Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-07-2017-0013
       
  • Incompatibilities and seclusion of patients with an autism spectrum
           disorder detained in high-secure psychiatric care
    • Pages: 188 - 200
      Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 8, Issue 4, Page 188-200, December 2017.
      Purpose Whilst individuals with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) represent a relatively small proportion of patients detained in high-secure psychiatric care (HSPC), previous research suggests that such individuals present with difficulties and needs significantly different from non-ASD patient groups. However, to date, there has not been any formal examination of how individuals with an ASD are represented in records of key risk management actions (i.e. seclusions and incompatibilities with other patients). The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach An observation of hospital data examining two key risk management actions for a group of individuals with an ASD is detained in one HSPC hospital. These include the number of formal incompatibilities with other patients and the number of, and hours in, seclusion. Both actions require extra staff and security provisions and can decelerate the rehabilitation and recovery process. Findings In addition to suggesting an overall increase in the general prevalence of ASD within the hospital compared to previous estimates, individuals with an ASD appear to have a disproportionately higher number of incompatibilities with other patients compared to those patients without an ASD and experience more and longer periods of seclusions. Originality/value Although the methodological limitations of the study are acknowledged, explanations for the findings are discussed along with future research and recommendations as to how ASD patients might be best managed in the hospital. It is argued that the findings add further support for a specialist ASD service within HSPC.
      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2017-11-28T12:58:09Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-05-2017-0007
       
  • Football teams for people with intellectual disabilities living in the
           community: “it helps your self-esteem and that, don’t it'”
    • Pages: 201 - 211
      Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 8, Issue 4, Page 201-211, December 2017.
      Purpose People with intellectual disabilities (ID) can be vulnerable to developing mental health problems. It has been found that participating in regular exercise can help to improve emotional well-being, both in typically developing people and those with ID. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the experiences of community clients with ID who have engaged in a football training programme, and the perceived impacts on attitudes, mood and behaviour. Design/methodology/approach Interviews with seven patients from generic or forensic community ID services were conducted. The transcripts were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Findings Two master themes were identified from the interviews, “Striving” and “Togetherness”. Originality/value The most important factors related to taking part in the football programme were the social, emotional and personal growth associated with being part of a team and general enjoyment of being part of something. Although aspects of football knowledge and physical fitness were still evident, their impact seemed to be less significant. The experience of football was overwhelmingly positive.
      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2017-11-28T12:58:07Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-06-2017-0009
       
  • A critical review of current police training and policy for autism
           spectrum disorder
    • Pages: 212 - 222
      Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 8, Issue 4, Page 212-222, December 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to critically review the current police training and criminal justice policy regarding the treatment of suspects with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) during the initial stages of the criminal justice system (CJS), and provide potential policy reform and areas for further research. Design/methodology/approach By reviewing extant literature, research and policy documents, this paper provides a critical review of the current policy and training for dealing with suspects with ASD in the current CJS in England and Wales for suspects with ASD. Findings This paper proposes that current policy and police staff training is insufficient during all initial stages of the criminal justice process. Although there are emerging policies and schemes which are promising, they require further research and national participation. Policy reform and improved training is required to ensure minimal opportunities for miscarriages of justice to those individuals with ASD. Originality/value This paper provides a chronological journey through the initial stages of the CJS in England and Wales for a suspect with ASD, and the challenges that they may face. Suggestions are made based on criminological and psychological research to remedy the potential opportunities for miscarriages of justice.
      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2017-11-28T12:58:13Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-06-2017-0011
       
 
 
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