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Journal Cover Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
  [SJR: 0.321]   [H-I: 3]   [26 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 2050-8824
   Published by Emerald Homepage  [312 journals]
  • The impact of DNA on criminal investigation
    • First page: 105
      Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 7, Issue 3, September 2016.

      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2016-07-29T12:11:33Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-07-2016-0010
       
  • A comparison of the emotional and behavioural problems of intellectual
           disability offenders in medium and low security
    • First page: 109
      Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 7, Issue 3, September 2016.
      Purpose There are few reliable psychometric measures of the psychopathology of offenders with ID. However, previous research has indicated that the Emotional Problems Scale (EPS) is useful in identifying a range of treatment needs and in predicting risk to self and others. The current study aims to compare the severity of the emotional and behavioural problems of a small sample of offenders with ID in medium and low secure services, as assessed by EPS. Additionally, the data are tentatively compared with those reported in previous research to precipitate discussion regarding the changes in clinical populations in secure care over time. Design/methodology/approach The study collected demographic and EPS data for patients with ID (N=25) on medium secure and a low secure wards. Data were collected as part of routine clinical practice, with EPS forms being completed by nursing and other multi-disciplinary staff. Findings It was found that there was no statistically significant difference in EPS scores between medium and low secure patients with ID. We also highlight differences between the current sample and the normative data collected by previous research. Originality/value The data regarding the psychopathology of medium and low secure patients with ID provides insight into the ever changing resourcing needs and risk profiles of this complex patient group. In addition, there is a dearth of empirical research that comments on the clinical differences observed over time in forensic populations. As the current data differs from pre-existing normative data, the potential shift in populations and also implications for the accuracy of clinical decision making based on the assessment are discussed.
      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2016-07-29T12:11:35Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-12-2015-0047
       
  • Autism, sexual offending, and the criminal justice system
    • First page: 116
      Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 7, Issue 3, September 2016.
      Purpose There has been growing concern among stakeholders about individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and sex offending as research supports an indirect association. The purpose of this paper is threefold. First, bring more awareness of the sexuality and deviant/criminal sexual behavior among those with ASD to stakeholders in the criminal justice system (CJS). Second, demonstrate that much of the deviant or sexual offending behavior exhibited among those with ASD is often a manifestation of their ASD symptoms and not malice. Third, demonstrate the necessity to address specific needs of individuals with ASD who enter the CJS due to criminal sexual behavior. Design/methodology/approach This paper provides an overview of the ASD symptomology, including the diagnostic changes, a review of the literature on ASD and sexuality, which includes deviant sexual behavior and sexual offending. Findings The author linked examples of deviant or sexual behavior in the research literature to the ASD symptomology and described how the symptomology explains such behavior. Originality/value Sexual offending among those with ASD has received little research outside the mental health field. This review is of particular importance to those in the CJS unfamiliar with ASD, as they should handle them differently with regard to formal interviewing, measures of competency, capacity, and sentencing.
      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2016-07-29T12:11:37Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-02-2016-0004
       
  • Developing an autism specific framework for forensic case formulation
    • First page: 127
      Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 7, Issue 3, September 2016.
      Purpose This paper outlines the initial development of a framework to assist in clinical case formulation for individuals diagnosed with Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) who have been convicted of violent and other offences. Design/methodology/approach The proposed framework obtains information on the presence of ASD features from an individual’s developmental history, index offence and offence paralleling behaviours (OPBs). Through obtaining information across these three domains the framework helps the practitioner make an informed assessment of the possible contribution of ASD to offending. Findings The framework aims to assist the practitioner to develop a clinical formulation based on hypothesised linkages between these domains for use in forensic assessment reports and to aid treatment planning. The use of the proposed framework is illustrated through a reference formulation based on a fictive case example. Research limitations/implications The framework is still in the early stages of development and has not been tested. The next stage is to utilise case information data to assess the validity of the items. This does not preclude the use of the framework by practitioners as an aid to generating clinical hypotheses about the possible link between autism and offending as the development of the tool has been informed by research on ASD and offending. Practical implications The framework may be used in conjunction with SPJt’s. For example, the recently published third version of the HCR-20 includes Pervasive Developmental Disorders as a historical risk item. This possible relevance of this item in terms of forensic risk could be presented using information obtained from the framework outlined in this paper. This in turn could be used to inform the formulation section of the HCR-20 and in the generation of treatment plans. In the longer term, the framework may help inform our understanding of possible relationships between violence risk and ASD and therefore aid effective assessment and treatment planning. Originality/value Although there is an emergent body of research on ASD and offending this has not yet been translated into a tool to help practitioners. This paper sets out an approach to do this and therefore makes an original contribution to the literature.
      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2016-07-29T12:11:30Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-04-2015-0006
       
  • What kind of support and training do junior qualified nurses working with
           women with learning disabilities in a secure setting require when dealing
           with violence and aggression
    • First page: 140
      Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 7, Issue 3, September 2016.
      Purpose The paper aims to explore the perceived needs of junior nurses working with women with learning disabilities in a secure setting who display violence and aggression. The study aims to contribute to this specialised area of research and to identify potential areas for further post registration education. Design/methodology/approach The study adopted a qualitative design using thematic analysis. Initial questionnaires were distributed and the results analysed in order to form initial themes. These initial themes were then used to carry out a one off focus group and this was transcribed verbatim and then analysed using Braun & Clarke (2006) thematic analysis to develop final themes. Findings The findings identified a need for staff to be able to access effective immediate support following incidents of violence and aggression and support be offered within a clear structured environment. Staff indicated that peer supervision be made available and that they also receive adequate education relating to gender specific issues and the use of seclusion. Research limitations/implications The research had several limitations. These included a small sample size which was also largely self-selected. Bias may have to be acknowledged in respect of completion of questionnaires depending on their view of participation and what they might be contributing to. Despite this the results do raise further questions such as staff decision making around the use of seclusion. Practical implications Implications centred around the organisation's delivery of education to staff in relation to the clinical decision making skills they require in order to effectively support women with learning disabilities who display violent and / or aggressive behaviour. The study also has implications for potential supervision structures currently offered within these services. Originality/value This paper fulfills a need to explore services for women with a learning disability further and how services can be shaped using current perspective and up to date research in line with recent policy, e.g Corston Report 2007.
      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2016-07-29T12:11:24Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-04-2015-0009
       
  • Treating online inappropriate sexualised behaviour
    • First page: 151
      Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 7, Issue 3, September 2016.
      Purpose This single case design evaluates the use of cognitive behavioural approaches to treat a gentleman with a learning disability who had been reported to the police for allegedly making contact with children using social media in an attempt to initiate a romantic relationship. Design/methodology/approach An 11 session cognitive behavioural intervention was employed, comprising of index offence analysis, challenging distorted cognitions related to the offence, developing an internal focus for responsibility, and psychoeducation with regards to ‘staying safe’ online. Findings Follow up data demonstrated no improvements in victim empathy, nor in agreement ratings in terms of key cognitions associated with responsibility for offending behaviour. Research limitations/implications Whilst treatment efficacy was not established, this case study raises important questions that go beyond the single case design. Whilst the gentleman reported becoming ‘safer’ in terms of initiating contact with unknown people via social media, this could not be substantiated, and is indicative of the cardinal difficulty of monitoring online recidivism. Generalisability of findings to the wider learning disability population is limited by a single case design. Originality/value This is the first published case study to our knowledge to evaluate cognitive behavioural approaches to reduce antisocial internet related behaviour in a forensic learning disability setting. Findings of are considered within the context of the concept of minimisation of offending behaviour, the concept of 'counterfeit deviance', and also how best to measure therapeutic change within this population.
      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2016-07-29T12:11:31Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-11-2015-0045
       
  • Developing a screening tool for offenders with intellectual disabilities -
           the R.A.P.I.D
    • First page: 161
      Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 7, Issue 3, September 2016.
      Purpose The main purpose of this paper is to outline and report on the factors involved with developing a screening tool for offenders with suspected intellectual disability (ID). Design/methodology/approach This paper summarises the wider literature in specific relation to screening tools and methodology, indicating that the need for quick and easy screening measures for this population are sparse. The findings reported in this paper outline the processes involved in developing an evidence-based screening tool for ID offenders in a specific service, and an overall pathway approach to the identification, assessment and diagnosis of ID. Findings It is possible to develop a tool that can be used to identify ID with relative ease. The RAPID Screening tool provided practitioners with a simple and easy measure to identify such individuals so that they may be referred for further specialist assessment. The RAPID screening tool has demonstrated that it is an effective measure in identifying offenders with ID Research limitations/implications Formal statistical validation of this tool will serve to understand its overall effectiveness and strengthen its utility, further encouraging the timely identification of ID offenders. Originality/value This paper responds to current extensive literature about the variability of screening measures, and provides an effective solution whereby vulnerable offenders can be identified easily, who may benefit from reasonable adjustments and alternatives to custodial sentencing where appropriate.
      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2016-07-29T12:11:39Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-01-2015-0001
       
  • Editorial
    • Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 7, Issue 2, June 2016.

      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2016-04-28T11:51:33Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-01-2016-0002
       
  • Liaison and diversion services: embedding the role of learning disability
           nurses
    • First page: 56
      Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 7, Issue 2, June 2016.
      Purpose The aim of liaison and diversion services is to improve the health and criminal justice outcomes for people who come into contact with the criminal justice system. People with learning disabilities (LD) are particularly vulnerable to health and social inequalities within the criminal justice system. Design/methodology/approach Using examples from practice, this paper discusses some of the challenges and achievements experienced by a LD nurse employed within a liaison and diversion service within the North-West of England. Findings Whilst the specific functions of liaison and diversion practitioners are detailed by National Health Service (NHS) England (2014), complexities in communication, multi-disciplinary working and role recognition affect the embedment of the role in practice. Research limitations/implications The implications for practice are identified and recommendations for further research made. These seek to evaluate the impact of liaison and diversion services from the perspectives of LD nurses within liaison and diversion services, people with LD, their families and the wider multi-disciplinary team. Originality/value NHS England (2015) are in the process of evaluating of liaison and diversion services. This paper adds to the evaluation by discussing the experiences of a LD nurse within a liaison and diversion service through the inclusion of activity data and illustrative examples.
      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2016-04-28T11:51:41Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-09-2015-0039
       
  • Development of the community based individual risk mitigation profile
           (IRMP) for people who have intellectually disability and at risk of
           offending
    • First page: 66
      Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 7, Issue 2, June 2016.
      Purpose The aim of this paper is to discuss the development of the community-based Individual Risk Mitigation Profile and to examine its effectiveness for people who have an intellectual disability, and are at risk of offending, through the use of a case study. Design/methodology/approach Case Study and literature review Findings The tool has been found to be useful and accessible by clinicians. It has a particular focus on joint sharing of opinion on risk and decision making in a structured and contained Multi-disciplinary forum, that is evidence based and defensible. This multi-disciplinary approach meets recommendations in best practice in relation to risk. Research limitations/implications A current limitation to the IRMP has not been evaluated for reliability and validity, though a research study is being planned.. Originality/value The Paper highlights the usefulness of a community based risk profile assessment and linked risk mitigation process.
      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2016-04-28T11:51:37Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-09-2015-0033
       
  • Coping with stress: the experiences of service-users with intellectual
           disabilities in forensic services
    • First page: 75
      Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 7, Issue 2, June 2016.
      Purpose It is now widely acknowledged that stress negatively impacts holistic and well-being and has been identified as a major global concern. This article reports on a qualitative research study which sought to explore the experiences of stress and the use of coping strategies from the perspective of people with intellectual disabilities (ID) currently residing within the forensic in-patient services of one NHS Trust. Design/methodology/approach Data were gathered via focus group discussions involving 20 service-users with an ID. The data was subject to thematic analysis. Findings Data analysis produced three key themes: Experiencing stress; Sources of stress and Coping with stress. Practical implications The findings of the research study have implications for practice. These include the need to utilise appropriate stress assessment measures and implement effective stress reduction and management programmes to address the holistic needs of people with ID, to ensure forensic services are truly high quality, person-centred and recovery focused. Originality/value Whilst stress experienced by people with ID residing in community settings has been explored, no studies have focused on how stress is experienced by people with ID residing in forensic services. This paper seeks to address this gap in the literature.
      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2016-04-28T11:51:39Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-09-2015-0031
       
  • Journeys into dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT): capturing the staff and
           service-user experience
    • First page: 84
      Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 7, Issue 2, June 2016.
      Purpose This paper will explore the lived experiences of staff and service-users regarding the introduction of Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT) into an NHS forensic learning disability (LD) service. Design/methodology/approach Drawing on data from two recent qualitative research studies,the research team used a case- oriented approach to see beyond original findings to capture the shared experiences of the participants’ journeys, thus giving a deeper insight to the commonalities of the participants’ voices which is rarely reported in the literature (Sandelowski, 2011). Findings A common set of phenomena became apparent when the cases were analysed, these included; Trust, Intensity and Worthwhile. It is intended this paper gives some opportunity for reflection and shared empathetic responses to the similar experiences discussed. Originality/value The case orientated analysis adds value to the evidence base by highlighting the importance of the qualitative voice of both the staff and service user. This is important because most available literature reflects the process of setting up a team or DBT service, rather than describing the team experience. Equally, most published literature regarding the effectiveness of DBT is not written from the perspective of the people who receive the therapy.
      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2016-04-28T11:51:34Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-09-2015-0027
       
  • The support needs of learning disability nurse facilitators of sex
           offender treatment programmes: a discussion
    • First page: 94
      Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 7, Issue 2, June 2016.
      Purpose The role of the learning disability [LD] nurse has developed and expanded significantly within recent years, especially their responsibility for delivering a variety of specialist treatment programmes. This paper discusses the facilitation of Sex Offender Treatment Programmes [SOTP] and the issues this raises in providing support for LD nurses. Design/methodology/approach This is an opinion paper and the views and opinions expressed are solely those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of any organisation or group with which the author is affiliated. The aims of this paper are: 1) to explore the support needs of the LD nurse facilitators of SOTPs; 2) to consider the practical implications of providing clinical supervision and support for LD nurse facilitators of SOTPs; and 3) to highlight the need for further research in this area. Findings Findings: This paper does not contain original research findings but offers a discussion of the support needs of the LD nurse who facilitate SOTP, concentrating on the specific themes of training, clinical supervision and support. Practical implications Implications for clinical practice are identified and recommendations for further research are made. Originality/value Originality/value: Whilst this is not the first consideration of the support needs of facilitators of SOTPs, it offers a contribution to the discussion of how best to support the LD nurse to continue to deliver the high-quality, specialist care for people with learning disabilities.
      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2016-04-28T11:51:36Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-09-2015-0035
       
 
 
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