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Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.242
Number of Followers: 35  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2050-8824
Published by Emerald Homepage  [341 journals]
  • Outcomes of an inner city forensic intellectual disability service
    • Pages: 1 - 8
      Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 9, Issue 1, Page 1-8, March 2018.
      Purpose National policy in England is now directed towards keeping patients with intellectual disability (ID) presenting with forensic problems for time-limited treatment. The result is that secure hospital services are expected to work much more proactively to discharge patients to community-based services. However, there is little evidence in recent years on the outcome of discharged patients with ID from secure hospitals. The purpose of this paper is to describe the outcomes of a patient group discharged from a specialist forensic ID service in London, England. Design/methodology/approach This is a descriptive retrospective case note study of patients with ID admitted to and discharged from a secure service with both low and medium secure wards, over a six-year period from 2009 to 2016. The study examined patient demographic, clinical and outcome variables, including length of stay, pharmacological treatment on admission and discharge, offending history and readmissions to hospital and reoffending following discharge. Findings The study identified 40 male patients, 29 of which were admitted to the medium secure ward. In all, 27 patients (67.5 per cent) were discharged into the community with 14 patients having sole support from the community ID services and 4 from the community forensic services. In total, 20 per cent of patients were readmitted within the study period and 22.2 per cent of patients received further convictions via the Criminal Justice System following discharge. Originality/value This was a complex group of patients with ID discharged into the community with a number at risk of requiring readmission and of reoffending. Community-based services providing for offenders with ID must have sufficient expertise and resourcing to manage the needs of such a patient group including the ongoing management of risks. The national drive is significantly to reduce the availability of specialist inpatient services for this group of patients but this must occur alongside an increase in both resources and expertise within community services.
      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2018-03-21T09:12:08Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-08-2017-0016
       
  • Does the adapted sex offender treatment programme reduce cognitive
           distortions' A meta-analysis
    • Pages: 9 - 21
      Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 9, Issue 1, Page 9-21, March 2018.
      Purpose For the 3.8 per cent of people with intellectual disabilities (IDs) who have offended sexually, the main form of treatment is the group-based, cognitive-behavioural, adapted sex offender treatment programme (ASOTP) that focusses on challenging cognitive distortions condoning sex offending. The purpose of this paper is to provide an evaluation of how effective the ASOTP is at reducing ID sex offenders’ cognitive distortions. Design/methodology/approach Three databases were searched systematically: PsycINFO, MEDLINE and Web of Science. Six studies met the inclusion criteria, yielding 118 participants. Using a random-effects model, effect sizes were calculated using pre- and post-treatment scores on a measure of cognitive distortions. The standardised mean difference (SMD) was 1.77 (95 per cent CI: 1.06, 2.46), which was statistically significant (p
      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2018-03-21T09:12:03Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-08-2017-0018
       
  • Working with intellectually disabled autistic individuals – a
           qualitative study using repertory grids
    • Pages: 22 - 31
      Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 9, Issue 1, Page 22-31, March 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to elucidate how care professionals/providers construe, understand and make sense of the characteristics that are important when providing care to adults with intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder, based on their experiences of working within their roles within a residential care setting. Design/methodology/approach Care professionals and providers working at a community autism and intellectual disability service were interviewed to ascertain their experiences of working with this client group. The research design adopted a qualitative methodology using repertory grids. Findings Ten members of staff who agreed to participate formed the study’s sample.  This consisted of team leaders, support workers, one member of the executive management team and one clinical member of staff. Ten themes were identified for working effectively with people with autism and intellectual disabilities. These were: making autism-specific adaptations, approachable, reflective/self-aware, strong understanding of their residents/empathetic, benevolent, empowering, follows plans consistently, confident in ability to support residents with autism, resilient, respectful. Practical implications The paper discusses each of these ten themes above and how employers can aid in selecting individuals who may be more suited to working with this patient group. Originality/value A literature search demonstrated a lack of empirical research, especially qualitative research, on this topic.
      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2018-03-21T09:12:06Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-08-2017-0017
       
  • Social cognition in intellectually disabled male criminal offenders: a
           deficit in affect perception'
    • Pages: 32 - 48
      Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 9, Issue 1, Page 32-48, March 2018.
      Purpose Although intellectual disability (ID) and criminal offending have long been associated, the nature of this link is obfuscated by reliance on historically unrigorous means of assessing ID and fractionating social cognitive skills. The purpose of this paper is to review and report current findings and set an agenda for future research in social perception, social inference and social problem solving in ID violent offenders. Design/methodology/approach The literature is reviewed on comorbidity of criminal offending and ID, and on social cognitive impairment and ID offending. In an exploratory case-control series comprising six violent offenders with ID and five similarly able controls, emotion recognition and social inference are assessed by the Awareness of Social Inference Test and social problem-solving ability and style by an adapted Social Problem-Solving Inventory. Findings Violent offenders recognised all emotions except “anxious”. Further, while offenders could interpret and integrate wider contextual cues, absent such cues offenders were less able to use paralinguistic cues (e.g. emotional tone) to infer speakers’ feelings. Offenders in this sample exceeded controls’ social problem-solving scores. Originality/value This paper confirms that ID offenders, like neurotypical offenders, display specific deficits in emotion recognition – particularly fear recognition – but suggests that in ID offenders impairments of affect perception are not necessarily accompanied by impaired social problem solving. The implication for therapeutic practice is that ID offenders might be most effectively rehabilitated by targeting simpler, low-level cognitive processes, such as fear perception, rather than adapting treatment strategies from mainstream offenders.
      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2018-03-21T09:12:15Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-09-2017-0022
       
  • Keep Safe: the development of a manualised group CBT intervention for
           adolescents with ID who display harmful sexual behaviours
    • Pages: 49 - 58
      Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 9, Issue 1, Page 49-58, March 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to focus on the development of Keep Safe, a manualised group intervention for adolescents with intellectual disabilities (ID) who display harmful sexual behaviour (HSB) as the initial phase of a feasibility study. National reports have highlighted the need for the development of specialist programmes, as adolescents with ID make up a significant proportion of young people referred to specialist HSB services and there is a lack of evidence or practice-based interventions for them. Aims included taking account of adolescents’ and families’ needs, motivations and practical commitments, integrating best- practice and being accessible and appropriate across different types of services. Design/methodology/approach Keep Safe development progressed from the practitioner/researcher collaborative young sex offender treatment services collaborative-ID through a project team, Keep Safe development group, comprising a range of practitioners with a variety of clinical expertise across services and an Advisory Group of people with ID. An expert-consensus methodology based on the Delphi method was used. The iterative process for the manual draws on the slim practice-based evidence from UK, New Zealand, North America and Australia. Findings Keep Safe comprises six modules distributed through 36 term-time young people’s sessions, alongside 16 concurrent parental/ carer sessions (some joint). The main focus of Keep Safe is to enhance well-being and reduce harm. Four initial sites volunteered as feasibility leads, and two more were added as recruitment was more difficult than foreseen. Originality/value National reports have highlighted the need for the development of specialist programmes, as adolescents with ID make up a significant proportion of young people referred to specialist HSB services and there is a lack of evidence or practice-based interventions for them. This study is innovative and valuable given the recognition that research and practice is significantly lacking in this area.
      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2018-03-21T09:11:57Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-10-2017-0023
       
  • Rare instances of individuals with autism supporting or engaging in
           terrorism: a response to Lino Faccini and Clare Allely
    • Pages: 59 - 63
      Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 9, Issue 1, Page 59-63, March 2018.

      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2018-03-21T09:12:00Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-06-2017-0012
       
  • Rare instances of individuals with autism supporting or engaging in
           terrorism: a reply
    • Pages: 64 - 66
      Abstract: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, Volume 9, Issue 1, Page 64-66, March 2018.

      Citation: Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour
      PubDate: 2018-03-21T09:11:50Z
      DOI: 10.1108/JIDOB-07-2017-0015
       
 
 
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