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Computer Fraud & Security
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.261
Number of Followers: 357  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1361-3723
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3161 journals]
  • Events
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 8Author(s):
       
  • Nation-state hacking – a threat to everyone
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 8Author(s): Steve Mansfield-DevineThe notion of skilled hackers in the employ of national governments has long been a nightmare. But that bad dream became a reality years ago, and the use of cyber-attacks to support political goals has been concentrating the minds of those information security specialists charged with protecting the networks of organisations and governments. Lately, though, the tempo seems to have increased. From election meddling to bringing down power grids, nation-state hacking has moved into the headlines. So what is the scale of this activity and who should be concerned about it' In this interview, Simon Townsend, CTO at Ivanti, makes the case that this is an issue that affects every organisation.
       
  • Not your fairy-tale prince: the Nigerian business email compromise threat
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 8Author(s): Adam MeyersBusiness email compromise (BEC) is a form of fraud by which a team of cyber-criminals convince victims to wire large amounts of funds or send valuable data to criminally controlled accounts. It is facilitated by victims' belief that they are being asked or instructed to do so by a trusted party.
       
  • Get the full e-signature picture to avoid falling foul of the law
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 8Author(s): Sam CrookCompanies initiate e-signature projects for a variety of reasons. For some it is to improve document security, for others it is about speeding up the contract signing process, improving efficiency or cutting costs. These are tangible, easy-to-quantify benefits that resonate strongly with business leaders.Companies initiate e-signature projects for a variety of reasons. For some it is to improve document security, for others it is about speeding up the contract-signing process, improving efficiency or cutting costs for the business.These are tangible, easy-to-quantify benefits that resonate strongly with business leaders. Against a background of regulatory change, however, it is the part that e-signatures play in the management of data governance strategies, meeting compliance and reducing risk that makes them an essential tool in the corporate armoury, argues Sam Crook of Ascertia.
       
  • In brief
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 8Author(s):
       
  • 2018 Thales Data Threat Report: Retail Edition
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 8Author(s): Data beaches among US retailers have more than doubled in the past year, according to research by Thales eSecurity. The retail edition of its latest threat report found that half of US retailers had experienced a data breach over the previous 12 months, compared with 19% the previous year.
       
  • New alliance
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 8Author(s): A new cross-sector alliance incorporating 17 UK cyber-security organisations has been created. The new alliance will help shape national cyber-security standards, drive advances in education and advise the Government on national cyber-security policy.
       
  • Cosco hit by ransomware
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 8Author(s): Just as many organisations and security specialists have started to relax a little about the ransomware threat, another major organisation has been severely hit.
       
  • Editorial
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 8Author(s): Steve Mansfield-DevineFor years, vendors and specialists have been pushing two-factor authentication (2FA) as the answer to our security woes. But it seems that not all 2FA solutions are quite up to the job.
       
  • Technology drives down card fraud in major European countries
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 8Author(s): The levels of payment card fraud have dropped significantly in some European countries thanks to the use of technology, according to analytic software firm FICO. However, fraud levels across Europe as a whole are continuing to rise.
       
  • Events
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 7Author(s):
       
  • Critical infrastructure: understanding the threat
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 7Author(s): Steve Mansfield-DevineWith nation state cyber-meddling now an acknowledged problem, there's growing concern about the threats to critical national infrastructure (CNI) – everything from water treatment plants through electricity generation and distribution to air traffic control. The vulnerability of systems that underpin the functioning of society isn't exactly news to security specialists. But now politicians and the general public are waking up to the potential carnage that hackers could wreak. As Scott King, a senior director at Rapid7, explains in this interview, the threats are real, but not necessarily in the way people imagine.With nation state cyber-meddling now an acknowledged problem, there's growing concern about the threats to critical national infrastructure (CNI).The vulnerability of the systems that underpin the functioning of society isn't exactly news to security specialists. But now politicians and the general public are waking up to the potential havoc that hackers could wreak. As Scott King of Rapid7 explains in this interview, the threats are real, but not necessarily in the way people imagine.
       
  • Assessing website password practices – over a decade of
           progress'
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 7Author(s): Steven FurnellWorld Password Day 2018 saw Microsoft suggesting that it would deliver a “world without passwords” and BlackBerry proposing that they would be replaced by adaptive authentication (based on the buzzwords du jour of artificial intelligence and machine learning).1, 2 Yet at the same time we had the irony of Twitter asking 330 million subscribers to change their passwords, having discovered a bug in the firm's internal systems that resulted in them being stored in unencrypted form.3Every now and again we get a flurry of headlines proclaiming the passing of passwords, yet they are still with us and still being broken and breached.Steven Furnell of the University of Plymouth, UK and Edith Cowan University, Australia presents the results of an assessment of password guidance and policy enforcement on a series of leading websites and compares them with three earlier studies. A consistent finding in all prior cases was that sites were doing less than might be expected. So, 11 years on from the original study, what's changed and have things got better'
       
  • In brief
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 7Author(s):
       
  • Bank of England: Systemic Risk Survey
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 7Author(s): The Bank of England's twice-yearly ‘Systemic Risk Survey’ report shows a slight increase in the expectation among financial services companies that they will suffer a high-impact cyber-attack. At the same time, those same organisations seem to be extremely confident that they can withstand or survive such an attack. But the historical data from past reports shows a fast ramping up of concern about both cyber-attacks and non-technical risks, particularly in the political sphere.
       
  • Big names in major breaches
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 7Author(s): A rash of data breaches has affected millions of people and big-name brands, albeit indirectly in some cases.
       
  • Editorial
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 7Author(s): Steve Mansfield-DevineThings seem to have taken a turn for the better lately with regard to privacy. And no, I'm not talking about the EU's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), although that will have focused the minds of many organisations in the right direction.
       
  • Financial organisations must show they're ready for disaster
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 7Author(s): At the beginning of July, the Bank of England (BoE) and Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) gave notice to the UK's financial institutions that they had three months in which to produce reports on how they avoid IT failures and mitigate cyber-attacks.
       
 
 
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