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Computer Fraud & Security
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.261
Number of Followers: 365  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1361-3723
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3155 journals]
  • Events
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 11Author(s):
       
  • The gulf between fear and reality
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 11Author(s): Roger Grimes
       
  • The ever-changing face of phishing
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 11Author(s): Steve Mansfield-DevinePhishing is one of the oldest tricks in the book. As a form of impersonation-based fraud, you can trace its origins to the days of fax and even snailmail letters. And in essence it's very simple – convince people you're someone you're not in order to convince them to click links, open attachments or take actions that will harm them and enrich the attacker. But as Stu Sjouwerman, founder and CEO of KnowBe4, points out in this interview, that doesn't mean there's nothing new in the world of phishing – in fact, quite the reverse.
       
  • Unmasking deceptive attacks with machine learning
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 11Author(s): Patrick PetersonThe success of a cyber attack is increasingly dictated not by the use of the most nefarious zero-day malware weapons, but by the strength of the attackers’ ability to deceive their targets. Powerful social engineering techniques mean that even the best security strategies can be undone by users clicking on a link that they believe came from a trusted contact.
       
  • The latest attacks and how to stop them
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 11Author(s): Chris RossSince the first email was sent way back in 1971, you'd think that we would be more informed and prepared for email-focused attacks by now. However, email remains the number one way for threats to enter your network, with research suggesting nearly three quarters (74%) of attacks enter this way.1
       
  • Phishing 2.0: the new evolution in cybercrime
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 11Author(s): Matt BoddyPhishing is simply trying to trick people into doing something – be it opening a malicious email attachment, clicking a link, transferring funds or revealing confidential data. As such, it carries with it the stigma of having been foolish enough to be caught out, especially in light of large-scale programmes to educate users and encourage healthy scepticism when looking at your inbox or messages.
       
  • In brief
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 11Author(s):
       
  • ONS: Crime Survey for England and Wales
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 11Author(s): The latest crime figures from the UK's Office of National Statistics (ONS) have come up with the rather startling claim that cybercrime has fallen in England and Wales by 30% in the past year. But this conclusion is shared by hardly anyone else.
       
  • HSBC and Facebook among latest breaches
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 11Author(s): Personal information from at least 81,000 Facebook accounts has been offered for sale on the dark web, according to investigations by the BBC Russian Service.
       
  • Editorial
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 11Author(s): Steve Mansfield-DevineWhen I interviewed Stu Sjouwerman of KnowBe4 for the interview on , he started by telling me to check my email inbox.
       
  • The Art of Phishing
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 11Author(s): In the information security world we often become fixated on technology. We probe systems for weaknesses, scour code for flaws and knock on firewalls until they crumble. And yet the weakest part of any system continues to be the people who use it.
       
  • Events
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 10Author(s):
       
  • The rise of the cyber insider
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 10Author(s): Simon Cuthbert
       
  • Fraud detection-oriented operators in a data warehouse based on forensic
           accounting techniques
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 10Author(s): Francisco Javier Moreno Arboleda, Jaime Alberto Guzman-Luna, Ingrid-Durley TorresThe fields of finance and accounting are especially susceptible to fraud. For this reason, special techniques have been developed for prevention or detection in these fields. For instance, in the field of finance, there are proposals focused on historical data analysis and statistical distribution, credit card transaction analysis and financial statements.1, 2, 3 One of them is an integrated language model.4The fields of finance and accounting are especially susceptible to fraud. For this reason, special techniques have been developed for prevention or detection.Francisco Javier Moreno Arboleda, Jaime Alberto Guzman-Luna and Ingrid-Durley Torres present several fraud detection techniques, focusing on the fields of finance and forensic accounting. Based on these techniques, they define specialised operators focusing on fraud detection in a data warehouse. While the techniques are able to flag potential frauds, there is some way to go to being able to positively identify them, and the authors suggest future work in this area.
       
  • The best form of defence – the benefits of red teaming
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 10Author(s): Steve Mansfield-DevineOne of the best ways to understand how well your defences would withstand a cyber-attack is, in fact, to come under attack. Nothing exposes your weaknesses better than having them revealed by skilled hackers. That's the idea behind penetration testing. However, if you have systems or information assets you know are especially valuable, you might want to consider ramping things up a notch and engage in red teaming exercises, as Gemma Moore, a director at Cyberis, explains in this interview.One of the best ways to understand how well your defences would withstand a cyber-attack is, in fact, to come under attack.Nothing exposes your weaknesses better than having them revealed by skilled hackers. That's the idea behind penetration testing. However, if you have systems or information assets you know are especially valuable, you might want to consider ramping things up a notch and engage in red teaming exercises, as Gemma Moore explains in this interview.
       
  • Using cyber insurance to run virtuous circles around cyber risk
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 10Author(s): Mike LloydIn 1789, Benjamin Franklin wrote to his friend, the French physicist and Encylopédiste Jean-Baptiste Le Roy: “Our new Constitution is now established, and has an appearance that promises permanency”.1 Then he added: “But in this world nothing can be said to be certain except death and taxes.”It seems a security breach is practically a certainty for most organisations. But that doesn't mean you should surrender – and insurance is a key way to manage risk.By pegging coverage qualification and cost to an organisation's resilience, it's possible to create a virtuous circle in which insurance products de-risk financial loss even as they de-risk the potential causes of that loss by incentivising more resilient networks, explains Dr Mike Lloyd of RedSeal.
       
  • In brief
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 10Author(s):
       
  • UK Finance: 2018 half-year fraud update
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 10Author(s): More than £500m was stolen from UK banks in the first half of this year, according to the latest report from UK Finance. These figures include £358m in unauthorised transactions on payment cards, remote banking accounts and cheques, and £145m in authorised push payment (APP) scams in which victims are duped into making payments into the criminals' accounts.
       
  • Massive breach at Facebook
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 10Author(s): Facebook has reset passwords for 90 million accounts following a massive data breach.
       
  • Editorial
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 10Author(s): Steve Mansfield-DevineThe UK Government has finally come out and stated what many of us already presumed – that the Russian Government's chief military intelligence agency, the GRU (or Main Directorate) is behind some of the more egregious and effective hacking attacks that we've witnessed in the recent past.
       
  • Russia accused of hacking as its intelligence agents are expelled
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2018, Issue 10Author(s): State-sponsored hacking by Russia has come under the spotlight in the past few weeks following failed attacks, diplomatic expulsions and accusations levelled by Western nations.
       
 
 
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