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Computer Fraud & Security
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.261
Number of Followers: 395  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1361-3723
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3177 journals]
  • Events
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 11Author(s):
       
  • Quantum computing's impact on security
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 11Author(s): Roger A Grimes
       
  • Gateway to securing the cloud
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 11Author(s): Steve Mansfield-DevineFor some years now, security professionals have been bemoaning the erosion – even disappearance – of the traditional network perimeter. First mobile computing, then the cloud rendered many of their traditional and well-honed tools, such as firewalls, less effective and, in some conditions, irrelevant. Other solutions came along to take their place, but as Simon Eappariello and Craig Talbot of cloud security firm iboss explain in this interview, today's IT and communications infrastructure is complex and requires a different mindset when it comes to security.
       
  • The guide to ransomware: how businesses can manage the evolving threat
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 11Author(s): Thorsten KurpjuhnToday, cyber criminals are using increasingly sophisticated approaches to exploit people and businesses online. This was particularly the case last year with criminals taking a more targeted approach and using ransomware, a type of malware that makes it particularly difficult to regain control of data stored on affected devices unless a ransom is paid.
       
  • In brief
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 11Author(s):
       
  • Europol: Internet Organised Crime Threat Assessment (IOCTA) 2019
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 11Author(s): Much of the debate around cybercrime focuses on novelty. Whether it's criminals deploying artificial intelligence (AI) to create cunning new exploits or the latest zero-day vulnerabilities, the security industry likes to emphasise what's new about the threats that face us.
       
  • UK Government funds security developments
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 11Author(s): The UK Government is investing £54m in partnerships and programmes to enhance cyber security for businesses and individuals.
       
  • Editorial
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 11Author(s): Steve Mansfield-DevinePretty much everyone uses a computer these days. But very few people have more than a superficial understanding of how their software and hardware work and how to maintain them. And criminals are only too happy to capitalise on this ignorance.
       
  • UK fraud increases again as Action Fraud comes under fire
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 11Author(s): The UK's Office of National Statistics (ONS) has issued the latest annual figures for crime in England and Wales and, once again, the figures for fraud – most of which is technology-enabled – are up.
       
  • Events
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 10Author(s):
       
  • The value of threat intelligence
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 10Author(s): Liv Rowley
       
  • Police raids take down cybercrime servers
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 10Author(s): Police in the Netherlands, working with the UK's National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC), claim to have taken down a ‘bulletproof’ hosting operation and, in the process, to have disrupted a Mirai-based botnet.
       
  • A source code perspective framework to produce secure web applications
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 10Author(s): Alka Agrawal, Mamdouh Alenezi, Rajeev Kumar, Raees Ahmad KhanHackers and other cyber attackers remain fearless concerning the mitigation mechanisms that have evolved for addressing security over the past few years. Cyber attacks are on the rise and countless security breaches take place daily. It is believed that cybercrime in its various forms will cost the world $6tr per year by 2021.1 It has become essential that software companies evaluate their businesses to identify application security needs, strategies and weaknesses. Establishing a security policy to safeguard their software applications has become an urgent need.Vulnerable applications are the bane of the software industry. Software companies need to make sure that their developers write more secure code, but developers struggle with this issue.To encourage developers to write secure source code, there is a need to integrate the whole process of scanning, detecting and mitigating security vulnerabilities and flaws during code analysis. Alka Agrawal, Mamdouh Alenezi, Rajeev Kumar and Raees Ahmad Khan propose an integrated and prescriptive framework intended to identify and mitigate vulnerabilities and provide suggestions for writing more secure code.
       
  • How graph technology can map patterns to mitigate money-laundering risk
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 10Author(s): Emil EifremThe estimated amount of money laundered illegally worldwide is a staggering $800bn-$2tr. This equates to as much as 5% of global GDP, according to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime.1 And the problem is growing thanks to digitisation, which has made it easier and faster to move money around.Money laundering is a growing problem. Criminals are getting more sophisticated, making eradicating this issue ever-more complex and challenging.The problem is that most tools for dealing with money laundering focus on discrete data. This makes it difficult to spot the shared characteristics that are typical of money-laundering networks. But graph technology has the power to mine the truth from data to help you quickly pinpoint potential areas of concern, explains Neo4j's Emil Eifrem.
       
  • In brief
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 10Author(s):
       
  • RiskIQ – Magecart: The State of a Growing Threat
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 10Author(s): Magecart has become notorious as a form of malware that ‘skims’ e-commerce websites. Injected into the site's code, usually on payment pages, it captures payment card data and any other information entered by shoppers before sending this data to the criminals' servers. But in fact, Magecart is more than just malware – it's a sub-culture of cyber criminals who are becoming more effective, more widespread and probably a lot richer every day.
       
  • Editorial
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 10Author(s): Steve Mansfield-DevineOn 1 January 2020, the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) will come into force. Much like the EU's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), it has the potential to radically change how organisations approach data privacy.
       
  • FBI issues ransomware warning as hospitals hit
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 10Author(s): The US Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) has issued a renewed warning about ransomware – coincidentally as a number of hospitals in the country suffered serious outages due to attacks. Hospitals in Australia were also affected.
       
 
 
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