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Computer Fraud & Security
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.261
Number of Followers: 395  
 
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ISSN (Print) 1361-3723
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3182 journals]
  • Events
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 9Author(s):
       
  • The evolution of Instagram porn bots
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 9Author(s): Satnam Narang
       
  • Close to home: building in-house security expertise
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 9Author(s): Steve Mansfield-DevineInformation security is now such a critical part of an organisation's ability to manage risk that it pays to have skilled and knowledgeable people on hand to guide, advise and deal with issues. But as everyone knows, cyber security skills are in short supply and firms have trouble hanging on to the experienced security experts they have. So what do they do about this' In this interview, Matt Lorentzen, principal security consultant at Trustwave SpiderLabs, outlines the current state of in-house security skills within organisations, where they're falling short and what can be done about it, particularly in terms of upskilling existing staff.
       
  • How can CISOs use AI in their business'
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 9Author(s): Neil KellNo sector is immune from cyber attacks and the increasing level of sophistication means that they present some of the most strategically significant risks to business today. Cyber security is driven by the need to remain one step ahead of the attacker. As a business transforms digitally by harnessing artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning, its cyber weaponry needs to transform with it if it's to have a perpetual edge on cyberthreats.
       
  • Just about managing: dealing with the threats to industrial systems
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 9Author(s): Ilan BardaAlthough studies and surveys from analyst firms Gartner and IDC differ slightly, there is an assumption that organisations spend around 10% of their IT budgets on cyber security.1, 2 When differentiated by industry sector, financial services tend to spend more, leisure and hospitality slightly less. Industrial sectors including manufacturers that deploy industrial control system (ICS) solutions sit somewhere in the middle but often face a set of cyber security challenges that are harder to overcome. This includes budgets for upgrades often measured in five- to 10-year cycles that impose a major obstacle in the fast-changing world of IT-related security.Industrial firms face some particularly difficult cyber security challenges. These include upgrades often measured in five- to 10-year cycles.Many manufacturers that have operated within closed networks have failed to adapt to targeted threats. Underfunding of cyber security along with archaic security principles that lag 10 years behind the mainstream computing world can make industrial organisations easy targets. Firms need to look at holistic solutions that include people, skills and technologies across the organisation, says Ilan Barda of Radiflow.
       
  • Cyber security and the brand
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 9Author(s): Akino ChikadaA brand is an organisation's most valuable asset. It gives out strong messages, both explicit and implicit, to anyone who encounters it – customers, employees, advocates, investors and even competitors. It will leave a clear understanding of what the product or organisation is all about and if it is something which they may want to get more involved with. Many top brands such as Apple and Coca-Cola are valued in the tens of billions of pounds.1, 2Brand protection has become more of a priority in recent years and a key element of this for many organisations is keeping their customers safe. Incorporating cyber security best practices into brand-protection strategies as well as working with the right registrar are good places to start, explains Akino Chikada of MarkMonitor.
       
  • In brief
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 9Author(s):
       
  • Trend Micro: 2019 Mid-Year Security Roundup
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 9Author(s): Reacting to attacks after they've happened is no longer good enough, reckons Trend Micro in its latest six-monthly security summary. It's becoming more important than ever to detect attacks while they are in progress and prevent them from doing their worst.
       
  • Texas and dentists hit with ransomware
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 9Author(s): Among the victims in a serious outbreak of ransomware attacks are more than 20 local governments in Texas and hundreds of dentist surgeries in the US – in both cases because an organisation supplying services was compromised.
       
  • Editorial
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 9Author(s): Steve Mansfield-DevineThe humble password has long been a problem. Used on its own, it is a crude form of security – a simple ‘something you know’ that can be compromised in so many ways. And yet we seem to have trouble finding anything better.
       
  • Anti-fraud unit takes down 13 organised crime gangs in the UK
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 9Author(s): An industry-funded anti-fraud organisation has led operations that dismantled 13 organised crime groups operating in the UK. But it warns that more are appearing, and at an ever-faster rate.
       
  • Events
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 8Author(s):
       
  • The future is Society 5.0
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 8Author(s): Kai Grunwitz
       
  • Improving employees' cyber security awareness
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 8Author(s): Grayson KemperIn 2019, employees still aren't convinced about their company's vulnerability to cybercrimes. While immensely frustrating for employers, employees’ disposition on this matter aligns with the general public's unawareness or failure to address data security.Employees still aren't convinced about their company's vulnerability to cybercrime, and this aligns with the general public's unawareness or failure to address data security.Employees are the primary vulnerability at a company, regardless of the size or scale. To reduce the risk they pose to your company's security, consider creative ways to engage and encourage employees to proactively contribute to your cyber security. Starting from the top of your organisation, design a cyber security policy and compliance plan that educates and incentivises employees to learn and follow security best practices, says Grayson Kemper of Clutch.
       
  • Why employees matter in the fight against ransomware
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 8Author(s): Marcus ChungRansomware attacks keep coming and the stakes get higher every day. Each employee in a company, from the newest hire to the CEO, can either strengthen or weaken an organisation's security posture. For this reason, companies should help employees take precautions against the latest ransomware scams.Ransomware attacks keep coming and each employee, from the newest hire to the CEO, can either strengthen or weaken an organisation's security posture.Many malicious attacks can be stopped by endpoint security products and advanced threat protection solutions, but creative scammers keep finding ways to get past these defences. If a company's security programme does not empower employees to defend themselves, they will be more likely to engage in actions that threaten the security of the network, says Marcus Chung of BoldCloud.
       
  • AI vs AI: fraudsters turn defensive technology into an attack tool
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 8Author(s): Swami VaithianathasamyThe first rule of managing online fraud and mitigating risk is to remember that fraudsters are entrepreneurs. While it's tempting to think of those committing digital fraud as hoody-wearing lone wolves spending hours in their bedroom working to weasel their way into someone's online account, in reality professional fraud operations look more like the JP Morgan trading floor.Cyber criminals are not simple, hoodie-wearing lone wolves. Many are sophisticated fraud operations using the most advanced technology, including artificial intelligence (AI).The energy and ingenuity with which fraud rings and cyber criminals have deployed AI-based solutions has matched that of the businesses and organisations that work to protect themselves from bad actors. Machines have been put to malicious use in ways ranging from click farms to complex model extraction schemes, explains Swami Vaithianathasamy of Signifyd.
       
  • In brief
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 8Author(s):
       
  • IBM: Cost of a Data Breach Report 2019
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 8Author(s): Data beaches aren't getting any cheaper. The sheer complexity of cleaning up after a breach, the fact that the repercussions can keep rolling in for years after the event and the arrival of tougher regulations are conspiring to make leaking data a pricey – and potentially organisation-killing – issue.
       
  • Criminals target financial services
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 8Author(s): Financial services organisations are increasingly the focus of targeted and persistent attacks, according to a number of new reports.
       
  • Editorial
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 8Author(s): Steve Mansfield-DevineThe humble password has long been a problem. Used on its own, it is a crude form of security – a simple ‘something you know’ that can be compromised in so many ways. And yet we seem to have trouble finding anything better.
       
  • Power blackouts and government systems taken offline following multiple
           ransomware attacks
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2019Source: Computer Fraud & Security, Volume 2019, Issue 8Author(s): The US state of Louisiana declared an emergency, its neighbouring state of Georgia shut down multiple systems, including some used by police forces, and parts of Johannesburg suffered power blackouts following ransomware infections.
       
 
 
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