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Journal Cover   Humanity & Society
  [2 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0160-5976
   Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [819 journals]
  • Interdisciplinarity, Post-disciplinarity, and Anomic Specialization: Where
           Do We Locate Sociology?
    • Authors: Wright, J. T; Embrick, D. G, Henke, K.
      Pages: 267 - 273
      PubDate: 2015-07-15T19:59:44-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0160597615593233
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • Where Else Could That Ever Happen? The Reproduction of Heteronormative
           Masculinity on a Catholic College Campus
    • Authors: Lafleur; S.
      Pages: 274 - 293
      Abstract: This article considers how a Catholic college’s men’s beauty pageant serves as an arena where cultural ideals of heteronormative masculinity are constructed, performed, and reinforced. Since its inception in 1998, the annual "Mr. Brookfield" pageant has become a way of promoting solidarity and discouraging dissent in regard to gender and sexuality on campus. Through a qualitative analysis of materials promoting and discussing the event on campus, I argue that the performance celebrates and reinforces heteronormative masculinity, which has implications for the student culture as a whole. Located within the context of the Catholic institution, the perpetuation of heteronormative masculinity and the policies of the Church together ensure that the marginalization of women and gay people persists. As reflected in the archival documents, the pageant has become an important way of doing so, through the construction and celebration of a heteronormative masculine identity that calls attention to the boundaries between feminine and masculine and straight and gay, the degradation of women as a way of demonstrating the heterosexuality and masculinity of the contestants, and the promotion of this masculine identity as the ideal within the student culture.
      PubDate: 2015-07-15T19:59:44-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0160597614555980
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • Exiles in a Foreign Land: A Comparative Analysis of the Historical Role of
           Religion for African Americans and Irish Immigrants
    • Authors: Barnes; S. L.
      Pages: 294 - 320
      Abstract: Despite documentation of intergroup conflict between African Americans and Irish immigrants during the mid-nineteenth to mid-twentieth centuries, few studies have comparatively considered the beneficence of religion as an adaptive, conciliatory mechanism for the two ethnic groups. Yet, literature supports the historic centrality of the Black Church for the former group and the indelible influence of Catholicism for the latter. This research examines common religious themes and organized efforts associated with these faith traditions for the two historically oppressed groups. Informed by Cultural Theory, this study compares and contrasts religious cultural dynamics to illumine adaptive features and activism. Exilic themes based on nationality, race, and/or ethnicity tied to biblical symbolism; social programs and self-help; as well as appropriation of Liberation Theology are common group patterns. Yet, findings also illustrate the inability of religion to foster substantial intergroup cooperation in light of other prevailing systemic forces.
      PubDate: 2015-07-15T19:59:44-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0160597614560567
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • Victims of Terrorism and the Right to Redress: Challenges and
           Contradictions in the 2012 Emmerson Report
    • Authors: Del Villar, E. L; Glasberg, D. S.
      Pages: 321 - 338
      Abstract: The U.N. Global Counterterrorism Strategy (A/RES/60/288) recognizes that the war on terror can only be won by protecting the rights of its victims. However, almost a decade since its adoption, the application of a human rights framework to the protection of the rights of victims of terrorism has been largely neglected. A 2012 report by U.N. Special Rapporteur Ben Emmerson sought to address this inattention, recommending that member states provide reparations to victims of terrorism regardless of the question of State responsibility. While this application of a human rights framework to the discourse on terrorism victims’ rights has been a breakthrough, the recommendations of the Emmerson report imply several thorny issues and fail to confront several key concepts embedded in its assumptions. Analyzing the international norms surrounding victims’ rights vis-à-vis reparations and state responsibility, we posit that all member states indeed have the obligation to protect the rights of victims as human rights and provide avenues for redress. However, we argue that the narrow definition of terrorism in the Emmerson report that fails to include institutional or state terrorism leads to legal and normative questions about who its rightful victims are, who should be held responsible, and what the role of the state and international community is with regard to restitution. Such unresolved questions in international law could ultimately be detrimental to the recognition and protection of the rights of victims of terrorism within a human rights framework.
      PubDate: 2015-07-15T19:59:44-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0160597614563386
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • A Reflection on the Sociological Study of Subcultures
    • Authors: Hughey; M. W.
      Pages: 339 - 341
      PubDate: 2015-07-15T19:59:44-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0160597615588852
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • Book Review: Our Roots Run as Deep as Ironweed: Appalachian Women and the
           Fight for Environmental Justice
    • Authors: Denning; C. H.
      Pages: 342 - 343
      PubDate: 2015-07-15T19:59:44-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0160597615579703
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • Book Review: Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies: Migrant Farmworkers in the United
           States
    • Authors: Fenton; R. P.
      Pages: 344 - 345
      PubDate: 2015-07-15T19:59:44-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0160597615578900
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • Book Review: Gang Life in Two Cities: An Insider's Journey
    • Authors: Bailey; E. G.
      Pages: 346 - 347
      PubDate: 2015-07-15T19:59:44-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0160597615588848
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • Multimedia Review: Colleges and Universities Losing Their Way
    • Authors: Borchard; K.
      Pages: 348 - 350
      PubDate: 2015-07-15T19:59:44-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0160597615578899
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • Film Review
    • Authors: Washington, P. C. T; Washington, D.
      Pages: 351 - 353
      PubDate: 2015-07-15T19:59:44-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0160597615584478
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • Film Review
    • Authors: Miles; C.
      Pages: 354 - 356
      PubDate: 2015-07-15T19:59:44-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0160597615584475
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • Men of Mountains
    • Authors: Gajiev; E.
      Pages: 357 - 359
      PubDate: 2015-07-15T19:59:44-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0160597615576521
      Issue No: Vol. 39, No. 3 (2015)
       
 
 
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