for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help
Journal Cover Disability Studies Quarterly
  [26 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 1041-5718 - ISSN (Online) 2159-8371
   Published by Ohio State University Homepage  [3 journals]
  • Review of Telethons: Spectacle, Disability, and the Business of Charity

    • Authors: Nate Holdren
      Abstract: No abstract available.
      PubDate: 2016-12-02
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Review of After War: The Weight of Life at Walter Reed

    • Authors: John Matthew Kinder
      Abstract: No abstract available.
      PubDate: 2016-12-02
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Review of Fading Scars: My Queer Disability History

    • Authors: Elizabeth Glass
      Abstract: No abstract available.
      PubDate: 2016-12-02
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Review of Autism in a Decentered World

    • Authors: Mark Osteen
      Abstract: No abstract available.
      PubDate: 2016-12-02
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Review of Blind Workers against Charity: The National League of the Blind
           of Great Britain and Ireland, 1893-1970

    • Authors: Mike Roman Mantin
      Abstract: No abstract available.
      PubDate: 2016-12-02
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Review of Imagining Autism: Fiction and Stereotypes on the Spectrum

    • Authors: Ajitpaul Mangat
      Abstract: No abstract available.
      PubDate: 2016-12-02
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • How We Label Students with Disabilities: A Framework of Language Use in an
           Urban School District in the United States

    • Authors: Lindsey T. Back, Christopher B. Keys, Susan D. McMahon, Kaney O'Neill
      Abstract: Although scientists have often overlooked the role of language used to refer to people with disabilities in their identities, language may reflect societal attitudes that are critical in shaping the experiences of people with disabilities, particularly during formative periods. International controversy surrounds disability-first versus people-first language, but little research to date has explored specific linguistic references to people with disabilities. This study draws on a content analysis of 22 qualitative interviews with students, parents, teachers, and administrators to explore language used to refer to students with disabilities. Results offer the first framework of language in a U.S. urban school district, including people-first, disability-implicit, and disability-first language. Results demonstrate noteworthy variation in form and content, and offer a values-based and contextual understanding of language.  This nuanced way of understanding experiences of students with disabilities has implications for potentially improving language used to refer to people with disabilities, as well as creating a more positive disability identity.
      PubDate: 2016-12-02
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Building Back Wards in a 'Post' Institutional Era: Hospital
           Confinement, Group Home Eviction, and Ontario's Treatment of People
           Labelled with Intellectual Disabilities

    • Authors: Natalie Spagnuolo
      Abstract: Although Ontario has closed the regional centres that were intended for people labelled with intellectual disabilities and apologized to survivors, the institutionalization of disabled people persists in other forms in the province. This article demonstrates that the eligibility criteria established by privately-operated and publically-funded group homes contributes to the use of what will be termed 'back ward' placements in institutions such as hospitals and nursing homes. While group homes themselves have been – quite rightly – criticized as neo-institutional forms of residential support, they also play a role in shaping more overt forms of confinement by refusing to tailor their services to the needs of certain individuals. What follows is an analysis of residential support systems that builds upon case studies and reports to expose how impairment hierarchies, based on ranked support needs, determine who will end up in these 'back wards' and who will be offered a place in a group home.
      PubDate: 2016-12-02
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • "When I am in Japan, I feel as though I'm not disabled": A
           cross-cultural adjustment study of trainees with disabilities from
           Asia-Pacific regions

    • Authors: Miho Iwakuma, Masako Okuhira, Satomi Nasu
      Abstract: This study aims to examine the cross-cultural adjustment processes of trainees with disabilities from Asia-Pacific regions, with the aim to explore factors that influence cross-cultural adjustments and uncover experiences by individuals with disabilities. We interviewed a total of 13 trainees, some of whom were interviewed multiple times. Several factors (e.g., affluence of the Japanese lifestyle, maintaining contact with home via the Internet, and/or previous knowledge of the host culture) greatly affected their transitions to Japan. Notably, participant adjustments were made on several different levels, including physical, social, and attitudinal.
      PubDate: 2016-12-02
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • The Deficit View and Its Critics

    • Authors: Janette Dinishak
      Abstract: This paper investigates what it is to understand human differences in terms of deficits and examines criticisms of this approach. In the past few decades, across many fields of inquiry and outside the academy there has been a surge of interest in critiquing "the deficit view" of all manner of group differences and deviations from the norm.  But what exactly is meant by "deficit view" and related terms when they figure in accounts of human differences?  Do critics of the deficit view claim that they are never appropriate or that particular applications of the approach are inappropriate?  The aim of this paper is twofold: to identify and articulate some of the conceptual issues at the heart of debates about deficit approaches and to examine how these issues matter. Autism is my focus case. As we will see, many critiques of the deficit view of autism tend to characterize what is problematic about taking a deficit view in terms of the personal and social harm that deficit views can or do effect.  One important upshot of my discussion, I argue, is that there is another kind of drawback to deficit thinking that is independent of the deficit view's potential negative personal and social consequences, a drawback that deserves serious consideration and sustained critical attention: in some instances, at least, deficit views impede scientific and philosophical progress in our understanding of the phenomena themselves.  Thus, articulating and assessing deficit approaches is of practical and theoretical importance. 
      PubDate: 2016-12-02
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • A Death in the Family: Disability Activism, Mourning, and Diagnostic
           Kinship

    • Authors: Elizabeth Lewis
      Abstract: This article utilizes data from ethnographic research on deafblindness advocacy in Guatemala to show how families in this community create new forms of kinship with one another based on their children's shared diagnosis. The category of deafblindness expanded significantly in recent decades and now describes a diverse disability population. This case study shows that the umbrella diagnosis of deafblindness opens new possibilities for community formation and belonging, granting diagnostic intelligibility to children who would have received an ambiguous label of having "multiple disabilities" in the recent past. By proposing the concept of diagnostic kinship, this essay demonstrates that diagnoses can offer not only affective and logistical support, but can also generate new kinship possibilities and forms that are contingent on biomedical categories.
      PubDate: 2016-12-02
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Chronically Ill, Critically Crip?: Poetry, Poetics and Dissonant
           Disabilities

    • Authors: Emilia Nielsen
      Abstract: In this hybrid critical-creative paper, I explore disability poetry and crip poetics via my manuscript, Body Work. Poetry provides a site to explore crip experience because, as Petra Kuppers (2007) argues, "poems and their performance of meaning clasp something of crip culture's force" (p. 103). Here, the "instability of language" (Kuppers, p. 89) provides a way of understanding chronic illnesses as "dissonant disabilities" (Driedger & Owen, 2008). In placing chronic illness in a disability studies framework, and via crip theory, which critiques the common sense naturalness of ability and heterosexuality, I investigate how chronic illness demands ways of understanding that intelligently address mind and body unpredictability. In close, I will revisit Robert McRuer's notion of "critically crip" arguing that any claim to crip be enacted with intentional criticality.© 2016 Nielsen. All rights reserved. By author request, this article is excluded from Creative Commons licensing. 
      PubDate: 2016-12-02
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Lewis Clarke and the "Color" of Disability: The Past and Future of Black
           Disability Studies

    • Authors: Jean Franzino
      Abstract: This article analyzes Lewis Clarke's 1845 slave narrative, the Narrative of the Sufferings of Lewis Clarke, for what it can offer contemporary theorizing at the intersection of disability and race. Clarke's text, I suggest, "crips" the genre of the slave narrative, replacing abolitionist spectacle with the knowledge gained from a number of temporary or otherwise ambiguous disability positions. In doing so, Clarke's Narrative both expands the parameters of disability as often conceived within disability studies and offers a reconfiguration of the meaning of disability for critical race studies.
      PubDate: 2016-12-02
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Uprooting the Schizophrenic Seed of Faith: Mental Disability in The
           Violent Bear It Away

    • Authors: Sonya Freeman Loftis
      Abstract: This article examines Flannery O'Connor's depiction of mental disability in The Violent Bear It Away. O'Connor's work presents a particularly rich and complex intellectual space for examining stereotypes connecting mental disability with religious faith. Religious difference and disabled difference are presented as symbolically inseparable in The Violent Bear It Away, a conflation that may encourage negative stereotypes regarding both faith and madness. In the larger scope of the novel, O'Connor uses Tarwater's ambiguous status as both a mad man and a man of faith to question modern psychology and the mental healthcare system: just as readers are implicitly asked to "diagnose" her mad characters (but are set up to fail by the novel's deliberate indeterminacy), the psychologist character Rayber also struggles (and fails) to diagnose the other characters around him. In the end, however, O'Connor's critique of the mental healthcare system may be undermined by her use of mental disability as a symbol to convey religious mystery.© 2016 Loftis. All rights reserved. By author request, this article is excluded from Creative Commons licensing.
      PubDate: 2016-12-02
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Re-visioning Negative Archetypes of Disability and Deformity in Fantasy:
           Wicked, Maleficent, and Game of Thrones

    • Authors: Colleen Elaine Donnelly
      Abstract: Fantasy and horror often exploit disabled people, presenting them as embodiments of terror and evil.  In contemporary fantasy, we sometimes see archetypically evil characters redefined primarily by the telling of their backstories to provide rationale for their behavior and to evoke sympathy or pity from the audience. Pity often places the viewer in the position to seem benevolent while masking the ways that disabled people are often treated as inferior, different, and are isolated from the rest of society.  In Wicked, Maleficent, and Game of Thrones, we are asked to confront the judgments and behaviors in which spectators and society engage.  Instead of reaffirming the views and values of society, these works question and denounce our consumption of the stereotypes we have learned and our often unexamined behaviors towards those who are often treated as "others."
      PubDate: 2016-12-02
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Viral Transmissions: Safer Sex Videos, Disability, and Queer Politics

    • Authors: Karisa Butler-Wall
      Abstract: Bringing disability studies into conversation with queer histories of AIDS activism, this article examines the relationship between disability and queer politics in safer sex videos created by AIDS activists in the 1980s. As a form of what the author terms "guerrilla biopolitics," safer sex videos insisted on the viability of queer life and sexual expression at a historical moment of intense homophobia and sex negativity. At the same time, the vision of sexual health and identity they offered risked reproducing racialized and classed ideologies of ableism. Seeking to "crip" our understandings of safer sex discourses and practices, this study explores how risk reduction techniques have been historically linked to imperatives of compulsory able-bodiedness, precluding alternative expressions of queer/crip life.
      PubDate: 2016-12-02
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Misfitting and Hater Blocking: A Feminist Disability Analysis of the
           Extraordinary Body on Reality Television

    • Authors: Krystal Cleary
      Abstract: This article analyzes three popular TLC programs that are emblematic of contemporary reality televisual representations of the extraordinary body: Abby & Brittany (2012), The Little Couple (2009-), and My Big Fat Fabulous Life (2015-). Extending Rosemarie Garland-Thomson's concept of "misfitting," I demonstrate how the non-normative body fits seamlessly into the mediated domain of reality television precisely because of its misfit in material and social spheres. The representational mode of these programs appears as a corrective to oppressive depictions of people with non-normative bodies, yet, I argue, the discourse of extraordinary normalcy built into the narrative framework of these programs is in fact supported by a scaffolding of normativizing logics that hinge upon casts members' whiteness, upward class mobility, and fulfillment of conventional gender and sexual norms. As such, I examine how specific bodies–heterosexual, white, gender normative, affluent–are called upon to perform disability on reality television. I assert that these programs dangerously depoliticize disability by narratively isolating it from other facets of identity and power, and furthermore regard ableism as an individual and moralistic matter perpetuated by antagonistic "haters" rather than a concern of the State.
      PubDate: 2016-12-02
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 4 (2016)
       
  • Editorial Introduction for 36:4

    • Authors: Ally Day, Kim E. Nielsen
      Abstract: No abstract available.
      PubDate: 2016-12-02
      Issue No: Vol. 36, No. 4 (2016)
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
Home (Search)
Subjects A-Z
Publishers A-Z
Customise
APIs
Your IP address: 54.204.185.107
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-2016