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Disability Studies Quarterly
   Journal TOC RSS feeds Export to Zotero [8 followers]  Follow    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
     ISSN (Print) 1041-5718 - ISSN (Online) 2159-8371
     Published by Ohio State University Homepage  [2 journals]
  • MetaMeta Upload: Composing a Review in ASL and English

    • Authors: Teresa Blankmeyer Burke
      PubDate: 2014-07-23
      Issue No: Vol. 34 (2014)
       
  • Editor's Introduction

    • Authors: Bruce Henderson
      PubDate: 2014-07-03
      Issue No: Vol. 34 (2014)
       
  • Writing About Disability, With Disability: A Review of Stephanie
           Kerschbaum's Toward a New Rhetoric of Difference

    • Authors: Amy Vidali
      PubDate: 2014-07-01
      Issue No: Vol. 34 (2014)
       
  • Listening to the Lyricals: A Partial Discovery

    • Authors: Teresa Blankmeyer Burke
      PubDate: 2014-07-01
      Issue No: Vol. 34 (2014)
       
  • Reflections and Explorations of Passing

    • Authors: Hilary Selznick
      PubDate: 2014-06-16
      Issue No: Vol. 34 (2014)
       
  • Legacies of Colonialism: Toward a Borderland Dialogue between Indigenous
           and Disability Rhetorics

    • Authors: Stephanie K. Wheeler
      PubDate: 2014-06-16
      Issue No: Vol. 34 (2014)
       
  • "People of the Apokalis": Spatial Disability and the Bhopal
           Disaster

    • Authors: Jina Kim
      Abstract: This paper considers Indra Sinha's Animal's People (2007), a fictional re-telling of the Union Carbide Bhopal disaster, as a productive site of mutual engagement between postcolonial studies and disability studies, two fields rarely in dialogue.  Dominant models of disability, I argue, do not translate to formerly colonial sites and/or sites that bear the burden of global capitalism.  The uneven processes of globalization—which produce disabling environments—necessitate that we revise established conceptions of disability, which are derived largely from US/UK contexts.  I explore a socio-spatial model that emphasizes the necessity of specific locational axes in figurations of disability.  This enables more flexible understandings of embodiment, which may shift and be shifted by the particularities of space.  A victim of the disaster, Animal--the novel's protagonist--navigates Bhopal’s streets on all fours.  His unique spatial imaginary, contingent on his particular form of embodiment, produces a local and embodied knowledge that foregrounds points of convergence between anti-colonial, anti-capitalist, and disability politics. Keywords: postcolonialism, globalization, Bhopal India, Union Carbide, neoliberalism, transnational, contemporary English literature, industrial disaster, environmental studies
      PubDate: 2014-06-04
      Issue No: Vol. 34 (2014)
       
  • On the possibilities and limits of "DEAF DEAF SAME": Tourism and
           empowerment camps in Adamorobe (Ghana), Bangalore and Mumbai (India).

    • Authors: Michele Ilana Friedner, Annelies Kusters
      Abstract: This article qualitatively analyzes the ways that the discourse of "deaf universalism" circulates within two common deaf practices: tourism and engaging in interventions. Arguing that the largely Northern-situated discipline of Deaf Studies does not adequately examine how deaf bodies and discourses travel, ethnographic data compiled in India and Ghana during transnational encounters is employed to examine how claims of "sameness" and "difference" are enacted and negotiated. Similarly, this article examines how deaf individuals and groups deploy the concepts of deaf "heavens" and "hells" to analyze their travel experiences and justify interventions. We argue that deaf travelers and those engaging in interventions, mostly from Northern countries, employ teleological concepts that they attempt to impose on deaf "others." Adopting a critical approach, this article argues for the importance of carving out a space within Deaf Studies for allowing non-Northern concepts to come to the fore.Keywords: Deaf, Development, Universalism, Discourse, India, Ghana
      PubDate: 2014-06-04
      Issue No: Vol. 34 (2014)
       
  • “We are sick and we are stressed”: understanding the
           correlates of reported emotional distress in individuals with lupus

    • Authors: Elissa D. Giffords, Orly Calderon
      Abstract: This article examines needs and concerns of individuals with lupus and the correlates of self-reported emotional distress.  A survey tested the following hypotheses: Individuals with lupus report a high level of emotional distress that is associated with (1) their perceived levels of social support, (2) the self-reported frequency with which they require assistance in their daily living and (3) the amount of time from initial symptoms to diagnosis. 1,776 individuals participated.  More than 95% of the individuals are diagnosed with systematic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Multivariate analyses confirm individuals report a significant level of stress associated with the frequency of needing assistance in daily life.  The findings do not support a strong relationship between perceived social support and reported stress. Similarly, there was no strong association between reported stress and the length of time lapsed from initial symptoms to diagnosis. Implications for mental health practice are also discussed.   Keywords: lupus, stress, social support, assistance in daily life, emotional distress.
      PubDate: 2014-06-04
      Issue No: Vol. 34 (2014)
       
  • A Global Perspective of Violence Against Women with Disabilities:
           Evaluating the Response of Pastoral Care and Religious Organizations
           [WITHDRAWN]

    • Authors: Jamie S. Hussain
      Abstract: This article has been withdrawn at the request of the editor. (7/25/14) 
      PubDate: 2014-06-04
      Issue No: Vol. 34 (2014)
       
  • Employment Accommodations for People with Disabilities: Does Gender Really
           Matter?

    • Authors: Helen P Hartnett, Leslie Tower, Crystal Harper, Jessica Lech, Candice Rubin, Ann Hirsh
      Abstract: AbstractThe Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requires employersto provide reasonable accommodations for any qualified individual with adisability. By examining the ongoing evaluation data from the Job AccommodationNetwork (JAN), this study seeks to investigate whether or not genderdifferences are present in the reasonable accommodation process. Open andclosed-ended data are collected using a 20-minute structured telephoneinterview of JAN customers (n= 1,247; 44% response rate). The results show veryfew differences between men’s and women’s accommodation request types, whetheror not accommodations were granted, the costs of requested accommodations, andsatisfaction with JAN. A significant difference, however, was found by genderon the effectiveness of the accommodation.  Key Words: Accommodations, Disabilities, Gender, Employment, Social Work Practice
      PubDate: 2014-06-04
      Issue No: Vol. 34 (2014)
       
  • Scoping Review of the Americans with Disabilities Act: What Research
           Exists, and Where do we go from Here?

    • Authors: Sarah Parker Harris, Robert Gould, Patrick Ojok, Glenn Fujiura, Robin Jones, Avery Olmstead IV
      Abstract: A broad range of research on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) tracks its progress and impact. Much of the research is inconclusive or conflicting, creating a fragmented evidence base about the ADA’s effectiveness as a social policy. In response, academic researchers and disability organizations have called for an extensive review of the existing research. To address this fragmentation, the University of Washington has begun a five year project systematically reviewing the ADA research as part of the ADA Knowledge Translation Center at the University of Washington . This article reports results from year one of the project, the scoping review, that will assist in identifying a research plan to inform policy and practice.Keywords: ADA, systematic review, scoping review, policy analysis 
      PubDate: 2014-06-04
      Issue No: Vol. 34 (2014)
       
  • Miracle Madness

    • Authors: Allison Hedge Coke
      PubDate: 2014-06-04
      Issue No: Vol. 34 (2014)
       
  • Report from the Field: Follow Up

    • Authors: Linamara Rizzo Battistella, Vinicius Delgado Ramos
      PubDate: 2014-06-04
      Issue No: Vol. 34 (2014)
       
  • Scottish Disability Organizations and Online Media: A Path to Empowerment
           or “Business as Usual”?

    • Authors: Filippo Trevisan
      Abstract: Can online media help disabled people become more engaged in the organizations that represent their interests in the public arena? Using a combination of Web content analysis and qualitative interviews, this article investigates whether online communications are challenging traditional patterns of power distribution in Scottish disability organizations. Overall, empirical findings only partially matched expectations that member-led groups would be more inclined than ‘professionalized’ charities to embrace interactive online media. Although most groups acknowledged the Internet’s potential to empower disabled users, none of them deliberately pursued that outcome through their respective Web outlets. Instead, conservative views on the Internet prevailed across the entire organizational spectrum. Nonetheless, the analysis revealed also that such ‘minimalistic’ approach to online media was in fact underpinned by very different motives for disability non-profits on one side and self-advocacy groups on the other.
      PubDate: 2014-06-04
      Issue No: Vol. 34 (2014)
       
  • Exploring Issues of Disability in Children's Literature Discussions

    • Authors: Donna Sayers Adomat
      Abstract: In this qualitative study, the author uses the theoretical lens of disability studies to examine how children in two multiage classrooms examine issues of disability through conversations during read-aloud and literature circle discussions. In this study, the author looks at how children build positive understandings of disability from children’s literature but also how societal attitudes, beliefs, and stereotypes might play into their interpretations of literature. Student’s talk before, during, and after literature discussions was audio- and videorecorded. Several themes emerged from a discourse analysis of the transcriptions, including: defining disabilities, questioning and critiquing notions of normalcy; idealizing disabilities; identifying with characters; developing an advocacy stance; and using imagination to open up perspectives towards people in the real world. Through exploring characters in books, children not only learned about various disabilities, but they came to understand characters with disabilities as full and complex beings, similar in many ways to themselves. Keywords: children's literature, literature discussions, disability studies, elementary education, qualitative research
      PubDate: 2014-06-04
      Issue No: Vol. 34 (2014)
       
  • Non-Combatants and Other Peace Activists: “Everyday”
           disability in a time of war

    • Authors: Courtney Andree
      Abstract: While depictions of war-related disability would come to dominate the novels of male combatants in the decades following the First World War, congenital disability continued to be represented in the works of female novelists who were advocating peace. Even as the figure of the disabled veteran became hypervisible in Britain, civilians with disabilities frequently came to be overlooked where charitable aid, vocational training, and governmental assistance were concerned. We can chart a similar movement in the literature of the period, as representations of the war maimed came to eclipse "civilian" or congenital disability. In Rose Macaulay’s Non-Combatants and Others (1916) and Rose Allatini’s Despised and Rejected (1918), characters with physical disabilities become outspoken activists for the anti-war movement as they openly combat the illogic of the war and continue to labor as artists and intellectuals. Besides making these disabled bodies visible again, Allatini and Macaulay draw attention to what fitness means in sexual, intellectual, and physical terms, and encourage readers to consider what it means for the “unfit” to reject a war that has already rejected them. Keywords: First World War; Congenital disability; War disability; Women writers 
      PubDate: 2014-06-04
      Issue No: Vol. 34 (2014)
       
  • “How well one has to be, to be ill!”: Work, Pain, and the
           Discourse of Neurasthenia in The Diary of Alice James

    • Authors: Shawna Rushford-Spence
      Abstract: Neurasthenia, though no longer diagnosed today, was an illness that was commonly diagnosed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It was an umbrella category that encompassed all manner of somatic and psychosomatic ailments. In order to make this disease more palatable to the American public, Dr. George Miller Beard constructed an economic metaphor, in which people had certain amounts of “nerve-force” that could be saved or spent and, when overspent, could result in “nervous bankruptcy.” My essay analyzes The Diary of Alice James from a disability studies perspective in order to how Alice James uses this economic terminology rhetorically to reclaim her subjectivity, to characterize disability as central to identity, to disrupt the narrative of disability as global incapacity, and to configure pain (rather than illness itself) as work.Keywords: neurasthenia, "rest cure," invalid, discourse, nervous, nerve-force, and "nervous bankruptcy"
      PubDate: 2014-06-04
      Issue No: Vol. 34 (2014)
       
  • Refrigerator Mothers and Queer Little Boys: Bruno Bettelheim, Eugenics,
           and the De-Pathologization of Jewish Identity

    • Authors: griffin jaye epstein
      Abstract: Child psychologist and Nazi concentration camp survivor Bruno Bettelheim’s influential theories of autism reveal a startling connection between Jewish identity, the medicalization of disability, colonial eugenics and race-making practices over the 20th century in North America. Using Bettelheim’s life and work as a case-study, this paper explores Ashkenazi Jewish immigrant complicity in a whitened colonial landscape through the lens of Disability Studies. It asks the question: can we be more accountable to our disabled identities – and to those disabled people who have come before us – if we learn how our families, our identities, our very selves have been complicit in medicalization and violence? Keywords: madness, race, whiteness, Jewish identity, eugenics, psychiatry
      PubDate: 2014-06-04
      Issue No: Vol. 34 (2014)
       
  • Idiots Savants, Retarded Savants, Talented Aments, Mono-Savants, Autistic
           Savants, Just Plain Savants, People with Savant Syndrome, and Autistic
           People Who Are Good at Things: A View from Disability Studies

    • Authors: Joseph Straus
      Abstract: People with a particular profile of strengths and weaknesses—typically involving prodigious skill in one area (such as calendar or arithmetical calculation, art, or music) and a general “mental deficiency”—have long been categorized as “idiots savants,” or with other, similar labels.  It is the goal of this paper to dismantle this category in all of its terminological manifestations by deconstructing both the “idiocy” and the “savantism” that underpin it.  In its place, I focus instead on people with autism, who typically have special interests and activities they pursue intensively and skillfully: people identified as savants are mostly autistic, and autistic people usually have some sort of special interest or skill.  For the idiot savant, the savant skill is understood to emerge in spite of the general lack of intelligence.  For the autistic person, the special interests or skills arise not in spite of the autism but precisely because of it: autism enables the skill; the skill makes the autism visible.  Instead of enfreaking people as super-crips, I propose to celebrate them in a realistic mode, as autistic people who are good at things.Keywords: Idiot savant, savant syndrome, autism. 
      PubDate: 2014-06-04
      Issue No: Vol. 34 (2014)
       
 
 
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