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PACEsetterS
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     ISSN (Online) 1449-7700
     Published by Wolters Kluwer - Lippincott Williams and Wilkins Homepage  [287 journals]
  • COnNECT the Dots
    • Authors: JBI Evidence Review Team
      Abstract: image No abstract available
      Keywords: Information
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2012 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/01.JBI.0000419760.19833.ee
       
  • JBI World News
    • Abstract: image No abstract available
      Keywords: Information
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2012 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/01.JBI.0000419761.27456.28
       
  • Centers/Groups
    • Abstract: No abstract available
      Keywords: Information
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2012 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/01.JBI.0000419762.65574.c7
       
  • Initiation of Pre‐ and Post‐operative Feeding in
           Gastrointestinal Patients at the Royal Adelaide Hospital: A best practice
           implementation project
    • Authors: Clover; Emma
      Abstract: image Background: Gastrointestinal (GI) patients have a high risk of malnutrition. Evidence suggests pre-operative nutrition support in malnourished patients improves surgical outcomes. There is no advantage in keeping patients fasted after GI surgery, and early initiation of food intake or enteral feeding has been shown to be beneficial. Aims/Objectives: To improve initiation of pre- and post-operative nutrition support in GI patients at the Royal Adelaide Hospital in accordance with evidence-based recommendations. Methods: An organizational audit was conducted across three GI surgical units within the Center of Digestive Diseases using the Joanna Briggs Institute Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System (PACES) program. The Getting Research into Practice (GRIP) module was used to facilitate identification of barriers and implementation strategies. A follow-up audit was conducted to assess change in practice. Results: The baseline audit revealed two of three GI surgical units had successful protocols to facilitate best practice for post-operative nutrition support. Compliance with provision of oral supplements via nurses improved following the GRIP phase. The third surgical unit showed poor compliance with best practice which did not change following the GRIP phase. More time is required to assess whether strategies to improve pre-operative nutrition support in malnourished patients are successful. Conclusions: Two of three GI surgical units are achieving post-operative nutrition support in accordance with best practice guidelines. Attempts to implement change were unsuccessful with the third unit. Implementation strategies engaging nursing staff were successful. Additional positive outcomes from strategies implemented are expected to be seen in the longer term.
      Keywords: Evidence in Action: Peer Reviewed Article
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2012 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/01.JBI.0000419759.42703.67
       
  • Preoperative fasting times among emergency orthopedic patients in an acute
           hospital setting: A best practice implementation project
    • Authors: Sanchez; Kristian
      Abstract: image Background: There is a need to establish how long patients awaiting emergency surgery are currently being fasted for preoperatively, so that strategies can be explored to reduce preoperative fasting times. Aims: This project aims to establish how long emergency patient fast for, and set up a working party to discuss the reasons why emergency patients fast for an excessive amount of time. Method: Phase 1: Conduct a baseline audit and use the Practical Application of Clinical Evidence Systems (PACES) to measure the percentage compliance against specific audit criteria. Phase 2: Met with stakeholders and utilized the Getting Research into Practice (GRIP) program to assist with identifying barriers and recording strategies that were implemented. Phase 3: A post implementation audit was conducted using the same criteria as phase 1. Results: The majority of patients awaiting emergency theater fasted from midnight and for an excessive amount of time. There was a decrease in the amount of patients fasted from midnight on the follow-up audit, but patients continued to fast for an excessive amount of time. There was an increase in the number of nurses who received education on preoperative fasting on the follow-up audit, however, documented actions to prevent periods of prolonged fasting had low percentage compliance on the baseline audit with a slight improvement on the follow-up audit. Conclusion: This project has confirmed that patients awaiting emergency orthopedic surgery do fast for an excessive amount of time, and that barriers, although easily identified, are difficult to overcome. This project has not achieved all of its aims at this stage, but it has enabled discussion around the topic of preoperative fasting to take place that may lead to change in the future.
      Keywords: Evidence in Action: Peer Reviewed Article
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2012 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/01.JBI.0000419758.35080.0c
       
  • Implementation of best practice evidence in the nursing management of
           graduated compression stockings (GCS) in the prevention of venous
           thromboembolism in an adult surgical setting
    • Authors: Li; Goh Mien; Yuan, Tan Min; Qi, Goh Wei
      Abstract: image Problem: Graduated compression stockings (GCS) are commonly prescribed for surgical patients post-operatively in order to prevent deep vein thrombosis. The nurse's role and responsibility is to ensure that patients receive proper information and effective therapy in the nursing management of GCS. Significance: Proper monitoring of patients with GCS reduces complications such as skin abrasions, redness, and impaired blood circulations. Good knowledge of GCS among patients would help to achieve compliance to the therapy. Study design: This was a quality improvement study. A baseline and post-implementation audit was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the practice change. Sampling method: This study was conducted in two surgical units in a 935-bed acute care tertiary hospital. Surgical Patients are required to wear GCS post-operation and were included in the study. Before wearing the GCS, they received information about the stockings. Findings: The study revealed a lack of standard work process in the nursing management of patients wearing GCS. It was observed that nurses did not regularly monitor patients' neurovascular status or provide related patient education. An information leaflet about GCS was then developed in order to ensure that patients receive correct information. Conclusion: The study was successful; 80% of the patients received an information leaflet about GCS since the audit. They also received regular monitoring when wearing GCS. The nurses provided patient education using the GCS information leaflet.
      Keywords: Evidence in Action: Peer Reviewed Article
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2012 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/01.JBI.0000419757.35080.e8
       
  • Editorial
    • Authors: Jordan; Zoe
      Abstract: image No abstract available
      Keywords: Editorial
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2012 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/01.JBI.0000419747.18047.d4
       
  • Snapshots from Africa: Perspectives of Africans working in healthcare
    • Authors: de Almeida; Gavin
      Abstract: image No abstract available
      Keywords: News and Views: Feature
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2012 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/01.JBI.0000419748.18047.30
       
  • Questions for Dr. Frode Forland: The Royal Tropical Institute and The
           Collaboration for Evidence Based Healthcare in Africa: From Amsterdam to
           Africa: How one collaboration is bringing two worlds together
    • Authors: de Almeida; Gavin
      Abstract: image No abstract available
      Keywords: News and Views: Feature
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2012 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/01.JBI.0000419749.25671.eb
       
  • An examination of unintended pregnancy in low and middle income countries
    • Authors: de Almeida; Gavin
      Abstract: No abstract available
      Keywords: News and Views: Feature
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2012 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/01.JBI.0000419750.02800.ca
       
  • Q&A with Professor Morankar Sudhakar Director of the Malaria Alert Center
           in Ethiopia
    • Authors: de Almeida; Gavin
      Abstract: image No abstract available
      Keywords: News and Views: Feature
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2012 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/01.JBI.0000419751.10424.5e
       
  • Interview with Dr. Helen Cox, Médecins Sans Frontières: New
           frontiers in African health: Dr. Helen Cox talks about her experiences
           working for Medecins Sans Frontieres across Africa
    • Authors: de Almeida; Gavin
      Abstract: image No abstract available
      Keywords: News and Views
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2012 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/01.JBI.0000419752.04586.51
       
  • RE: Members
    • Abstract: image No abstract available
      Keywords: News and Views
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2012 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/01.JBI.0000419753.12209.9e
       
  • Recommended Practice: Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
    • Authors: Schneller; Lea-Ellen
      Abstract: image No abstract available
      Keywords: Evidence in Action
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2012 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/01.JBI.0000419754.12209.50
       
  • Recommended Practice: Epilepsy and Seizures
    • Authors: Bentley; Ava
      Abstract: image No abstract available
      Keywords: Evidence in Action
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2012 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/01.JBI.0000419755.89338.4b
       
  • Hand hygiene adherence among healthcare providers working in radiation
           therapy center: A quality improvement project
    • Authors: Chai; Chuen Fun; Chow, Ying Leng
      Abstract: image Background: Good hand hygiene is a crucial measure for preventing the spread of antimicrobial resistance and healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs). The factors contributing to the rise of HCAIs in patients with cancer may include an increase in antimicrobial resistance and the treatment effects of radiation and chemotherapeutic agents. Infection control and prevention practices such as proper hand hygiene practice could decrease infection rates among patients with cancer. Hence, in order to minimize cross-transmission of HCAIs, it is essential that healthcare providers working in the radiation therapy center practice proper hand hygiene technique. Aims: This project aimed to improve adherence of hand hygiene practices among healthcare providers working in a radiation therapy center using the six steps hand hygiene techniques together with the “My five moments for hand hygiene” concept. Methods: The team utilized the Joanna Briggs Institute Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System and Getting Research into Practice program to conduct pre- and post-implementation audit using evidence-based criteria, and implement the change. The project was implemented from July 2011 to November 2011, in three different phases. Results: The post-implementation results showed an improvement for all criteria except Criterion 5. Adherence rate for Criterion 2 showed a slight improvement of 28% (36% to 64%). There was a remarkable improvement of 73% (0 to 73%) in Criterion 3. Another remarkable improvement in adherence of 72% (10% to 82%) was observed for Criterion 4. Criterion 5 showed a 12% reduction in adherence (100% to 88%). Criteria 1 and 6 showed no change in adherence rate. Conclusion: The improvement of adherence in five out of the six criteria in hand hygiene could be attributed to teamwork and dedication of the project team. The team had also gained knowledge and skills in enhancing their leadership roles in conducting this project. Sustaining the outcomes is an ongoing challenge, and the team had come up with different strategies to maintain the positive outcomes.
      Keywords: Evidence in Action: Peer Reviewed Article
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jul 2012 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/01.JBI.0000419756.96961.15
       
 
 
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