for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help
Followed Journals
Journal you Follow: 0
 
Sign Up to follow journals, search in your chosen journals and, optionally, receive Email Alerts when new issues of your Followed Journals are published.
Already have an account? Sign In to see the journals you follow.
Journal Cover African Journal of Reproductive Health
  [SJR: 0.561]   [H-I: 29]   [5 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 1118-4841 - ISSN (Online) 2141-3606
   Published by African Journals Online Homepage  [265 journals]
  • Challenges for measuring progress towards the Sustainable Development
           Goals

    • Authors: Lindsay Edouard, Stan Bernstein
      Abstract: With the adoption, in September 2015, of the Sustainable Development Goals with a time horizon of 2030, there is a dire need to exploit avenues for the monitoring of progress towards meeting the targets pertaining to sexual and reproductive health, whether at global, regional, national or grassroots level. The current process for the selection of indicators, to complement the targets, provides an opportunity for a concerted effort to improve monitoring procedures and ensure their relevance for programme adjustment and accountability. It is imperative for national processes to ensure effective reporting besides linkages with related sectors.Keywords: Indicators; International development; Social sector; Global health; Gender
      PubDate: 2016-11-15
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 3 (2016)
       
  • Achieving health SDG 3 in Africa through NGO capacity building - insights
           from the Gates Foundation Investment in Partnership in Advocacy for Child
           and Family Health (PACFaH) Project

    • Authors: Judith-Ann Walker
      Abstract: As global impact investors gear up to support roll out of the Sustainable Development Goals in the developing world, African CSOs are urged to ensure that governments shift health funding sources away from aid and loans to innovative domestic funding sources which prioritize health. To do so, African CSOs require support to build their capacity for policy and budget advocacy. Governments and development partners have failed to invest in long term capacity building projects for indigenous NGOs and instead support INGOs to push the health advocacy agenda forward. In Nigeria, the Gates foundation has risen to the challenge of building capacity of indigenous NGOs for social accountability in child and family health. The 3 year pilot project - Partnership for Advocacy in Child and Family Health Project (PACFaH) mainstreams capacity building as an effective implementation strategy for 8 indigenous NGOs to deliver on - policy; budgetary; legislative; and administrative advocacy in four issue areas: 1) family planning; 2) nutrition; 3) routine immunization; and 4) reduction of under-5 deaths from diarrhea and pneumonia. This paper documents the achievements of the eight advocacy NGOs in PACFaH, at midterm and notes that while there have been challenges, working through capacity building as an implementation strategy has enabled the local groups in the delivery of evidence based advocacy.Keywords: SDGs, Aid localization, Child and Family Health, Gates Foundation, PACFaH
      PubDate: 2016-11-15
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 3 (2016)
       
  • Dependency of quality education for attaining the health-related
           Sustainable Development Goals in Africa

    • Authors: Peter A. Okebukola
      Abstract: No Abstract
      PubDate: 2016-11-15
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 3 (2016)
       
  • Achieving universal access to health care in Africa: the role of primary
           health care

    • Authors: Andrew G. Onokerhoraye
      Abstract: No Abstract
      PubDate: 2016-11-15
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 3 (2016)
       
  • Nutrition security and Sustainable Development Goals in Africa

    • Authors: Ramadhani A. Noor, Wafaie W. Fawzi
      Abstract: No Abstract
      PubDate: 2016-11-15
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 3 (2016)
       
  • From MDGs to SDGs: implications for maternal newborn health in Africa

    • Authors: Sarah M. Hodin, Jacquelyn M. Caglia, Martina Baye, Joannie Bewa, Peter Waiswa, Ana Langer
      Abstract: No Abstract
      PubDate: 2016-11-15
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 3 (2016)
       
  • The challenge of implementing the Sustainable Development goals in Africa:
           the way forward

    • Authors: Rotimi Jaiyesimi
      Abstract: No Abstract
      PubDate: 2016-11-15
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 3 (2016)
       
  • Editorial: Special edition on the implications of the Sustainable
           Development Goals for Africa’s development: editor’s choice

    • Authors: Friday Okonofua
      Abstract: No Abstract
      PubDate: 2016-11-15
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 3 (2016)
       
  • The imperative to expand provision, access and use of misoprostol for
           post-abortion care in sub-Saharan Africa

    • Authors: Andrzej Kulczycki
      Abstract: No Abstract
      PubDate: 2016-11-15
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 3 (2016)
       
  • Achieving the Sustainable Development Goals in Africa: call for a paradigm
           shift

    • Authors: Kole Shettima
      Abstract: No Abstract
      PubDate: 2016-11-15
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 3 (2016)
       
  • SDGs: the need for vital registration and accurate record keeping

    • Authors: Paul Feyi-Waboso
      Abstract: No Abstract
      PubDate: 2016-11-15
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 3 (2016)
       
  • Engendering the attainment of the SDG-3 in Africa: overcoming the socio
           cultural factors contributing to maternal mortality

    • Authors: Rosemary N. Ogu, Kingsley N. Agholor, Friday E. Okonofua
      Abstract: At the conclusion of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) provide an opportunity to ensure healthy lives, promote the social well-being of women and end preventable maternal death. However, inequities in health and avoidable health inequalities occasioned by adverse social, cultural and economic influences and policies are major determinants as to whether a woman can access evidence-based clinical and preventative interventions for reducing maternal mortality. This review discusses sociocultural influences that contribute to the high rate of maternal mortality in Nigeria, a country categorised as having made ―no progress‖ towards achieving MDG 5. We highlight the need for key interventions to mitigate the impact of negative sociocultural practices and social inequality that decrease women‘s access to evidence-based reproductive health services that lead to high rate of maternal mortality. Strategies to overcome identified negative sociocultural influences and ultimately galvanize efforts towards achieving one of the tenets of SDG-3 are recommended.Keywords: Maternal Mortality, Preventable maternal death, SGD, Cultural Factors, Respectful Maternal care, Nigeria
      PubDate: 2016-11-15
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 3 (2016)
       
  • Religion and labour force participation in Nigeria: is there any
           inequality among women?

    • Authors: Oluwagbemiga E. Adeyem, Kolawole E. Odusina, Akinwole E. Akintoye
      Abstract: This paper provides answers to the question on the effects of religion on female labour force participation in Nigeria, using trend analysis from three Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) and secondary data. The study reveals that female labour force participation in Nigeria increased from 39.3% in 1990 to 48.1% in 2011. The logistic models established that religion has a positive significant effect on female labour force participation indicators (P<0.0001). The relationship between working at home and Islam remains significant in all the three data sets (P<0.001) while it creates mixed reactions in all other religious groups. Engaging in unpaid work was significant with other Christian and Muslim women in all the three data sets even with the adjusted models except in 2013 alone for Catholic women. We conclude that increase in female labour force participation will emancipate women from the trap of poverty and give them a voice in decision making in Nigeria.Keywords: Inequality, women. Muslims, Education. Labour force
      PubDate: 2016-11-15
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 3 (2016)
       
  • Social Return on Investment (SROI): an innovative approach to Sustainable
           Development Goals for sexual and reproductive health programming in
           sub-Saharan Africa

    • Authors: Shubha R. Kumar, Aduragbemi Banke-Thomas
      Abstract: Despite efforts, sub-Saharan Africa did not achieve many key Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) targets under the Millennium Development Goals. In the post 2015 era, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) will frame decisions on donor priorities and resource allocations. Successfully addressing SRH challenges in sub-Saharan Africa have been blunted due to fragmentation of SRH interventions in planning and implementation, lack of coherence between policies and program implementation, resulting in poor program performance and lack of accountability. We suggest the Social Return on Investment (SROI) framework offers a strategic approach for sub-Saharan Africa in support of the implementation, monitoring and evaluation of SRH programs given its capacity to capture social and economic impacts, stakeholder participation, and sensitivity towards key human rights concerns relevant to SRH. SROI disrupts a ―business as usual‖ approach for one that is systematic, participatory, and supportive of economic and human rights needs for success in the SDG era.Keywords: Sustainable Development Goals; Social Return on Investment; SROI; Sexual and Reproductive Health; sub-Saharan Africa; Human Rights
      PubDate: 2016-11-15
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 3 (2016)
       
  • Factors associated with teen pregnancy in sub-Saharan Africa: a
           multi-country cross-sectional study

    • Authors: Clifford Odimegwu, Sibusiso Mkwananzi
      Abstract: This study aimed to assess the contextual factors associated with teenage pregnancy in sub-Saharan Africa. Using DHS data we modelled females aged 15-19 with multilevel logistic regression to establish the independent influence of social disadvantage on teenage pregnancy in West, East and Southern Africa with aid of the MLwiN programme. Results showed teenage pregnancy decreased in East Africa, plateaued in West Africa and increased slightly in Southern Africa between 1992 and 2011. Multilevel multivariate regression revealed teenage pregnancy was associated with family disruption (0.39; 0.40: P<0.05), community-levels of female unemployment (1.01; 0.99: P<0.05) and community poverty (1.01; 1.02: P<0.05) in Southern and East Africa, while only community poverty (1.01; P<0.05) independently predicted the outcome in West Africa. Our findings emphasise the necessity of creating regional-specific interventions and prevention campaigns to address multilevel factors such as family disruption as well as the need for governments to address issues of unemployment, poverty and inequality.Keywords: Teenage pregnancy, sub-Saharan Africa, multilevel modelling, family disruption, poverty, unemployment
      PubDate: 2016-11-15
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 3 (2016)
       
  • Trends in health facility births in sub-Saharan Africa: an analysis of
           lessons learned under the Millennium Development Goal framework

    • Authors: Ifeyinwa E. Udo, Henry V. Doctor
      Abstract: Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) has the highest maternal and under-5 mortality rates as well as low facility births, with a high percentage of births occurring in the absence of skilled personnel. We examine trends in health facility births in SSA by geographic areas (urban-rural) and regions; and also the correlation between health facility birth and neonatal mortality rate (NMR). Data come from Demographic and Health Surveys (27 countries), conducted between 1990 and 2014. Median health facility births, urban-rural gaps, and regional variations in health facility births between initial (1990) and latest (2014) surveys were calculated. The median health facility birth increased from 44% at initial survey to 57% at the latest survey. Rural areas had a higher percentage increase in health facility births between initial and latest surveys (16%) than urban areas (6%) with a 2% overall gap reduction between initial and latest surveys. Health facility births were inversely associated with NMR at initial (R2=0.20, p=0.019) and latest (R2=0.26, p=0.007) surveys. To achieve the Sustainable Development Goal target of reducing neonatal mortality, policies should particularly focus on bringing rural areas on par with urban areas.Keywords: Skilled birth attendants, maternal mortality, infant mortality, neonatal mortality, health facility birth
      PubDate: 2016-11-15
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 3 (2016)
       
  • Obstetric fistula: a narrative review of the literature on preventive
           interventions in sub-Saharan Africa

    • Authors: Eniya K. Lufumpa, Sarah Steele
      Abstract: Obstetric fistulas are childbearing injuries that present a major public health issue, especially in the developing context. This study brings together the literature on the causes of these injuries in sub-Saharan Africa, as well as suggested interventions aimed at its prevention. Furthermore, it also aims to identify gaps in the research that need to be addressed. A systematic search of PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and Scopus identified that extensive research has been carried out on the factors causing this injury, the main factors being complications during labour, three phases of delay, and culture. Nonetheless, there remains a dearth of literature detailing preventive measures. While few studies discussed preventive interventions that had been implemented, the literature does well to suggested preventive interventions. Suggested preventive measures target the community, as well as healthcare facilities. The literature also highlights the need for increased governmental support, as a means of preventing the development of fistulas. Using narrative review methods, we identify that the research focus remains primarily on the causes of obstetric fistula and ways of managing the injury, while paying less attention to means of preventing this injury. We therefore recommend further exploration of preventive measures. Keywords: Obstetric fistula, Prevention, Intervention, Sub-Saharan Africa, Maternal health
      PubDate: 2016-11-15
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 3 (2016)
       
  • Changing patterns of unmet needs for family planning among women of
           reproductive age in Nigeria

    • Authors: E.A. Bamgboye, I Ajayi
      Abstract: Unplanned pregnancy poses a major public health challenge to women of reproductive age in Nigeria and this has been hastened by poor use of modern family planning methods. This study employed secondary data analysis of the National HIV/AIDS and Reproductive Health Survey conducted in 2007 and 2012 to explore the the pattern of unmet needs for family planning and associated factors over the five year period. The total unmet needs were 9.1% in 2007 and increased to 11.4% in 2012. Identified predictors were locality, fear of side effects and geopolitical zones in both the 2007 and 2012 surveys though with some variations. The level of family planning use among married couples is still very low in Nigeria and there was a rise in the unmet need for family planning among women of reproductive age group over the 5 year period. Regional specific interventions as well as provider-client discussions about family planning can be key to sustained use of modern contraceptives in Nigerian women.Keywords: Unmet Need, Family Planning, Women of Reproductive Age group
      PubDate: 2016-11-15
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 3 (2016)
       
  • Exploratory study of the current status of the rights and welfare of
           Ghanaian women: taking stock and mapping gaps for new actions

    • Authors: Dan-Bright S. Dzorgbo, Sylvia Esther Gyan
      Abstract: This paper assesses the progress Ghanaian women have made in terms of rights and welfare in the last three decades or more when democratic politics was introduced in the country. It examines the legislative and policy environment that exist to combat all forms of discrimination against women and assesses women‟s rights and welfare on a number of indicators: women's rights to life, marriage, participation and representation in politics, access to justice, right to education, reproductive health, and sustainable development. The study revealed that there is a robust legislative and policy environment for pursuing women's issue in Ghana. There are constitutional and legal provisions and state institutions as well as a number of NGOs acting as duty bearers to combat all forms of discrimination against women. However, the evidence from these indicators, suggests that there is a gap between the legal and policy environment on the one hand and the rights and welfare of women on the other hand. Women in Ghana are still threatened by early and forced marriages, deficit in political participation, limited access to health services, and harmful traditional norms and cultural practices. We conclude that duty bearers such as the policymakers and other stakeholders need to scale-up their activities and programmes that advance the rights and social well-being of Ghanaian women.Keywords: Women, Ghana, women's right, women's welfare
      PubDate: 2016-11-15
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 3 (2016)
       
  • Service availability and readiness assessment of maternal, newborn and
           child health services at public health facilities in Madagascar

    • Authors: Sandrine H. Andriantsimietry, Raymond Rakotomanga, Jean Pierre Rakotovao, Eliane Ramiandrison, Marc Eric R. Razakariasy, Rachel Favero, Patricia Gomez, Blami Dao, Eva Bazant
      Abstract: The Service Availability and Readiness Assessment (SARA) survey was adapted and used to generate information on service availability and the readiness of maternal, newborn and child health facilities to provide basic health care interventions for obstetric care, neonatal and child health in Madagascar. The survey collected data from fifty-two public health facilities, ranging from university hospitals (CHU), referral district and regional hospitals (CHD/ CHRR) to basic health centres (CSB). For basic emergency obstetric and newborn care (BEmONC) readiness, on average, CHU had nine (71.8%), CHD/CHRR had eight and CSB had six out of the thirteen tracer items. Regarding the availability of the eleven tracer items for comprehensive CEmONC services, on average a CHU had nine ( 80.0%), a CHRR had eight (71.1%) and a CHD that is the only type of hospitals in rural area had three tracer items (30.0%). Tracer item availability results are low, indicating the need to strengthen supplies at basic health centers in order to improve the chances of success of Madagascar’s Roadmap for accelerating the reduction of the maternal and neonatal mortality 2015-2019, and meeting Sustainable Development Goals 3.1 and 3.Keywords: Madagascar, Maternal and Child health services, Service availability and readiness assessment, Public health facilities
      PubDate: 2016-11-15
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 3 (2016)
       
  • Reducing maternal mortality by strengthening community maternal support
           systems: findings from a qualitative baseline study in northern Nigeria

    • Authors: Ekechi Okereke, Susan B. Aradeon, Ibrahim Yisa
      Abstract: The “three delays model” illustrates how issues around obstetric emergency can lead to maternal deaths. This study applied in-depth interviews of key community gatekeepers in 16 rural communities across two states in northern Nigeria to evaluate the presence and functionality of key community maternal support systems for reducing maternal mortality. Findings show that only one out of the 16 communities had all the key support systems. Five rural communities reported that pregnant women have standing permission to visit health facilities during obstetric emergencies. A quarter of the communities reported the presence of transport for maternal emergencies. One rural community each reported the existence of community savings for obstetric emergencies and the presence of blood donor groups. Establishing and/or strengthening community support systems, ensuring citizens are well-informed about maternal danger signs and preparing for safe pregnancies can enable communities overcome the delays and reduce maternal mortality especially in low resource settings.Keywords: Community maternal support systems, ''three delays‟, maternal mortality, Northern Nigeria
      PubDate: 2016-11-15
      Issue No: Vol. 20, No. 3 (2016)
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
Home (Search)
Subjects A-Z
Publishers A-Z
Customise
APIs
Your IP address: 54.211.11.50
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-2016