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Journal Cover Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology
   Journal TOC RSS feeds Export to Zotero [3 followers]  Follow    
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     ISSN (Print) 0973-6883
     Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2563 journals]
  • Future of therapy for Hepatitis C in India: A Matter of Accessibility and
           Affordability'
    • Authors: Radha K. Dhiman
      Pages: 85 - 86
      Abstract: An estimated 170–185 million people (about 3% of the world's population) are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). Untreated chronic hepatitis C increases the risk of cirrhosis of liver, liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma. Chronic hepatitis C is also the most common cause for liver transplantation and liver related death in USA, which has recently eclipsed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection as a cause of death.1 Globally, HCV is implicated in 28% of cases of liver cirrhosis and 26% of cases of hepatocellular carcinoma, which accounts for almost 500,000 deaths per year.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology 4, 2 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-06
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.06.011
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 2 (2014)
       
  • The New INASL President: Brilliant and Effective
    • Authors: A.K. Jain
      Pages: 87 - 88
      Abstract: Vinod K. Dixit MD (Medicine) DM (Gastroenterology) Department of Gastroenterology, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh 221005, India
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology 4, 2 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-06
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.05.008
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 2 (2014)
       
  • Covert Hepatic Encephalopathy: Does the Mini-Mental State Examination
           Help'
    • Authors: Michela Corrias; Matteo Turco, Michele D. Rui, Angelo Gatta, Paolo Angeli, Carlo Merkel, Piero Amodio, Sami Schiff, Sara Montagnese
      Pages: 89 - 93
      Abstract: The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) has been utilized for the diagnosis of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). However, its threshold of abnormality has not been formally tested in patients with cirrhosis and its diagnostic/prognostic validity remains unknown. The aim of this study was to assess it in a large group of well-characterized outpatients with cirrhosis and no overt HE.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology 4, 2 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-01-06
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2013.12.005
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 2 (2014)
       
  • Metadoxine Versus Placebo for the Treatment of Non-alcoholic
           Steatohepatitis: A Randomized Controlled Trial
    • Authors: Kotacherry T. Shenoy; Leena K. Balakumaran, Philip Mathew, Mohan Prasad, Boddu Prabhakar, Ajit Sood, Shivaram P. Singh, Nagaraj P. Rao, Shoukat A. Zargar, Angelo A. Bignamini
      Pages: 94 - 100
      Abstract: The study aimed at assessing the therapeutic efficacy and safety of metadoxine versus placebo on the ultrasonographic and histological features of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH).
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology 4, 2 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-03-31
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.03.041
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 2 (2014)
       
  • Clinical Profile and Response to Treatment with Pegylated Interferon
           α 2b and Ribavirin in Chronic Hepatitis C—A Reappraisal
           from a Tertiary Care Center in Northern India
    • Authors: Vinod K. Dixit; Jayanta K. Ghosh, Sangey C. Lamtha, Pankaj Kaushik, Sundeep K. Goyal, Manas K. Behera, Neha Singh, Ashok K. Jain
      Pages: 101 - 105
      Abstract: To assess the clinical profile of 80 chronic hepatitis C patients in a tertiary health care center in Northern India and also to study the efficacy and tolerability of pegylated interferon (Peg-IFN) α 2b and ribavirin therapy in a cohort of chronic hepatitis C patients.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology 4, 2 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-06-18
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.05.012
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 2 (2014)
       
  • Consensus Statement of HCV Task Force of the Indian National Association
           for Study of the Liver (INASL). Part I: Status Report of HCV Infection in
           India
    • Authors: Pankaj Puri; Anil C. Anand, Vivek A. Saraswat, Subrat K. Acharya, Radha K. Dhiman, Rakesh Aggarwal, Shivram P. Singh, Deepak Amarapurkar, Anil Arora, Mohinish Chhabra, Kamal Chetri, Gourdas Choudhuri, Vinod K. Dixit, Ajay Duseja, Ajay K. Jain, Dharmesh Kapoorz, Premashis Kar, Abraham Koshy, Ashish Kumar, Kaushal Madan, Sri P. Misra, Mohan V.G. Prasad, Aabha Nagral, Amarendra S. Puri, R. Jeyamani, Sanjiv Saigal, Shiv K. Sarin, Samir Shah, P.K. Sharma, Ajit Sood, Sandeep Thareja, Manav Wadhawan
      Pages: 106 - 116
      Abstract: Globally, around 150 million people are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). India contributes a large proportion of this HCV burden. The prevalence of HCV infection in India is estimated at between 0.5% and 1.5%. It is higher in the northeastern part, tribal populations and Punjab, areas which may represent HCV hotspots, and is lower in western and eastern parts of the country. The predominant modes of HCV transmission in India are blood transfusion and unsafe therapeutic injections. There is a need for large field studies to better understand HCV epidemiology and identify high-prevalence areas, and to identify and spread awareness about the modes of transmission of this infection in an attempt to prevent disease transmission.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology 4, 2 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-06-10
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.05.006
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 2 (2014)
       
  • Consensus Statement of HCV Task Force of the Indian National
           Association for Study of the Liver (INASL). Part II: INASL
           Recommendations for Management of HCV in India
    • Authors: Pankaj Puri; Anil C. Anand, Vivek A. Saraswat, Subrat K. Acharya, Shiv K. Sarin, Radha K. Dhiman, Rakesh Aggarwal, Shivaram P. Singh, Deepak Amarapurkar, Anil Arora, Mohinish Chhabra, Kamal Chetri, Gourdas Choudhuri, Vinod K. Dixit, Ajay Duseja, Ajay K. Jain, Dharmesh Kapoor, Premashis Kar, Abraham Koshy, Ashish Kumar, Kaushal Madan, Sri P. Misra, Mohan V.G. Prasad, Aabha Nagral, Amarendra S. Puri, R. Jeyamani, Sanjiv Saigal, Samir Shah, Praveen K. Sharma, Ajit Sood, Sandeep Thareja, Manav Wadhawan
      Pages: 117 - 140
      Abstract: The estimated prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in India is between 0.5 and 1.5% with hotspots showing much higher prevalence in some areas of northeast India, in some tribal populations and in certain parts of Punjab. Genotype 3 is the most prevalent type of infection. Recent years have seen development of a large number of new molecules that are revolutionizing the treatment of hepatitis C. Some of the new directly acting agents (DAAs) like sofosbuvir have been called game-changers because they offer the prospect of interferon-free regimens for the treatment of HCV infection.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology 4, 2 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-06-23
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.06.001
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 2 (2014)
       
  • Pregnancy with Portal Hypertension
    • Authors: Neelam Aggarwal; Neha Negi, Aakash Aggarwal, Vijay Bodh, Radha K. Dhiman
      Pages: 163 - 171
      Abstract: Even though pregnancy is rare with cirrhosis and advanced liver disease, but it may co-exist in the setting of non-cirrhotic portal hypertension as liver function is preserved but whenever encountered together is a complex clinical dilemma. Pregnancy in a patient with portal hypertension presents a special challenge to the obstetrician as so-called physiological hemodynamic changes associated with pregnancy, needed for meeting demands of the growing fetus, worsen the portal hypertension thereby putting mother at risk of potentially life-threatening complications like variceal hemorrhage.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology 4, 2 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-06-23
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.05.014
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 2 (2014)
       
  • Patient with Liver Cirrhosis and Hemorrhagic Ascites
    • Authors: Mukesh Rathor; Anupam Lal, Radha K. Dhiman
      First page: 178
      Abstract: A 54-year-old male presented with progressive abdominal distension and loss of appetite for 2 months. Prior to being admitted at this institute, patient got evaluated for abdominal distension at a local hospital. Diagnostic ascites aspiration was done, which was hemorrhagic. Ultrasound abdomen showed features suggestive of chronic liver disease. The patient had mild pallor. Abdomen was distended with no visible veins. Liver and spleen were not palpable. Moderate ascites was present. His hemoglobin was 8.6 g/dL, total leukocyte count was 8800/mm3, and platelet count was 313 × 103/mm3.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology 4, 2 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-06-20
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.06.002
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 2 (2014)
       
  • Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 3: Hope for Nonresponders and Patients With
           Cirrhosis
    • Authors: Shalimar
      Pages: 179 - 181
      Abstract: Zeuzem S, Dusheiko GM, Salupere R, Mangia A, Flisiak R, Hyland RH, Illeperuma A, Svarovskaia E, Brainard DM, Symonds WT, Subramanian GM, McHutchison JG, Weiland O, Reesink HW, Ferenci P, Hézode C, Esteban R; the VALENCE Investigators. Sofosbuvir and Ribavirin in HCV Genotypes 2 and 3. N Engl J Med. 2014 May 4 [Epub ahead of print].
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology 4, 2 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-06-10
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.05.009
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 2 (2014)
       
  • Hepatobiliary Quiz—10 (2014)
    • Authors: Swastik Agrawal; Radha K. Dhiman
      Pages: 182 - 183
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology 4, 2 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-06-15
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.05.010
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 2 (2014)
       
  • Hepatobiliary Quiz—10 (2014)
    • Authors: Swastik Agrawal; Radha K. Dhiman
      Pages: 184 - 187
      Abstract: Progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis (PIC), benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis (BRIC), intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) and certain drug induced cholestasis are genetically determined disease due to mutations of genes encoding proteins responsible for bile transport from hepatocyte to canaliculi. PFIC is the most severe disease in this spectrum, and results from complete or almost complete absence of functional transporter proteins while the other conditions are associated with milder reduction in functional transporter activity.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology 4, 2 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-06-16
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.05.011
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 2 (2014)
       
  • Spontaneous Rupture of Hepatocellular Carcinoma
    • Authors: Mukesh Rathor; Anupam Lal, Radha K. Dhiman
      Pages: 188 - 189
      Abstract: A contrast enhanced computer tomography (CECT) abdomen of the patient showed hepatomegaly with nodular irregular liver margins. A 15.5 × 10.5 cm large exophytic heterogeneously attenuating mass seen arising from segment VI/VII with extension into the subphrenic space. Multiple right hepatic artery branches were supplying it. There was a breech in the lateral margin of the superior part of this mass lesion suggestive of rupture (Figures 1B and 2B).
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology 4, 2 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-06-20
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.06.003
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 2 (2014)
       
  • Neuroinflammation in Hepatic Encephalopathy: Mechanistic Aspects
    • Authors: Arumugam R. Jayakumar; Kakulavarapu V. Rama Rao, Michael D. Norenberg
      Abstract: Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is a major neurological complication of severe liver disease that presents in acute and chronic forms. While elevated brain ammonia level is known to be a major etiological factor in this disorder, recent studies have shown a significant role of neuroinflammation in the pathogenesis of both acute and chronic HE. This review summarizes the involvement of ammonia in the activation of microglia, as well as the means by which ammonia triggers inflammatory responses in these cells.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-08-05
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.07.006
       
  • Clinical Neurophysiology of Hepatic Encephalopathy
    • Authors: Piero Amodio; Sara Montagnese
      Abstract: Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) has relevant impact on the quality of life of patients and their caregivers and causes relevant costs because of hospitalizations and work days lost. Its quantification is important to perform adequate clinical trials on this relevant complication of cirrhosis and portal-systemic shunting. Clinical neurophysiology, which detects functional alterations of the nervous system, has been applied to the study of HE for over 60 years. This review aims at summarizing and clarifying the role of neurophysiologic techniques in the study of HE.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-08-03
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.06.007
       
  • Diagnosis of Minimal Hepatic Encephalopathy
    • Authors: Karin Weissenborn
      Abstract: Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (mHE) has significant impact upon a liver patient's daily living and health related quality of life. Therefore a majority of clinicians agree that mHE should be diagnosed and treated. The optimal means for diagnosing mHE, however, is controversial. This paper describes the currently most frequently used methods—EEG, critical flicker frequency, Continuous Reaction time Test, Inhibitory Control Test, computerized test batteries such as the Cognitive Drug Research test battery, the psychometric hepatic encephalopathy score (PHES) and the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS)—and their pros and cons.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-07-31
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.06.005
       
  • Idiopathic Non-Cirrhotic Intrahepatic Portal Hypertension
           (NCIPH)—Newer Insights into Pathogenesis and Emerging Newer
           Treatment Options
    • Authors: Ashish Goel; Joshua E. Elias, Chundamannil E. Eapen, Banumathi Ramakrishna, Elwyn Elias
      Abstract: Chronic microangiopathy of portal venules results in idiopathic non-cirrhotic intrahepatic portal hypertension (NCIPH). Recent data suggest a role for vasoactive factors of portal venous origin in the pathogenesis of this ‘pure’ vasculopathy of the liver. Enteropathies (often silent), are an important ‘driver’ of this disease. NCIPH is under-recognized and often mis-labeled as cryptogenic cirrhosis. Liver biopsy is needed to prove the diagnosis of NCIPH. In these patients, with advancing disease and increased porto-systemic shunting, the portal venous vasoactive factors bypass the liver filter and contribute to the development of pulmonary vascular endothelial disorders—porto-pulmonary hypertension and hepato-pulmonary syndrome as well as mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-07-28
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.07.005
       
  • Hepatitis C Virus Treatment in the ‘Real-World’: How Well Do
           ‘Real’ Patients Respond'
    • Authors: N. Deborah Friedman; Joanne H. Green, Hanna M. Weber, Shiny Stephen, Stephen E. Lane, Alvin Y. Ting, Jonathan P. Watson
      Abstract: Published clinical trials of the treatment of HCV are largely multicentre prospective pharmaceutical trials. Patients in clinical trials tend to have more favorable outcomes than patients in the ‘real-world’, due to strict patient selection and differences in treatment conditions and available resources.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-07-25
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.07.003
       
  • Infections After Orthotopic Liver Transplantation
    • Authors: Mark Pedersen; Anil Seetharam
      Abstract: Opportunistic infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality after orthotopic liver transplantation. Systemic immunosuppression renders the liver recipient susceptible to de novo infection with bacteria, viruses and fungi post-transplantation as well to reactivation of pre-existing, latent disease. Pathogens are also transmissible via the donor organ. The time from transplantation and degree of immunosuppression may guide the differential diagnosis of potential infectious agents. However, typical systemic signs and symptoms of infection are often absent or blunted after transplant and a high index of suspicion is needed.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-07-24
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.07.004
       
  • Current Practices in Management of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in India:
           Results of an Online Survey
    • Authors: Ashish Kumar
      Abstract: Prior to INASL guidelines, there were no Indian guidelines for management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in India. The guidelines given by other societies like AASLD, EASL etc are not uniform and not tailored for Indian patients. Hence management practices for HCC in India largely depended on physicians' individual preferences. This survey aimed to study current practices in management of HCC in India.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-07-23
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.07.001
       
  • Nodule in Liver: Investigations, Differential Diagnosis and Follow-up
    • Authors: Nagaraja Rao Padaki
      Abstract: Conventional ultrasonogram of the abdomen being noninvasive, inexpensive and ubiquitously available is the first imaging modality that raises suspicion of HCC in a patient with chronic liver disease with or without cirrhosis. The lesions in liver particularly nodule are being recognized with increased frequency with the wide spread use of ultrasonogram as the initial investigation and computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging subsequently. Any nodule in a cirrhotic liver should be considered as hepatocellular carcinoma until otherwise proved.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-07-22
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.06.010
       
  • Radiological Features of Hepatocellular Carcinoma
    • Authors: Samir Shah; Akash Shukla, Bhawan Paunipagar
      Abstract: Present article is a review of radiological features of hepatocellular carcinoma on various imaging modalities. With the advancement in imaging techniques, biopsy is rarely needed for diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), unlike other malignancies. Imaging is useful not only for diagnosis but also for surveillance, therapy and assessing response to treatment. The classical and the atypical radiological features of HCC have been described.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-07-19
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.06.009
       
  • Role of External Beam Radiation Therapy in Management of Hepatocellular
           Carcinoma
    • Authors: Hanish Sharma
      Abstract: Diagnosis at advanced disease stage and early vascular invasion are the bane of majority of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in India. The currently standardized curative and palliative treatment modalities [surgery, ablative techniques, trans-catheter chemotherapy, systemic chemotherapy] are suboptimal for a significant proportion of disease stages. Interest in radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma has seen a resurgence with revolutionary improvements in targeting radiation doses safely.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-07-18
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.05.002
       
  • Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy: Role of Ammonia and Systemic
           Inflammation
    • Authors: Dominic R. Aldridge; Edward J. Tranah, Debbie L. Shawcross
      Abstract: The syndrome we refer to as Hepatic Encephalopathy (HE) was first characterized by a team of Nobel Prize winning physiologists led by Pavlov and Nencki at the Imperial Institute of Experimental Medicine in Russia in the 1890's. This focused upon the key observation that performing a portocaval shunt, which bypassed nitrogen-rich blood away from the liver, induced elevated blood and brain ammonia concentrations in association with profound neurobehavioral changes. There exists however a spectrum of metabolic encephalopathies attributable to a variety (or even absence) of liver hepatocellular dysfunctions and it is this spectrum rather than a single disease entity that has come to be defined as HE.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-06-30
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.06.004
       
  • Hepatic Encephalopathy and Sleepiness: An Interesting Connection'
    • Authors: Sara Montagnese; Matteo Turco, Piero Amodio
      Abstract: Sleep-wake abnormalities in patients with cirrhosis have been traditionally associated with hepatic encephalopathy (HE). In recent years, a certain amount of work has been devoted to the study of this relationship. This has lead to a modified picture, with weakening of the association between HE and poor night sleep, and the emergence of stronger links between HE and excessive daytime sleepiness. This brief review focuses on the evidence in favor of the interpretation of HE as a sleepiness syndrome, and on the diagnostic, therapeutic and social implications of such an interpretation.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-06-29
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.06.006
       
  • Designing Immune Therapy for Chronic Hepatitis B
    • Authors: Sheikh Mohammad Fazle Akbar; Mamun Al-Mahtab, Yoichi Hiasa
      Abstract: Presently-available antiviral drugs may not be a satisfactory option for treatment of patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB). In spite of presence of several antiviral drugs, sustained off-treatment clinical responses are not common in CHB patients treated with antiviral drugs. In addition, antiviral drug treatment may have limited effects on blocking the progression of HBV-related complications. However, substantial long-term risk of viral resistance and drug toxicity are related with maintenance antiviral therapy in CHB patients with presently-available antiviral agents.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-06-26
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.06.008
       
  • Role of Mycophenolate Mofetil for the Treatment of Autoimmune
           Hepatitis—An Observational Study
    • Authors: Dinesh Jothimani; Mathew E. Cramp, Tim J.S. Cross
      Abstract: Eighty percent (80%) of patients with Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) respond to a combination of prednisolone and Azathioprine (AZA). Choice of treatment is limited for those who do not respond to this standard therapy. We evaluated the role of Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) as a second line therapy in AIH.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-06-24
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.05.003
       
  • Treatment Response Evaluation and Follow-up in Hepatocellular Carcinoma
    • Authors: Anil Arora; Ashish Kumar
      Abstract: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the major causes of morbidity, mortality and healthcare expenditure in patients with chronic liver disease. The management of HCC is evolving because of recently introduced novel therapeutic approaches. Optimal outcome requires an early and accurate assessment of tumor response to therapy. Current imaging modalities, such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging; provide reliable and reproducible anatomical data in order to demonstrate tumor burden changes.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-06-23
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.05.005
       
  • Epidemiology of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in India
    • Authors: Subrat K. Acharya
      Abstract: Indian data on epidemiology of HCC is not available. Cancer is not a reportable disease in India and the cancer registries in India are mostly urban. National cancer registry program of the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR) has been recently expanded to include 21 population based and 6 hospital based cancer registries. The last published registry data by ICMR available in the cancer registry website (www.ncrpindia.org) was in 2008 which provides information on various cancers from 2006 to 2008.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-06-20
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.05.013
       
  • A Tribute to a Dear Colleague
    • Authors: Roger F. Butterworth
      Abstract: It was with great sadness that we learned that Joan (Juan) Cordoba, a dear colleague and friend had passed away. Born in Barcelona, Juan was quintessentially Spanish and a proud Catalan. He was the eldest of five children. Armed with his MD degree (cum laude in all subjects) from The University of Barcelona in 1987, Juan trained with the best on both sides of the Atlantic but it was the time he spent with Dr Andy Blei at North Western University in Chicago that fostered what was to become a career-long interest in hepatic encephalopathy (HE).
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-06-20
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.05.001
       
  • Approach to Clinical Syndrome of Jaundice and Encephalopathy in Tropics
    • Authors: Anil C. Anand; Hitendra K. Garg
      Abstract: A large number of patients present with jaundice and encephalopathy in tropical country like India and acute liver failure is the usual cause. Clinical presentation like ALF is also a complication of many tropical infections, and these conditions may mimic ALF but may have subtle differences from ALF. Moreover, what hepatologists see as acute liver failure in tropics is different from what is commonly described in Western Textbooks. Paracetamol overdose, which is possibly the commonest cause of ALF in UK and USA, is hardly ever seen in India.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-06-07
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.05.007
       
  • Treatment Algorithms for Managing Hepatocellular Carcinoma
    • Authors: Vivek A. Saraswat; Gaurav Pandey, Sachin Shetty
      Abstract: Early diagnosis and aggressive therapy improves outcome in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Several potentially curative as well as palliative treatment options are available for patients. The choice of therapy is influenced by factors such as extent of tumor and severity of underlying liver dysfunction as well as availability of resources and of expertise. A systematic, algorithmic approach would ensure optimal therapy for each patient and is likely to improve outcomes. Even after receiving therapy for HCC, patients remain at risk for recurrent HCC as well as progression of underlying cirrhosis.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-06-05
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.05.004
       
  • Staging of Hepatocellular Carcinoma
    • Authors: Ajay Duseja
      Abstract: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is different from other malignancies because the prognosis in HCC is not only dependent upon the tumor stage but also on the liver function impairment due to accompanying cirrhosis liver. Various other staging systems used in HCC include the European systems [French staging system, Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) staging system and the cancer of the liver Italian program (CLIP)] and Asian systems [Okuda staging system, Japan integrated Staging (JIS), Tokyo score and Chinese University Prognostic Index (CUPI)].
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-06-05
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.03.045
       
  • Role of Surveillance in Prevention of Hepatocellular Carcinoma
    • Authors: Dipanjan Panda
      Abstract: Hepatocellular carcinoma is a common malignancy and one of the important public health problems in India. The surveillance of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an established approach to detect early cancers in patients with defined risks. However, there are still controversies and issues to be addressed regarding the optimal surveillance methods sand interval. The current level of awareness among physicians in India about surveillance is low and the need and most cost effective surveillance strategy in developing country like ours is unclear.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-05-25
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.03.044
       
  • Role of Transcatheter Intra-arterial Therapies in Hepatocellular Carcinoma
    • Authors: Shashi Bala Paul; Hanish Sharma
      Abstract: Transcatheter intra-arterial therapies play a vital role in treatment of HCC due to the unique tumor vasculature. Evolution of techniques and newer efficacious modalities of tumor destruction have made these techniques popular. Various types of intra-arterial therapeutic options are currently available. These constitute: bland embolization, trans-arterial chemotherapy, trans-arterial chemo embolization with or without drug-eluting beads and trans-arterial radio embolization, which are elaborated in this review.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-05-23
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.03.048
       
  • The Indian National Association for Study of the Liver (INASL) Consensus
           on Prevention, Diagnosis and Management of Hepatocellular Carcinoma in
           India: The Puri Recommendations
    • Authors: Ashish Kumar; Subrat K. Acharya, Shivaram P. Singh, Vivek A. Saraswat, Anil Arora, Ajay Duseja, Mahesh K. Goenka, Deepali Jain, Premashish Kar, Manoj Kumar, Vinay Kumaran, Kunisshery M. Mohandas, Dipanjan Panda, Shashi B. Paul, Jeyamani Ramachandran, Hariharan Ramesh, Padaki N. Rao, Samir R. Shah, Hanish Sharma, Ragesh B. Thandassery, (The INASL Task-Force on Hepatocellular Carcinoma)
      Abstract: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the major causes of morbidity, mortality and healthcare expenditure in patients with chronic liver disease. There are no consensus guidelines on diagnosis and management of HCC in India. The Indian National Association for Study of the Liver (INASL) set up a Task-Force on HCC in 2011, with a mandate to develop consensus guidelines for diagnosis and management of HCC, relevant to disease patterns and clinical practices in India. The Task-Force first identified various contentious issues on various aspects of HCC and these issues were allotted to individual members of the Task-Force who reviewed them in detail.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-05-21
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.04.003
       
  • Management of Overt Hepatic Encephalopathy
    • Authors: Praveen Sharma; Barjesh C. Sharma
      Abstract: Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) is an important complication of cirrhosis with significant morbidity and mortality. Management of HE primarily involves avoidance of precipitating factors and administration of various ammonia-lowering therapies such as non-absorbable disaccharides, antimicrobial agents like rifaximin and l-ornithine l-aspartate. The non-absorbable disaccharides which include lactulose and lactitol are considered the first-line therapy for the treatment of HE and in primary and secondary prophylaxis of HE.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-05-08
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.04.004
       
  • Surveillance for Hepatocellular Carcinoma
    • Authors: Jeyamani Ramachandran
      Abstract: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a dreaded complication of cirrhosis as it is the commonest cause of mortality in these patients .The last few years have seen a dramatic improvement in the management of this tumor as nearly 50–70% of selected patients with early HCC survive for a median period of up to 5 years after liver transplantation, resection or local ablation. Surveillance has been found to be an effective tool to detect early tumors and expand the applicability of these curative treatment options.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-21
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.03.050
       
  • Mesenteric Venous Thrombosis
    • Authors: Bashar Hmoud; Ashwani K. Singal, Patrick S. Kamath
      Abstract: Mesenteric vein thrombosis is increasingly recognized as a cause of mesenteric ischemia. Acute thrombosis commonly presents with abdominal pain and chronic type with features of portal hypertension. Contrast enhanced CT scan of abdomen is quite accurate for diagnosing and differentiating two types of mesenteric venous thrombosis. Prothrombotic state, hematological malignancy, and local abdominal inflammatory conditions are common predisposing conditions. Over the last decade, JAK-2 (janus kinase 2) mutation has emerged as an accurate biomarker for diagnosis of myeloproliferative neoplasm, an important cause for mesenteric venous thrombosis.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-11
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.03.052
       
  • Risk Factors for Hepatocellular Carcinoma in India
    • Authors: Premashis Kar
      Abstract: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is an important cause of death all over the world, more so in Asia and Africa. The representative data on epidemiology of HCC in India is very scanty and cancer is not a reportable disease in India and the cancer registries in India are mostly urban. 45 million people who are suffering from chronic Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and approximately 15 million people who are afflicted with chronic Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in India. HBV and HCV infection is considered an important etiologic factor in HCC.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-08
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.02.155
       
  • Terbinafine Induced Liver Injury: A Case Report
    • Authors: Narendra S. Choudhary; Hardik Kotecha, Neeraj Saraf, Dheeraj Gautam, Sanjiv Saigal
      Abstract: Drug induced liver injury (DILI) is a cause of significant morbidity; timely diagnosis is important and requires a high index of suspicion. Terbinafine induced liver injury is rare. We report a case of Terbinafine induced hepatitis-cholestatic injury. The patient had a prolonged recovery phase lasting 3 months after discontinuation of drug.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-03
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.03.040
       
  • Tissue Diagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma
    • Authors: Deepali Jain
      Abstract: The current American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) guideline provides strategies for achieving the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) based on the size of liver nodules seen on surveillance imaging. For lesions less than 1 cm in size, follow-up surveillance imaging is recommended. Lesions larger than 2 cm require typical radiological hallmark on dynamic imaging. Lesions of 1–2 cm in size require typical imaging features including intense uptake of contrast during arterial phases followed by decreased enhancement during portal venous phases on at least 2 imaging modalities.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.03.047
       
  • Role of Local Ablative Therapy in Hepatocellular Carcinoma
    • Authors: Ragesh Babu Thandassery; Usha Goenka, Mahesh Kumar Goenka
      Abstract: Percutaneous local ablation (PLA) techniques are currently considered as the best treatment option for patients with early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who are not candidates for surgical resection. They are safe, minimally invasive, efficacious and cost-effective. Radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is considered as the first line treatment in some centers, though most of the guidelines recommend it for small HCCs, where surgical resection is not feasible. In developing countries percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI) and percutaneous acetic acid injection (PAI) may be used instead of RFA.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.03.046
       
  • Role of Supportive Care for Terminal Stage Hepatocellular Carcinoma
    • Authors: Manoj Kumar; Dipanjan Panda
      Abstract: Patients with end stage or terminal HCC are those presenting with tumors leading to a very poor Performance Status (ECOG 3–4) or Child–Pugh C patients with tumors beyond the transplantation threshold. Among HCC patients, 15–20% present with end stage or terminal stage HCC. Their median survival is less than 3–4 months. The management of end stage or terminal HCC is only symptomatic and no definitive tumor directed treatment is indicated. Patients with end stage or terminal HCC should receive palliative support including management of pain, nutrition and psychological support.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-03-31
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.03.049
       
  • Decellularization and Cell Seeding of Whole Liver Biologic Scaffolds
           Composed of Extracellular Matrix
    • Authors: Denver M. Faulk; Justin D. Wildemann, Stephen F. Badylak
      Abstract: The definitive treatment for patients with end-stage liver disease is orthotropic transplantation. However, this option is limited by the disparity between the number of patients needing transplantation and the number of available livers. This issue is becoming more severe as the population ages and as the number of new cases of end-stage liver failure increases. Patients fortunate enough to receive a transplant are required to receive immunosuppressive therapy and must live with the associated morbidity.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-03-28
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.03.043
       
  • Management of Covert Hepatic Encephalopathy
    • Authors: Abhijeet Waghray; Nisheet Waghray, Kevin Mullen
      Abstract: Hepatic encephalopathy is a reversible progressive neuropsychiatric disorder that encompasses a wide clinical spectrum. Covert hepatic encephalopathy is defined as patients with minimal hepatic encephalopathy and Grade I encephalopathy by West-Haven Criteria. Terminology such as “sub-clinical”, “latent”, and “minimal” appear to trivialize the disease and have been replaced by the term covert. The lack of clinical signs means that covert hepatic encephalopathy is rarely recognized or treated outside of clinical trials with options for therapy based on patients with episodic hepatic encephalopathy.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-02-25
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.02.007
       
  • Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy and Brain Edema in Acute Liver
           Failure
    • Authors: Roger F. Butterworth
      Abstract: Neuropathologic investigations in acute liver failure (ALF) reveal significant alterations to neuroglia consisting of swelling of astrocytes leading to cytotoxic brain edema and intracranial hypertension as well as activation of microglia indicative of a central neuroinflammatory response. Increased arterial ammonia concentrations in patients with ALF are predictors of patients at risk for the development of brain herniation. Molecular and spectroscopic techniques in ALF reveal alterations in expression of an array of genes coding for neuroglial proteins involved in cell volume regulation and mitochondrial function as well as in the transport of neurotransmitter amino acids and in the synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokines.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-02-14
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.02.004
       
  • Protective Effects of Norursodeoxycholic Acid Versus Ursodeoxycholic Acid
           on Thioacetamide-induced Rat Liver Fibrosis
    • Authors: Vyacheslav U. Buko; Oxana Y. Lukivskaya, Elena E. Naruta, Elena B. Belonovskaya, Horst-Dietmar Tauschel
      Abstract: Effects of norursodeoxycholic acid (norUDCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) on liver fibrosis progression and liver fibrosis reversal in thioacetamide (TAA)-treated rats were studied.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-02-10
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.02.001
       
  • Role of Liver Transplantation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma
    • Authors: Vinay Kumaran
      Abstract: This review evaluates the available evidence to establish the role of liver transplantation in the management of hepatocellular carcinoma in India. Most liver transplants in India are living donor transplants due to the paucity of brain dead organ donors. There is sufficient evidence to permit allocation of organs to patients with tumors within the Milan criteria. If the waiting list time is more than 6 months, a down-staging locoregional treatment modality such a trans-arterial chemoembolization, radiofrequency ablation, resection or percutaneous ethanol injection may be used to prevent disease progression.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-01-09
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2014.01.002
       
  • Nutrition in the Management of Cirrhosis and its Neurological
           Complications
    • Authors: Chantal Bémeur; Roger F. Butterworth
      Pages: 141 - 150
      Abstract: Malnutrition is a common feature of chronic liver diseases that is often associated with a poor prognosis including worsening of clinical outcome, neuropsychiatric complications as well as outcome following liver transplantation. Nutritional assessment in patients with cirrhosis is challenging owing to confounding factors related to liver failure. The objectives of nutritional intervention in cirrhotic patients are the support of liver regeneration, the prevention or correction of specific nutritional deficiencies and the prevention and/or treatment of the complications of liver disease per se and of liver transplantation.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology 4, 2 (2014)
      PubDate: 2013-05-29
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2013.05.008
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 2 (2013)
       
  • Pregnancy-Related Liver Disorders
    • Authors: Ashish Goel; Kapil D. Jamwal, Anup Ramachandran, Kunissery A. Balasubramanian, Chundamannil E. Eapen
      Pages: 151 - 162
      Abstract: Pregnancy-related liver disorders accounted for 8% of all maternal deaths at our center from 1999 to 2011. Of the three pregnancy-related liver disorders (acute fatty liver of pregnancy (AFLP), HELLP (Hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets) syndrome and pre-eclamptic liver dysfunction, which can lead to adverse maternal and fetal outcome, AFLP is most typically under - diagnosed. Risk of maternal death can be minimised by timely recognition and early/aggressive multi-specialty management of these conditions.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology 4, 2 (2014)
      PubDate: 2013-03-18
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2013.03.220
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 2 (2013)
       
  • Melioidosis Presenting as Fever and Jaundice: A Rare Presentation
    • Authors: Pankaj Tyagi; Vinit Shah, Praveen Sharma, Naresh Bansal, Vikas Singla, Ashish Kumar, Anil Arora
      Pages: 172 - 174
      Abstract: Melioidosis caused by the environmental Gram-negative bacillus Burkholderia pseudomallei is endemic in northern Australia and Southeast Asia and is being described increasingly from south and west coastal regions of India. Melioidosis is known to have high mortality (14–50%) and the risk factors associated with it are diabetes mellitus and heavy alcohol abuse. Melioidosis primarily presents as pneumonia, genitourinary infection and bacteremia. We present a case of Melioidosis from North India, a 56-year-old diabetic male, presenting with fever and jaundice.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology 4, 2 (2014)
      PubDate: 2013-08-05
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2013.07.003
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 2 (2013)
       
  • Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) in Children Presenting as Liver
           Disease
    • Authors: Nomisha Amin; Ira Shah, Sushmita Bhatnagar
      Pages: 175 - 177
      Abstract: Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a rare acute hyperinflammatory condition presenting with high fever, pancytopenia, splenomegaly with the pathologic finding of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in bone marrow and other tissues. Predominant hepatic manifestations at presentation are rare. We report a series of three cases which showcase the spectrum of liver disease as presentation in hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology 4, 2 (2014)
      PubDate: 2013-06-24
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2013.06.003
      Issue No: Vol. 4, No. 2 (2013)
       
  • Portal Vein Thrombosis in Cirrhosis
    • Authors: Kaiser Raja; Mathew Jacob, Sonal Asthana
      Abstract: Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is being increasingly recognized in patients with advanced cirrhosis and in those undergoing liver transplantation. Reduced flow in the portal vein is probably responsible for clotting in the spleno-porto-mesenteric venous system. There is also increasing evidence that hypercoagulability occurs in advanced liver disease and contributes to the risk of PVT. Ultrasound based studies have reported a prevalence of PVT in 10–25% of cirrhotic patients without hepatocellular carcinoma.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2013)
      PubDate: 2013-12-09
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jceh.2013.12.003
       
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy in Hepatic Encephalopathy
    • Authors: Laia Chavarria; Juan Cordoba
      Abstract: Hepatic encephalopathy is a brain alteration associated to liver failure that produces cognitive impairments at long term. Neuroimaging are non-invasive methods for the study of the brain by means of spectroscopy and imaging techniques. These technologies give huge information about cerebral metabolism and water distribution to explore brain pathways involved in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. Furthermore, new magnetic resonance implementations such as voxel-based morphometry or resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging allow studying brain atrophy and neuronal connectivity of the cerebral network involved in the neurocognitive impairments observed in the patients.
      Citation: Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hepatology (2013)
      PubDate: 2013-10-28
       
 
 
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