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Journal Cover Journal of Christian Nursing
  [SJR: 0.113]   [H-I: 5]   [1 followers]  Follow
    
   Partially Free Journal Partially Free Journal
   ISSN (Print) 0743-2550 - ISSN (Online) 1931-7662
   Published by LWW Wolters Kluwer Homepage  [280 journals]
  • Significant Moments
    • Authors: Schoonover-Shoffner; Kathy
      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/CNJ.0000000000000329
       
  • NCF @ Work
    • Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/CNJ.0000000000000324
       
  • Etc.
    • Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Aging Gracefully
    • Authors: Dameron; Carrie M.
      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/CNJ.0000000000000317
       
  • Nursing in the Church
    • Authors: Hinton; Sharon T.
      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/CNJ.0000000000000320
       
  • Student TXT
    • Authors: De Haan; Julie; Friesen, Pamela K.
      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/CNJ.0000000000000316
       
  • Dying Healthy
    • Authors: Salladay; Susan A.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/CNJ.0000000000000319
       
  • Trauma-Informed Care: Helping Patients with a Painful Past
    • Authors: Koetting; Cathy
      Abstract: imageABSTRACT: Life trauma is highly correlated with an increased risk of mortality from chronic disease. Trauma-informed care (TIC) is an evidence-based approach to deliver healthcare in a way that recognizes and responds to the long-term health effects of the experience of trauma in patients' lives. Four essential features and six defining concepts delineate a TIC approach to healthcare. Nurses can realize the benefits and learn the tenets of TIC to deliver superior care to patients with chronic illness.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/CNJ.0000000000000315
       
  • Perceptions of Spirituality and Spiritual Care in Religious Nurses
    • Authors: Sanders; Lynne; Kopis, Sharon; Moen, Carolyn; Pobanz, Angela; Volk, Fred
      Abstract: imageABSTRACT: This study explored nurses' perceptions of how they provide spiritual care, the barriers to delivering spiritual care, and the adequacy of their education and training on spiritual care. Past and current students from a faith-based university nursing program completed an online survey (N = 614). Participants reported varying definitions of spirituality and view spiritual care practices through a wide lens. The majority believed nurses do not receive sufficient spiritual education but reported they usually feel able to meet patients' spiritual needs. Time limitations were the most frequent obstacle to providing spiritual care.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/CNJ.0000000000000308
       
  • Spiritual Darkness: Reflections on a Medical Mission
    • Authors: Jimenez; Rosalinda Ramirez
      Abstract: imageABSTRACT: This is a reflective analysis on the lived experience of a medical mission in a third world country, where young women are abused and trafficked for sex. Practices of Scripture study, Lectio Divina, and contemplative prayer enabled me to deal with the spiritual darkness we encountered. Opening a dialogue with community members to view males and females in a different manner and battling alongside the local mission and ministers against sex trafficking, are not easy tasks. The perseverance found in the Bible gives us hope to be witnesses and healers in our broken world, and a small part in change that can take root with prayer.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/CNJ.0000000000000323
       
  • Improving Health Through Political Activism
    • Authors: Johnston; Donald; Landreneau, Kandace
      Abstract: imageABSTRACT: Nurse leaders have a moral and professional obligation to be aware of and influence policy to promote health at local to national levels. As nurse leaders and concerned local residents, the authors engaged in changing the influence of a sexually-oriented business that was impacting the psychosocial health of local citizenry, especially children. Learning city ordinances and state and federal laws was a precursor to change. Professionalism in action can successfully engage community leaders, create change, and support community health.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/CNJ.0000000000000314
       
  • Equipping African American Clergy to Recognize Depression
    • Authors: Anthony; Jean Spann; Morris, Edith; Collins, Charles W.; Watson, Albert; Williams, Jennifer E.; Ferguson, B'nai; Ruhlman, Deborah L.
      Abstract: imageABSTRACT: Many African Americans (AAs) use clergy as their primary source of help for depression, with few being referred to mental health providers. This study used face-to-face workshops to train AA clergy to recognize the symptoms and levels of severity of depression. A pretest/posttest format was used to test knowledge (N = 42) about depression symptoms. Results showed that the participation improved the clergy's ability to recognize depression symptoms. Faith community nurses can develop workshops for clergy to improve recognition and treatment of depression.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/CNJ.0000000000000322
       
  • Strategies for Providing Spiritual Care & Support to Nursing Students
    • Authors: Milner; Kerry A.; Foito, Kim; Watson, Sherylyn
      Abstract: imageABSTRACT: Nurse educators need to equip nursing students with suitable resources and education so they can develop their own spiritual care, as well as recognize spiritual care needs in patients. There is a paucity of literature on teaching strategies for spiritual care and prayer in undergraduate nursing programs. This article describes how one faith-based school implemented strategies to facilitate spiritual development in students, which are integrated throughout the curriculum and utilized in the U.S. and a study-abroad program in Ireland.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/CNJ.0000000000000309
       
  • Nursing in the Mercy Traditions: Engaging Students in the Life of
           Catherine McAuley
    • Authors: Kwasky; Andrea; Corrigan, Catherine
      Abstract: imageABSTRACT: The Institute of Medicine and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing advise that professional nursing education include development of a high level of cultural competency. A 10-day learning experience to Ireland for nursing students at the University of Detroit Mercy, an independent Catholic university, sponsored by the Sisters of Mercy and the Society of Jesus (Jesuit Fathers), helped them develop a philosophy of Mercy care and build cultural competence. Learning focused on the life of Catherine McAuley, Irish culture, spirituality, social justice, reflective thinking, and a value-centered professional education.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/CNJ.0000000000000311
       
  • Focus on Your Feelings
    • Authors: Mooney; Sharon Fish
      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/CNJ.0000000000000312
       
  • FAQs: How Do We Listen Deeply'
    • Authors: Sweat; Mary T.
      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/CNJ.0000000000000318
       
  • Purpose or Paycheck'
    • Authors: Hackney; Michele G.
      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/CNJ.0000000000000310
       
  • Surprised by Prayer
    • Authors: Patton; Cheryl
      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/CNJ.0000000000000321
       
  • Resources
    • Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/CNJ.0000000000000326
       
  • PulseBeats
    • Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/CNJ.0000000000000325
       
  • Model for a Healthy Work Environment
    • Authors: Blevins; Jamie
      Abstract: imageABSTRACT: The Healthy Work Environment (HWE) Model, considered a model of standards of professional behaviors, was created to help foster an environment that is happy, healthy, realistic, and feasible. The model focuses on areas of PEOPLE and PRACTICE, where each letter of these words identifies core, professional qualities and behaviors to foster an environment amenable and conducive to accountability for one's behavior and action. Each of these characteristics is supported from a Christian, biblical perspective. The HWE Model provides a mental and physical checklist of what is important in creating and sustaining a healthy work environment in education and practice.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/CNJ.0000000000000332
       
  • Discovering Their Needs: Southern Rural Women of East India
    • Authors: Wilson-Anderson; Kaye; Lee, Holly; Pinnock, Jessi; Sybrandt, Anne; White, Alissa
      Abstract: ABSTRACT: This qualitative, descriptive, phenomenological study explored how southern, rural women in India (N = 14) view health, how they learned about health, and what health education they desired. Health education classes were offered, based on participants' responses. Recommendations are offered for a best practice model that could potentially enhance the efforts of non-Indian nurses desiring to assist impoverished women and families in India.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/CNJ.0000000000000328
       
  • Trauma-Informed Care: Helping Patients with a Painful Past
    • Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/CNJ.0000000000000331
       
  • Equipping African American Clergy to Recognize Depression
    • Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Oct 2016 00:00:00 GMT-
      DOI: 10.1097/CNJ.0000000000000330
       
 
 
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