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Journal Cover Interventional Cardiology Clinics
  [SJR: 0.162]   [H-I: 2]   [1 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 2211-7458 - ISSN (Online) 2211-7466
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2970 journals]
  • Design Principles of Bioresorbable Polymeric Scaffolds
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 May 2016
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics
      Author(s): Mary Beth Kossuth, Laura E.L. Perkins, Richard J. Rapoza

      Teaser The concept for a bioresorbable vascular scaffold combines the best features of the first 3 generations of percutaneous coronary intervention (namely), balloon angioplasty, bare metallic stents, and drug-eluting stents, into a single device. The principles of operation of a BRS follow 3 phases of functionality that reflect the different physiologic requirements over time; revascularization, restoration, and resorption. Most BRS designs make use of the continuum of hydrolytic degradation in aliphatic polyesters, such as poly(l-lactide), in which molecular weight, strength, and mass decrease progressively in 3 distinct stages, consistent with the in vivo requirements of each performance phase.

      PubDate: 2016-05-22T08:13:43Z
       
  • Pathology of Endovascular Stents
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 May 2016
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics
      Author(s): Kenta Nakamura, John H. Keating, Elazer R. Edelman

      Teaser Contemporary endovascular stents are the product of an iterative design and development process that leverages evolving concepts in vascular biology and engineering. This article reviews how insights into vascular pathophysiology, materials science, and design mechanics drive stent design and explain modes of stent failure. Current knowledge of pathologic processes is providing a more complete picture of the factors mediating stent failure. Further evolution of endovascular stents includes bioresorbable platforms tailored to treat plaques acutely and to then disappear after lesion pacification. Ongoing refinement of stent technology will continue to require insights from pathology to understand adverse events, refine clinical protocols, and drive innovation.

      PubDate: 2016-05-22T08:13:43Z
       
  • Copyright
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 5, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2016-03-22T23:00:23Z
       
  • Contributors
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 5, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2016-03-22T23:00:23Z
       
  • Contents
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 5, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2016-03-22T23:00:23Z
       
  • Complex coronary intervention
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 5, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2016-03-22T23:00:23Z
       
  • Hemodynamic Support Devices for Complex Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 5, Issue 2
      Author(s): Basil Alkhatib, Laura Wolfe, Srihari S. Naidu

      Teaser High-risk percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) encompasses a growing portion of total PCIs performed and typically includes patients with high-risk clinical and anatomic characteristics. Such patients may represent not only a high-risk group for complications but also a group who may derive the most benefit from complete revascularization. Several hemodynamic support devices are available. Trial data, consensus documents, and guidelines currently recommend high-risk PCI aided by hemodynamic support devices, and this article discusses the patient populations who would benefit from such an approach, the available devices and strategies, and expected outcomes.

      PubDate: 2016-03-22T23:00:23Z
       
  • Interventional Cardiology Clinics
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 5, Issue 2
      Author(s): Matthew J. Price



      PubDate: 2016-03-22T23:00:23Z
       
  • Antiplatelet Therapy in Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 February 2016
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics
      Author(s): Alexander C. Fanaroff, Sunil V. Rao

      Teaser Platelets play a key role in mediating stent thrombosis, which is the major cause of ischemic events immediately after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Antiplatelet therapy is therefore the cornerstone of antithrombotic therapy after PCI. However, the use of antiplatelet agents increases bleeding risk, with more potent antiplatelet agents further increasing bleeding risk. In the past 5 years, potent and fast-acting P2Y12 inhibitors have augmented the antiplatelet armamentarium available to interventional cardiologists. This article reviews the preclinical and clinical data surrounding these new agents, and discusses the significant questions and controversies that still exist regarding the optimal antiplatelet strategy.

      PubDate: 2016-02-16T17:44:56Z
       
  • The New Era of Interventional Cardiology: Tackling Complex Coronary
           Intervention
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 February 2016
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics
      Author(s): Michael S. Lee



      PubDate: 2016-02-16T17:44:56Z
       
  • Percutaneous Coronary Intervention for Bifurcation Lesions
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 February 2016
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics
      Author(s): Björn Redfors, Philippe Généreux

      Teaser This article summarizes treatment alternatives for coronary bifurcation lesions. It also reviews current definitions and classifications pertaining to bifurcation lesions and provides an overview of the impact of bifurcation lesions on clinical outcomes.

      PubDate: 2016-02-16T17:44:56Z
       
  • Acute Myocardial Infarction/Thrombectomy
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 February 2016
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics
      Author(s): Jonathan Soverow, Manish A. Parikh

      Teaser This article focuses on specialized techniques and devices used in the most challenging cases of acute myocardial infarction. Areas where high-quality evidence is either clear or absent are avoided. Controversies in the use of support or thrombectomy devices, the addition of adjunct pharmacology, and the decision to treat nonculprit lesions are discussed. Recent years have seen a shift in guidelines to downgrading the use of assist devices in cardiogenic shock and aspiration thrombectomy, whereas consideration of nonculprit coronary intervention has been revived. These changes come in the wake of a series of large, practice-changing clinical trials.

      PubDate: 2016-02-16T17:44:56Z
       
  • Update on Coronary Chronic Total Occlusion Percutaneous Coronary
           Intervention
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 February 2016
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics
      Author(s): Emmanouil S. Brilakis, Dimitri Karmpaliotis, Minh N. Vo, Mauro Carlino, Alfredo R. Galassi, Marouane Boukhris, Khaldoon Alaswad, Leszek Bryniarski, William L. Lombardi, Subhash Banerjee

      Teaser Chronic total occlusion (CTO) percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has significantly evolved during recent years. High success rates are being achieved by experienced centers and operators, but not at less-experienced centers. Use of CTO crossing algorithms can help improve the success and efficiency of these potentially lengthy procedures. There is a paucity of clinical trial data examining clinical outcomes of CTO PCI, which is critical for further adoption and refinement of the procedure. We provide a detailed overview of the clinical evidence and current available crossing strategies, with emphasis on recent developments and techniques.

      PubDate: 2016-02-16T17:44:56Z
       
  • In-stent Restenosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 February 2016
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics
      Author(s): Michael S. Lee, Gaurav Banka

      Teaser In-stent restenosis (ISR) is the narrowing of a stented coronary artery lesion. The mean time from percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) to ISR was 12 months with drug-eluting stents (DES) and 6 months with bare metal stents (BMS). ISR typically presents as recurrent angina. The use of DES has significantly reduced the rate of ISR compared with BMS. Predictors of ISR include patient, lesion, and procedural characteristics. Intravascular ultrasound, optical coherence tomography, and fractional flow reserve are important tools for the anatomic and hemodynamic assessment of ISR. Treatment options for ISR include percutaneous coronary intervention with DES.

      PubDate: 2016-02-16T17:44:56Z
       
  • Atherectomy Devices for the Treatment of Calcified Coronary Lesions
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 February 2016
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics
      Author(s): Jeffrey W. Chambers, Ann N. Behrens, Brad J. Martinsen

      Teaser The presence of moderate and severe coronary artery calcification (CAC) is associated with higher rates of angiographic complications during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), as well as higher major adverse cardiac events compared with noncalcified lesions. Diabetes mellitus, a risk factor for CAC, is increasing in the United States. Vessel preparation before PCI with atherectomy can facilitate successful stent delivery and expansion that may otherwise not be possible. We review here CAC prevalence, risk factors, and impact on PCI, as well as the currently available coronary atherectomy devices including rotational atherectomy, orbital atherectomy, and laser atherectomy.

      PubDate: 2016-02-12T16:42:03Z
       
  • Antithrombotic Therapy in Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 February 2016
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics
      Author(s): Xiaoyu Yang, Joanna Ghobrial, Duane S. Pinto

      Teaser Numerous agents are available for anticoagulation during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). These agents have been evaluated in a variety of clinical settings, including elective, urgent, and emergent PCI. Although unfractionated heparin remains a frequent choice, accumulating data support the use of newer agents to mitigate bleeding risk, especially in the setting of femoral access and concomitant use of glycoprotein IIb/IIa receptor inhibition. With several antithrombotic agents available, an assessment must be made regarding the ischemic and bleeding risks. This article summarizes existing data examining the benefits and limitations of the various anticoagulants and guidelines for their use.

      PubDate: 2016-02-12T16:42:03Z
       
  • Saphenous Vein Graft Interventions
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 February 2016
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics
      Author(s): Michael S. Lee, Gopi Manthripragada

      Teaser Saphenous vein graft interventions compose a small but important subset of percutaneous coronary revascularization. Because of their unique biology, percutaneous angioplasty and stenting require tailored patient and lesion selection and modification of intervention technique to optimize outcomes. The use of embolic protection and appropriate adjunctive pharmacology can help minimize periprocedural complications, such as the no-reflow phenomenon. Recommendations for best practice in saphenous vein graft interventions continue to evolve with emerging research and therapy.

      PubDate: 2016-02-12T16:42:03Z
       
  • Management of Complications
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 February 2016
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics
      Author(s): Peter P. Monteleone, Robert W. Yeh

      Teaser Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has matured rapidly to tackle increasingly complex coronary disease. Operators must be aware of the incidence of the basic risks involved with coronary angiography and PCI to appropriately inform patients and obtain procedural consent. Even before a wire enters a coronary artery, specific risks, including vascular access complications, renal injury, allergic reaction, and radiation injury, are constantly present. With initiation of PCI, new risks to the coronary circulation arise. A fundamental knowledge of the presentation of these complications and expert ability to emergently manage them are of the utmost importance to the successful completion of PCI.

      PubDate: 2016-02-12T16:42:03Z
       
  • Risk Stratification for Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 February 2016
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics
      Author(s): Davide Capodanno

      Teaser The Synergy Between Percutaneous Coronary Intervention with Taxus and Cardiac Surgery (SYNTAX) score is a semiquantitative angiographic score developed to prospectively characterize the disease complexity of the coronary vasculature. With more than 50 validation studies, the SYNTAX score is the most-studied risk model in the setting of percutaneous coronary intervention. In this article, the evolutionary journey of the SYNTAX score is reviewed, with emphasis on its sequential modifications and adaptations, now culminating in the development and validation of the SYNTAX score II.

      PubDate: 2016-02-12T16:42:03Z
       
  • Left Main Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 February 2016
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics
      Author(s): Neil Ruparelia, Alaide Chieffo

      Teaser Significant unprotected left main stem (ULMS) disease is in approximately 5% to 7% of patients undergoing coronary angiography. Historically, coronary artery bypass grafting has been the gold standard treatment of these patients. With recent advances in stent technology, adjunctive pharmacotherapy, and operator experience, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is increasingly regarded as a viable alternative treatment option, especially in patients with favorable coronary anatomy (low and intermediate SYNTAX (Synergy Between Percutaneous Coronary Intervention with TAXUS and Cardiac Surgery) scores). This article aims to discuss the evidence supporting PCI for ULMS disease, current guidelines, and technical aspects.

      PubDate: 2016-02-12T16:42:03Z
       
 
 
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