Journal Cover Interventional Cardiology Clinics
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   ISSN (Print) 2211-7458 - ISSN (Online) 2211-7466
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3118 journals]
  • Interventional Cardiology Clinics
    • Authors: Matthew J. Price
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 7, Issue 1
      Author(s): Matthew J. Price


      PubDate: 2017-11-17T17:10:47Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s2211-7458(17)30129-3
       
  • Interventional Imaging of the Tricuspid Valve
    • Authors: Francesco Ancona; Eustachio Agricola; Stefano Stella; Cristina Capogrosso; Claudia Marini; Alberto Margonato; Rebecca T. Hahn
      Pages: 13 - 29
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 7, Issue 1
      Author(s): Francesco Ancona, Eustachio Agricola, Stefano Stella, Cristina Capogrosso, Claudia Marini, Alberto Margonato, Rebecca T. Hahn
      Teaser Nowadays, reasonable transcatheter tricuspid valve (TV) interventions are emerging as therapeutic options for functional tricuspid regurgitation (TR). The preprocedural planning is based on a multimodality imaging approach, which aims to (1) define the mechanisms of TR, (2) characterize TV morphology, (3) analyze the anatomic relationship between the TV apparatus and other structures, and (4) determine the size of the tricuspid annulus and vena cavae. Intraprocedural guidance is based mainly on transesophageal echocardiography (seldom transthoracic) and fluoroscopy, with the recent introduction of fusion imaging.

      PubDate: 2017-11-17T17:10:47Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.iccl.2017.08.010
       
  • The FORMA Repair System
    • Authors: Rishi Puri; Josep Rodés-Cabau
      Pages: 47 - 55
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 7, Issue 1
      Author(s): Rishi Puri, Josep Rodés-Cabau
      Teaser Significant tricuspid valve disease affects many patients with left-sided heart disease. Concomitant tricuspid valve surgery for at least moderate tricuspid insufficiency is undertaken far less frequently at the time of left-sided heart surgery. The burden of residual tricuspid disease in high-surgical-risk patients has spawned the evolution of several percutaneous treatment options. A dedicated percutaneously delivered tricuspid Spacer device (FORMA Repair System) has been developed and trialed in humans. This system anchors a Spacer to reduce the regurgitant orifice area, thereby providing a surface for valve leaflet coaptation. This article provides an overview of the FORMA Repair System to date.

      PubDate: 2017-11-17T17:10:47Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.iccl.2017.08.007
       
  • Systemic Thrombolysis for Pulmonary Embolism
    • Authors: Hafeez Ul Hassan Virk; Sanjay Chatterjee; Partha Sardar; Chirag Bavishi; Jay Giri; Saurav Chatterjee
      Pages: 71 - 80
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 7, Issue 1
      Author(s): Hafeez Ul Hassan Virk, Sanjay Chatterjee, Partha Sardar, Chirag Bavishi, Jay Giri, Saurav Chatterjee
      Teaser Acute pulmonary embolism presents a clinical challenge for optimal risk stratification. Although associated with significant morbidity and mortality at the population level, the spectrum of presentation in an individual patient varies from mild symptoms to cardiac arrest. Treatment options include anticoagulation, systemic thrombolysis, catheter-based interventions, and surgical embolectomy. In this article, an attempt is made to optimally identify patients who, based on available evidence, may benefit from systemic thrombolytic therapy. The clinical efficacy of systemic thrombolysis must be balanced against increased risks of major bleeding and intracranial hemorrhage.

      PubDate: 2017-11-17T17:10:47Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.iccl.2017.08.001
       
  • Catheter-Based Embolectomy for Acute Pulmonary Embolism
    • Authors: Wissam A. Jaber; Michael C. McDaniel
      Pages: 91 - 101
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 7, Issue 1
      Author(s): Wissam A. Jaber, Michael C. McDaniel
      Teaser A significant number of patients with high-risk pulmonary embolism have contraindications to thrombolytic therapy. Catheter-based therapy may be helpful and consists of a multitude of catheters and techniques, some old and some new. Although there are few data supporting the use of any of these techniques, there has been a recent rise in interest and use of catheter-based pulmonary embolectomy. This text describes the contemporary devices used in pulmonary embolism treatment, discusses their challenges, and proposes some future directions.

      PubDate: 2017-11-17T17:10:47Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.iccl.2017.08.003
       
  • Balloon Pulmonary Angioplasty for Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary
           Hypertension
    • Authors: Ehtisham Mahmud; Omid Behnamfar; Lawrence Ang; Mitul P. Patel; David Poch; Nick H. Kim
      Pages: 103 - 117
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 7, Issue 1
      Author(s): Ehtisham Mahmud, Omid Behnamfar, Lawrence Ang, Mitul P. Patel, David Poch, Nick H. Kim
      Teaser Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is associated with several risk factors but is most frequently seen as a rare consequence of an acute pulmonary embolism. Surgical pulmonary thromboendarterectomy (PTE) is potentially curative for CTEPH with the best outcomes seen for the treatment of primarily proximal, accessible lobar or segmental disease. For surgically inoperable patients, percutaneous balloon pulmonary angioplasty (BPA) is feasible and has good short- to mid-term efficacy outcomes. This review focuses on the technique and outcomes associated with BPA which has emerged as a new therapeutic option for CTEPH.

      PubDate: 2017-11-17T17:10:47Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.iccl.2017.09.003
       
  • Mechanical Circulatory Support for High-Risk Pulmonary Embolism
    • Authors: Mahir Elder; Nimrod Blank; Adi Shemesh; Mohit Pahuja; Amir Kaki; Tamam Mohamad; Theodore Schreiber; Jay Giri
      Pages: 119 - 128
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 7, Issue 1
      Author(s): Mahir Elder, Nimrod Blank, Adi Shemesh, Mohit Pahuja, Amir Kaki, Tamam Mohamad, Theodore Schreiber, Jay Giri
      Teaser Temporary mechanical circulatory support (MCS) devices have a role in treating high-risk patients with pulmonary embolism with cardiogenic shock. Mechanical circulatory device selection should be made based on center experience and device-specific features. All current devices are effective in decreasing right arterial pressure and providing circulatory support of 4 to 5 L/min. The pulmonary artery pulsatility index may prove to be an unreliable method to assess right ventricular function. Careful clinical evaluation on an individual patient basis should determine the need for MCS.

      PubDate: 2017-11-17T17:10:47Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.iccl.2017.09.002
       
  • Inferior Vena Cava Filters
    • Authors: John Andrew Kaufman
      Pages: 129 - 135
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 7, Issue 1
      Author(s): John Andrew Kaufman
      Teaser The inferior vena cava filter clinical environment is notable for the degree of controversy, uncertainty, and fear associated with these devices by both physicians and the public. This article reviews some of the more important current issues with these devices as well as emerging and future trends.

      PubDate: 2017-11-17T17:10:47Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.iccl.2017.08.004
       
  • Transcatheter Closure of Patent Foramen Ovale
    • Authors: Matthew J. Price
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 6, Issue 4
      Author(s): Matthew J. Price


      PubDate: 2017-09-11T23:42:11Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.iccl.2017.07.001
       
  • Transcatheter Closure of Patent Foramen Ovale
    • Authors: Matthew J. Price
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 6, Issue 4
      Author(s): Matthew J. Price
      Teaser Transcatheter closure of a patent foramen ovale (PFO) reduces the risk of recurrent cryptogenic stroke compared with medical therapy. PFO closure is a prophylactic procedure, and will not provide the patient with symptomatic improvement, except in cases of hypoxemia due to right-to-left shunt or possibly migraine headaches. Therefore, appropriate patient selection is critical, and procedural safety is paramount. Herein, we review key characteristics of the devices currently available for transcatheter PFO closure within the United States, and highlight key technical aspects of the PFO closure procedure that will maximize procedural success.

      PubDate: 2017-09-11T23:42:11Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.iccl.2017.07.001
       
  • Imaging Assessment of the Interatrial Septum for Transcatheter Atrial
           Septal Defect and Patent Foramen Ovale Closure
    • Authors: Mary Z. Bechis; David S. Rubenson; Matthew J. Price
      Pages: 505 - 524
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 6, Issue 4
      Author(s): Mary Z. Bechis, David S. Rubenson, Matthew J. Price
      Teaser Transcatheter closure of atrial septal defects and patent foramen ovale has become increasingly common with advances in device and imaging technology. The percutaneous approach is now the preferred method of closure when anatomically suitable. Two-dimensional and 3-dimensional echocardiography determines anatomic suitability by characterizing the interatrial defect and its surrounding structures, and is critical for intraprocedural guidance and postprocedure follow-up. This article provides an overview of interatrial anatomy as it pertains to interventional considerations and discusses the transthoracic, transesophageal, and intracardiac echocardiographic modalities used for periprocedural and intraprocedural imaging of the interatrial septum.

      PubDate: 2017-09-11T23:42:11Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.iccl.2017.05.004
       
  • Current Dataset for Patent Foramen Ovale Closure in Cryptogenic Stroke
    • Authors: Olufunso W. Odunukan; Matthew J. Price
      Pages: 525 - 538
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 6, Issue 4
      Author(s): Olufunso W. Odunukan, Matthew J. Price
      Teaser Approximately one-third of all strokes have no apparent cause. A patent foramen ovale (PFO) is present in as many as 60% of these patients with cryptogenic strokes, which is significantly more frequent than that of the general population. The presumed biologic mechanisms of ischemic stroke in the setting of a PFO are paradoxic embolism from the peripheral venous system through this interatrial shunt or embolism from in situ thrombosis. In this review, the authors summarize and critically assess the contemporary studies evaluating the efficacy and safety of PFO closure for prevention of recurrent cryptogenic strokes.

      PubDate: 2017-09-11T23:42:11Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.iccl.2017.05.007
       
  • Patent Foramen Ovale and Migraine Headache
    • Authors: David Hildick-Smith; Timothy M. Williams
      Pages: 539 - 545
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 6, Issue 4
      Author(s): David Hildick-Smith, Timothy M. Williams
      Teaser Migraine headache is a common and debilitating disease that has a demonstrable association with the presence of patent foramen ovale (PFO) in multiple case series. Closure of PFO has been performed to try to treat migraine with aura, with variable results. Although early trials suggested benefit to PFO closure, these were of poor quality, and subsequent randomized trials have failed to yield positive results. This article discusses the evidence of an association with PFO and migraine headache, and the trials that have so far been performed to assess the benefits of closure.

      PubDate: 2017-09-11T23:42:11Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.iccl.2017.05.006
       
  • Invasive Hemodynamics of Pericardial Disease
    • Authors: Ganesh Athappan; Paul Sorajja
      Pages: 309 - 317
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 6, Issue 3
      Author(s): Ganesh Athappan, Paul Sorajja
      Teaser Pericardial diseases can be classified broadly as 3 entities: acute pericarditis, cardiac tamponade, and constrictive pericarditis. These disorders can be diagnosed and managed with noninvasive studies following a comprehensive history and physical examination, without the need for cardiac catheterization in most patients. Despite the advances in noninvasive cardiac imaging, there are limitations to their diagnostic accuracy. The invasive hemodynamic study offers the advantage of simultaneous, direct pressure measurement across multiple chambers, with direct examination of blood flow. Herein, the authors review the techniques for obtaining and interpreting invasive hemodynamic data in patients with suspected pericardial disease.

      PubDate: 2017-06-08T17:45:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.iccl.2017.03.002
       
  • Invasive Hemodynamics of Pulmonary Disease and the Right Ventricle
    • Authors: David Silber; Justine Lachmann
      Pages: 329 - 343
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 6, Issue 3
      Author(s): David Silber, Justine Lachmann
      Teaser Pulmonary hypertension (PH) falls into 5 groups, as defined by the World Health Organization. Swan-Ganz catheters determine precapillary versus postcapillary PH. The hemodynamic values of PH at rest and with vasodilatory challenge categorize the etiology of PH and guide treatment. RV maladaptations to increased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and the chronicity of the right ventricle's (RV) response to increased PH and/or increased PVR can be understood with pressure-volume (PV) loops constructed with use of conductance catheters. These PV loops demonstrate the RV's ability to increase stroke volume in acutely and chronically increased PVR.

      PubDate: 2017-06-08T17:45:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.iccl.2017.03.004
       
  • Invasive Hemodynamics of Adult Congenital Heart Disease
    • Authors: Surendranath R. Veeram Reddy; Alan W. Nugent; Thomas M. Zellers; V. Vivian Dimas
      Pages: 345 - 358
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 6, Issue 3
      Author(s): Surendranath R. Veeram Reddy, Alan W. Nugent, Thomas M. Zellers, V. Vivian Dimas
      Teaser Adults with congenital heart disease are a growing population with increasingly more complex disease, in large part due to improvements in delivery of care to the pediatric population. Cardiac catheterization is an integral component of diagnosis and management in these patients. Careful attention to detail and a thorough understanding of intracardiac hemodynamics are critical to performing complete diagnostic evaluations. This article outlines the most commonly encountered lesions with guidelines for invasive assessment to help guide further therapy.

      PubDate: 2017-06-08T17:45:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.iccl.2017.03.005
       
  • Hemodynamics of Cardiogenic Shock
    • Authors: Ariel Furer; Jeffrey Wessler; Daniel Burkhoff
      Pages: 359 - 371
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 6, Issue 3
      Author(s): Ariel Furer, Jeffrey Wessler, Daniel Burkhoff
      Teaser Cardiogenic shock (CS) represents an advanced state of morbidity along the pathophysiologic pathway of end-organ hypoperfusion caused by reduced cardiac output and blood pressure. Acute coronary syndromes remain the most common cause of CS. The spectrum of hypoperfusion states caused by low cardiac output ranges from pre-CS to refractory CS and can be characterized by an array of hemodynamic parameters. This review provides the foundation for a hemodynamic understanding of CS including the use of hemodynamic monitoring for diagnosis and treatment, the cardiac and vascular determinants of CS, and a hemodynamic approach to risk stratification and management of CS.

      PubDate: 2017-06-08T17:45:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.iccl.2017.03.006
       
  • Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement and MitraClip to Reverse Heart
           Failure
    • Authors: Sukhdeep Basra; Molly Szerlip
      Pages: 373 - 386
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 6, Issue 3
      Author(s): Sukhdeep Basra, Molly Szerlip
      Teaser Valvular heart diseases such as aortic stenosis and mitral regurgitation are often associated with heart failure, which in turn increases patients’ Surgical Thoracic Society (STS) score. A high STS score means the patient is high risk for surgical aortic valve replacement and mitral valve repair/replacement. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement and percutaneous mitral valve repair offer a minimally invasive alternative for the treatment of valvular heart disease in patients with severe heart failure. We aim to review the current evidence on the safety, efficacy, and outcomes of these devices in patients with severe heart failure.

      PubDate: 2017-06-08T17:45:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.iccl.2017.03.007
       
  • Mechanical Circulatory Support in Acute Decompensated Heart Failure and
           Shock
    • Authors: Nishtha Sodhi; John M. Lasala
      Pages: 387 - 405
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 6, Issue 3
      Author(s): Nishtha Sodhi, John M. Lasala
      Teaser An array of interventional therapeutics is available in the modern era, with uses depending on acute or chronic situations. This article focuses on support in acute decompensated heart failure and cardiogenic shock, including intra-aortic balloon pumps, continuous aortic flow augmentation, and extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation.

      PubDate: 2017-06-08T17:45:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.iccl.2017.03.008
       
  • Multivessel Revascularization in Shock and High-Risk Percutaneous Coronary
           Intervention
    • Authors: Sandeep K. Krishnan; Robert F. Riley; Ravi S. Hira; William L. Lombardi
      Pages: 407 - 416
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 6, Issue 3
      Author(s): Sandeep K. Krishnan, Robert F. Riley, Ravi S. Hira, William L. Lombardi
      Teaser This review explores the usefulness of multivessel revascularization with percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with multivessel obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD) presenting with and without cardiogenic shock. We also evaluate the literature regarding complete versus incomplete revascularization for patients with cardiogenic shock, acute coronary syndromes, and stable coronary artery disease.

      PubDate: 2017-06-08T17:45:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.iccl.2017.03.009
       
  • Adult Congenital Interventions in Heart Failure
    • Authors: Hussam S. Suradi; Ziyad M. Hijazi
      Pages: 427 - 443
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 6, Issue 3
      Author(s): Hussam S. Suradi, Ziyad M. Hijazi
      Teaser Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common birth defect, occurring in approximately 0.8% to 1.0% of neonates. Advances in medical and surgical therapies for children with CHD have resulted in a growing population of patients reaching adulthood, with survival rates exceeding 85%. Many of these patients, especially if managed inappropriately, face the prospect of future complications including heart failure and premature death. For adults with uncorrected or previously palliated CHD, percutaneous therapies have become the primary treatment for many forms of CHD. In this article, we discuss the role of transcatheter interventions in the treatment of adults with CHD.

      PubDate: 2017-06-08T17:45:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.iccl.2017.03.011
       
  • Interventional Cardiology Clinics
    • Authors: Matthew J. Price
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 6, Issue 4
      Author(s): Matthew J. Price


      PubDate: 2017-09-11T23:42:11Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s2211-7458(17)30011-1
       
  • Interventional Cardiology Clinics
    • Authors: Matthew J. Price
      Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 6, Issue 3
      Author(s): Matthew J. Price


      PubDate: 2017-06-08T17:45:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s2211-7458(16)30135-3
       
  • Transcatheter Tricuspid Valve Intervention/Interventional Therapy FOR
           Pulmonary Embolism
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 7, Issue 1


      PubDate: 2017-11-17T17:10:47Z
       
  • The Evolving State of Care for Acute Pulmonary Embolism
    • Authors: Jay Giri
      Abstract: Publication date: January 2018
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 7, Issue 1
      Author(s): Jay Giri


      PubDate: 2017-11-17T17:10:47Z
       
  • Tricuspid Clip
    • Authors: Gilbert H.L. Tang
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 November 2017
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics
      Author(s): Gilbert H.L. Tang
      Teaser Symptomatic severe tricuspid regurgitation (TR), if untreated, carries a dismal prognosis. These patients are at very high risk for surgical repair or replacement and transcatheter options to treat TR are emerging. More than 300 transcatheter tricuspid repairs with the MitraClip system have been performed worldwide with promising results. The TriClip system, with the MitraClip NT delivered via a dedicated tricuspid steerable guide catheter, is currently under investigation. This article describes the step-by-step technique on using the MitraClip system to perform transcatheter tricuspid repair using echocardiographic and fluoroscopic guidance. The latest data on worldwide experience with tricuspid clipping are also discussed.

      PubDate: 2017-11-10T13:53:03Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.iccl.2017.09.001
       
  • Transcatheter Tricuspid Valve Intervention: Addressing an Unmet Clinical
           Need
    • Authors: Azeem Latib
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 October 2017
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics
      Author(s): Azeem Latib


      PubDate: 2017-10-28T08:56:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.iccl.2017.10.001
       
  • Transcatheter Tricuspid Valve Replacement
    • Authors: Amar Krishnaswamy; Jose Navia; Samir R. Kapadia
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 October 2017
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics
      Author(s): Amar Krishnaswamy, Jose Navia, Samir R. Kapadia
      Teaser Tricuspid regurgitation (TR) is a common entity, most commonly functional in nature due to right-sided dysfunction in the setting of concomitant cardiac disease or pulmonary hypertension. Patients living with TR often experience numerous limitations as a result of right-sided heart failure symptoms, including functional decline, frequent hospitalizations, liver failure, and kidney failure. Furthermore, patients with significant TR demonstrate worse survival, although a cause-and-effect relationship has not been proven. For patients with a degenerated surgical bioprosthesis or valve ring, placement of a transcatheter aortic valve prosthesis in a valve-in-valve or valve-in-ring fashion may provide symptomatic benefit. For patients with native valve regurgitation, novel devices for treatment are currently under development.

      PubDate: 2017-10-28T08:56:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.iccl.2017.08.009
       
  • Anatomy of the Tricuspid Valve, Pathophysiology of Functional Tricuspid
           Regurgitation, and Implications for Percutaneous Therapies
    • Authors: Nicola Buzzatti; Michele De Bonis; Neil Moat
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 October 2017
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics
      Author(s): Nicola Buzzatti, Michele De Bonis, Neil Moat
      Teaser The tricuspid valve is a complex dynamic apparatus made up of many different closely linked structures: the annulus, the three leaflets, the chordae, the papillary muscles and the right ventricle. Other nearby structures, such as the coronary sinus ostium, the conduction system, the membranous septum, and the right coronary artery must be taken into account when dealing with the tricuspid. Annulus dilation and leaflet tethering due to right ventricular remodeling are the 2 major mechanisms responsible for most tricuspid regurgitation cases. Precise knowledge of tricuspid anatomy and function, as well as careful preoperative planning, is fundamental for successful transcatheter tricuspid procedures.

      PubDate: 2017-10-28T08:56:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.iccl.2017.08.005
       
  • Percutaneous Tricuspid Annuloplasty
    • Authors: Antonio Mangieri; Scott Lim; Jason H. Rogers; Azeem Latib
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 October 2017
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics
      Author(s): Antonio Mangieri, Scott Lim, Jason H. Rogers, Azeem Latib
      Teaser The tricuspid valve was ignored for a long time. The prevalence of severe tricuspid regurgitation is not negligible, however, and is associated with poor prognosis. In cases of primary tricuspid regurgitation, surgical options are limited by a high risk of mortality and morbidity. New percutaneous approaches are becoming available to meet this consistent unmet clinical need. This review presents the current available devices that reproduce both the complete and uncomplete surgical annuloplasty techniques.

      PubDate: 2017-10-21T08:07:10Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.iccl.2017.08.006
       
  • Catheter-Directed Therapy for Pulmonary Embolism
    • Authors: Bedros Taslakian; Akhilesh K. Sista
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 October 2017
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics
      Author(s): Bedros Taslakian, Akhilesh K. Sista
      Teaser Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is the third most common cause of death among hospitalized patients. Treatment escalation beyond anticoagulation therapy is necessary in patients with cardiogenic shock and may be of benefit in select normotensive patients with right heart strain. Percutaneous catheter-based techniques (catheter-directed mechanical thrombectomy, clot maceration, and/or pharmacologic thrombolysis) as an alternative or adjunct to systemic thrombolysis can rapidly debulk central clot in patients with shock. Catheter-directed thrombolysis, which uses a low-dose intraclot prolonged thrombolytic infusion, is a promising but insufficiently studied therapy for patients presenting with acute intermediate-risk PE.

      PubDate: 2017-10-14T07:34:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.iccl.2017.08.002
       
  • Caval Valve Implantation
    • Authors: Alexander Lauten; Henryk Dreger; Michael Laule; Karl Stangl; Hans R. Figulla
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 October 2017
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics
      Author(s): Alexander Lauten, Henryk Dreger, Michael Laule, Karl Stangl, Hans R. Figulla
      Teaser Recently, transcatheter therapy has expanded the treatment options for patients with heart valve disease. With the growing understanding of tricuspid regurgitation and its natural history, it becomes increasingly obvious that this patient population is a heterogeneous cohort presenting for treatment in different stages of a continuous disease process. It is still unclear which interventional approach will result in functional and clinical success and in which subtype of patient population. This article reviews the pathophysiologic background and current evidence for caval valve implantation and examines the potential role of this approach for the treatment of severe tricuspid regurgitation.

      PubDate: 2017-10-14T07:34:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.iccl.2017.08.008
       
  • Forthcoming Issues
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 6, Issue 4


      PubDate: 2017-09-11T23:42:11Z
       
  • Patent Foramen Ovale Closure for Hypoxemia
    • Authors: Jonathan Marvin Tobis; Deepika Narasimha; Islam Abudayyeh
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 July 2017
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics
      Author(s): Jonathan Marvin Tobis, Deepika Narasimha, Islam Abudayyeh
      Teaser A patent foramen ovale (PFO) is a common anatomic finding in 20% of the normal population. Significant hypoxemia can occur in circumstances in which hemodynamic or anatomic changes predispose to increased right-to-left intra-atrial shunting. The subsequent hypoxemia produces substantial dyspnea that may affect the patient’s quality of life, independent of underlying pulmonary disease. Profound hypoxemia caused by right-to-left shunt across the interatrial septum usually responds to percutaneous PFO closure. An important impediment to successful treatment is the lack of awareness of the potential role of a PFO in this condition.

      PubDate: 2017-07-04T20:19:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.iccl.2017.05.003
       
  • Cryptogenic Stroke and Patent Foramen Ovale Risk Assessment
    • Authors: Emiliya Melkumova; David E. Thaler
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 June 2017
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics
      Author(s): Emiliya Melkumova, David E. Thaler
      Teaser Stroke is a devastating condition. It is the fifth leading cause of death in the United States, and a leading cause of serious long-term disability. Stroke occurs at any age. Younger patients tend to have strokes of undetermined cause, termed cryptogenic. Herein, the authors describe the classification of stroke cause; the risk of recurrent cryptogenic stroke with patent foramen ovale (PFO); a risk assessment model to stratify incidental versus a pathogenic PFO in patients presenting with stroke; and patient selection for device occluder therapy in the context of the long-term follow-up of the RESPECT randomized clinical trial.

      PubDate: 2017-07-04T20:19:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.iccl.2017.05.005
       
  • Identification and Quantification of Patent Foramen Ovale–Mediated
           Shunts
    • Authors: Ahmed N. Mahmoud; Islam Y. Elgendy; Nayan Agarwal; Jonathan M. Tobis; Mohammad Khalid Mojadidi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 June 2017
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics
      Author(s): Ahmed N. Mahmoud, Islam Y. Elgendy, Nayan Agarwal, Jonathan M. Tobis, Mohammad Khalid Mojadidi
      Teaser Once deemed benign, patent foramen ovale (PFO)–mediated right-to-left shunting has now been linked to stroke, migraine, and hypoxemia. Contrast transesophageal echocardiography is considered the standard technique for identifying a PFO, allowing visualization of the atrial septal anatomy and differentiation from non-PFO right-to-left shunts. Transthoracic echocardiography is the most common method for PFO imaging, being cost-effective, but has the lowest sensitivity. Transcranial Doppler is highly sensitive but is unable to differentiate cardiac from pulmonary shunts; it is the best method to quantitate shunt severity, being more sensitive than transthoracic or transesophageal echocardiography so is our preferred screening method for PFO.

      PubDate: 2017-07-04T20:19:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.iccl.2017.05.002
       
  • Interventional Heart Failure
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2017
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 6, Issue 3


      PubDate: 2017-06-08T17:45:33Z
       
  • Operationalizing Interventional Heart Failure: Adding Substance to the
           Concept
    • Authors: Srihari S. Naidu
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 May 2017
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics
      Author(s): Srihari S. Naidu


      PubDate: 2017-05-05T01:34:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.iccl.2017.04.001
       
  • Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy for Heart Failure
    • Authors: Amole Ojo; Sohaib Tariq; Prakash Harishkrishnan; Sei Iwai; Jason T. Jacobson
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 April 2017
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics
      Author(s): Amole Ojo, Sohaib Tariq, Prakash Harishkrishnan, Sei Iwai, Jason T. Jacobson
      Teaser Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) has emerged as a valued nonpharmacologic therapy in patients with heart failure, reduced ejection fraction (EF), and ventricular dyssynchrony manifest as left bundle branch block. The mechanisms of benefit include remodeling of the left ventricle leading to decreased dimensions and increased EF, as well as a decrease in the severity of mitral regurgitation. This article reviews the rationale, effects, and indications for CRT, and discusses the patient characteristics that predict response and considerations for nonresponders.

      PubDate: 2017-04-27T22:58:03Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.iccl.2017.03.010
       
  • Invasive Hemodynamics of Valvular Heart Disease
    • Authors: Michele Pighi; Anita W. Asgar
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 April 2017
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics
      Author(s): Michele Pighi, Anita W. Asgar
      Teaser In the current era, diagnosis and follow-up of valvular heart disease is performed noninvasively using echocardiography. In some cases, the results of echocardiographic evaluation are inconclusive or discrepant with the patient’s clinical symptoms. In such cases, a well-planned and executed cardiac catheterization is invaluable to clarify the clinical dilemma and assist in planning further management. This article reviews the indications, technique, and interpretation of cardiac catheterization in the setting of valvular stenosis and regurgitation.

      PubDate: 2017-04-27T22:58:03Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.iccl.2017.03.003
       
  • Invasive Hemodynamics of Myocardial Disease
    • Authors: Michael Eskander; Morton J. Kern
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 April 2017
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics
      Author(s): Michael Eskander, Morton J. Kern
      Teaser Heart failure is a clinical diagnosis that is supported by various laboratory, imaging, and invasive hemodynamic measures. There is no single diagnostic test. A variety of structural and/or functional myocardial abnormalities can lead to the inability of the heart to fill or eject blood. Despite ejection fraction being the most commonly assessed measure of systolic function in clinical practice, it is a poor measure of contractility because it is susceptible to loading conditions and chamber size. Invasive hemodynamic assessment remains of great importance in the evaluation of patients with myocardial disease or hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

      PubDate: 2017-04-27T22:58:03Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.iccl.2017.03.001
       
 
 
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