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Journal Cover   Interventional Cardiology Clinics
  [SJR: 0.162]   [H-I: 2]   [1 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 2211-7458 - ISSN (Online) 2211-7466
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2807 journals]
  • Intravascular Ultrasound for the Assessment of Coronary Lesion Severity
           and Optimization of Percutaneous Coronary Interventions
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 3
      Author(s): Seung-Jung Park , Jung-Min Ahn

      Teaser Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) has provided valuable information on cross-sectional coronary vascular structure and has played a key role in contemporary stent-based percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). It accurately assesses coronary anatomy, assists in the selection of treatment strategy, and helps to optimize stenting outcomes. IVUS-guided PCI for drug-eluting stent implantation seems to be associated with a significantly reduced risk of death, myocardial infarction, target lesion revascularization, and stent thrombosis.

      PubDate: 2015-05-30T05:24:15Z
       
  • Intravascular Ultrasound for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Left Main
           Coronary Artery Disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 3
      Author(s): Jose M. De la Torre Hernandez , Tamara Garcia Camarero

      Teaser Limitations of angiography for assessment of coronary artery disease are well-known, but are more evident and relevant in the left main coronary artery (LMCA) segment given the amount of myocardium this vessel subtends and the risks associated with the presence of atherosclerosis and subsequent intervention. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) characterizes the severity of luminal narrowing, plaque morphology, and plaque extension into the distal bifurcation. Once the indication for percutaneous intervention (PCI) is established, information provided by IVUS is crucial to plan treatment and optimize results. IVUS-guided PCI with drug-eluting stents improves clinical outcomes, particularly in patients with distal left main disease.

      PubDate: 2015-05-30T05:24:15Z
       
  • Short- and Long-term Evaluation of Bioresorbable Scaffolds by Optical
           Coherence Tomography
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 3
      Author(s): Carlos M. Campos , Pannipa Suwannasom , Shimpei Nakatani , Yoshinobu Onuma , Patrick W. Serruys , Hector M. Garcia-Garcia

      Teaser The analysis of bioresorbable scaffolds (BRSs) by optical coherence tomography (OCT) requires a dedicated methodology, as the polymeric scaffold has a distinct appearance and undergoes dynamic structural changes with time. The high resolution of OCT allows for the detailed assessment of scaffold implantation, rupture, discontinuity, and strut integration. OCT does not provide reliable information on the extent of scaffold degradation, as it cannot differentiate between polylactide polymer and the provisional matrix of proteoglycan formed by connective tissue. Three-dimensional OCT reconstruction can aid in the evaluation of BRS in special scenarios such as overlapping scaffold segments and bifurcations.

      PubDate: 2015-05-30T05:24:15Z
       
  • Advances in Automated Assessment of Intracoronary Optical Coherence
           Tomography and Their Clinical Application
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 3
      Author(s): Giovanni J. Ughi , Tom Adriaenssens

      Teaser Intravascular optical coherence tomography (OCT) is capable of acquiring 3-dimensional (3D) data of coronary arteries allowing for the assessment of plaques, stents, thrombus, side branches, and other relevant structures in a 3D fashion. Given that state-of-the-art OCT systems acquire images at a very high frame rate (up to 200 frames per second), typically a very large number of images per pullback (ie, 500 or more) need to be analyzed. The manual assessment of stents, plaques, and other structures is time-consuming, cumbersome, and inefficient and thus not suitable for on-line analysis during percutaneous coronary intervention procedures.

      PubDate: 2015-05-30T05:24:15Z
       
  • Neointimal Coverage After Drug-Eluting Stent Implantation Insights from
           Optical Coherence Tomography
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 3
      Author(s): Seung-Yul Lee , Myeong-Ki Hong

      Teaser Optical coherence tomography (OCT), which provides high-resolution imaging of the coronary vasculature, has provided novel insights into the pathophysiology of neointimal growth after drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation. The natural history, time course, and characteristics of strut coverage with neointima have been well defined by OCT. Pathology studies have identified strut coverage as a risk factor for stent thrombosis, and OCT studies have shown that next-generation DES have better strut coverage than first-generation DES. By reducing the incidence of stent thrombosis, improved strut coverage should lead to favorable clinical safety and the feasibility of shorter-duration dual antiplatelet therapy after DES implantation.

      PubDate: 2015-05-30T05:24:15Z
       
  • Optical Coherence Tomography in the Diagnosis and Management of
           Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 3
      Author(s): Christopher Franco , Lim Eng , Jacqueline Saw

      Teaser Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is an infrequent condition that has been underdiagnosed and misdiagnosed. The use of intracoronary imaging with intravascular ultrasound or optical coherence tomography enables the accurate diagnosis of this challenging condition. Diagnostic and management algorithms have been proposed to improve the diagnosis and therapeutic stratification of SCAD. Optical coherence tomography has superior spatial resolution than intravascular ultrasound, and is instrumental in the diagnosis of SCAD cases where angiographic findings are ambiguous for confirming SCAD. Understanding the role and appropriate and careful use of this technology is expected to improve the diagnosis of SCAD, and also improve outcomes with percutaneous coronary intervention, when clinically indicated.

      PubDate: 2015-05-30T05:24:15Z
       
  • Interventional Cardiology Clinics
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 3
      Author(s): Matthew J. Price



      PubDate: 2015-05-30T05:24:15Z
       
  • Percutaneous Coronary Intervention Planning and Optimization with Optical
           Coherence Tomography
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 3
      Author(s): Chiara Bernelli , Vasile Sirbu , Giulio Guagliumi

      Teaser Coronary angiography confirms or excludes coronary artery disease, assesses lesions severity, and helps to decide percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). Coronary angiography has clear limitations. Intravascular imaging guides PCI. Frequency domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) gained attention for accurate planning and guidance of complex PCI. High-speed OCT image acquisition enables prompt vessel assessment in stable and unstable patients. The high-resolution images provide precise tissue characterization and a reliable quantitative assessment of the coronary pathology. Immediately after stent implantation, OCT allows accurate evaluation of stent expansion and symmetry. Real-time angio-OCT co-registration integrates OCT into the PCI workflow for accurate decision making.

      PubDate: 2015-05-30T05:24:15Z
       
  • Assessment and Quantitation of Stent Results by Intracoronary Optical
           Coherence Tomography
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 3
      Author(s): Akiko Maehara , Mitsuaki Matsumura , Gary S. Mintz

      Teaser Optical coherence tomography evaluation of poststent results includes stent expansion as the absolute minimum stent area ratio by comparing the minimum stent area with the proximal and distal reference lumen areas or mean stent area defined as the total stent volume divided by the analyzed stent length; stent strut malapposition defined when the distance from the center of the blooming artifact and the surface of plaque is greater than the sum of stent thickness and polymer thickness; tissue protrusion through the stent struts; semiquantitative residual thrombus evaluation; and stent edge dissection.

      PubDate: 2015-05-30T05:24:15Z
       
  • Diagnosis and Evaluation of Stent Thrombosis with Optical Coherence
           Tomography
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 3
      Author(s): Alessio Mattesini , Benedetta Bellandi , Serafina Valente , Guido Parodi

      Teaser Stent thrombosis (ST) is a rare complication of percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI), especially with drug-eluting stents. ST presents as acute myocardial infarction requiring emergent repeat PCI; optimal reperfusion occurs in two-thirds of patients. As a result, ST has been associated with a high mortality rate and a high rate of recurrent thrombosis. We discuss the use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) for the diagnosis and evaluation of ST. OCT-guided ST management seems a feasible, safe, and appropriate approach. Intracoronary assesses the efficacy of coronary thrombus removal procedures and detects the prevalent stent-related factor that caused ST.

      PubDate: 2015-05-30T05:24:15Z
       
  • Copyright
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 3




      PubDate: 2015-05-30T05:24:15Z
       
  • Contributors
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 3




      PubDate: 2015-05-30T05:24:15Z
       
  • Contents
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 3




      PubDate: 2015-05-30T05:24:15Z
       
  • Intravascular Imaging: OCT and IVUS
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 3




      PubDate: 2015-05-30T05:24:15Z
       
  • Fundamentals of Optical Coherence Tomography Image Acquisition and
           Interpretation
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 3
      Author(s): Daniel S. Ong , Ik-Kyung Jang

      Teaser Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an intravascular imaging modality that enables high-resolution cross-sectional imaging of coronary arteries in vivo. With resolution that is a 10-fold improvement compared with intravascular ultrasonography, OCT can facilitate detailed plaque characterization. This article introduces the basic principles of OCT image acquisition and interpretation. Qualitative analysis entails the evaluation of plaque morphology, including features associated with plaque vulnerability to rupture. Quantitative analysis and recognition of OCT image artifacts are also discussed.

      PubDate: 2015-05-30T05:24:15Z
       
  • Technical Considerations and Practical Guidance for Intracoronary Optical
           Coherence Tomography
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 3
      Author(s): Arabindra B. Katwal , John J. Lopez

      Teaser Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an intravascular imaging technology analogous to intravascular ultrasound, using near-infrared light rather than ultrasound, thereby providing higher-resolution images. This review provides a practical guide to OCT imaging, with a particular emphasis on the techniques and approaches to optimize image acquisition, improve the evaluation of coronary lesions, and guide the strategies for percutaneous coronary intervention.

      PubDate: 2015-05-30T05:24:15Z
       
  • The Transradial Learning Curve and Volume-Outcome Relationship
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 2
      Author(s): Ian C. Gilchrist

      Teaser This article discusses how learning curves correlate with learning in transradial catheterization. Although learning curves exist in the conversion to transradial approaches, current percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) procedures are so safe that only surrogate end points such as contrast usage and x-ray exposure show learning effects. Using these surrogates, a learning curve of 30 to 50 patients seems typical to transition cardiologists from transfemoral to transradial PCI. This transition occurs with the immediate benefit of reduced vascular complications and bleeding and without loss of overall procedural success. These measures of safety during learning exist despite difference of procedural volumes.

      PubDate: 2015-04-04T08:28:22Z
       
  • The Transradial Approach and Antithrombotic Therapy Rationale and Outcomes
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 2
      Author(s): Alberto Barria Perez , Goran Rimac , Guillaume Plourde , Yann Poirier , Olivier Costerousse , Olivier F. Bertrand

      Teaser This article reviews antithrombotic strategies for percutaneous coronary interventions according to the access site and the current evidence with the aim of limiting ischemic complications and preventing radial artery occlusion (RAO). Prevention of RAO should be part of the quality control of any radial program. The incidence of RAO postcatheterization and interventions should be determined initially using the echo-duplex and then frequently assessed using the more cost-effective pulse oximetry technique. Any evidence of higher risk of RAO should prompt internal analysis and multidisciplinary mechanisms to be put in place.

      PubDate: 2015-04-04T08:28:22Z
       
  • Transradial Peripheral Arterial Procedures
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 2
      Author(s): Kintur Sanghvi , John Coppola

      Teaser Increased understanding and increased adoption of transradial catheterization across the world have led to further exploring of radial artery access for transradial endovascular interventions in peripheral artery disease (PAD). This article discusses the advantages and limitations of the transradial approach for endovascular medicine by using case examples, illustrations, and videos. The details about how to use a radial approach for PAD intervention, including and tips tricks, are discussed.

      PubDate: 2015-04-04T08:28:22Z
       
  • Complications of Transradial Cardiac Catheterization and Management
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 2
      Author(s): Vinay Arora , Meet Patel , Adhir R. Shroff

      Teaser The transradial approach for coronary angiography has become an increasingly used alternative to the conventional transfemoral approach. Decreased access site complications and bleeding, reduced hospital stays and health care costs, and increased patient satisfaction contribute to the attractiveness of this approach. However, operators must be familiar with the distinct complications associated with the transradial approach. In this article, we discuss the common and less common complications of transradial catheterization, prevention strategies, and management options.

      PubDate: 2015-04-04T08:28:22Z
       
  • Slender Approach and Sheathless Techniques
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 2
      Author(s): Saurabh Sanon , Rajiv Gulati

      Teaser Most radial arteries cannot accommodate 7- and 8-French introducer sheaths for large-bore percutaneous coronary intervention without overstretch. In addition to being uncomfortable, radial artery overstretch is associated with spasm and higher rates of procedure-related radial artery occlusion. Methods for the transradial interventionist to overcome the limitation of radial artery-sheath size mismatch include both sheath-based and sheathless approaches. In this article we discuss a variety of techniques that can be used to minimize radial artery stretch for straightforward and complex coronary procedures.

      PubDate: 2015-04-04T08:28:22Z
       
  • Transradial Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 2
      Author(s): Sasko Kedev

      Teaser Despite advances in antithrombotic and antiplatelet therapy, bleeding complications remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with acute ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI). Many bleeding events are related to the access site. Transradial access (TRA) PPCI is associated with significant reduction in bleeding and vascular complications and reduced cardiac mortality compared with the transfemoral approach (TFA). High-risk patients might particularly benefit from TRA. Radial skills providing procedural times and success rates comparable with those of the TFA are strongly recommended before using this technique in the STEMI PPCI setting.

      PubDate: 2015-04-04T08:28:22Z
       
  • Strategies to Traverse the Arm and Chest Vasculature
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 2
      Author(s): Tejas M. Patel , Sanjay Shah , Samir B. Pancholy

      Teaser This article discusses different methods of working through arm and chest vasculature to increase the success rate of the transradial approach (TRA). Despite lower rates of bleeding and vascular complications as compared with the transfemoral approach, adoption of the TRA has been slow, particularly because of higher failure rates. Anatomic complexities of arm and chest vasculature play an important role in cases of TRA failure. Using a simple framework to classify the anatomic or functional problem and approaching these challenges in a logical sequence should facilitate management and increase the success rate for TRA.

      PubDate: 2015-04-04T08:28:22Z
       
  • Diagnostic and Guide Catheter Selection and Manipulation for Radial
           Approach
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 2
      Author(s): Carlos E. Alfonso , Mauricio G. Cohen

      Teaser Transradial catheterization and percutaneous coronary interventions have multiple advantages, including reduced bleeding risk, reduced length of stay and costs, and increased patient comfort. Transradial catheterization and interventions requires the acquisition of various additional skill sets including radial arterial puncture, the ability to navigate the upper extremity vasculature, and understanding catheter selection and coronary engagement technique. Although standard femoral catheter shapes perform adequately from the left or right radial approach for coronary angiography, for percutaneous coronary intervention guide catheter support is critical. This article summarizes some practical learning points pertaining to navigating the upper extremity vasculature, and understanding catheter selection and coronary engagement technique.

      PubDate: 2015-04-04T08:28:22Z
       
  • Interventional Cardiology Clinics
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 2
      Author(s): Matthew J. Price



      PubDate: 2015-04-04T08:28:22Z
       
  • Copyright
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2015-04-04T08:28:22Z
       
  • Contributors
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2015-04-04T08:28:22Z
       
  • Contents
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2015-04-04T08:28:22Z
       
  • TRANSRADIAL ANGIOGRAPHY AND INTERVENTION
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2015-04-04T08:28:22Z
       
  • Radial Approach: Fundamental Techniques and Evidence
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 2
      Author(s): Sunil V. Rao



      PubDate: 2015-04-04T08:28:22Z
       
  • Radial Artery Access, Hemostasis, and Radial Artery Occlusion
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 2
      Author(s): Samir B. Pancholy , Sanjay Shah , Tejas M. Patel

      Teaser Radial artery access is usually achieved using a micropuncture system. Hydrophilic introducers are used to improve comfort, probably by reducing spasm. A vasodilator cocktail should be administered to prevent severe spasm and anticoagulation; usually, unfractionated heparin is administered to prevent subsequent radial artery occlusion (RAO). Hemostasis at the radial artery puncture site is easily achievable by local compression. Application of local compression frequently leads to interruption of radial artery flow and subsequent occlusion. Careful attention to maintenance of radial artery patency during hemostatic compression has been shown to decrease the risk of RAO without increasing access-related bleeding complications.

      PubDate: 2015-04-04T08:28:22Z
       
  • Nontransfemoral Approaches to Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 1
      Author(s): Jared E. Murdock , Hanna A. Jensen , Vinod H. Thourani

      Teaser Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is noninferior to surgical aortic valve replacement in patients with high operative risk and superior to medical treatment in patients deemed unsuitable for surgical intervention. However, up to 30% to 50% of patients screened for this intervention are not candidates for TAVR via the preferred transfemoral route because of severe peripheral arterial disease. Alternative access routes must be considered and include the transapical, transaortic, transsubclavian, and transcarotid approaches. The use of alternative access is predicated on appropriate patient selection as determined by a dedicated multispecialty heart valve team and can lead to excellent outcomes.

      PubDate: 2015-02-14T05:43:29Z
       
  • Valve-in-Valve Therapy for Failed Surgical Bioprosthetic Valves Clinical
           Results and Procedural Guidance
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 1
      Author(s): Alia Noorani , Vinayak Bapat

      Teaser With improved life expectancy and increased use of bioprosthetic heart valves, more elderly and frail patients present with degenerative surgical heart valve disease. The valve-in-valve procedure is an attractive alternative to a conventional open redo procedure. Although it is a novel extension of established transcatheter aortic valve implantation for severe aortic stenosis in a high-risk population, it is gaining momentum worldwide, particularly for aortic and mitral positions. Success depends on the operator being familiar with emerging transcatheter heart valve technology and morphology as well as that of the existing surgical heart valve, patient selection, accurate sizing, an ideal implantation position.

      PubDate: 2015-02-14T05:43:29Z
       
  • Neurologic Events After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 1
      Author(s): Brandon M. Jones , E. Murat Tuzcu , Amar Krishnaswamy , Samir R. Kapadia

      Teaser Early trials involving transcatheter aortic valve replacement raised concerns for an elevated risk of neurologic events compared to surgical AVR. Contemporary studies suggest declining rates with better patient selection, improved operator experience, and newer generation devices. Events are usually embolic in nature, occur in the periprocedural period, and can lead to increased morbidity and mortality. Current investigations are focused on developing embolic protection devices for intraprocedural use and optimizing antiplatelet and anticoagulant regimens. These efforts aim to further reduce the incidence of stroke, which is particularly important as the technology expands to include intermediate and possibly low surgical risk populations.

      PubDate: 2015-02-14T05:43:29Z
       
  • Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 1
      Author(s): Susheel K. Kodali



      PubDate: 2015-02-14T05:43:29Z
       
  • The Role of Preoperative and Intraoperative Imaging in Guiding
           Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 1
      Author(s): Saif Anwaruddin

      Teaser Optimal intraprocedural imaging is central to transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Familiarity with commonly used modalities is necessary. Real-time, intraprocedural imaging is provided by fluoroscopy and echocardiography to ensure proper valve position and deployment, and to assess for postdeployment complications. By providing anatomic information to real-time fluoroscopy, fusion imaging has the potential to positively affect TAVR. As newer generation valves are introduced and as TAVR is potentially offered to lower risk patient populations, it will be important to ensure that improvements in intraprocedural imaging lead to better outcomes.

      PubDate: 2015-02-14T05:43:29Z
       
  • Assessment of Paravalvular Regurgitation Following Transcatheter Aortic
           Valve Replacement
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 1
      Author(s): Rebecca T. Hahn

      Teaser Paravalvular regurgitation (PVR) following transcatheter aortic valve replacement is a known complication associated with poorer outcomes. This article discusses the current techniques for assessing the severity of PVR, including angiography, hemodynamics, MRI, and echocardiography. The strengths and pitfalls of each modality are reviewed.

      PubDate: 2015-02-14T05:43:29Z
       
  • Impact and Management of Paravalvular Regurgitation After Transcatheter
           Aortic Valve Replacement
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 1
      Author(s): Abdellaziz Dahou , Henrique Barbosa Ribeiro , Josep Rodés-Cabau , Philippe Pibarot

      Teaser Paravalvular regurgitation (PVR) is a frequent complication of transcatheter aortic valve replacement that has been shown to be associated with increased mortality. The objective of this article was to review the most up-to-date information about the impact and management of PVR. A multimodality, multiparametric, integrative approach including angiography, Doppler echocardiography, and/or cardiac MR is essential to accurately assess the severity of PVR and the underlying etiology. Corrective procedures such as balloon postdilation, valve-in-valve, or leak closure may be considered, depending on the severity, location, and etiology of PVR.

      PubDate: 2015-02-14T05:43:29Z
       
  • Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 1
      Author(s): Susheel K. Kodali



      PubDate: 2015-02-14T05:43:29Z
       
  • Risk Assessment in Patient Selection for Transcatheter Aortic Valve
           Replacement
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 1
      Author(s): Joseph A. Walsh III , Paul S. Teirstein , Curtiss Stinis , Matthew J. Price

      Teaser Risk assessment models for transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) versus surgical aortic valve replacement in high-risk patients and TAVR versus palliation in inoperable patients are based on surgical data and have limited discrimination and calibration in the setting of TAVR. Several novel risk models specifically designed for TAVR have improved discrimination over existing models but require further validation. Several clinical and echocardiographic variables, such as chronic lung disease, mitral regurgitation, and stroke volume index, influence outcomes. This article reviews current and novel risk models and important predictors of TAVR outcomes and proposes a framework to integrate them into clinical decision-making for patients with severe, symptomatic aortic stenosis.

      PubDate: 2015-02-14T05:43:29Z
       
  • Imaging the Aortic Annulus with Multi-Detector Computed Tomography and
           3-Dimensional Transesophageal Echocardiography
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 1
      Author(s): Chaitu Cheruvu , Philipp Blanke , Jonathon Leipsic

      Teaser Degenerative aortic stenosis is the most common cause of valvular heart disease in Western nations. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is an alternative therapy for inoperable or high-risk patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis. Three-dimensional imaging techniques provide multiplanar imaging, allowing precise measurements of the noncircular aortic annulus and complex anatomy of the aortic root. These measurements influence patient eligibility, allow adequate prosthesis sizing, and determine the success of implantation and likelihood of complications. This review compares imaging modalities and addresses their strengths and weaknesses to assess the aortic annulus and other aortic root structures.

      PubDate: 2015-02-14T05:43:29Z
       
  • Copyright
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 1




      PubDate: 2015-02-14T05:43:29Z
       
  • Contributors
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 1




      PubDate: 2015-02-14T05:43:29Z
       
  • Contents
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 1




      PubDate: 2015-02-14T05:43:29Z
       
  • Forthcoming Issues
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 1




      PubDate: 2015-02-14T05:43:29Z
       
 
 
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