for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help
Followed Journals
Journal you Follow: 0
 
Sign Up to follow journals, search in your chosen journals and, optionally, receive Email Alerts when new issues of your Followed Jurnals are published.
Already have an account? Sign In to see the journals you follow.
Journal Cover   Interventional Cardiology Clinics
  [H-I: 1]   [3 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 2211-7458 - ISSN (Online) 2211-7466
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2589 journals]
  • Nontransfemoral Approaches to Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 1
      Author(s): Jared E. Murdock , Hanna A. Jensen , Vinod H. Thourani

      Teaser Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is noninferior to surgical aortic valve replacement in patients with high operative risk and superior to medical treatment in patients deemed unsuitable for surgical intervention. However, up to 30% to 50% of patients screened for this intervention are not candidates for TAVR via the preferred transfemoral route because of severe peripheral arterial disease. Alternative access routes must be considered and include the transapical, transaortic, transsubclavian, and transcarotid approaches. The use of alternative access is predicated on appropriate patient selection as determined by a dedicated multispecialty heart valve team and can lead to excellent outcomes.

      PubDate: 2015-02-14T05:43:29Z
       
  • Valve-in-Valve Therapy for Failed Surgical Bioprosthetic Valves Clinical
           Results and Procedural Guidance
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 1
      Author(s): Alia Noorani , Vinayak Bapat

      Teaser With improved life expectancy and increased use of bioprosthetic heart valves, more elderly and frail patients present with degenerative surgical heart valve disease. The valve-in-valve procedure is an attractive alternative to a conventional open redo procedure. Although it is a novel extension of established transcatheter aortic valve implantation for severe aortic stenosis in a high-risk population, it is gaining momentum worldwide, particularly for aortic and mitral positions. Success depends on the operator being familiar with emerging transcatheter heart valve technology and morphology as well as that of the existing surgical heart valve, patient selection, accurate sizing, an ideal implantation position.

      PubDate: 2015-02-14T05:43:29Z
       
  • Neurologic Events After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 1
      Author(s): Brandon M. Jones , E. Murat Tuzcu , Amar Krishnaswamy , Samir R. Kapadia

      Teaser Early trials involving transcatheter aortic valve replacement raised concerns for an elevated risk of neurologic events compared to surgical AVR. Contemporary studies suggest declining rates with better patient selection, improved operator experience, and newer generation devices. Events are usually embolic in nature, occur in the periprocedural period, and can lead to increased morbidity and mortality. Current investigations are focused on developing embolic protection devices for intraprocedural use and optimizing antiplatelet and anticoagulant regimens. These efforts aim to further reduce the incidence of stroke, which is particularly important as the technology expands to include intermediate and possibly low surgical risk populations.

      PubDate: 2015-02-14T05:43:29Z
       
  • Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 1
      Author(s): Susheel K. Kodali



      PubDate: 2015-02-14T05:43:29Z
       
  • The Role of Preoperative and Intraoperative Imaging in Guiding
           Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 1
      Author(s): Saif Anwaruddin

      Teaser Optimal intraprocedural imaging is central to transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR). Familiarity with commonly used modalities is necessary. Real-time, intraprocedural imaging is provided by fluoroscopy and echocardiography to ensure proper valve position and deployment, and to assess for postdeployment complications. By providing anatomic information to real-time fluoroscopy, fusion imaging has the potential to positively affect TAVR. As newer generation valves are introduced and as TAVR is potentially offered to lower risk patient populations, it will be important to ensure that improvements in intraprocedural imaging lead to better outcomes.

      PubDate: 2015-02-14T05:43:29Z
       
  • Assessment of Paravalvular Regurgitation Following Transcatheter Aortic
           Valve Replacement
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 1
      Author(s): Rebecca T. Hahn

      Teaser Paravalvular regurgitation (PVR) following transcatheter aortic valve replacement is a known complication associated with poorer outcomes. This article discusses the current techniques for assessing the severity of PVR, including angiography, hemodynamics, MRI, and echocardiography. The strengths and pitfalls of each modality are reviewed.

      PubDate: 2015-02-14T05:43:29Z
       
  • Impact and Management of Paravalvular Regurgitation After Transcatheter
           Aortic Valve Replacement
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 1
      Author(s): Abdellaziz Dahou , Henrique Barbosa Ribeiro , Josep Rodés-Cabau , Philippe Pibarot

      Teaser Paravalvular regurgitation (PVR) is a frequent complication of transcatheter aortic valve replacement that has been shown to be associated with increased mortality. The objective of this article was to review the most up-to-date information about the impact and management of PVR. A multimodality, multiparametric, integrative approach including angiography, Doppler echocardiography, and/or cardiac MR is essential to accurately assess the severity of PVR and the underlying etiology. Corrective procedures such as balloon postdilation, valve-in-valve, or leak closure may be considered, depending on the severity, location, and etiology of PVR.

      PubDate: 2015-02-14T05:43:29Z
       
  • Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 1
      Author(s): Susheel K. Kodali



      PubDate: 2015-02-14T05:43:29Z
       
  • Risk Assessment in Patient Selection for Transcatheter Aortic Valve
           Replacement
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 1
      Author(s): Joseph A. Walsh III , Paul S. Teirstein , Curtiss Stinis , Matthew J. Price

      Teaser Risk assessment models for transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) versus surgical aortic valve replacement in high-risk patients and TAVR versus palliation in inoperable patients are based on surgical data and have limited discrimination and calibration in the setting of TAVR. Several novel risk models specifically designed for TAVR have improved discrimination over existing models but require further validation. Several clinical and echocardiographic variables, such as chronic lung disease, mitral regurgitation, and stroke volume index, influence outcomes. This article reviews current and novel risk models and important predictors of TAVR outcomes and proposes a framework to integrate them into clinical decision-making for patients with severe, symptomatic aortic stenosis.

      PubDate: 2015-02-14T05:43:29Z
       
  • Imaging the Aortic Annulus with Multi-Detector Computed Tomography and
           3-Dimensional Transesophageal Echocardiography
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 1
      Author(s): Chaitu Cheruvu , Philipp Blanke , Jonathon Leipsic

      Teaser Degenerative aortic stenosis is the most common cause of valvular heart disease in Western nations. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is an alternative therapy for inoperable or high-risk patients with symptomatic severe aortic stenosis. Three-dimensional imaging techniques provide multiplanar imaging, allowing precise measurements of the noncircular aortic annulus and complex anatomy of the aortic root. These measurements influence patient eligibility, allow adequate prosthesis sizing, and determine the success of implantation and likelihood of complications. This review compares imaging modalities and addresses their strengths and weaknesses to assess the aortic annulus and other aortic root structures.

      PubDate: 2015-02-14T05:43:29Z
       
  • Copyright
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 1




      PubDate: 2015-02-14T05:43:29Z
       
  • Contributors
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 1




      PubDate: 2015-02-14T05:43:29Z
       
  • Contents
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 1




      PubDate: 2015-02-14T05:43:29Z
       
  • Forthcoming Issues
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 4, Issue 1




      PubDate: 2015-02-14T05:43:29Z
       
  • Management of Coronary Disease in the Era of Transcatheter Aortic Valve
           Replacement Comprehensive Review of the Literature
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 October 2014
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics
      Author(s): Anthony Poulin , Josep Rodés-Cabau , Jean-Michel Paradis

      Teaser Among the cohort of complex and multifaceted patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR), the prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD) ranges from 48% to 75%. However, optimal management of CAD in this setting has not been established. This article provides a comprehensive review of the literature to depict the actual knowledge on the subject of aortic stenosis and concomitant CAD. This article also aids heart teams in their decision-making process to appropriately manage these challenging patients with aortic stenosis and CAD. Upcoming randomized studies will clarify the influence of CAD, the best timing for percutaneous coronary intervention, and its impact on TAVR results.

      PubDate: 2014-10-10T03:32:43Z
       
  • Index
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 3, Issue 4




      PubDate: 2014-10-10T03:32:43Z
       
  • Noninvasive Testing in Peripheral Arterial Disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 3, Issue 4
      Author(s): Ian Del Conde , James F. Benenati

      Teaser Most patients suspected of having peripheral arterial disease should undergo noninvasive vascular testing to confirm the diagnosis, and to determine the severity and extent of the disease. This article reviews practical aspects of commonly used noninvasive tests for lower extremity peripheral arterial disease, including the ankle-brachial index, segmental limb pressures, pulse volume recordings, duplex ultrasonography, computed tomography angiography, and magnetic resonance angiography.

      PubDate: 2014-10-06T02:29:04Z
       
  • Endovascular Management of Brachiocephalic Disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 3, Issue 4
      Author(s): D. Christopher Metzger

      Teaser Brachiocephalic disease can pose important clinical risks and manifestations. Most of these lesions are amenable to endovascular treatment. However, these treatments have significant risks and require modified procedural techniques. All interventions require a careful preprocedural evaluation and consultation. These endovascular interventions should be performed by experienced operators with extensive previous carotid and endovascular experience in appropriate adequately equipped venues. Most brachiocephalic disease also has surgical options for treatment. This article presents guidelines to assist experienced operators to perform these procedures with proper technique after using good clinical judgment.

      PubDate: 2014-10-06T02:29:04Z
       
  • Management of Aneurysmal Disease of the Aorta
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 3, Issue 4
      Author(s): Vishal Kapur , William A. Gray

      Teaser Aneurysm of the aorta is largely a disease of the elderly. The incidence/prevalence of the disease has steadily increased in recent times, mainly because of the increase in awareness among patients/physicians and better imaging modalities. Early diagnosis and treatment of this disease holds the key to success and plays a part in prevention of catastrophic complications. With advancements in endovascular and surgical innovations, repair of aneurysmal disease has made significant progress, translating into better survival and long-term benefits. However, with significant morbidity and mortality associated with this disease, there is still a need for further research.

      PubDate: 2014-10-06T02:29:04Z
       
  • Contents
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 3, Issue 4




      PubDate: 2014-10-06T02:29:04Z
       
  • Forthcoming Issues
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 3, Issue 4




      PubDate: 2014-10-06T02:29:04Z
       
  • Peripheral Artery Disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 3, Issue 4
      Author(s): Prakash Krishnan , Tyrone Collins



      PubDate: 2014-10-06T02:29:04Z
       
  • History and Physical Examination in Diagnosis of Peripheral Artery Disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 3, Issue 4
      Author(s): Anitha Rajamanickam , Prakash Krishnan

      Teaser Peripheral artery disease (PAD) may be silent or present with an assortment of symptoms and signs suggesting peripheral artery ischemia. Peripheral vascular disease includes PAD and disorders of the peripheral venous system and lymphatic system. Generally, PAD is synonymous with arteries of the limbs and pelvis, but it can be expanded to include the renal arteries, carotid arteries, mesenteric arteries, and the aorta. It is imperative to recognize and treat PAD early, as appropriate management of PAD can help avoid devastating complications such as limb amputation and death.

      PubDate: 2014-10-06T02:29:04Z
       
  • Contributors
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 3, Issue 4




      PubDate: 2014-10-06T02:29:04Z
       
  • Acute Limb Ischemia
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 3, Issue 4
      Author(s): Bhaskar Purushottam , Karthik Gujja , Adrian Zalewski , Prakash Krishnan

      Teaser Acute limb ischemia is a vascular event presenting with sudden decrease in limb perfusion (of <14 days’ duration) that threatens limb viability. Acute thrombosis of the native artery or graft makes up the bulk of etiopathogenesis. Prompt revascularization is the cornerstone of management of acute limb ischemia in limbs that have not undergone irreversible tissue and nerve damage. Amputation is performed in patients with irreversible tissue and nerve damage.

      PubDate: 2014-10-06T02:29:04Z
       
  • Management of Infrapopliteal Arterial Disease Critical Limb Ischemia
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 3, Issue 4
      Author(s): Jihad A. Mustapha , Larry J. Diaz-Sandoval

      Teaser According to the TransAtlantic Inter-Society Consensus Document on Management of Peripheral Arterial Disease, “there is increasing evidence to support a recommendation for angioplasty in patients with critical limb ischemia and infrapopliteal artery occlusion.” Management of infrapopliteal artery disease starts with diagnosis using modern preprocedural noninvasive and invasive imaging. Interventionalists need to learn the role of chronic total occlusion cap analysis and collateral zone recognition in angiosome-directed interventions for management of critical limb ischemia and be familiar with equipment and device selection and a stepwise approach for endovascular interventions. Interventionalists need to know which crossing tools to use to successfully cross-complex chronic total occlusion caps.

      PubDate: 2014-10-06T02:29:04Z
       
  • Chronic Venous Insufficiency
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 3, Issue 4
      Author(s): Karthik Gujja , Jose Wiley , Prakash Krishnan

      Teaser Varicose veins are a common manifestation of chronic venous disease and affect approximately 25% of adults in the western hemisphere. The historical standard treatment has been surgery, with high ligation and stripping, combined with phlebectomies. In the past decade, alternative treatments such as endovenous ablation of the great saphenous vein (GSV) with laser, radiofrequency ablation, and ultrasonography-guided foam sclerotherapy have gained popularity. Performed as office-based procedures using tumescent local anesthesia, the new minimally invasive techniques have been shown in numerous studies to obliterate the GSV, eliminate reflux, and improve symptoms safely and effectively.

      PubDate: 2014-10-06T02:29:04Z
       
  • Endovascular Treatment of Deep Vein Thrombosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 3, Issue 4
      Author(s): Julian J. Javier

      Teaser Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Conventional treatment with anticoagulation therapy may undertreat the condition. Patients with VTE are at risk for recurrence with increasing time passage. Endovascular approaches exist for treating VTE, including deep vein thrombosis, but it is unclear which patients are appropriate candidates for endovascular versus medical approaches. Many new endovascular technologies are in development, and new oral anticoagulants are also on the market. Clinicians must be mindful of these new products and use them appropriately to better manage VTE.

      PubDate: 2014-10-06T02:29:04Z
       
  • Management of Mesenteric Ischemia
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 August 2014
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics
      Author(s): Anvar Babaev , David W. Lee , Louai Razzouk

      Teaser Acute mesenteric ischemia is associated with a high mortality rate and requires emergent evaluation and surgical management. However, patients with chronic mesenteric ischemia can undergo either surgical or endovascular revascularization. Review of recent medical literature suggests lower rates of mortality and complications after endovascular revascularization, but higher rates of primary patency after surgical revascularization. The decision regarding method of revascularization in patients with chronic mesenteric ischemia should be based on the patient’s vascular anatomy, comorbidities, and life expectancy.

      PubDate: 2014-08-07T20:59:11Z
       
  • Management of Atherosclerotic Aortoiliac Occlusive Disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 August 2014
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics
      Author(s): Marcin Bujak , Jacqueline Gamberdella , Carlos Mena

      Teaser Development of aortoiliac occlusive disease (AIOD) is associated with classic risk factors for atherosclerotic disease such as hyperlipidemia, hypertension, diabetes, or smoking. Risk factor modification, smoking cessation, and prevention of cardiovascular events remain the cornerstones of AIOD management. Symptom improvement and limb loss prevention are considered secondary goals of therapy. Continuous technological advances, new devices, as well as new revascularization techniques are constantly changing the landscape of AIOD management. Surgical interventions, which were considered a gold standard therapy for nearly 50 years, currently give way to newer and less invasive endovascular techniques.

      PubDate: 2014-08-07T20:59:11Z
       
  • Contemporary Management of Femoral Popliteal Revascularization
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 August 2014
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics
      Author(s): Phillip A. Erwin , Mehdi H. Shishehbor

      Teaser Symptomatic peripheral artery disease of the femoral popliteal segment can be treated by surgical and endovascular revascularization, but the best approach is controversial. Conventional approaches to revascularization have focused on lesion anatomy to decide on bypass versus endovascular treatment, but advances in endovascular therapy make an endovascular-first approach increasingly feasible—either as a single approach or as an adjunct to short-segment bypass (ie, hybrid procedure). In this review, we discuss the medical, endovascular, and surgical treatment of femoral popliteal revascularization with a special emphasis on advances in percutaneous therapy.

      PubDate: 2014-08-07T20:59:11Z
       
  • Management of Renal Arterial Disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 August 2014
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics
      Author(s): Jun Li , Sahil A. Parikh

      Teaser Severe atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis can manifest as treatment-resistant hypertension, ischemic nephropathy and/or cardiac disturbance syndromes of recurrent flash pulmonary edema and refractory angina. Renal artery revascularization can dramatically impact patient outcome. However, patient selection for revascularization can be challenging. Renal artery stenting is most commonly used for renal revascularization and is a safe procedure when performed in carefully selected patients. This review addresses the pathophysiology of renal artery stenosis and the data supporting revascularization in such patients.

      PubDate: 2014-08-07T20:59:11Z
       
  • Renal Complications in Patients Undergoing Peripheral Artery Interventions
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2014
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 3, Issue 3
      Author(s): Sachin S. Goel , Mehdi H. Shishehbor

      Teaser Surgical or endovascular revascularization procedures for severe peripheral artery disease (PAD) are typically performed in patients with lifestyle-limiting symptoms or evidence of end-organ ischemia secondary to PAD. The role of endovascular therapy in the treatment of PAD is expanding. Contrast-induced nephropathy is the most important and most frequent renal complication of endovascular interventional procedures. Knowledge about complications and their prevention and management is essential for successful outcomes. This article focuses on renal complications during peripheral artery interventions.

      PubDate: 2014-07-27T10:46:30Z
       
  • Renal Complications in Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve
           Replacement
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2014
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 3, Issue 3
      Author(s): Justin M. Dunn , E. Murat Tuzcu , Samir R. Kapadia

      Teaser Acute kidney injury in hospitalized patients is associated with significantly increased mortality across a broad spectrum of conditions. According to the Society of Thoracic Surgeons database, patients with chronic kidney disease undergoing surgical aortic valve replacement with or without coronary artery bypass grafting had a more than 50% reduction in observed 8-year survival compared with those without chronic kidney disease. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement is an exciting new approach for the treatment of aortic stenosis in high-risk or inoperable patients with severe aortic stenosis. This article discusses the incidence, predictors, impact, and potential avoidance and management strategies of renal dysfunction associated with transcatheter aortic valve replacement.

      PubDate: 2014-07-27T10:46:30Z
       
  • Device-Based Therapy in the Prevention of Contrast-Induced Nephropathy
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2014
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 3, Issue 3
      Author(s): Dion Stub , Stephen J. Duffy , David M. Kaye

      Teaser Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is a common condition that is associated with short- and, likely, long-term adverse outcomes. Although periprocedural intravenous hydration is the simplest and most widely used technique to prevent CIN, the limited ability of this approach to mitigate the CIN risk in high-risk populations has provided an impetus to develop new preventive strategies. A range of potentially useful device-based approaches offers new preventive techniques. Well-designed and adequately powered randomized studies of these device-based therapies are urgently needed to determine the expanding role they will play in future clinical practice.

      PubDate: 2014-07-27T10:46:30Z
       
  • A Practical Approach to Preventing Renal Complications in the
           Catheterization Laboratory
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2014
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 3, Issue 3
      Author(s): Michael Howe , Hitinder S. Gurm

      Teaser Kidney injury following cardiac catheterization is an infrequent, though persistent, complication, which in some cases may be preventable. Patients at increased risk for renal complications following catheterization can be identified through individual and procedural risk factors, and several risk-prediction models are readily available. The authors advocate for the development of an easily implemented and standardized protocol, readily accessible to catheterization laboratory staff, for the identification and treatment of those patients who may be at increased risk for renal complications following cardiac catheterization.

      PubDate: 2014-07-27T10:46:30Z
       
  • Pharmacologic Prophylaxis for Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2014
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 3, Issue 3
      Author(s): Anna Toso , Mario Leoncini , Mauro Maioli , Francesco Tropeano , Francesco Bellandi

      Teaser In the effort to prevent contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI), several pharmacologic agents have been tested for their single or combined nephroprotective properties. To date, however, no drug has been officially approved for this aim. This article focuses on the three agents that have been most extensively studied: statins, N-acetylcysteine, and ascorbic acid. Particular attention is paid to the impact of these drugs on the CI-AKI prevention and improved prognosis.

      PubDate: 2014-07-27T10:46:30Z
       
  • Predicting Contrast-induced Renal Complications in the Catheterization
           Laboratory
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2014
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 3, Issue 3
      Author(s): Judith Kooiman , Hitinder S. Gurm

      Teaser Risk scores should undergo 3 analytical phases before they are suitable for adoption in clinical practice, namely, derivation, external validation, and assessment of effect on clinical outcomes of use of the risk score in a so-called impact study. Major risk factors for renal complications after percutaneous coronary intervention are pre-existing chronic kidney disease, diabetes mellitus, use of a high contrast dose, and hemodynamic instability. Unfortunately, only 3 of these 10 risk scores have undergone external validation. As a result, there is a great need for further research on the already designed risk scores.

      PubDate: 2014-07-27T10:46:30Z
       
  • Biomarkers of Contrast-Induced Nephropathy Which Ones and What Is Their
           Clinical Relevance?
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2014
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 3, Issue 3
      Author(s): Jolanta Malyszko , Hanna Bachorzewska-Gajewska , Slawomir Dobrzycki

      Teaser Contrast-induced nephropathy, or contrast-induced acute kidney injury (AKI), is an acute impairment of renal function as manifested by an increase in serum creatinine. Different urinary and serum proteins have been intensively investigated as possible biomarkers for the early diagnosis of AKI. Promising candidate biomarkers have the ability to detect an early and graded increase in tubular epithelial cell injury and to distinguish prerenal causes of AKI from acute tubular necrosis. In this article new, emerging biomarkers of contrast-induced AKI are presented and described, of which serum neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin appears to be the most promising.

      PubDate: 2014-07-27T10:46:30Z
       
  • Intravenous and Oral Hydration Approaches, Principles, and Differing
           Regimens
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2014
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 3, Issue 3
      Author(s): Igor Rojkovskiy , Richard Solomon

      Teaser Prevention of contrast-induced nephropathy is founded on minimizing the pathophysiologic consequences of contrast media (CM) interacting with a vulnerable kidney. In this article, the rationale for administering fluid (oral or intravenous) is discussed, and the clinical trials exploring different protocols are reviewed. A benefit from administration of fluids before CM exposure, which corrects volume depletion and increases urine output, can be expected. Forced diuresis without adequate volume replacement is deleterious.

      PubDate: 2014-07-27T10:46:30Z
       
  • Contrast-Induced Nephropathy Definitions, Epidemiology, and Implications
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2014
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 3, Issue 3
      Author(s): Peter A. McCullough

      Teaser Contrast-induced nephropathy, now termed contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI), has been a long-recognized complication of administering intravascular iodinated contrast. This article reviews the newest literature on subclinical CI-AKI detected by novel biomarkers, and clinical CI-AKI recognized by an increase in serum creatinine and a reduction in urine output. Both components of CI-AKI are associated with adverse outcomes, including in-hospital complications, increased length of stay, need for renal replacement therapy, rehospitalization, permanent loss in renal filtration function, and death.

      PubDate: 2014-07-27T10:46:30Z
       
  • Pathophysiology of Contrast-Induced Acute Kidney Injury
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2014
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 3, Issue 3
      Author(s): Remy W.F. Geenen , Hylke Jan Kingma , Aart J. van der Molen

      Teaser Contrast-induced acute kidney injury (CI-AKI) refers to acute kidney injury (AKI) after intravenous or intra-arterial administration of contrast media (CM). The 2 key mechanisms related to AKI are acute tubular necrosis and prerenal azotemia. Although the pathophysiology of AKI is complex, modern frameworks show that AKI has 3 major pathways: hemodynamic injury, systemic inflammation, and toxic injury. In the pathophysiology of CI-AKI, 3 major distinct, but potentially interacting pathways are recognized: hemodynamic effects, increase in oxygen free radicals, and direct CM molecule tubular cell toxicity. This article reviews the pathophysiology of CI-AKI by describing and explaining these pathways.

      PubDate: 2014-07-27T10:46:30Z
       
  • Nonrenal Complications of Contrast Media
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2014
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 3, Issue 3
      Author(s): Damien Marycz , Khaled M. Ziada

      Teaser Nonrenal complications of contrast media are caused by chemotoxic or anaphylactoid reactions related to the contrast agent used. Chemotoxicity is mainly attributed to ionic concentration and osmolality. Anaphylactoid reactions are typically caused by direct activation of basophils, mast cells, and complement rather than an observable antigen-antibody interaction, and may be acute or delayed. History of an adverse reaction following prior exposure is the strongest predictor of a subsequent adverse reaction to contrast. Premedication regimens of corticosteroids or antihistamines can lower the risk of repeat adverse reactions. Treatment of anaphylactoid reactions depends on the severity of symptoms.

      PubDate: 2014-07-27T10:46:30Z
       
  • Relative Nephrotoxicity of Different Contrast Media
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2014
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 3, Issue 3
      Author(s): Iram Aqeel , Amarinder S. Garcha , Michael R. Rudnick

      Teaser Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is a common cause of acute kidney injury among hospitalized patients. High-osmolar contrast agents are associated with increased risk of CIN. Low-osmolar (LOCM) and iso-osmolar (IOCM) agents show no difference in the incidence of CIN, even among high-risk patients. This finding suggests that factors other than osmolality may play a role in the pathogenesis of CIN. The use of either LOCM or IOCM agents is recommended in high-risk patients.

      PubDate: 2014-07-27T10:46:30Z
       
  • Contributors
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2014
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 3, Issue 3




      PubDate: 2014-07-27T10:46:30Z
       
  • Contents
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2014
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 3, Issue 3




      PubDate: 2014-07-27T10:46:30Z
       
  • Forthcoming Issues
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2014
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 3, Issue 3




      PubDate: 2014-07-27T10:46:30Z
       
  • Implications of Kidney Disease in the Cardiac Patient
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2014
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 3, Issue 3
      Author(s): Roger Rear , Pascal Meier , Robert M. Bell

      Teaser Traditional cardiovascular risk factors, particularly hypertension and diabetes, are common in the disease processes of both renal and cardiac pathology. Unfortunately the coexistence of renal impairment is not an innocent bystander in cardiovascular disease; it disorder not only increases the prevalence and severity of cardiovascular disease, but also negatively affects prognostic outcomes and the safety and efficacy of cardiac interventions. This article discusses the role and impact of kidney disease in the cardiac patient in 3 key common cardiovascular processes: coronary artery disease, arrhythmia, and heart failure.

      PubDate: 2014-07-27T10:46:30Z
       
  • Contrast Media History and Chemical Properties
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2014
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics, Volume 3, Issue 3
      Author(s): Michael Buschur , Peter Aspelin

      Teaser Contrast media are essential for cardiac catheterization, and the evolution of these agents has had a significant role in cardiology. Contrast agents are classified as ionic or nonionic based on water solubility and as monomers or dimers based on their chemical structures. Furthermore, these agents are classified on osmolality as high osmolar, low osmolar, or iso-osmolar. The last century has seen a rapid evolution of these agents from their discovery during the search for syphilis treatments to advancements in their chemical properties, making them safer for patients and improving tissue visualization.

      PubDate: 2014-07-27T10:46:30Z
       
  • Renal Complications in the Catheterization Laboratory
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 May 2014
      Source:Interventional Cardiology Clinics
      Author(s): Hitinder S. Gurm , Judith Kooiman



      PubDate: 2014-05-16T06:04:38Z
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-2014