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Journal Cover Religions of South Asia
  [SJR: 0.101]   [H-I: 1]   [9 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1751-2689 - ISSN (Online) 1751-2697
   Published by Equinox Publishing Homepage  [30 journals]
  • Editorial
    • Authors: Simon Brodbeck, Dermot Killingley, Anna King
      PubDate: 2017-12-21
      Issue No: Vol. 10 (2017)
       
  • The Yoni Cult at Kāmākhyā: Its Cross-Cultural Roots
    • Authors: Paolo E. Rosati
      Abstract: In ancient Assam the mythology of Dakṣa’s sacrifice and the consequent suicide of Satī was transformed, in order to incorporate the yoni (vulva) symbol in the Brahmanic context. According to the North-eastern Purāṇas the limbs of the dismembered goddess’s corpse fell to the earth, originating the śākta pīṭhas (seats of the goddess); in particular, the yoni of Satī fell on Kāmagiri, a place that became well known as either the place where Śiva and Śakti met to make love, or the goddess’s tomb. Before Brahmanic cultural contact with the local traditions of Kāmarūpa, the autochthonous religion was the kirāta dharma (religion of Kirātas), and it was already developed within the Kāmākhyā cult, later absorbed in the Brahmanic religious fold. In her shrine, Kāmākhyā has been worshipped in the shape of a yoni-stone. This non-anthropomorphic cult is the result of crosscultural dialectic between autochthonous tribes and the Vedic and heterodox Brahmanic traditions, which led to the fusion of local deities and the mainstream Hindu goddesses, resulting in the goddess Kāmākhyā. Later, Kāmākhyā was raised to the rank of royal tutelary deity to integrate local tribes and the Hinduized kings of Kāmarūpa. Using inter-textual and intra-textual analysis as well as ethnographic data, this essay aims to demonstrate that tribal traditions strongly influenced the śākta-tantra developments of the yoni cult at Kāmākhyā.
      PubDate: 2017-12-21
      Issue No: Vol. 10 (2017)
       
  • Understanding Jainism, by Lawrence A. Babb. Edinburgh: Dunedin, 2015. and
           Jainism: A Guide for the Perplexed, by Sherry Fohr. London & New York:
           Bloomsbury, 2015
    • Authors: Naomi Appleton
      Abstract: Understanding Jainism, by Lawrence A. Babb. Edinburgh: Dunedin, 2015. 198 pp., £12.50 (pb). ISBN 978-1-780-46032-1 Jainism: A Guide for the Perplexed, by Sherry Fohr. London & New York: Bloomsbury, 2015. 176 pp., £54 (hb), £16.19 (pb and Ebook). ISBN 978-1-441-15116-2 (hb), 978-1-441-16594-7 (pb), 978-1-474-22755-1 (eBook)
      PubDate: 2017-12-21
      Issue No: Vol. 10 (2017)
       
  • Krishna et ses métamorphoses dans les traditions indiennes: Récits
           d’enfance autour du Harivamsha, by André Couture and Christine
           Chojnacki. Religions dans l’Histoire. Paris: Presses de l’Université
           Paris-Sorbonne, 2014. ISBN 978-2-84050-953-0
    • Authors: Simon Brodbeck
      Abstract: Krishna et ses métamorphoses dans les traditions indiennes: Récits d’enfance autour du Harivamsha, by André Couture and Christine Chojnacki. Religions dans l’Histoire. Paris: Presses de l’Université Paris-Sorbonne, 2014. 454 pp., €24 (pb). ISBN 978-2-84050-953-0
      PubDate: 2017-12-21
      Issue No: Vol. 10 (2017)
       
  • Provincial Hinduism: Religion and Community in Gwalior City, by Daniel
           Gold. New York: Oxford University Press, 2015. xii + 292 pp., 53 figs.,
           $99.00 (hb), $35.00 (pb). ISBN 9780190212483 (hb), 9780190212490 (pb)
    • Authors: John E. Cort
      Abstract: Provincial Hinduism: Religion and Community in Gwalior City, by Daniel Gold. New York: Oxford University Press, 2015. xii + 292 pp., 53 figs., $99.00 (hb), $35.00 (pb). ISBN 9780190212483 (hb), 9780190212490 (pb)
      PubDate: 2017-12-21
      Issue No: Vol. 10 (2017)
       
  • Young Sikhs in a Global World: Negotiating Traditions, Identities and
           Authorities, edited by Knut A. Jacobsen and Kristina Myrvold, Farnham:
           Ashgate, 2015. xv + 293 pp., £70.00 (hb). ISBN 978-1-472-45696-0 (hb)
    • Authors: Elearnor Nesbitt
      Abstract: Young Sikhs in a Global World: Negotiating Traditions, Identities and Authorities, edited by Knut A. Jacobsen and Kristina Myrvold, Farnham: Ashgate, 2015. xv + 293 pp., £70.00 (hb). ISBN 978-1-472-45696-0 (hb)
      PubDate: 2017-12-21
      Issue No: Vol. 10 (2017)
       
  • Philosophy of Space-Time in Early Jaina Thought: Quantification as a Means
           of Knowing
    • Authors: Alessandra Petrocchi
      Abstract: The aim of this article is to bring to light the determining role played by quantification for early Jain monastic intellectuals. Jaina philosophy of space-time attempts to fix in a finely elaborated numerical structure the model of the Universe and the whole system of reality. In discussions about the sophisticated mathematical practices characterizing Jaina sources, the achievements realized by highly elaborate formulae have been variously emphasized. An aspect that has been thus far disregarded by historiography is the reasoning behind mathematical modes of enquiry. Therefore, there is a need to investigate the relationship between the way Jaina thinkers expounded philosophical issues and the use of quantifying procedures. Everything imaginable that could be quantified was computed: the numbers of individuals among different kinds of beings in the various regions of the three worlds, the extent of their lifespans, the volumes of space occupied by living beings of various shapes, and other matters. I shall argue that in Jainism, mathematics is a fundamental expedient of philosophical enquiry. Textual evidence from religious-philosophical works will be presented to demonstrate that, for Jainas, quantification responds to a‘quest for order’: the intellectual and spiritual ambition to recognize in nature structured and predictable patterns.
      PubDate: 2017-11-28
      Issue No: Vol. 10 (2017)
       
  • Dāsa Sāhitya: Some Notes on Early Publications
    • Authors: Shashikantha Koudur
      Abstract: Dāsa Sāhitya is a literary genre in Kannada, first seen in the late fifteenth century. Making its mark both in literature and in Indian classical music, Dāsa Sāhitya attracted the attention of missionaries and other colonial functionaries, and was one of the first genres to be edited and published in Kannada in the mid-nineteenth century. Very soon, native editors and publishers started working on the genre. Usually classified under bhakti literature in the literary historiography of Kannada literature, Dāsa Sāhitya was published by individuals of varying interests. This article makes a survey of some of the early publications of the genre, and notes varying concerns and interests with which they were produced. We refrain from classifying these works as either ‘colonial’ or ‘nationalist’, while noting that the genre and the associated works were inextricably linked to the brahmin community from the days of the early publications, even as this community projected it as part of ‘Kannada’ culture. We also note evidence of cultural opposition to the change from manuscript to print.
      PubDate: 2017-11-28
      Issue No: Vol. 10 (2017)
       
  • Palanquins of the Gods: Indigenous Theologies, Ritual Practice, and
           Complex Agency in the Western Indian Himalayas
    • Authors: Ehud Halperin
      Abstract: Village deities in the West Indian Himalayas, who manifest in temples, possessed oracles, and moving vehicles, intervene in various aspects of the private and public lives of their devotees. As such, these devīs and devtās (goddesses and gods) emerge from both indigenous theologies and innovative scholarly theories as complex agents whose cognition is distributed among community members and whose agency is articulated and enacted in public rituals. After presenting the body of theory to which I have just referred, I argue in this essay that the institution of the moving rath—literally a ‘chariot,’ but in reality a palanquin carried on devotees’ shoulders—is a major ritual arena where the deities are established as such complex agents. I do so by documenting in detail and analyzing the ritual handling of the shared rath of the goddess Haḍimbā and the god Manu Ṛṣī, two well-known village deities in the Kullu Valley (Himachal Pradesh), otherwise known as ‘The Valley of Gods.’
      PubDate: 2017-11-28
      Issue No: Vol. 10 (2017)
       
 
 
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