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Religions of South Asia
   Journal TOC RSS feeds Export to Zotero [6 followers]  Follow    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
     ISSN (Print) 17512689 - ISSN (Online) 1751-2697
     Published by Equinox Publishing Homepage  [26 journals]
  • Lee Marsden (ed.), The Ashgate Research Companion to Religion and Conflict
           Resolution. Farnham: Ashgate, 2012. 421 pp. £85. ISBN
           978-1-4094-1089-8 (hbk), ISBN 978-1-4094-1090-4 (ebk-PDF), ISBN
           978-1-4094-7128-8 (ebk-ePUB).
    • Authors: Anna King
      Abstract: Book review.
      PubDate: 2014-08-21
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2014)
       
  • Federico Squarcini (ed.), Boundaries, Dynamics and Construction of
           Traditions in South Asia. London: Anthem Press, 2011. 618 pp. £80.
           ISBN 978-0-85728-430-3 (hardback).
    • Authors: Hazel Collinson
      Abstract: Book review.
      PubDate: 2014-08-21
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2014)
       
  • Tsongkhapa Losang Drakpa, Great Treatise on the Stages of Mantra: Chapters
           XI– XII (The Creation Stage). Annotated translation by Thomas
           Freeman Yarnall. New York: American Institute for Buddhist
           Studies/Columbia University Press, 2013. xxiii + 381 pp. £3
    • Authors: Michael Zrenner
      Abstract: Book review.
      PubDate: 2014-08-21
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2014)
       
  • Svādhyāya: An Ancient Way of Using the Veda
    • Authors: Dermot Killingly
      Abstract: Svādhyāya in Vedic ritual is the recitation of previously memorized texts, outside the context of yajña, but constituting in itself a ritual which bestows merit on the practitioner. It is described in the Brāhmaṇas, in Manu and elsewhere, in terms which present it as a virtual performance of yajña. The claim that the merit gained by svādhyāya equals or even surpasses that gained by yajña is analogous to claims made for temple worship or for Vedāntic knowledge of brahman. Svādhyāya, by separating the recitation of texts from the context of yajña which is the primary purpose of the Veda, ensured the survival of the Veda when yajña became rare or obsolete. This decontextualization helps to explain how the Veda could be transmitted orally and yet remain a stable text, despite the general view that oral texts are by nature fluid.
      PubDate: 2014-08-21
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2014)
       
  • Buddhist Aesthetics?
    • Authors: Richard Gombrich
      Abstract: The Pali canon shows a largely negative view of visual art. In ancient Indian culture, beauty is associated with sexual attraction, and has an erotic overtone. Concern with beauty conflicts with the Buddhist ideal of detachment from worldly pleasures. On the other hand Buddhists have created wonderful works of art, and monks can be painters or dancers. Pictures and performances are made as expressions of devotion, and as means of acquiring merit, and most importantly to convey a Buddhist message.
      PubDate: 2014-08-21
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2014)
       
  • Ordination and Disrobing in Theravada Buddhism: The Sangha as a Barometer
           of the Community
    • Authors: Kate Crosby
      Abstract: Much has been written about motivations for becoming a monk in Theravada societies. This article examines the other end of the process, the monk’s ‘re-entering’ society. It begins by looking at the motives for becoming a monk, and the difference between the lifelong commitment typical of Sri Lanka and the temporary ordination typical of Southeast Asian countries. It then looks at motives for disrobing, which may be a wish to enjoy lay life, a wish to serve one’s family or the community, a sense of unworthiness, or dissatisfaction with the Sangha. The social and economic problems faced by the former monk are also discussed. We then look at what disrobing practices tell us about the position of Theravada and of the Theravada monk in different Southeast Asian countries.
      PubDate: 2014-08-21
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2014)
       
  • The Buddhist Permutations of Consciousness
    • Authors: Tadeusz Skorupski
      Abstract: This article offers a broad survey of the Buddhist interpretations of consciousness as an integral component of the various taxonomies of animate life, and as it evolves and functions in its karmic or mundane, and its purified or supramundane conditions. It discusses the concepts set out in the texts of Abhidharma, and their interpretation by different schools. It shows the complex and intricate discussion among Buddhist thinkers of the nature and different aspects of consciousness, and suggests that they still leave some problems unresolved.
      PubDate: 2014-08-21
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2014)
       
  • The Nature of the Eight-factored Ariya, Lokuttara Magga in the Suttas
           Compared to the Pali Commentarial Idea of it as Momentary
    • Authors: Peter Harvey
      Abstract: It is widely recognized that the key practice of Theravāda Buddhism is the ‘Noble Eightfold Path’ (ariya aṭṭhaṅgika magga). While this is sometimes loosely seen as encompassing all Theravāda Buddhist practices, the developed tradition, as expressed in the Pali commentaries, sees it as a momentary state, the culmination of prior practice, that glimpses the transcendent Nibbāna and= is immediately followed by the attainment of ‘fruit’ consciousnesses that signifies becoming a stream-enterer, once-returner, non returner or Arahat. In the Pali Suttas, however, the noble path can be seen to be a specific kind of calm and open mind state that is a skilful, eight-factored method. Once it arises it is certain to bring stream-entry, and its seeing of Nibbāna, later in the present life, but for this it needs to be developed to full strength, which usually takes some period of time, as a person intently works to directly see the unconditioned.
      PubDate: 2014-08-21
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2014)
       
  • The Place of Relic Worship in Buddhism: An Unresolved Controversy?*
    • Authors: Karel Werner
      Abstract: Although worship of the relics of the Buddha—and its corollary, stūpa worship—is a widespread feature of Buddhist devotional practice among both lay Buddhists and monks, there is in some quarters a view that, while recommended to lay followers, it is forbidden to monks. This controversy started very early after the Buddha’s parinibbāna, and has reverberated throughout the centuries till the present time. Its source is in the Mahāparinibbāna-sutta, and it stems from the ambiguity in the meaning of the compound sarīrapūjā in the Buddha’s reply to Ānanda’s two questions concerning the actions to be taken after the Master’s death with respect to his body. The resolution of the controversy depends on correct understanding of the nature of the Buddha’s replies to the two questions. This article analyses the relevant passages of the sutta and the way they have been translated, correctly or incorrectly, into Western languages and into Chinese, and finally arrives at a solution derived entirely from within the text of the Mahāparinibbāna-sutta itself.
      PubDate: 2014-08-18
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2014)
       
  • Editorial
    • Authors: Anna King, Dermot Killingly, Simon Brodbeck
      Abstract: Editor's Introduction
      PubDate: 2014-08-18
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2014)
       
  • Karel Werner: An Autobiographical Sketch
    • Authors: Karel Werner
      PubDate: 2014-08-18
      Issue No: Vol. 8 (2014)
       
 
 
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