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Journal of Town and City Management    [9 followers]  Follow    
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
     ISSN (Print) 1756-9538 - ISSN (Online) 1756-9591
     Published by Henry Stewart Publications Homepage  [17 journals]
  • Editorial The future may be urban … but how sustainable is it'
    • Abstract:
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Editorial
      Pages 313-316

      Authors
      J. Andres Coca-Stefaniak
      Journal Journal of Town and City Management
      Online ISSN 1756-9591
      Print ISSN 1756-9538
      Journal Volume Volume 2
      Journal Issue Volume 2, Number 4 / March-May, 2012
      PubDate: Tue, 22 May 2012 16:08:23 GMT
       
  • Guest Editorial The long and winding road ahead towards a way out of the
           global financial crisis: International views from the Editorial Board of
           the Journal of Town & City Management
    • Abstract:
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Editorial
      Pages 317-349

      Authors
      Editorial Board Members
      Journal Journal of Town and City Management
      Online ISSN 1756-9591
      Print ISSN 1756-9538
      Journal Volume Volume 2
      Journal Issue Volume 2, Number 4 / March-May, 2012
      PubDate: Tue, 22 May 2012 16:08:23 GMT
       
  • Book reviews
    • Abstract: Inventive City Regions — Path Dependence and Creative Knowledge Strategies; By Marco Bontje, Sako Musterd and Peter Pelzer; Reviewed by Dr Raymond Saller. Promotion of Cities: A New Perspective; By Anna Proszowska-Sala and Magdalena Florek; Reviewed by Jarosław Górski. Cities and Fascination: Beyond the Surplus of Meaning; Edited by Heiko Schmid, Wolf-Dietrich Sahr and John Urry; Reviewed by Elizabeth Jackson Globalization, modernity and the city; By John Rennie Short; Reviewed by Dr Raymond Saller. Securing and Sustaining the Olympic City: Reconfiguring London for 2012 and Beyond; By Pete Fussey, Jon Coaffee, Gary Armstrong and Dick Hobbs; Reviewed by Chrissie Gibson.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Book reviews
      Pages 304-413

      Authors

      Journal Journal of Town and City Management
      Online ISSN 1756-9591
      Print ISSN 1756-9538
      Journal Volume Volume 2
      Journal Issue Volume 2, Number 4 / March-May, 2012
      PubDate: Tue, 22 May 2012 16:08:23 GMT
       
  • TECHNICAL NOTE The mathematical model for costing a public sector
           technical project: The case of Greece
    • Abstract: In Greece, the overall procedure for public works is governed by detailed legislation. As a result of this several construction project variables are simplified, given that this legislative framework pertains even to specific details related to the description of the individual works to be performed for each project. However, no literature exists in Greece with regards to project processes, including costing estimations.Greek law states that the value of private sector investment in any public works project should be considered as an independent variable with regards to determining the overall value of a public works project. This means that public infrastructure projects in Greece are often overpriced. This has happened as a result of a conscious choice by the State. The contracting agent has often secured a profit, even before construction is started, because of the difference between the value of the project as a result of the client being the public sector rather than a private enterprise or individual. This assertion is proven in this paper using a mathematical model.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Practice papers
      Pages 395-403

      Authors
      Pavlos Metallinos
      Journal Journal of Town and City Management
      Online ISSN 1756-9591
      Print ISSN 1756-9538
      Journal Volume Volume 2
      Journal Issue Volume 2, Number 4 / March-May, 2012
      PubDate: Tue, 22 May 2012 16:08:23 GMT
       
  • City marketing and place branding: A critical review of practice and
           academic research
    • Abstract: This paper investigates the consolidation of currents of thought on the marketing and branding of cities and territories. It starts by an analysis of the importance of the identity of cities and briefly also of regions and countries, as a prior factor for strategic management of marketing. It puts forward a model that has an initial phase of physical planning and urban design, followed by a process of marketing in interchanges with the various groups involved. Finally, there is a phase of creation of a brand, more or less developed, ie the ‘branding phase’. This approach is analysed at the various different geographical levels of cities, regions and countries, with noteworthy cases from around the world being highlighted on these lines. Keys for institutional collaboration in the shape of networks are looked at, as are their links with the modern paradigm of relationship marketing.One of this paper’s major contributions is its exploration of the relationships among different territorial contexts, as it goes beyond the purely urban environment, considering parallelisms of cities with regions and countries. These crosswise comparisons lead to potential institutional cooperation, in accordance with modern approaches to economics business management in strategic networks and the paradigm for marketing through multiple interchanges. Furthermore, since the marketing of cities and place branding is envisaged within a process of strategic management or direction, with networked institutional governance, the paper also contributes to overcoming a simplistic view of place marketing as merely the application of promotional techniques.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Practice papers
      Pages 369-394

      Authors
      Norberto Muñiz Martinez
      Journal Journal of Town and City Management
      Online ISSN 1756-9591
      Print ISSN 1756-9538
      Journal Volume Volume 2
      Journal Issue Volume 2, Number 4 / March-May, 2012
      PubDate: Tue, 22 May 2012 16:08:23 GMT
       
  • How shale gas extraction affects drilling localities: Lessons for regional
           and city policy makers
    • Abstract: In countries around the world, the public debate over the prospect of high-volume hydraulic fracturing for shale gas has revolved around its environmental impacts, while taking as a given that exploitation of this newly available natural gas asset will produce significant economic benefits for local and regional economies. In this paper, the authors use multiple methods, including a case study of the Marcellus Shale gas ‘play’ in the USA, to examine how the economic costs and benefits of high-volume hydraulic fracturing have been assessed. They argue that the economic impact models, which have been used to project potential benefits and job creation, provide only a fraction of the information needed to understand the consequences of drilling for the regions in which it occurs. The paper also examines some of the challenges local communities face in responding to the costs posed by shale gas extraction. The authors’ analysis indicates that, while shale gas development may increase jobs and tax revenues in the predominantly rural regions where drilling occurs, it can also impose significant short- and long-term costs. To assess fully the economic effects of hydraulic fracturing, local and regional policy makers need to understand the boom-bust cycle that characterises natural gas development. This cycle has implications for local costs and benefits short-term, and for the longer-term economic development prospects of localities in drilling regions.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Practice papers
      Pages 350-368

      Authors
      Susan Christopherson
      Ned Rightor
      Journal Journal of Town and City Management
      Online ISSN 1756-9591
      Print ISSN 1756-9538
      Journal Volume Volume 2
      Journal Issue Volume 2, Number 4 / March-May, 2012
      PubDate: Tue, 22 May 2012 16:08:23 GMT
       
  • Collaborative city liveability study using Gehl methodology: Pedestrian
           and bicycle counts and stationary activity survey in Penrith
    • Abstract: Jan Gehl is the most prominent urban planner when it comes to devising design-based, practical prescriptions to enhance the liveability of cities. His thoughts have largely been applied in studying and transforming large, city-central business districts (CBDs). The inspiration for improvement in suburbs and smaller cities has come mostly from New Urbanism. This paper presents findings from (perhaps the first) application of the Jan Gehl method for study of a small suburban CBD location. Penrith Central Business District is one of the regional cities of New South Wales that has been selected for substantial growth in the near future. This paper discusses the data collected and the observations recorded during a study of public spaces in Penrith CBD by a group of University of Western Sydney planning students using techniques employed by Jan Gehl in his Public Spaces and Public Life studies. The purpose of the study is to identify the number of pedestrians at specific locations and times, examine the amount and type of cyclists, recognise the behaviour and decisions of pedestrians using the urban space, and document the pedestrian life of the city. This paper presents the findings of the survey, as well as analysing the suitability and adaptability of the Gehl methodology for small cities. It also highlights the relevance of this study for management of other suburban cities.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Technical note
      Pages 287-299

      Authors
      Dr Awais Piracha
      Journal Journal of Town and City Management
      Online ISSN 1756-9591
      Print ISSN 1756-9538
      Journal Volume Volume 2
      Journal Issue Volume 2, Number 3 / December 2011–February, 2012
      PubDate: Tue, 10 Jan 2012 15:21:20 GMT
       
  • Politics and culture in commercial district revitalisation policy:
           Comparing the American and Italian approaches
    • Abstract: The globalisation and corporatisation of the retail and services sectors has led to differing public-policy responses throughout the world, and this invites comparative international analyses of the nature and effectiveness of these responses. This exploratory analysis compares the nature and operation of the American Main Street approach and the Italian Centro Commerciale Naturale initiatives, as well as some of the cultural and political factors in each country that have given them their specific focus and shape. The formal structure and rules of the Main Street programme, while excluding many retail districts from participation, also appear to be responsible for the success of those that commit to following the rules. The Centri Commerciali Naturali do not share common structures or rules and they allow easy entry into the initiatives for commercial districts, which are part of a much stronger national system of political support for small businesses than exists in the USA. On the other hand, the Centri Commerciali Naturali focus primarily on physical improvements and promotion, and most of them devote little or no attention to organisational capacity-building or self-management, which may limit their effectiveness over time. The findings raise several questions for subsequent research.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Papers
      Pages 215-233

      Authors
      John Accordino
      Giovanna Codato
      Fabrizio Fasulo
      Journal Journal of Town and City Management
      Online ISSN 1756-9591
      Print ISSN 1756-9538
      Journal Volume Volume 2
      Journal Issue Volume 2, Number 3 / December 2011–February, 2012
      PubDate: Tue, 10 Jan 2012 15:21:20 GMT
       
  • Pedestrian streets, public spaces, and Business Improvement Districts
    • Abstract: Pedestrian malls were an economic development ‘fad’ in the 1960s and 1970s. Most proved unsuccessful owing to a lack of active management, forces of suburbanisation and a lack of complementary surrounding urban design. But after 40 years, there are a number of successful pedestrian malls from which lessons can be drawn. A major feature is that these malls have active management, typically Business Improvement Districts, which ensure that they are clean, safe and have activities to draw customers in. In addition, with the urban renaissance that many downtowns have undergone, the negative forces of suburbanisation are being replaced with a new downtown vitality. New pedestrian malls have been created and others are under consideration. It is time that more cities consider these development tools, especially where active management exists.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Papers
      Pages 280-286

      Authors
      David M. eehan
      Carol J. Becker
      Journal Journal of Town and City Management
      Online ISSN 1756-9591
      Print ISSN 1756-9538
      Journal Volume Volume 2
      Journal Issue Volume 2, Number 3 / December 2011–February, 2012
      PubDate: Tue, 10 Jan 2012 15:21:20 GMT
       
  • Book reviews
    • Abstract: African Identity in Post-Apartheid Public Architecture: White Skin, Black Masks. Edited by J. A. Noble. Reviewed by Hernan CasakinKrajobraz kulturowy Japonii [Cultural Landscapes of Japan]. Edited by Krystyna Pawłowska. Reviewed by Urszula Immamura
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Book reviews
      Pages 300-303

      Authors

      Journal Journal of Town and City Management
      Online ISSN 1756-9591
      Print ISSN 1756-9538
      Journal Volume Volume 2
      Journal Issue Volume 2, Number 3 / December 2011–February, 2012
      PubDate: Tue, 10 Jan 2012 15:21:20 GMT
       
  • Culture city
    • Abstract: Culture and creativity have been seen as catalysts for social change, urban diversity and revitalisation of neighbourhoods by thinkers such as Richard Florida and Charles Landry. The creative and cultural sectors are also viewed as essential parts of urban economies, both as factors attracting population and as a dynamic part of the economy with strong growth. This means that these sectors stimulate economic growth in cities in several ways. From descriptive statistics one knows that occupation in the creative and cultural sectors is spatially concentrated in large metropolitan regions. This observation, and other theoretical arguments, stress that the performance and growth of these sectors should be assumed to be dependent on agglomeration economies. In this analysis, the authors examine the relationship between spatial distribution and growth of occupation, in a sample of people working in the creative and cultural sectors, in relation to growth in cities in Sweden. One interesting finding from the empirical analysis is that, when the authors analyse differences between the core and peripheral parts of functional regions, they find that there are no real signs of significant differences between them. In particular, they find that in the peripheral municipalities (suburbs) that surround the core municipalities, the occupation in the creative and cultural sectors is more correlated to population growth in these municipalities than proximity to creative and cultural occupation in the core parts of the functional regions. From a policy perspective, this means that investments in culture not only matter for the biggest cities and city centres, but also for the medium and smaller-sized regions, as well as the suburbs.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Papers
      Pages 246-262

      Authors
      Charlotta Mellander
      Lars Pettersson
      Özge Öner
      Journal Journal of Town and City Management
      Online ISSN 1756-9591
      Print ISSN 1756-9538
      Journal Volume Volume 2
      Journal Issue Volume 2, Number 3 / December 2011–February, 2012
      PubDate: Tue, 10 Jan 2012 15:21:20 GMT
       
  • Building community engagement for area planning in Warrington, UK: Can
           
    • Abstract: The UK Government proposes radical changes to planning to give parishes and neighbourhoods opportunities to make planning decisions and produce plans. This paper reflects on participation in planning, especially where Participatory Appraisal (PA) has been used. The case study from Warrington considers how PA helped build community capacity to contribute to area planning, while developing confidence, skills and energy for wider community initiatives and agency-community partnership. After reflection on community engagement in planning and regeneration, it is considered how the proposed Decentralisation and Localism Bill (and the Big Society) will affect planning and community engagement. The paper reviews the origins and applications of PA internationally and in the UK, and discusses area planning in Warrington, where PA work (a) strengthened resident participation in area planning; (b) developed a pool of community researchers who could work with agencies to help ensure that local needs are understood and incorporated into delivery plans; and (c) explored social enterprise, volunteering, and community partnership models. Further capacity development is key to sustainability. If community development and training budgets are weakened, guidance is required on where local groups can find development and budget assistance in pursuit of goals for self-reliance, localism and devolving powers. PA requires more training, support, and ongoing practice than some other approaches. However, work in Warrington, the UK, and international urban contexts, has shown that PA can contribute to planning in the widest sense, taking community consultation beyond simple extractive approaches, to support people in planning consultation, through to approval, implementation and evaluation.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Papers
      Pages 234-245

      Authors
      Scott Jones
      Chrissie Gibson
      Journal Journal of Town and City Management
      Online ISSN 1756-9591
      Print ISSN 1756-9538
      Journal Volume Volume 2
      Journal Issue Volume 2, Number 3 / December 2011–February, 2012
      PubDate: Tue, 10 Jan 2012 15:21:20 GMT
       
  • The evolutionary ‘waves’ of place-shaping: Pre-, during and
           post-recession
    • Abstract: This paper is concerned with the evolution of place-shaping over the past decade or so and its potential future direction, specifically relating to a UK context but with varying aspects of resonance internationally. The methodological approach and empirical originality is derived from practitioner encounters synthesised with theory. Three ‘waves’ of place-shaping are discernible: renaissance, recession mitigation and recovery. By conceptualising and examining the changing face of place-shaping practice, some broad place-quality trends are identified. Asserting that renaissance interventions were heavily skewed towards enhancing the material aspects of city spaces, it is suggested that recessions provide a useful intersection to reflect on past practice, rethink future policies and sharpen skills. It is within such a climate that innovatory practice can flourish as (public, private and community) actors are challenged to seek alternative ways of working. Questioning the wisdom of cuts in quality, the paper calls for new ways of capturing place quality.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Papers
      Pages 263-279

      Authors
      Lee Pugalis
      Journal Journal of Town and City Management
      Online ISSN 1756-9591
      Print ISSN 1756-9538
      Journal Volume Volume 2
      Journal Issue Volume 2, Number 3 / December 2011–February, 2012
      PubDate: Tue, 10 Jan 2012 15:21:20 GMT
       
  • Life beyond retail: A new and better vision for town centres
    • Abstract: Life beyond retail: A new and better vision for town centres
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Guest editorial
      Pages 201-214

      Authors
      Julian Dobson
      Journal Journal of Town and City Management
      Online ISSN 1756-9591
      Print ISSN 1756-9538
      Journal Volume Volume 2
      Journal Issue Volume 2, Number 3 / December 2011–February, 2012
      PubDate: Tue, 10 Jan 2012 15:21:20 GMT
       
  • Book reviews
    • Abstract: City Branding: Theory and Cases, edited by Keith Dinnie. Reviewed by Elsa G. Wilkin-ArmbristerThe SAGE Handbook of Economic Geography, edited by A. Leyshon, R. Lee, L. McDowell and P. Sunley. Reviewed by Alan HallsworthSports Event Management: The Caribbean Experience, edited by Leslie-Ann Jordan, Ben Tyson, Carolyn Hayle and David Truly. Reviewed by David Feehan
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Book reviews
      Pages 188-191

      Authors

      Journal Journal of Town and City Management
      Online ISSN 1756-9591
      Print ISSN 1756-9538
      Journal Volume Volume 2
      Journal Issue Volume 2, Number 2 / September–November, 2011
      PubDate: Mon, 10 Oct 2011 15:39:13 GMT
       
  • Business Improvement Districts: The Scottish experience
    • Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to discuss how the Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) model can deliver sustainable economic growth for local communities across Scotland by aiding regeneration, assisting town centre management and planning, and encouraging partnership working between the public and private sectors for mutual benefit. The paper has been designed to provide background information on Business Improvement Districts Scotland (BIDS), the national umbrella organisation and local BID organisations, as well as detailing case study examples of the sorts of activity that BIDs in Scotland have been/are undertaking. The paper concludes with some detail on the future of BIDs.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Comment
      Pages 105-116

      Authors
      Ian Davison Porter
      Journal Journal of Town and City Management
      Online ISSN 1756-9591
      Print ISSN 1756-9538
      Journal Volume Volume 2
      Journal Issue Volume 2, Number 2 / September–November, 2011
      PubDate: Mon, 10 Oct 2011 15:39:12 GMT
       
  • Technological change and the lowest common denominator problem: An
           analysis of Oregon's vehicle miles travelled fee experiment
    • Abstract: In 2003, the state of Oregon began preparing an approach for replacing the state motor fuel tax with a Vehicle Miles Travelled (VMT) fee. This experiment promised a flexible platform of taxation allowing for long-run innovation. This paper discusses some of the challenges associated with a nationwide application of the VMT fee, and suggests that local experimentation with different technological solutions for the implementation of a VMT fee will avoid one-size-fits-all solutions, called the lowest common denominator problem. In order to replace the motor fuel tax, the VMT fee must respond to a variety of issues which, if ignored, cause unintended consequences. These include changing the incentives affecting choice over vehicle type. This paper responds to the policy implications of the Oregon experiment for state-level policy makers primarily, but offers a vision for an organic response to technological change which is already under way. The debate over national policy becomes secondary to activating the process of experimentation at the local level. A role for leadership is outlined.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Papers
      Pages 177-187

      Authors
      Michael Thomas
      Kevin Heaslip
      Journal Journal of Town and City Management
      Online ISSN 1756-9591
      Print ISSN 1756-9538
      Journal Volume Volume 2
      Journal Issue Volume 2, Number 2 / September–November, 2011
      PubDate: Mon, 10 Oct 2011 15:39:12 GMT
       
  • Town centre management at a crossroad in central Spain: Organisational
           challenges and the way to BIDs
    • Abstract: In Spain, voluntary associations of small and medium enterprises exist to defend their interests within city centre locations. These organisations — similar to what are known as Town Centre Managements (TCM) in academic or practitioner communities — are usually supported by regional governments or, less frequently, by local authorities.The first TCM schemes in Castilla y León, the largest region in Spain, were established at the beginning of the nineteen-nineties. A few years after their creation, the Regional Government wanted to know about their situation and their future prospects, being particularly interested in their management structure, functions, membership and financial capacity. This paper summarises the results of the research that was commissioned, and shows that Castilla y León TCMs nowadays face a great dilemma. Retailers pay only voluntary and very low fees, while government generously subsidises these organisations. The public authority believes that this situation must change and has decided to reduce financial support for the TCMs. Moreover, in terms of private funding, there is a problem with what is known as ‘free riders’. As a consequence, both governments and business associations are keen to implement a model to solve these funding problems. Could the solution be the introduction of Business Improvement Districts (BIDs) into Castilla y León?
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Papers
      Pages 117-131

      Authors
      Juan Carlos Frechoso-Remiro
      Helena Villarejo-Galende
      Journal Journal of Town and City Management
      Online ISSN 1756-9591
      Print ISSN 1756-9538
      Journal Volume Volume 2
      Journal Issue Volume 2, Number 2 / September–November, 2011
      PubDate: Mon, 10 Oct 2011 15:39:12 GMT
       
  • ‘Tangled up in Bob’: An ethnographic case study of the impact
           of local Bob Dylan heritage on place branding in Hibbing, Minnesota
    • Abstract: This case study explores avenues for symbiotic co-branding of local music heritage sites in Hibbing, Minnesota, an isolated mining town with a strong local culture, where Bob Dylan grew up and lived from 1947 to 1959. Music heritage based tourism focusing on sites of biographical significance is a growth sector in countries with mature tourism and music industries, such as the US and the UK. Based on two field visits and correspondence, this ethnographic study applies ethnographic aims to generate an understanding of the perspectives and orientations of key Hibbing stakeholders. Issues of access to the field and the negotiation of multiple roles of the researcher as fan, observer and participator are discussed. Findings provide a holistic image of events, drivers and barriers and ‘tell the story’ of the contribution of Hibbing's Bob Dylan heritage towards a local sense of place. Building on the conceptualisation of ’place brand‘ as a relational network which emerges as an ongoing interactive process between ‘place’ and all its stakeholders, the paper suggests ways in which Dylan's Hibbing heritage can both further attract and inform his fan base while recognising local sensitivities and resources. It describes the local efforts towards symbiotic co-branding, leveraging the Dylan heritage within a developing distinctive Hibbing brand, which also includes outdoor recreation, a mining history of national importance and the origins of the Greyhound Bus Company. The skills which readers may gather from this paper lie in how organisations involved in place management, marketing and tourism with limited resources can address aspects of ‘cultural tourism’ in small-scale settings and effectively meet the needs of both the local communities and visitors.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Papers
      Pages 143-155

      Authors
      David Leaver David Leaver
      Ruth Ä. Schmidt (1957–2011)
      Journal Journal of Town and City Management
      Online ISSN 1756-9591
      Print ISSN 1756-9538
      Journal Volume Volume 2
      Journal Issue Volume 2, Number 2 / September–November, 2011
      PubDate: Mon, 10 Oct 2011 15:39:12 GMT
       
  • The role of business in the development of US cities
    • Abstract: The role of business in the development of US cities
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Guest editorial
      Pages 101-104

      Authors
      James A. Cloar
      Journal Journal of Town and City Management
      Online ISSN 1756-9591
      Print ISSN 1756-9538
      Journal Volume Volume 2
      Journal Issue Volume 2, Number 2 / September–November, 2011
      PubDate: Mon, 10 Oct 2011 15:39:12 GMT
       
 
 
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