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Journal of Building Survey, Appraisal & Valuation
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   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
     ISSN (Print) 2046-9594 - ISSN (Online) 2046-9608
     Published by Henry Stewart Publications Homepage  [18 journals]
  • Comparative testing of hydraulic lime and OPC mortar mixes
    • Abstract: In recent years there has been in increasing trend towards the use of hydraulic lime-based mortars within the construction industry, especially in low-rise domestic dwelling — due in part to their sustainable credentials. However, the construction industry has, until recent times, solely relied upon the use of Portland cement-based mortars and the introduction of lime-based mortars has added another dimension to the choice of binder and mortar specification to use. This limited comparative study is designed to clarify the relative merits of the two binder types in terms of their compressive strength, flexural strength, water absorption and porosity. The study was conducted using three different binder to aggregated designations: 1 part binder to 3 parts sand, 1 part binder to 6 parts sand and 1 part binder to 8 parts sand. The binder designations were chosen to give a range of different mortar types that are commonly used in the industry. A constant mass of aggregate was used and the proportion of ‘binder to be added’ calculated to give the desired ratios. This was done to enable greater control and consistency over the workability of each mix when adding the water.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research paper
      Pages 276-284

      Authors
      Stephen Hetherington
      Journal Journal of Building Survey, Appraisal & Valuation
      Online ISSN 2046-9608
      Print ISSN 2046-9594
      Journal Volume Volume 3
      Journal Issue Volume 3, Number 3 / Autumn/Fall 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 05 Nov 2014 14:08:21 GMT
       
  • Above ground damp proofing: How to improve detailing: Part 2 — Using
           air gap membrane systems
    • Abstract: Part 2 of this paper shows examples of air gap membrane systems used in above ground scenarios. The membranes are versatile, as they suit both above and below ground applications, and can even be used to overclad buildings. There has been a lack of independent research into remedial damp proofing in the UK. Bench tests on damp proofing products do not prove that they work in a real building, that they are installed correctly, or are even necessary. There is not much attention paid to external support measures by the remedial treatment industry. A leaky umbrella will have a greater chance of keeping you dry if you turn down the tap that is splashing water on it. Technical opinions in this paper are based primarily on experience gleaned from hundreds of thorough dampness investigations, together with findings from a number of the author's own, mainly self-funded, practical tests — on measuring instruments, materials and damp proofing systems. And of course interfacing with expert colleagues who are willing to share their own experiences. There is not enough time in one surveyor's life to make sense of all the mysteries of dampness investigation, but by publishing the pieces of knowledge that are acquired along the way, a final completed jigsaw will become more and more of a reality.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Practice papers
      Pages 253-275

      Authors
      Ralph F. Burkinshaw
      Journal Journal of Building Survey, Appraisal & Valuation
      Online ISSN 2046-9608
      Print ISSN 2046-9594
      Journal Volume Volume 3
      Journal Issue Volume 3, Number 3 / Autumn/Fall 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 05 Nov 2014 14:08:21 GMT
       
  • Energy efficiency of buildings: The business case
    • Abstract: Energy efficiency as a concept came to the fore in response to the oil crises of the 1970s. Energy demand reduction is essential as native energy supplies dwindle, to improve energy security and to meet carbon emissions targets. Globally, it is estimated that 30 to 40 per cent of energy is consumed in buildings and, therefore, it is vitally important that improvements are made to the energy performance of the built environment. Consequently, energy efficiency is an area of focus for both EU and UK policy and regulation. Furthermore, owners and occupiers are increasingly demanding more efficient buildings. This paper explores the business case considerations, summarises relevant policy and regulation; outlines market drivers and includes a case study.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Practice papers
      Pages 198-205

      Authors
      Mat Lown
      Journal Journal of Building Survey, Appraisal & Valuation
      Online ISSN 2046-9608
      Print ISSN 2046-9594
      Journal Volume Volume 3
      Journal Issue Volume 3, Number 3 / Autumn/Fall 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 05 Nov 2014 14:08:20 GMT
       
  • Is the parte over? Appealing ‘ex parte’ awards under the
           Party Wall etc Act, 1996
    • Abstract: This paper discusses the implications of a recent Court of Appeal decision concerning the appeal of ‘ex parte’ awards under the Party Wall etc. Act 1996, particularly where one party acts out of time, albeit effectively.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Practice papers
      Pages 228-233

      Authors
      James McAllister
      Journal Journal of Building Survey, Appraisal & Valuation
      Online ISSN 2046-9608
      Print ISSN 2046-9594
      Journal Volume Volume 3
      Journal Issue Volume 3, Number 3 / Autumn/Fall 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 05 Nov 2014 14:08:20 GMT
       
  • Natural ventilation: Harnessing natural forces to create comfort
           conditions within buildings
    • Abstract: Natural ventilation and passive cooling is the harnessing of natural forces — heat generated buoyancy, wind pressures, thermal mass, phase change, adiabatic processes and so on, to provide comfort conditions within buildings without the use of mechanical processes, ie, from air conditioning systems, chillers or refrigeration processes. Although the principles of natural ventilation have been understood for many years and have become increasingly popular in recent times, there are many ways in which these systems may fail or not work to best advantage. This article sets out to explain some of the issues surrounding the use of natural ventilation and passive cooling.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Practice papers
      Pages 234-247

      Authors
      Derek Walker
      Journal Journal of Building Survey, Appraisal & Valuation
      Online ISSN 2046-9608
      Print ISSN 2046-9594
      Journal Volume Volume 3
      Journal Issue Volume 3, Number 3 / Autumn/Fall 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 05 Nov 2014 14:08:20 GMT
       
  • Some things never change: Does this help or hinder our learning about
           them?
    • Abstract: Some things never change: Does this help or hinder our learning about them?
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Editorial
      Pages 196-197

      Authors
      Simon McLean
      Journal Journal of Building Survey, Appraisal & Valuation
      Online ISSN 2046-9608
      Print ISSN 2046-9594
      Journal Volume Volume 3
      Journal Issue Volume 3, Number 3 / Autumn/Fall 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 05 Nov 2014 14:08:20 GMT
       
  • Has the Supreme Court moved the goalposts on rights to light?
    • Abstract: A breach of a party's right to light has historically led to a court injunction preventing or even ordering the pulling down of offending parts of development. However, since the passing of Lord Cairns’ Act in 1858, the courts have had the discretion to award damages instead. A L Smith LJ in his Court of Appeal judgement in Shelfer v City of London Electric Lighting Co [1895] 1 Ch 287 set out what he believed to be a ‘good working rule’ for judges in exercising their discretion. However, this ‘rule’ is now thought to be a shackle and not an aide to judges. The Supreme Court, in the recently reported case Coventry & Others v Lawrence and Another [2014] UKSC 13, has declared the Shelfer rule out of date and has freed judges to decide to grant an injunction or damages in lieu, dependent simply upon the facts and circumstances of the case before them. Will this help or further hinder developers and their advisers? If damages are awarded, what has the Supreme Court had to say about the level of awards made and will the decision mean that the need for a change of law on rights to light as reviewed by the Law Commission is no longer required?
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Practice papers
      Pages 223-227

      Authors
      Ian McKenna
      Journal Journal of Building Survey, Appraisal & Valuation
      Online ISSN 2046-9608
      Print ISSN 2046-9594
      Journal Volume Volume 3
      Journal Issue Volume 3, Number 3 / Autumn/Fall 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 05 Nov 2014 14:08:20 GMT
       
  • Building Energy Management Systems (BEMS): Making best use of them
    • Abstract: The control of energy in buildings is generally poor, despite the availability of a range of tried and tested systems. Building Energy Management Systems (BEMS) are commonplace in larger buildings and are rapidly becoming standard. This has been recognised by the industry, culminating in the publication of BS EN 15232:2012 (Energy performance of buildings — Impact of building automation, controls and building management). This European Standard is aimed at the design of the systems and not at how to maintain and operate them. The impact, in practical terms, is that the design of such systems is generally very good and commissioning is acceptable. However, the understanding and operation of such systems at the user level is generally poor. As a result, the need to maintain these systems to realise the ongoing saving potential is not generally recognised by the end user and/or the engineering services provider, which often means that the systems are not maintained to the level required. In addition, the settings are not reconsidered and revised when significant changes occur to either the building or how it is used.1
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Practice papers
      Pages 248-252

      Authors
      Andy Lewry
      Journal Journal of Building Survey, Appraisal & Valuation
      Online ISSN 2046-9608
      Print ISSN 2046-9594
      Journal Volume Volume 3
      Journal Issue Volume 3, Number 3 / Autumn/Fall 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 05 Nov 2014 14:08:20 GMT
       
  • Infrared thermography: Is it just a question of ‘point and
           report’?
    • Abstract: Infrared technology is becoming more widely used as a fast, reliable and non-destructive test technique. Training is critical using infrared thermography to be able to interpret images correctly and to detect anomalies in construction. Before interpreting the readings the basic principles of measuring infrared radiation and the infrared radiation characteristics of the particular material being measured need to be understood. Both will affect the quality and value of the technology to client and thermographer.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Practice papers
      Pages 216-222

      Authors
      Brendan O'Callaghan
      Journal Journal of Building Survey, Appraisal & Valuation
      Online ISSN 2046-9608
      Print ISSN 2046-9594
      Journal Volume Volume 3
      Journal Issue Volume 3, Number 3 / Autumn/Fall 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 05 Nov 2014 14:08:20 GMT
       
  • Contamination and remediation: The impact upon a construction project
    • Abstract: A recent project suffered a six and a half week delay, with associated costs of circa £300,000 in variations. This was due to the discovery of cyanide contained within ‘blue billy’ slag materials at the site. This paper seeks to review the definition of contamination, the risks a developer faces and also the process that must be followed once such a discovery is made. The key elements reviewed relate to site selection, defining contamination, remediation, risk management and legislation.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Practice papers
      Pages 206-215

      Authors
      Matthew Haines
      Journal Journal of Building Survey, Appraisal & Valuation
      Online ISSN 2046-9608
      Print ISSN 2046-9594
      Journal Volume Volume 3
      Journal Issue Volume 3, Number 3 / Autumn/Fall 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 05 Nov 2014 14:08:20 GMT
       
  • Recent case law on contractual disputes: Practical tips and advice for
           surveyors when managing a dispute
    • Abstract: In this paper, the author considers what surveyors can learn from a selection of cases from the Technology and Construction Court over the past 12 months and concludes that the message from the Court is clear: a little time and care at the start of an endeavour should save time and money in the long run. The last 12 months have produced several cases from which a clear theme can be drawn: diligence at the start of an endeavour, be it at the start of a construction project, the start of proceedings or the start of an adjudication, can yield great benefits in the long run. It quite literally pays to plan ahead for the worst, while, of course, hoping for the best. This paper will consider these cases and the lessons that can be taken from them and should be of assistance to surveyors when they are contemplating or managing a dispute.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Practice papers
      Pages 178-183

      Authors
      Laurence Cobb
      Journal Journal of Building Survey, Appraisal & Valuation
      Online ISSN 2046-9608
      Print ISSN 2046-9594
      Journal Volume Volume 3
      Journal Issue Volume 3, Number 2 / Summer 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 17:00:11 GMT
       
  • An introduction to compulsory purchase valuation principles spanning 150
           years
    • Abstract: Compulsory purchase compensation law is an enormously complex, increasingly specialist, but very relevant area of law. It is an area of law that is unfortunately not well understood. With major public projects such as HS2 on the horizon, Members of Parliament and local councillors have had to engage with compulsory purchase concepts that have been in urgent need for reform for some time. The widespread application of compulsory purchase principles as a result of the enormous HS2 project is unprecedented. It is hoped that, whilst compulsory purchase has the attention of so many MPs, that the Government will at long last consider some of the reforms suggested by the Law Commission in its excellent report.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Practice papers
      Pages 184-189

      Authors
      David Vaughan
      Lucy Clements Smith
      Journal Journal of Building Survey, Appraisal & Valuation
      Online ISSN 2046-9608
      Print ISSN 2046-9594
      Journal Volume Volume 3
      Journal Issue Volume 3, Number 2 / Summer 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 17:00:11 GMT
       
  • Behaviour and costs in dilapidations and valuation claims: Why the clever
           children play nicely
    • Abstract: This paper explains what sort of behaviour is expected of the parties and their advisers in dilapidations claims by the courts, by reference to the provisions of the Civil Procedure Rules and four recent cases.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Practice papers
      Pages 170-177

      Authors
      Richard Webber
      Journal Journal of Building Survey, Appraisal & Valuation
      Online ISSN 2046-9608
      Print ISSN 2046-9594
      Journal Volume Volume 3
      Journal Issue Volume 3, Number 2 / Summer 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 17:00:10 GMT
       
  • What is behind the mouse click? Technology is driving physical changes
           in the space occupied by the industrial and office sectors
    • Abstract: The world of business is changing rapidly. It is truly global and the speed of change — driven by the Internet and the amount of data that is being created and analysed to provide new and better services — is astonishing. Technology is driving disruptive innovation in the ways that business is conducted; the channels, both physical and virtual; and the partners involved in the process. This is having a fundamental effect on the way real estate is used across all sectors — retail, office, manufacturing, warehousing, and research and development. This paper takes a look at just some of the changes that are occurring, focusing on two areas: the e-commerce world and the impact it is having on warehousing and logistics, and the changing nature of work and the role of the workplace. In both areas, the role of the physical space is becoming more important despite the increasing importance of technology. On the one hand, warehouse design, operation and the supply chain is critical to online retailers (e-tailers), who want to be able to deliver products to consumers at the click of a mouse. On the other hand, businesses are waking up to the fact that the way the workplace is used and managed is critical in enhancing the effectiveness of the organisation in terms of collaboration and attracting talent.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Practice papers
      Pages 152-169

      Authors
      Alex Charlesworth
      Mark Webster
      Neil McLocklin
      Journal Journal of Building Survey, Appraisal & Valuation
      Online ISSN 2046-9608
      Print ISSN 2046-9594
      Journal Volume Volume 3
      Journal Issue Volume 3, Number 2 / Summer 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 17:00:10 GMT
       
  • Condensation in loft spaces: Myths and realities
    • Abstract: Both European and national governments see the insulation of the existing housing stock as an effective method of reducing energy use across the UK and the EU. Although the proportion of insulated ‘hard to treat’ properties remains low, a variety of government initiatives has resulted in the insulation of a high proportion of accessible lofts and cavity walls. In relation to the insulation of lofts, anecdotal feedback from residential surveyors indicates an increase in condensation problems in loft spaces. Although this problem has been described and solutions proposed in a variety of publications, the defect is still misunderstood by many in the surveying and contracting sectors. In this paper the author draws on a range of published guidance and research and separates the myths from reality. The paper discusses the factors that cause condensation in loft spaces; describes how condensation can be distinguished from other forms of dampness and outlines how loft space condensation can be reduced to manageable levels.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Practice papers
      Pages 112-123

      Authors
      Phil Parnham
      Journal Journal of Building Survey, Appraisal & Valuation
      Online ISSN 2046-9608
      Print ISSN 2046-9594
      Journal Volume Volume 3
      Journal Issue Volume 3, Number 2 / Summer 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 17:00:10 GMT
       
  • Building surveying by questionnaire and its use in post occupancy
           evaluation
    • Abstract: Building surveying by questionnaire and its use in post occupancy evaluation
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Editorial
      Pages 100-103

      Authors
      Simon Mclean
      Journal Journal of Building Survey, Appraisal & Valuation
      Online ISSN 2046-9608
      Print ISSN 2046-9594
      Journal Volume Volume 3
      Journal Issue Volume 3, Number 2 / Summer 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 17:00:10 GMT
       
  • Flood damage: The surveyor's challenge
    • Abstract: These thoughts will not be new to the experienced building surveyor, but a professional reputation is often influenced by those with less experience. This paper has been written to assist those who are new to surveying. Those who may consider its comments to be too obvious may need to exercise some patience. These are the author's opinions and they are not necessarily shared by the RICS. This paper is an extended version of a short piece produced for the RICS on flooding, for circulation during the spring floods.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Practice papers
      Pages 104-111

      Authors
      Roy Ilott
      Journal Journal of Building Survey, Appraisal & Valuation
      Online ISSN 2046-9608
      Print ISSN 2046-9594
      Journal Volume Volume 3
      Journal Issue Volume 3, Number 2 / Summer 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 17:00:10 GMT
       
  • Rights of light: Parasitic injury and damages — a review
    • Abstract: At a time when the Law Commission has initiated consultation on the law relating to rights of light, this paper focuses specifically on one aspect of associated surveying practice – the treatment of ‘parasitic injury’ in the measure of nuisance, associated compensation figures and outcomes at trial. It concludes with suggestions as to debate and reform of surveying practice that seemingly resonate with reasoning underlying the Law Commission consultation project.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Practice papers
      Pages 124-133

      Authors
      Delwyn Jones
      Journal Journal of Building Survey, Appraisal & Valuation
      Online ISSN 2046-9608
      Print ISSN 2046-9594
      Journal Volume Volume 3
      Journal Issue Volume 3, Number 2 / Summer 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 17:00:10 GMT
       
  • Repair work and the Party Wall Act: Who decides what is notifiable?
    • Abstract: Undertaking repairs to party walls, party fence walls and, in certain situations, other forms of party structures such as a floor separating different occupancies, is a fact of daily life. However, does it mean that every time an owner decides to undertake some repairs to a party structure they are obliged to serve a notice upon a neighbour under the Party Wall Act? If not, who decides what is notifiable and what is not, and what factors influence the decision as to whether repairs become notifiable or simply routine operations? The following paper aims to clarify this common but somewhat perplexing issue, which is seemingly innocuous in most instances but periodically can be mischievous.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Practice papers
      Pages 134-138

      Authors
      Peyman Ghasemi
      Journal Journal of Building Survey, Appraisal & Valuation
      Online ISSN 2046-9608
      Print ISSN 2046-9594
      Journal Volume Volume 3
      Journal Issue Volume 3, Number 2 / Summer 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 17:00:10 GMT
       
  • Project reflections: The Florence Institute, Toxteth, Liverpool
    • Abstract: This paper reports on the saving of an historic Liverpool landmark for a local community. It focuses on how the condition of the building, which was in a state of near collapse, and the client's wider ambitions for community engagement, both strongly influenced the procurement and construction process. It also highlights aspects of these issues that might repay more in-depth investigation for the benefit of the heritage sector in general.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Practice papers
      Pages 139-151

      Authors
      Charles Anelay
      Journal Journal of Building Survey, Appraisal & Valuation
      Online ISSN 2046-9608
      Print ISSN 2046-9594
      Journal Volume Volume 3
      Journal Issue Volume 3, Number 2 / Summer 2014
      PubDate: Wed, 20 Aug 2014 17:00:10 GMT
       
 
 
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