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Journal Cover Land Economics
  [SJR: 1.367]   [H-I: 64]   [7 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal  (Not entitled to full-text)
   ISSN (Print) 0023-7639 - ISSN (Online) 1543-8325
   Published by U of Wisconsin Press Homepage  [10 journals]
  • Production Costs, Inefficiency, and Source Water Quality: A Stochastic
           Cost Frontier Analysis of Canadian Water Utilities
    • Abstract: Municipal water utilities operate in diverse market, regulatory, and environmental settings. Numerous studies have looked at how market and regulatory factors impact potable water production, with particular emphasis placed on identifying economies of scale or scope and understanding how ownership regimes (i.e., public or private) affect economic efficiency (Abbott and Cohen 2009). In contrast, only a handful of studies have evaluated how water production is affected by environmental conditions. The present analysis contributes to this limited body of literature, using a stochastic cost frontier (SCF) to estimate relationships between source water quality, production costs, and efficiency in Canadian water ... Read More
      Keywords: Water-supply; Water utilities; Water quality; Water; Crops and climate; Land use, Rural; Ranching; Tin; Lead; Copper; Zinc; Iron; Forests and forestry; Well-being; Renewable energy sources; Housing; Bicycle trails; Public goods; Finance, Public; Parks; Referendum; Fisher
      PubDate: 2017-01-25T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Costs of Nitrogen Runoff for Rural Water Utilities: A Shadow Cost Approach
    • Abstract: Nitrogen has long been recognized as an important and challenging water pollutant (USEPA 2011). Large amounts enter the environment through human actions, primarily as fertilizer for agriculture. Human-induced increases in reactive nitrogen emissions to the environment may contribute to harmful changes to ecosystems and impose a variety of costs on society. As Nancy K. Stoner (2011, 1), Acting Office of Water Assistant, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator, explains: “Nitrogen and phosphorus pollution has the potential to become one of the costliest and most challenging environmental problems we face.” One of the concerns posed by nitrogen pollution is the costs imposed on municipal drinking ... Read More
      Keywords: Water-supply; Water utilities; Water quality; Water; Crops and climate; Land use, Rural; Ranching; Tin; Lead; Copper; Zinc; Iron; Forests and forestry; Well-being; Renewable energy sources; Housing; Bicycle trails; Public goods; Finance, Public; Parks; Referendum; Fisher
      PubDate: 2017-01-25T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Assessing the Impact of Weather Risk on Land Use Intensity: A
           Nonstationary and Dynamic Panel Modeling Approach
    • Abstract: Several common factors affect the agricultural sector around the world. These include market price fluctuations, changes in domestic and agricultural policies, credit markets and facilities, and management practices, to name a few. However, because of its inherent link to natural resources, agricultural production is also affected by variations in climate (or weather risk), which in turn influence agricultural productivity and patterns of land use. Weather risk (also referred as weather variability) not only impacts human settlements but also places a greater pressure on agricultural land and production agriculture. As the population of our planet continues to grow, it is expected that there will be an increase ... Read More
      Keywords: Water-supply; Water utilities; Water quality; Water; Crops and climate; Land use, Rural; Ranching; Tin; Lead; Copper; Zinc; Iron; Forests and forestry; Well-being; Renewable energy sources; Housing; Bicycle trails; Public goods; Finance, Public; Parks; Referendum; Fisher
      PubDate: 2017-01-25T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • CREP: Cattle Receiving Enhanced Pastures?: Investigating Landowner
           Response to Federal Incentives
    • Abstract: The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA’s) Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) pays rural landowners to accept restrictions on farming in environmentally sensitive areas. Its purpose is to “cost-effectively assist owners and operators in conserving and improving the nation’s natural resource base” (FSA 2012, p. 1–2). Landowners accepting payments while refraining from raising crops adds about $3.5 billion per year to the U.S economy through reduced erosion, increased wildlife abundance, and improved water quality (Wu and Weber 2012). Since the program costs about $1.9 billion per year (FSA 2010), the program represents a substantial positive contribution to the welfare of U.S. citizens. In spite of the ... Read More
      Keywords: Water-supply; Water utilities; Water quality; Water; Crops and climate; Land use, Rural; Ranching; Tin; Lead; Copper; Zinc; Iron; Forests and forestry; Well-being; Renewable energy sources; Housing; Bicycle trails; Public goods; Finance, Public; Parks; Referendum; Fisher
      PubDate: 2017-01-25T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Market Power in Nonrenewable Resource Markets: An Empirical Dynamic Model
    • Abstract: Nonrenewable resources are important resources in the modern economy. From fossil fuels to various minerals, nonrenewable resources are used to provide energy and input materials in numerous industries. Business people, policy makers, and researchers, especially economists, have paid much attention to the study of nonrenewable resource markets, including the demand and supply for these resources. Nonrenewable resources share the characteristic that they cannot be replenished in a conceivable time horizon. Thus, persistent extraction will eventually lead to physical or economic depletion. With the expansion of the economy, it is reasonable to expect that the demand for nonrenewable resources might grow. ... Read More
      Keywords: Water-supply; Water utilities; Water quality; Water; Crops and climate; Land use, Rural; Ranching; Tin; Lead; Copper; Zinc; Iron; Forests and forestry; Well-being; Renewable energy sources; Housing; Bicycle trails; Public goods; Finance, Public; Parks; Referendum; Fisher
      PubDate: 2017-01-25T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Spatial Valuation of Forests’ Environmental Assets: An Application to
           Andalusian Silvopastoral Farms
    • Abstract: Recent initiatives for moving toward a green economy triggered the interest in developing environmental accounting to analyze and track the state of ecosystems and the services they provide (Millennium Ecosystem Assessment Board 2005; UN et al. 2014a, 2014b). In recent years, there has been a noticeable effort to consider explicitly the spatial configuration of the provision of various ecosystem services (ESs) (see Wolff, Schulp, and Verburg 2015 for a review) and natural stocks. Likewise, there has been an appreciable progress in the integration of biophysical and economic land use models to simulate the spatial and temporal patterns of provision of different ESs at relevant spatial scales (Bateman et al. 2013; ... Read More
      Keywords: Water-supply; Water utilities; Water quality; Water; Crops and climate; Land use, Rural; Ranching; Tin; Lead; Copper; Zinc; Iron; Forests and forestry; Well-being; Renewable energy sources; Housing; Bicycle trails; Public goods; Finance, Public; Parks; Referendum; Fisher
      PubDate: 2017-01-25T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Measuring Renewable Energy Externalities: Evidence from Subjective
           Well-being Data
    • Abstract: Electricity generation from renewable sources is rapidly expanding in many countries around the world. In Germany, the share of electricity generated from renewable energy (RE) sources in total electricity consumption has increased from 4.6% in 1994 to 23.7% in 2012. In the European Union, we observe the same trend; by 2012, the share of RE sources in total electricity consumptions amounted to 23.5%. The public attitude toward RE is typically favorable (VZBV 2013), because renewable power avoids the externalities associated with electricity from fossil fuels (air pollution and greenhouse gases) and nuclear power (nuclear risk and waste disposal). Consistent with voiced opinions, Welsch and Biermann (2014) ... Read More
      Keywords: Water-supply; Water utilities; Water quality; Water; Crops and climate; Land use, Rural; Ranching; Tin; Lead; Copper; Zinc; Iron; Forests and forestry; Well-being; Renewable energy sources; Housing; Bicycle trails; Public goods; Finance, Public; Parks; Referendum; Fisher
      PubDate: 2017-01-25T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Valuing Public Goods, the Time to Capitalization, and Network
           Externalities: A Spatial Hedonic Regression Analysis
    • Abstract: The value of environmental public goods, such as bike paths, multiuse trails, and green-ways, has been studied in the hedonic housing price literature as well as by several city, local, or state officials who applied the hedonic model technique to examine their trailways. Most analyses find a positive or insignificant effect (Asabere and Huffman 2009; Campbell and Munroe 2007; Carvajal 1999; Correll, Lillydahl, and Singell 1978; Karadeniz 2008; Lindsey et al. 2004; Krizek, Levinson, and Mogush 2005; Nicholls and Crompton 2005; Parent and vom Hofe 2013; Racca and Dhanju 2006). However, Correll, Lillydahl, and Singell (1978) found both positive and negative effects from being near a greenbelt. Comparing three ... Read More
      Keywords: Water-supply; Water utilities; Water quality; Water; Crops and climate; Land use, Rural; Ranching; Tin; Lead; Copper; Zinc; Iron; Forests and forestry; Well-being; Renewable energy sources; Housing; Bicycle trails; Public goods; Finance, Public; Parks; Referendum; Fisher
      PubDate: 2017-01-25T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Payment Vehicles for Public Goods: Evidence from California’s
           Proposition 21
    • Abstract: State park funding mechanisms across the United States have been shifting away from public funding for the past 20 years, leaning more heavily upon user-based fees instead. Parks typically represent a good that is publicly provided, although rival when congested, so parks would be underprovided without public funding. Furthermore, popular state parks may become congested in the absence of user fees. However, while state governments spend billions of tax dollars annually to maintain these parks for public use, the shift away from public funding has left many state parks around the country with substantial deferred maintenance and operating budget deficits. As a result, state parks have seen decreased access ... Read More
      Keywords: Water-supply; Water utilities; Water quality; Water; Crops and climate; Land use, Rural; Ranching; Tin; Lead; Copper; Zinc; Iron; Forests and forestry; Well-being; Renewable energy sources; Housing; Bicycle trails; Public goods; Finance, Public; Parks; Referendum; Fisher
      PubDate: 2017-01-25T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Subsidies, Fisheries Management, and Stock Depletion
    • Abstract: The debate over possible new rules for fishery subsidies has not been settled in spite of a decade of discussion in the Doha Round of the World Trade Organization (WTO).1 Complicating the debate is the common-property nature of the fishery resources, since the state of regulation may be a key factor determining whether subsidies exacerbate or ameliorate the overexploitation of fish stocks. This is a real concern because annual fishery subsidies are large, with one estimate suggesting a figure of $34 billion worldwide.2 While subsidies lowering the costs of fishing are generally perceived as harmful, subsidies related to fishery management are more controversial. Given the overexploited state of many fishery ... Read More
      Keywords: Water-supply; Water utilities; Water quality; Water; Crops and climate; Land use, Rural; Ranching; Tin; Lead; Copper; Zinc; Iron; Forests and forestry; Well-being; Renewable energy sources; Housing; Bicycle trails; Public goods; Finance, Public; Parks; Referendum; Fisher
      PubDate: 2017-01-25T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
 
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