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Journal of Human Resources
Journal Prestige (SJR): 7.563
Citation Impact (citeScore): 6
Number of Followers: 43  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0022-166X - ISSN (Online) 1548-8004
Published by U of Wisconsin Press Homepage  [10 journals]
  • Student Coaching: How Far Can Technology Go'
    • Abstract: Policymakers and academics share growing concerns about stagnating college completion rates and negative student experiences. Between 1970 and 1999, for example, while college enrollment rates of 23-year-old students rose substantially, completion rates fell by 25 percent (Turner 2004). More recent figures suggest that only 56 percent of students who pursue a bachelor’s degree complete it within six years (Symonds, Schwartz, and Ferguson 2011), and recent research questions whether students who attain degrees acquire meaningful new skills along the way (Arum and Roksa 2011). Students are increasingly entering college underprepared, with those who procrastinate, do not study enough, and have superficial attitudes ... Read More
      Keywords: Personal coaching; Academic achievement; Student assistance programs; Self-portraits; Poor children; Poverty; High school students; Risk-taking (Psychology) in adolescence; Social security beneficiaries; Social security; Examinations; Disclosure of i
      PubDate: 2018-04-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Developing Hope among Impoverished Children: Using Child Self-Portraits to
           Measure Poverty Program Impacts
    • Abstract: International development organizations often highlight how their work “brings hope to the poor.” Yet, until recently, economists have overlooked the importance of psychological factors such as hope and motivation in economic development, focusing instead on the relief of external constraints through interventions such as education, infrastructure, and microcredit. However, new research has begun to emphasize “internal constraints” as both a cause and a consequence of poverty. Examples of this research include Banerjee and Mullainathan (2010); Mani et al. (2013); Beaman et al. (2012); Chiapa, Garrido, and Prina (2012); Bernard et al. (2014); and Dalton, Ghosal, and Mani (2016). Lybbert and Wydick (forthcoming) ... Read More
      Keywords: Personal coaching; Academic achievement; Student assistance programs; Self-portraits; Poor children; Poverty; High school students; Risk-taking (Psychology) in adolescence; Social security beneficiaries; Social security; Examinations; Disclosure of i
      PubDate: 2018-04-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Rank, Sex, Drugs, and Crime
    • Abstract: Risky health behaviors of adolescents such as smoking, binge drinking, and unprotected sex are suspected to have immediate negative impacts on educational performance, as well as far-reaching consequences for a person’s labor market prospects and health (Carrell, Hoekstra, and West 2011; Cawley and Ruhm 2011; Carpenter and Dobkin 2009). To prevent adolescents from these negative consequences, it is important to know the determinants of risky behaviors. A major determinant identified in the literature is spillover effects from peers, whereby the more likely one’s peers are to smoke, drink or take drugs, the more likely that person is to engage in such behaviors. In this paper, we explore an additional important ... Read More
      Keywords: Personal coaching; Academic achievement; Student assistance programs; Self-portraits; Poor children; Poverty; High school students; Risk-taking (Psychology) in adolescence; Social security beneficiaries; Social security; Examinations; Disclosure of i
      PubDate: 2018-04-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • How Does Social Security Claiming Respond to Incentives' Considering
           Husbands’ and Wives’ Benefits Separately
    • Abstract: Despite rising female labor force participation and relative earnings, a majority of women receive most of their Social Security benefits based on their husbands’ earnings history (Levine, Mitchell, and Phillips 2000; Social Security Administration, various years). If husbands maximize lifetime household benefits (or Social Security Wealth, SSW), they should choose their benefit claiming age based on the total payments to be received by both spouses.1 If husbands fail to respond to dependent (spouse or survivor) benefit incentives built into the system, they may choose a claiming age that imposes significant financial losses on their spouse.2Household Social Security benefits received in old age are based on ... Read More
      Keywords: Personal coaching; Academic achievement; Student assistance programs; Self-portraits; Poor children; Poverty; High school students; Risk-taking (Psychology) in adolescence; Social security beneficiaries; Social security; Examinations; Disclosure of i
      PubDate: 2018-04-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Information, Market Incentives, and Student Performance: Evidence from a
           Regression Discontinuity Design in Brazil
    • Abstract: The literature that studies the impact of school accountability on student performance is by now large.1 There are two different ways in which school accountability can have an impact on student performance. First, disclosure of information about how schools perform along different dimensions can lead students, parents, and schools to change their behavior in response to the information revealed. For example, a school can change its teachers or curriculum in response to an unsatisfactory performance of its students on standardized tests. Likewise, parents can choose a different school for their children if the performance of the school in which their children are enrolled is worse than the performance of nearby ... Read More
      Keywords: Personal coaching; Academic achievement; Student assistance programs; Self-portraits; Poor children; Poverty; High school students; Risk-taking (Psychology) in adolescence; Social security beneficiaries; Social security; Examinations; Disclosure of i
      PubDate: 2018-04-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Family Labor Supply and the Timing of Cash Transfers: Evidence from the
           Earned Income Tax Credit
    • Abstract: Do households adjust their behavior in response to receiving expected income payments' This question is crucial to understanding households’ behavior and analyzing aspects of government policy. For example, it has important implications for the design of welfare programs, especially for determining the payment frequency for welfare benefits. If the benefit recipient’s behavior is sensitive to the receipt of income, then more frequent payments could improve policy by helping recipients to smooth out their consumption. On the other hand, the effectiveness of short-run fiscal policies, such as temporary rebates during a recession, largely depends on how people adjust their behavior after receiving payments. The ... Read More
      Keywords: Personal coaching; Academic achievement; Student assistance programs; Self-portraits; Poor children; Poverty; High school students; Risk-taking (Psychology) in adolescence; Social security beneficiaries; Social security; Examinations; Disclosure of i
      PubDate: 2018-04-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Preschool and Parental Response in a Second Best World: Evidence from a
           School Construction Experiment
    • Abstract: At least 200 million children in low- and lower-middle income countries fail to achieve their potential in terms of cognitive and overall development (Grantham-McGregor et al. 2007). Cognitive development in early childhood is important in its own right, and, in addition, low levels of cognitive development are often associated with inadequate school readiness, which possibly contributes to poor school performance. Low levels of cognitive development, amplified with poor school performance, can undermine children’s potential future economic success (Heckman 2008). Studies from low-, middle-, and high-income countries that track individuals from early childhood into adulthood show that children brought up in a more ... Read More
      Keywords: Personal coaching; Academic achievement; Student assistance programs; Self-portraits; Poor children; Poverty; High school students; Risk-taking (Psychology) in adolescence; Social security beneficiaries; Social security; Examinations; Disclosure of i
      PubDate: 2018-04-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Occupational Mobility, Occupation Distance, and Specific Human Capital
    • Abstract: The main goal of this paper is to gain a better understanding of the relationship between occupational mobility and specific human capital. This paper builds on recent literature employing data on skills used or tasks performed in different occupations. This literature has already provided evidence that some occupations are quite similar in the sense of skills used or tasks performed, suggesting that specific human capital losses arising from mobility across these “close” occupations may be negligible.1 However, in assessing potential loss of specific human capital from occupational mobility, it is also important to be able to distinguish the direction of a move. Without this distinction, moving to a different ... Read More
      Keywords: Personal coaching; Academic achievement; Student assistance programs; Self-portraits; Poor children; Poverty; High school students; Risk-taking (Psychology) in adolescence; Social security beneficiaries; Social security; Examinations; Disclosure of i
      PubDate: 2018-04-13T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
 
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