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Journal Cover Journal of Human Resources
  [SJR: 2.761]   [H-I: 71]   [34 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0022-166X - ISSN (Online) 1548-8004
   Published by U of Wisconsin Press Homepage  [10 journals]
  • The Journal of Human Resources Referees Volume LI
    • Abstract: The Editors of the Journal of Human Resources wish to thank the following persons who served as manuscript reviewers between June 1, 2015 and May 31, 2016 Ama Abeberese Martin Abel Katharine Abraham Scott Adams Achyuta Adhvaryu Tom Ahn Anna Aizer Kehinde Ajayi Yaa Akosa Antwi Richard Akresh Joseph Aldy Abby Alpert Kate Ambler Elizabeth Ananat Dan Anderberg Michael Anderson Rodney Andrews Vincenzo Andrietti Massimo Anelli Manuela Angelucci Heather Antecol Francisca ... Read More
      Keywords: Fetal death; Infants; September 11 Terrorist Attacks, 2001; Class size; Parents; Government aid to education; Intergenerational relations; Father and child; Education; Households; Old age pensions; Young adults; Marriage; Marriage age; Divorce; World War, 1914-1918
      PubDate: 2016-11-24T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Military Service and Human Capital Accumulation: Evidence from Colonial
           Punjab
    • Abstract: At the outbreak of World War I, the British Government quickly turned to the Indian Army as a formidable source of man power. The province of Punjab1 had become the Indian Army’s preferred recruitment area well before 1914 but the war massively increased demand for military forces. The number of men recruited from Punjab increased by a factor of more than 5 between 1914 and 1918. In total, more than 400,000 men (or 1.8 percent of the Punjabi population) served in the army during the war. The experience of serving in the army transformed both recruits and their communities. Most Indian soldiers were volunteers recruited from small rural villages and could not read or write before they joined the army. At least for ... Read More
      Keywords: Fetal death; Infants; September 11 Terrorist Attacks, 2001; Class size; Parents; Government aid to education; Intergenerational relations; Father and child; Education; Households; Old age pensions; Young adults; Marriage; Marriage age; Divorce; World War, 1914-1918
      PubDate: 2016-11-24T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Aging and Strategic Learning: The Impact of Spousal Incentives on
           Financial Literacy
    • Abstract: Empirical studies have found that women tend to have lower levels of financial literacy than men (for example, Lusardi and Mitchell 2008; Fonseca et al. 2012; Kotlikoff and Bernheim 2001). This gap may reflect a division of labor within the household such that men are responsible for financial matters. However, women also tend to outlive their husbands so they eventually will need to take over this task. Women therefore have incentives both to delay acquiring financial knowledge but also to begin learning prior to widowhood. Financial literacy is a critical form of financial knowledge that is linked to important economic outcomes, including more effective wealth management, better management of credit and debt ... Read More
      Keywords: Fetal death; Infants; September 11 Terrorist Attacks, 2001; Class size; Parents; Government aid to education; Intergenerational relations; Father and child; Education; Households; Old age pensions; Young adults; Marriage; Marriage age; Divorce; World War, 1914-1918
      PubDate: 2016-11-24T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Why Have Divorce Rates Fallen?: The Role of Women’s Age at
           Marriage
    • Abstract: Divorce rates more than doubled in the United States between 1950 and 1979. Only one-quarter of the marriages that started in the 1950s ended in divorce but half of all unions beginning in the 1970s eventually would dissolve. After 1980, divorce rates began to fall back to previous levels. American couples marrying in 2008 are projected to divorce about 40 percent less often than those who wed at the height of marital instability.1 Many researchers have tried to explain the initial rise in divorce rates. (See Stevenson and Wolfers 2007.) Work by Becker (1973, 1974, 1991); Johnson and Skinner (1986); and Ruggles (1997) suggests that rising female labor force participation may have caused the increase.2 ... Read More
      Keywords: Fetal death; Infants; September 11 Terrorist Attacks, 2001; Class size; Parents; Government aid to education; Intergenerational relations; Father and child; Education; Households; Old age pensions; Young adults; Marriage; Marriage age; Divorce; World War, 1914-1918
      PubDate: 2016-11-24T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Saying, “I Don’t”: The Effect of the Affordable Care Act Young Adult
           Provision on Marriage
    • Abstract: In 2010, Congress enacted the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) young adult provision to address the low health insurance rates of young adults. This provision allowed 19–25-year-olds to be covered by their parents’ private health insurance plans, regardless of marital status, student status, and whether they have children. Prior to the implementation of the provision, young adults who were not enrolled in school generally became ineligible for coverage under their parents’ private health insurance plans when they turned 19 years old while students generally aged out when they turned 24 years old. Several papers find that the provision was effective in increasing health insurance coverage of young ... Read More
      Keywords: Fetal death; Infants; September 11 Terrorist Attacks, 2001; Class size; Parents; Government aid to education; Intergenerational relations; Father and child; Education; Households; Old age pensions; Young adults; Marriage; Marriage age; Divorce; World War, 1914-1918
      PubDate: 2016-11-24T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Bargaining with Grandma: The Impact of the South African Pension on
           Household Decision-Making
    • Abstract: The growing importance of cash transfers as an antipoverty tool in the developing world has highlighted the importance of understanding how households make decisions and allocate resources. Over the past three decades the theory of household resource allocation has evolved from unitary models that treat the household as a single entity (Samuelson 1956; Becker 1974; Becker 1981) to models that argue that preferences may vary within the household and that the distribution of bargaining power across household members will determine intrahousehold decision-making dynamics (Chiappori 1988; Chiappori 1992; Lundberg and Pollack 1993; Lundberg and Pollack 1994; Manser and Brown 1980; McElroy and Horney 1981). This shift ... Read More
      Keywords: Fetal death; Infants; September 11 Terrorist Attacks, 2001; Class size; Parents; Government aid to education; Intergenerational relations; Father and child; Education; Households; Old age pensions; Young adults; Marriage; Marriage age; Divorce; World War, 1914-1918
      PubDate: 2016-11-24T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Father Presence and the Intergenerational Transmission of Educational
           Attainment
    • Abstract: Positive correlations between the economic, educational, social, and behavioral outcomes of parents and children have been widely documented. (See Björklund and Salvanes 2011; Black and Devereux 2010 for recent reviews.) These correlations are due to nature, nurture, and an interaction of these two factors. The nature perspective highlights that a large portion of parent-child correlations in skills and abilities can be attributed to genetic inheritance (Loehlin and Rowe 1992; Rowe 1994). The nurture perspective emphasizes social conditions such as parental economic inputs, cultural backgrounds, or parenting practices as key elements in the transmission of traits and behaviors across generations (Carneiro ... Read More
      Keywords: Fetal death; Infants; September 11 Terrorist Attacks, 2001; Class size; Parents; Government aid to education; Intergenerational relations; Father and child; Education; Households; Old age pensions; Young adults; Marriage; Marriage age; Divorce; World War, 1914-1918
      PubDate: 2016-11-24T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Parental Responses to Public Investments in Children: Evidence from a
           Maximum Class Size Rule
    • Abstract: Parents and schools interact to shape the educational outcomes of children. In this context, parents are important for two reasons. First, parental characteristics and the home environment influence cognitive skill development, implying that children may be differentially affected by variation in school inputs for given parental behavior. Second, parents may be differentially able to adjust to variation in school inputs by altering their investment behavior. This paper examines how parental investment behavior responds to variation in class size. By doing so we shed light on the extent of substitutability of household and school inputs in the human capital production function. To date, there is rather ... Read More
      Keywords: Fetal death; Infants; September 11 Terrorist Attacks, 2001; Class size; Parents; Government aid to education; Intergenerational relations; Father and child; Education; Households; Old age pensions; Young adults; Marriage; Marriage age; Divorce; World War, 1914-1918
      PubDate: 2016-11-24T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The 9/11 Dust Cloud and Pregnancy Outcomes: A Reconsideration
    • Abstract: The collapse of the World Trade Center (WTC) in New York City following the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, was the largest environmental disaster ever to have befallen a U.S. metropolis, releasing a million tons of toxic dust and smoke into the air of lower Manhattan (Landrigan et al. 2004; Lioy et al. 2002; Pleil et al. 2004). The levels of mutagenic and carcinogenic air pollutants measured in the aftermath of the WTC collapse are among the highest ever reported from outdoor sources (Pleil et al. 2004). Many previous studies have found a relationship between air pollution during pregnancy and adverse birth outcomes (for example, Black et al. 2013; Currie, Neidell, and Schmeider 2009; Currie and ... Read More
      Keywords: Fetal death; Infants; September 11 Terrorist Attacks, 2001; Class size; Parents; Government aid to education; Intergenerational relations; Father and child; Education; Households; Old age pensions; Young adults; Marriage; Marriage age; Divorce; World War, 1914-1918
      PubDate: 2016-11-24T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
 
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