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Journal Cover Ecosystem Services
  [SJR: 2.169]   [H-I: 21]   [6 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 2212-0416
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3031 journals]
  • Stakeholders’ perceptions of ecosystem services and Pangasius catfish
           farming development along the Hau River in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam
    • Authors: Nguyen Thi Kim Quyen; Håkan Berg; Wenresti Gallardo; Chau Thi Da
      Pages: 2 - 14
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 25
      Author(s): Nguyen Thi Kim Quyen, Håkan Berg, Wenresti Gallardo, Chau Thi Da
      This study identifies stakeholders’ perceptions of ecosystem services (ESS) along the Mekong River in Vietnam. It evaluates trade-offs made between ESS under different Pangasius catfish development scenarios, and stakeholders’ preferences to these scenarios. The study was conducted through interviews, focus group discussions and a questionnaire survey with 150 households. Rice cultivation and Pangasius catfish farming were identified as the most important economic activities. Provisioning services were scored as the most important ESS, followed by supporting, regulating and cultural services. Most stakeholders perceived that an intensification of Pangasius catfish farming would increase the production of catfish, but decrease nine other ESS, while integrated Pangasius catfish farming would decrease the Pangasius catfish production but increase nine other ESS. An integrated system was preferred by the majority of the respondents, mainly because it was perceived to enhance several ESS and provide benefits to local communities. In conclusion, a sustainable development of Pangasius catfish farming in the Mekong Delta must include local stakeholders’ participation and apply farming strategies that make use of the natural environment without severely or irreversibly degrading it.

      PubDate: 2017-03-28T15:56:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.03.007
      Issue No: Vol. 25 (2017)
       
  • Integrating supply and social demand in ecosystem services assessment: A
           review
    • Authors: Hejie Wei; Weiguo Fan; Xuechao Wang; Nachuan Lu; Xiaobin Dong; Yanan Zhao; Xijia Ya; Yifei Zhao
      Pages: 15 - 27
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 25
      Author(s): Hejie Wei, Weiguo Fan, Xuechao Wang, Nachuan Lu, Xiaobin Dong, Yanan Zhao, Xijia Ya, Yifei Zhao
      As a result of the unsustainable way in which natural resources are consumed, the gaps between the supply and social demand of ecosystem services (ES) are gradually widening. In this regard, studies have increasingly assessed both ES supply and demand comprehensively. This current review covers recent case studies about the integrated assessment of ES supply and demand (IAESSD), which is defined as the application of ES supply and demand assessments in one case study. By combining some key words (e.g., ES, supply or capacity, demand or flow), 38 IAESSD case studies were selected. The “indicator-method-mismatches” in the case studies were then analyzed in detail. The results show that different indicators are applied to distinguish supply and demand. Mapping, participatory methods, and modeling are often used in IAESSD. ES supply–demand mismatches, which have a strong impact on human well-being by causing unsatisfied demand, are influenced by natural and anthropogenic factors. Because of the complex and interactive nature of ecological and economic systems, IAESSD faces challenges regarding the clarification of different ES components from supply to social demand and the provision of promising methods for the identification of ES mismatches. Thus, a framework for further IAESSD research is proposed. This framework highlights the importance of identifying multi-dimensional mismatches and matching ES supply and demand in practice.

      PubDate: 2017-03-28T15:56:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.03.017
      Issue No: Vol. 25 (2017)
       
  • The use of meteorological data to assess the cooling service of forests
    • Authors: Xuehui Sun; Xueming Li; Zhangnan Guan; Jian Liu; Shuping Zhang
      Pages: 28 - 34
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 25
      Author(s): Xuehui Sun, Xueming Li, Zhangnan Guan, Jian Liu, Shuping Zhang
      The climate regulation effects of forests have been extensively studied. Many evaluation methods exist to assess the climate regulation service on regional and global scales. However, the processes driving local scale effects are poorly understood. We established a new method, which combined the cooling effects of forest and cooling costs to assess the value of climate regulation of a local scale forest. The inhabitable value of cooling service of forests for the farming area and built-up area and the payable value only for the built-up area were considered separately. The climate regulation effects of a forest in Fanggan, a mountainous village of East China, were studied. In 2014, the economic value of the cooling effects of the forest was 3727 USD per ha per year. In the inhabitable area, only about 10% of this amount was practically payable in the built-up area for humans. This method provides a new way of incorporating cooling effects into climate regulation services.

      PubDate: 2017-03-28T15:56:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.03.016
      Issue No: Vol. 25 (2017)
       
  • Refocusing ecosystem services towards sustainability
    • Authors: Matthias Schröter; Klara H. Stumpf; Jacqueline Loos; Alexander P.E. van Oudenhoven; Anne Böhnke-Henrichs; David J. Abson
      Pages: 35 - 43
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 25
      Author(s): Matthias Schröter, Klara H. Stumpf, Jacqueline Loos, Alexander P.E. van Oudenhoven, Anne Böhnke-Henrichs, David J. Abson
      Ecosystem services and sustainability have become prominent concepts in international policy and research agendas. However, a common conceptual ground between these concepts is currently underdeveloped. In particular, a vision is missing on how to align ecosystem services with overarching sustainability goals. Originally, the ecosystem service concept focused on sustaining human well-being through biodiversity conservation. Nevertheless, studies within the field also consider appropriation beyond carrying capacities, and natural resource management that involves environmentally damaging inputs as ecosystem service provision. This brings the ecosystem service concept into conflict with the core goal of sustainability, i.e. achieving justice within ecological limits over the long term. Here, we link the ecosystem service concept to sustainability outcomes operationalized in terms of justice. Our framing positions sustainability as an overarching goal which can be achieved through seven key strategies: equitable (1) intergenerational and (2) intragenerational distribution, (3) interspecies distribution, (4) fair procedures, recognition and participation, (5) sufficiency, (6) efficiency, and (7) persistence. Applying these strategies has the potential to re-focus the ecosystem service concept towards the normative goal of sustainability. We identify research needs for each strategy and further discuss questions regarding operationalization of the strategies.

      PubDate: 2017-03-28T15:56:14Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.03.019
      Issue No: Vol. 25 (2017)
       
  • How auctions to allocate payments for ecosystem services contracts impact
           social equity
    • Authors: F.L. McGrath; L.R. Carrasco; B. Leimona
      Pages: 44 - 55
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 25
      Author(s): F.L. McGrath, L.R. Carrasco, B. Leimona
      Conservation auctions are used in Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) scheme implementation as they are an efficient way to identify participants. Ensuring a fair implementation process is important when considering an equitable PES scheme. Currently the implications, such as impacts on social dynamics and participant perceptions, of auctions at both the individual and community level are poorly understood. Using a case study a long-standing and well-established PES scheme in Sumberjaya, Indonesia, we aim to explore the relationship between farmer characteristics and their perceived auction fairness/satisfaction and impacts on the community social dynamics. We find that a fair auction process allowing all to participate leads to perceived fairness at the individual level. However, at the community level, we find that individuals perceive more social impacts. Our results also find that information quality is the main factor in increasing fairness and reducing community impacts. Our results suggest that while it is possible to have an equitable implementation process, ensuring procedural equity may potentially compromise contextual equity. These results can aid in the implementation of PES schemes and shed some light into which characteristics to identify within potential participants and communities to avoid social disruptions.

      PubDate: 2017-04-05T14:32:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.02.017
      Issue No: Vol. 25 (2017)
       
  • Scenarios for land use and ecosystem services under global change
    • Authors: Maria Jose Martinez-Harms; Brett A. Bryan; Eugenio Figueroa; Patricio Pliscoff; Rebecca K. Runting; Kerrie A. Wilson
      Pages: 56 - 68
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 25
      Author(s): Maria Jose Martinez-Harms, Brett A. Bryan, Eugenio Figueroa, Patricio Pliscoff, Rebecca K. Runting, Kerrie A. Wilson
      Scenarios provide a platform to explore the provision of ecosystem services under global change. Despite their relevance to land-use policy, there is a paucity of such assessments, particularly in developing countries. Central Chile provides a good example from the Latin American realm as the region has experienced rapid transformation from natural landscapes to urbanization and agricultural development. Local experts from Central Chile identified climate change, urbanization, and fire regimes as key drivers of change. Scenarios depicting plausible future trajectories of change were developed to assess the combined effects on carbon storage, wine production, and scenic beauty for the year 2050. Across the region, the action of the drivers reduced the total amount of carbon storage (by 85%) and wine production (by 52%) compared with a baseline scenario, with minor changes incurred for scenic beauty. The carbon storage and wine production had declined by 90% and scenic beauty by 28% when the reaction to changed fire regimes was also taken into account. The cumulative outcomes of climate change and urbanization are likely to place substantial pressures on ecosystem services in Central Chile by mid-century, revealing the need for stronger planning regulations to manage land-use change.

      PubDate: 2017-04-05T14:32:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.03.021
      Issue No: Vol. 25 (2017)
       
  • An economic perspective on land use decisions in agricultural landscapes:
           Insights from the TEEB Germany Study
    • Authors: Christian Albert; Christoph Schröter-Schlaack; Bernd Hansjürgens; Alexandra Dehnhardt; Ralf Döring; Hubert Job; Johann Köppel; Sebastian Krätzig; Bettina Matzdorf; Michaela Reutter; Stefan Schaltegger; Mathias Scholz; Marianna Siegmund-Schultze; Hubert Wiggering; Manuel Woltering; Christina von Haaren
      Pages: 69 - 78
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 25
      Author(s): Christian Albert, Christoph Schröter-Schlaack, Bernd Hansjürgens, Alexandra Dehnhardt, Ralf Döring, Hubert Job, Johann Köppel, Sebastian Krätzig, Bettina Matzdorf, Michaela Reutter, Stefan Schaltegger, Mathias Scholz, Marianna Siegmund-Schultze, Hubert Wiggering, Manuel Woltering, Christina von Haaren
      Agricultural landscapes safeguard ecosystem services (ES) and biodiversity upon which human well-being depends. However, only a fraction of these services are generally considered in land management decisions, resulting in trade-offs and societally inefficient solutions. The TEEB Study (The Economics of Ecosystems and Biodiversity) spearheaded the development of assessments of the economic significance of ES and biodiversity. Several national TEEB follow-ups have compiled case studies and derived targeted policy advice. By synthesizing insights from “Natural Capital Germany – TEEB DE” and focusing on rural areas, the objectives of this study were (i) to explore causes of the continued decline of ES and biodiversity, (ii) to introduce case studies exemplifying the economic significance of ES and biodiversity in land use decisions, and (iii) to synthesize key recommendations for policy, planning and management. Our findings indicate that the continued decrease of ES and biodiversity in Germany can be explained by implementation deficits within a well-established nature conservation system. Three case studies on grassland protection, the establishment of riverbank buffer zones and water-sensitive farming illustrate that an economic perspective can convey recognition of the values of ES and biodiversity. We conclude with suggestions for enhanced consideration, improved conservation and sustainable use of ES and biodiversity.

      PubDate: 2017-04-05T14:32:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.03.020
      Issue No: Vol. 25 (2017)
       
  • Embracing complexity improves the assessment of environmental flows –
           One step beyond Gopal’s (2016) framework
    • Authors: Dídac Jorda-Capdevila; Beatriz Rodríguez-Labajos
      Pages: 79 - 81
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 25
      Author(s): Dídac Jorda-Capdevila, Beatriz Rodríguez-Labajos
      Gopal presented in 2016 a conceptual framework for incorporating ecosystem services into assessments of environmental flows. Quantifying the contribution of environmental flows to human wellbeing as Gopal proposes is indeed necessary. However, this alone does not address the challenges of their implementation or the problems caused by the lack of environmental flows. This paper offers a more comprehensive review of studies that used ecosystem services in the context of environmental flow management. Based on this we argue that it is important to embrace the complexity inherent in river-related benefits at all stages of assessment. The points to be considered that complement Gopal’s framework are: 1) the importance of characterising ecosystem services from both biophysical and social perspectives, 2) the spatial and temporal heterogeneity in ecosystem services provision, and 3) the differences of power among stakeholder groups, which allow to impose false consensus in the allocation of the access to and benefits from ecosystem services.

      PubDate: 2017-04-05T14:32:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.03.018
      Issue No: Vol. 25 (2017)
       
  • Analysis of publication trends in ecosystem services research
    • Authors: Kelsey McDonough; Stacy Hutchinson; Trisha Moore; J.M. Shawn Hutchinson
      Pages: 82 - 88
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 25
      Author(s): Kelsey McDonough, Stacy Hutchinson, Trisha Moore, J.M. Shawn Hutchinson
      Scholarly journal publications on the topic of ecosystem services have substantially grown throughout the past decade, which is evidenced by an expanding world-wide research base. However, several challenges in the field of ecosystem services still remain, including conflicting approaches to ecosystem services terminology, classification schemes, research methods, and reporting requirements. We assess the development and disciplinary focus of ecosystem service research over the last decade using a meta-analysis of peer-reviewed journal publications. The journals of Shengtai Xuebao Acta Ecologica Sinica, Ecosystem Services, PLoS One, and Ecological Economics lead scholarly journals publishing ecosystem services-focused articles. The European Union leads ecosystem services publications (42%), while the United States is responsible for 30% of ecosystem services publications. This analysis is supplemented by a discussion on ecosystem services-focused research and policy to identify trends that encourage future study to resolve some of the current issues faced by the research community.

      PubDate: 2017-04-05T14:32:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.03.022
      Issue No: Vol. 25 (2017)
       
  • Rapid Assessment of Wetland Ecosystem Services (RAWES): An example from
           Colombo, Sri Lanka
    • Authors: R.J. McInnes; M. Everard
      Pages: 89 - 105
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 25
      Author(s): R.J. McInnes, M. Everard
      Wetlands make essential positive contributions to multiple dimensions of human wellbeing. However, recognition of these benefits is often lacking in decision-making, compromising the wellbeing of both the ecosystem and is many linked human beneficiaries. Wetland site managers, decision-makers and stakeholders all need to better understand the benefits provided by wetlands. Despite a plethora of available assessment techniques, very few approaches are genuinely rapid, applicable across different wetland types or consider the realities of time and money resource constraints. The Rapid Assessment of Wetland Ecosystem Services (RAWES) approach is presented as a method that meets these needs, illustrated through its practical application in over 60 different wetland sites supporting development of a Wetland Strategy for the Metro Colombo Region, Sri Lanka. The approach is based on the trained, local assessors using a variety of field indicators in order to assess the positive or negative contribution over 30 wetland ecosystem services provide at local, regional or global scales. Outputs are simplified, signalling to decision-makers the diversity of interlinked ecosystem service outcomes consequent from management policies and actions.

      PubDate: 2017-04-12T06:45:13Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.03.024
      Issue No: Vol. 25 (2017)
       
  • Natural capital in practice: How to include its value in Dutch
           decision-making processes
    • Authors: Arjan Ruijs; Petra van Egmond
      Pages: 106 - 116
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 25
      Author(s): Arjan Ruijs, Petra van Egmond
      Scientific and policy attention for natural capital and ecosystem services have grown fast during the last decade. As a result, awareness on the value of the stock of natural capital and the flow of ecosystem services it provides increased. Decision-makers from governments, business and nature organisations nowadays have much better insights into the opportunities its sustainable use provides, for themselves and for society. Yet, translating lessons from natural capital research to policy remains complex. In this paper, on the basis of the results of the two-year Natural Capital Netherlands programme, it is elaborated how, in practice, governments, businesses and nature organisations can include the value of natural capital in their decision-making processes. The planning and decision-making processes studied in this programme can be clustered into three domains: sustainable entrepreneurship, entrepreneurial nature management and area development. For each domain of decision-making, the approach to be followed differs somewhat and different policies should be developed to reach the situation in which it is mainstream to include the value of natural capital in decision-making. Moreover, it is shown that incorporating natural capital leads to innovation, with new market opportunities, new nature development and new collaborations between various parties as a result.

      PubDate: 2017-04-12T06:45:13Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.03.025
      Issue No: Vol. 25 (2017)
       
  • Expanding the suite of Cultural Ecosystem Services to include ingenuity,
           perspective, and life teaching
    • Authors: Rachelle K. Gould; Noa Kekuewa Lincoln
      Pages: 117 - 127
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 25
      Author(s): Rachelle K. Gould, Noa Kekuewa Lincoln
      Cultural Ecosystem Services (CES) are a crucial but relatively understudied component of the ecosystem services framework. While the number and diversity of categories of other types of ES have steadily increased, CES categories are still largely defined by a few existing typologies. Based on our empirical data, we suggest that those typologies need updating. We analyzed data from interviews conducted in adjacent Hawaiian ecosystems—one agricultural and one forested. We found that current categories of CES do not capture the diversity and nuance of the nonmaterial benefits that people described receiving from ecosystems. We propose three new CES categories: ingenuity, life teaching, and perspective. We discuss issues of lumping and splitting CES categories, and advocate that creating categories for these emerging themes will help us to more fully capture nonmaterial benefits in ecosystem services research and policy.

      PubDate: 2017-04-27T12:15:11Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.04.002
      Issue No: Vol. 25 (2017)
       
  • Are ecosystem service studies presenting the right information for
           decision making?
    • Authors: William C.C. Wright; Florian V. Eppink; Suzie Greenhalgh
      Pages: 128 - 139
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 25
      Author(s): William C.C. Wright, Florian V. Eppink, Suzie Greenhalgh
      Monetary valuation is often used as a measure of ecosystem service value but is not appropriate for all Ecosystem Services. The ecosystem service literature has devised various formats to present monetary values together with other types of ecosystem service information, but these are rarely tested in a decision-making context. We search the literature to identify and classify formats used to present combinations of ecosystem service information types, and develop criteria to determine which features of these formats support instrumental and conceptual decisions. We find that many of the presentation formats present ecosystem service information in a way that supports conceptual discussions, but only a few formats present the information needed to make instrumental decisions. Furthermore, some of our assessment criteria are not met by any of the presentation formats. These gaps suggest further research areas to strengthen the usefulness of ecosystem service assessments in decision making.

      PubDate: 2017-04-27T12:15:11Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.03.002
      Issue No: Vol. 25 (2017)
       
  • Remote sensing combined with social-ecological data: The importance of
           diverse land uses for ecosystem service provision in north-eastern
           Madagascar
    • Authors: J.G. Zaehringer; G. Schwilch; O.R. Andriamihaja; B. Ramamonjisoa; P. Messerli
      Pages: 140 - 152
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 25
      Author(s): J.G. Zaehringer, G. Schwilch, O.R. Andriamihaja, B. Ramamonjisoa, P. Messerli
      Through ongoing deforestation in the tropics, forest-related ecosystem services are declining, while ecosystem services provided by agricultural land uses are on the increase. Land system science provides a framework for analysing the links between land use change and the resulting socio-environmental trade-offs. However, the evidence base to support the navigation of such trade-offs is often lacking, as information on land use cannot directly be obtained through remote sensing and census data is often unavailable at sufficient spatial resolution. The global biodiversity hotspot of north-eastern Madagascar exemplifies these challenges. Combining land use data obtained through remote sensing with social-ecological data from a regional level household survey, we attempt to make the links between land use and ecosystem service benefits explicit. Our study confirmed that remotely sensed information on landscapes reflects households’ involvement in rice production systems. We further characterized landscapes in terms of “ecosystem service bundles” linked to specific land uses, as well as in terms of ecosystem service benefits to households. The map of landscape types could help direct future conservation and development efforts towards places where there is potential for success.

      PubDate: 2017-05-04T05:09:45Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.04.004
      Issue No: Vol. 25 (2017)
       
  • “Things are different now”: Farmer perceptions of cultural ecosystem
           services of traditional rice landscapes in Vietnam and the Philippines
    • Authors: Vera Tekken; Joachim H. Spangenberg; Benjamin Burkhard; Monina Escalada; Susanne Stoll-Kleemann; Dao Thanh Truong; Josef Settele
      Pages: 153 - 166
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 25
      Author(s): Vera Tekken, Joachim H. Spangenberg, Benjamin Burkhard, Monina Escalada, Susanne Stoll-Kleemann, Dao Thanh Truong, Josef Settele
      Traditional rice production has shaped distinctive cultural landscapes in SE Asia. Rice cultivation is closely linked to socio-cultural values and has created specific agrobiodiversity. Increasing development pressures lead to an intensification of small-scale production systems and with this to changes of landscapes and associated ecosystems services. With a focus on cultural ecosystem services and along different land use gradients a qualitative assessment of farmer’s perceptions regarding cultural values of their landscapes was conducted. Interviews focused on traditional farming methods and the abundance of cultural values and perceptions that support the preservation of low-input, sustainable land management strategies. 73 indicators for Cultural Identity, Landscape Aesthetics, and Knowledge Systems were derived, revealing that socio-cultural structures and the socioeconomic situation of farmers influence their view on landscape-related cultural services. The qualitative approach of this research provides an important contribution to the field of ecosystem service assessments because these are the values people perceive based on culturally embedded and socially shaped preferences. For the implementation of ecological engineering, which is based on participation and on the belief into the natural resilience of ecosystems, the assessment of cultural ecosystem services provides important evidence in which areas this theoretical concept could find higher acceptance.

      PubDate: 2017-05-04T05:09:45Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.04.010
      Issue No: Vol. 25 (2017)
       
  • Challenges for valuing ecosystem services from an Indigenous estate in
           northern Australia
    • Authors: Kamaljit K. Sangha; Jeremy Russell-Smith; Scott C. Morrison; Robert Costanza; Andrew Edwards
      Pages: 167 - 178
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 25
      Author(s): Kamaljit K. Sangha, Jeremy Russell-Smith, Scott C. Morrison, Robert Costanza, Andrew Edwards
      Recent Australian government policy for developing northern Australia applies a standard financial approach that disregards the importance of Ecosystem Services (ES), and the significance of associated socio-cultural benefits of ES for the wellbeing of Indigenous people who constitute the majority of the regional rural population. First, we assess available ES valuation methods for estimating non-market and market values of ES from an Indigenous estate, Fish River Station (FRS), representative of ‘typical’ regional savannas. Second, we estimate the direct (fire and weed management) and indirect (foregone income from pastoral enterprise) costs associated with maintaining those services. For valuation of ES, we applied a conventional Basic Value Transfer technique using global databases including available regional studies—providing valuations of USD 286 and 84My−1, respectively. However, constituent studies used in these valuations had limited relevance to both the ecosystems and socio-cultural contexts of our study. For evaluating Indigenous socio-ecological benefits of ES, estimated conservatively at USD 2.21My−1, we applied a local wellbeing valuation technique. The minimum costs required to maintain ES flows were estimated as USD 5.6ha−1 y−1. Our study illustrates that, to better inform regional development policy, significant challenges remain for appropriate valuation of ES from north Australian savannas, including recognition of socio-cultural services and wellbeing benefits incorporating Indigenous values.

      PubDate: 2017-05-09T05:14:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.04.013
      Issue No: Vol. 25 (2017)
       
  • Cultural ecosystem services: Characteristics, challenges and lessons for
           urban green space research
    • Authors: Dawn C. Dickinson; Richard J. Hobbs
      Pages: 179 - 194
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 25
      Author(s): Dawn C. Dickinson, Richard J. Hobbs
      City dwellers have fewer opportunities to connect with nature, with urban green space (UGS) often one of the few places where this can occur. Natural environments are known to contribute to human wellbeing, although to date research has largely focused on quantifiable benefits. The less tangible benefits obtained from ecosystems have commonly been referred to as ‘Cultural Ecosystem Services’ (CES). However, challenges persist around the definition and measurement of CES. A qualitative review of literature was conducted to identify key characteristics of CES, challenges to CES research, and lessons for the future of UGS research. The review found that CES have tended to be characterised by intangibility and incommensurability, when perhaps the most distinguishing features are the form and extent of human-environment co-production, and association between CES and held values. Despite ongoing challenges, researchers have applied a range of methods to capture and analyse CES, including non-economic and participatory/deliberative approaches. As urbanisation increases, it is important to understand how CES from UGS affect wellbeing. The review found that attention to date has mainly focused on identifying CES but scope exists to research the effects of UGS attributes, and how the socio-cultural diversity of cities might influence co-production of CES.

      PubDate: 2017-05-09T05:14:44Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.04.014
      Issue No: Vol. 25 (2017)
       
  • A physical economic model of ecosystem services
    • Authors: John E. Coulter
      Pages: 195 - 200
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 25
      Author(s): John E. Coulter
      To make full use of the power of economics, ecosystem services accounting can show how work done can be understood from the carbon cycle and compared with the economic actions represented in the Circular Flow of the Macroeconomy. The comparison is useful in fitting data from both fields on the one spreadsheet to assist in economic and environmental management. This requires some review of concepts originally formed before the industrial revolution discoveries of modern science. Though labor and capital are conventionally considered as distinct, the concept of “work” is shown in a simple case study to be a unifying concept derived from the factor, “force” which may be biological or mechanical, almost invariably fueled in purposive action by the combustion of a carbohydrate (food or organic fuel) or hydrocarbons. Adapting from Odum’s “fractal cascade” of usable energy, 30,000 solar photons pass through a hierarchy of 5 phases to deliver work done by the breaking 2 carbon-hydrogen bonds. For the Earth in 2015 the increase in broken C–H bonds over those reconstituted naturally was 18×1038, emphasizing a unidirectional trend to higher costs, rather than any hoped-for recovery of business cycle.

      PubDate: 2017-05-13T11:20:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.04.007
      Issue No: Vol. 25 (2017)
       
  • To what extent have the links between ecosystem services and human
           well-being been researched in Africa, Asia, and Latin America?
    • Authors: Gisella S. Cruz-Garcia; Erwan Sachet; Genowefa Blundo-Canto; Martha Vanegas; Marcela Quintero
      Pages: 201 - 212
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 25
      Author(s): Gisella S. Cruz-Garcia, Erwan Sachet, Genowefa Blundo-Canto, Martha Vanegas, Marcela Quintero
      Most studies to date assume that there are multiple relationships between ecosystem services and human well-being, but there are few studies that quantify these relationships. Our objectives were: (1) to investigate the trends and understudied areas within ecosystem services and well-being research; and (2) within these general trends, to analyze to what extent the linkages between ecosystem services and well-being presented in empirical research in Africa, Asia, and Latin America were part of a tested hypothesis, and to assess which conceptual frameworks were used in understanding this interface. The results of this study highlighted that most publications assumed that ecosystem services and well-being were interlinked but did not analyze their relationship as part of the hypothesis to test. While different frameworks on well-being were adopted by empirical research, only one out of the 29 post-Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MEA) conceptual frameworks that illustrate the linkages between ecosystem services and well-being was documented, and most case studies adopted the MEA. Finally, trade-offs and synergies between ecosystem services and disaggregated well-being were understudied. Considering these knowledge gaps in future studies will help empirical ecosystem services research to simultaneously contribute to improved well-being and environmental sustainability when applied at multiple policy or institutional levels.

      PubDate: 2017-05-13T11:20:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.04.005
      Issue No: Vol. 25 (2017)
       
  • Incentive-compatible payments for watershed services along the Eastern
           Route of China’s South-North Water Transfer Project
    • Authors: Jichuan Sheng; Michael Webber
      Pages: 213 - 226
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 25
      Author(s): Jichuan Sheng, Michael Webber
      In transboundary rivers, upstream and downstream users have different interests, which affect their willingness to pay to protect the river’s ecological services. This is true of the Eastern Route of China’s South-North Water Transfer Project (SNWTP), with the added complication that the State Council Office (of SNWT Construction Committee) supervises upstream and downstream users. This paper analyses the strategies of upstream users, downstream users and the State Council Office, to explore an incentive-compatible system of payments for watershed services through a tripartite evolutionary game model. The results demonstrate that: First, whether lower Yangtze governments can obtain payments for reduced access to water depends on State Council Office’s supervision costs. Second, upstream and downstream users’ initial willingness to participate may determine the ultimate evolutionary stable strategy. Third, State Council Office could ensure that payment system works, by increasing punishment for users that are initially unwilling to pay for watershed services. Fourth, high opportunity costs and high payments to upstream governments reduce the upstream and downstream users’ incentives to participate. All these factors need to be considered in designing payment systems for watershed services to establish an incentive-compatible scheme and realize appropriate water governance in SNWTP.

      PubDate: 2017-05-13T11:20:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.04.006
      Issue No: Vol. 25 (2017)
       
  • Uncertainty assessment in ecosystem services analyses: Seven challenges
           and practical responses
    • Authors: Perrine Hamel; Benjamin P. Bryant
      Pages: 1 - 15
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 24
      Author(s): Perrine Hamel, Benjamin P. Bryant
      Ecosystem services (ES) analyses are increasingly used to address societal challenges, but too often are not accompanied by uncertainty assessment. This omission limits the validity of their findings and may undermine the ‘science-based’ decisions they inform. We summarize and analyze seven commonly perceived challenges to conducting uncertainty assessment that help explain why it often receives superficial treatment in ES studies. We connect these challenges to solutions in relevant scientific literature and guidance documents. Since ES science is based on a multiplicity of disciplines (e.g. ecology, hydrology, economics, environmental modeling, policy sciences), substantial knowledge already exists to identify, quantify, and communicate uncertainties. The integration of these disciplines for solution-oriented modeling has been the focus of the integrated assessment community for many years, and we argue that many insights and best practices from this field can be directly used to improve ES assessments. We also recognize a number of issues that hinder the adoption of uncertainty assessment as part of standard practice. Our synthesis provides a starting point for ES analysts and other applied modelers looking for further guidance on uncertainty assessment and helps scientists and decision-makers to set reasonable expectations for characterizing the level of confidence associated with an ES assessment.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2017-02-22T19:35:03Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.12.008
      Issue No: Vol. 24 (2017)
       
  • Ecosystem service tradeoff between grazing intensity and other services -
           A case study in Karei-Deshe experimental cattle range in northern Israel
    • Authors: Itai Divinsky; Nir Becker; Pua Bar (Kutiel)
      Pages: 16 - 27
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 24
      Author(s): Itai Divinsky, Nir Becker, Pua Bar (Kutiel)
      Grasslands cover around 25% of the earth's land surface and provide many essential Ecosystem Services (ES) to human well-being. Changes in grazing intensity have led to changes in biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, resulting in loss of some of these ES. This emphasizes the need for grassland management schemes that aim to maximize economic returns from grasslands while maintaining ecosystem functioning, but tools to assess the tradeoffs between economic benefits and Ecosystem Services are, for the most part, lacking. This study is aimed at economically valuing multiple ecosystem services, and the tradeoffs between them and species richness, across different management alternatives (control, light, moderate and heavy grazing) in the Karei-Deshe experimental farm and Long Term Ecosystem Research (LTER) site. Ecological data from previous research in Karei-Deshe was valuated using the Replacement Cost Method and a Contingent Valuation survey, which valued the farm's landscape. Grazing intensity was inversely related to the delivery of ES studied and positively related to species richness, except for heavy grazing, which resulted in lower species richness. Only heavy grazing was found to be an inefficient management alternative. This research demonstrates a fairly simple path for providing land managers an ecological-data-based tool for comparing management alternatives.

      PubDate: 2017-02-22T19:35:03Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.01.002
      Issue No: Vol. 24 (2017)
       
  • Assessment of Hurricane Sandy damage and resulting loss in ecosystem
           services in a coastal-urban setting
    • Authors: Marcia S. Meixler
      Pages: 28 - 46
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 24
      Author(s): Marcia S. Meixler
      We quantified the location and extent of damage from Hurricane Sandy in habitats within the complex coastal-urban region of Jamaica Bay, New York and calculated the values of ecosystem services (ESV) lost. Results were compared with those from Hurricane Katrina. We found that moderate flooding and sand deposition were the most prevalent types of damage, and they caused the most degradation to low salt marsh habitat. Compared with Hurricane Katrina, damage from Hurricane Sandy to built and natural capital was generally lower for almost all categories except beach erosion. This was especially damaging due to the high levels of disturbance prevention ecosystem services beaches and dunes provide. Our impact index revealed that the majority of damage was minimal in severity (60%) and would likely be reversed within five years (62%), with a total possible loss of up to US$ 6.5 million for Jamaica Bay, NY. We demonstrated the use of our results to identify vulnerable areas for protection and restoration, and to calculate gains in ESVs in each scenario. By quantifying the location, extent and type of damage from Hurricane Sandy and the ESVs lost, we can provide another dimension to protection and restoration efforts in this sensitive coastal-urban region.

      PubDate: 2017-04-12T06:45:13Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.12.009
      Issue No: Vol. 24 (2017)
       
  • Quantification of ecosystem services: Beyond all the “guesstimates”,
           how do we get real data?
    • Authors: Philippe C. Baveye
      Pages: 47 - 49
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 24
      Author(s): Philippe C. Baveye


      PubDate: 2017-03-02T15:30:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.02.006
      Issue No: Vol. 24 (2017)
       
  • Are diverse ecosystems more valuable? Economic value of biodiversity as
           result of uncertainty and spatial interactions in ecosystem service
           provision
    • Authors: Bartosz Bartkowski
      Pages: 50 - 57
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 24
      Author(s): Bartosz Bartkowski
      Economic valuation mostly focuses on specific ecosystems, species or the services they provide. The diversity within ecosystems is viewed as a valuation object less frequently. In this paper, it is argued that the economic value of biodiversity highlights the relevance of the temporal and spatial dimensions in ecosystem service provision. A framework is presented in which the economic value of biodiversity is the result of uncertainty about the future, regarding both supply of and demand for ecosystem services, and of spatial interactions between ecosystems. Three sources of biodiversity’s economic value are distinguished in this context: insurance value, option value and spill-over value. Furthermore, the paper introduces biodiversity-specific methodological challenges (importance of non-market ecosystem goods; uncertainty and subjectivity; complexity and abstractness) which can be used to identify suitable methods for the economic valuation of biodiversity.

      PubDate: 2017-03-02T15:30:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.02.023
      Issue No: Vol. 24 (2017)
       
  • New methods for valuing, and for identifying spatial variations, in
           cultural services: A case study of the Great Barrier Reef
    • Authors: Diane Jarvis; Natalie Stoeckl; Hong-Bo Liu
      Pages: 58 - 67
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 24
      Author(s): Diane Jarvis, Natalie Stoeckl, Hong-Bo Liu
      Estimating values for ecosystem services (ES) can contribute to the decision making process, reducing the risk that ES benefits are overlooked. For ES with no (direct or indirect) links to markets, valuation is a non-trivial exercise. Traditional methods require the use of hypothetical markets; the life satisfaction (LS) approach does not. LS has previously been used to estimate the value of regulating ES, but to the best of our knowledge has never been used to estimate the value of cultural services (CS). We examine the relationship between LS and a subset of CS provided by the Great Barrier Reef (GBR), (the non-use CS), using geographically weighted regression to investigate spatial variations in value. After controlling for other factors, we find income is more important to LS in the south than the north; the opposite is true for non-use CS. The coefficients are used to estimate the amount of income required to keep overall LS constant, should the non-use CS of the GBR not be preserved, estimated at $8.7bn annually. We acknowledge the imperfections of our work, noting the need for research on better CS measures, but feel that the general approach may add another useful tool to the valuation toolbox.

      PubDate: 2017-03-02T15:30:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.02.012
      Issue No: Vol. 24 (2017)
       
  • Demand and supply of cultural ecosystem services: Use of geotagged photos
           to map the aesthetic value of landscapes in Hokkaido
    • Authors: Nobuhiko Yoshimura; Tsutom Hiura
      Pages: 68 - 78
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 24
      Author(s): Nobuhiko Yoshimura, Tsutom Hiura
      We proposed a mapping method for landscape aesthetic demand and potential supply area based on viewsheds, which is a direct method that provides robust results. Moreover, we mapped the aesthetic value of Hokkaido as a case study in Asia. The Aichi Biodiversity Target refers to the importance of ecosystem service (ES) mapping methodologies. However, ES mapping in policy and practice has rarely been reported. Robust, reliable indicators are required. Recently, studies estimating aesthetic value have used geotagged photos on social networking services instead of survey results of user preferences. The methods used in these studies were cost effective and provided spatially explicit results. However, these methods used the photography positions. Using the photographed sites is a more direct method to estimate the aesthetic demand. Therefore, we used geotagged photos on Flickr and viewsheds from each photography position to identify the photographed sites. The demand area was estimated using the viewshed. The potential supply area was estimated using MaxEnt. The demand and potential supply areas were concentrated in natural parks. Comparing the demand and potential supply areas indicates areas with potential supply despite their low demand in forest, farmland, and natural parks. This method will contribute to CES research and decision-making.

      PubDate: 2017-03-02T15:30:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.02.009
      Issue No: Vol. 24 (2017)
       
  • Assessing the importance of cultural ecosystem services in urban areas of
           Beijing municipality
    • Authors: Yuehan Dou; Lin Zhen; Rudolf De Groot; Bingzhen Du; Xiubo Yu
      Pages: 79 - 90
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 24
      Author(s): Yuehan Dou, Lin Zhen, Rudolf De Groot, Bingzhen Du, Xiubo Yu
      The world is rapidly urbanising, with both positive and negative consequences. One major challenge is how to secure the long-term quality of life for urban residents. Many studies on quality of life are based on ‘material’ ecosystem services (i.e., provisioning and regulating services), with less attention paid to the non-material benefits gained from nature (e.g., green and blue spaces), which have been called cultural ecosystem services (CES). However, these non-material services are often most important to urban residents. Understanding perceptions and awareness of CES provided by urban blue space (i.e., water and wetlands) and green space (i.e., urban forest and grassland) are therefore important to support planning, creation, and protection of these spaces. To tackle these problems, we assessed and quantified the CES provided by urban green and blue space in six metropolitan areas of Beijing. By combining ecosystem services valuation with surveys (466 questionnaires and 16 expert interviews), we gained insights into residents’ perceptions of CES. Surprisingly, blue areas in metropolitan Beijing were valued at least 4.3 times higher than the value of green areas. More than 80% of the residents were willing to pay for maintenance of urban blue and green areas (an average of almost 64RMB/year). The contributions of cultural services are likely to increase if stakeholders value natural ecosystems more in urban areas than in rural or mountainous areas because of the additional value of these rare resources in densely populated areas.

      PubDate: 2017-03-02T15:30:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.02.011
      Issue No: Vol. 24 (2017)
       
  • Water assessment in a peri-urban watershed in Mexico City: A focus on an
           ecosystem services approach
    • Authors: Julieta Jujnovsky; Alya Ramos; Ángela Caro-Borrero; Marisa Mazari-Hiriart; Manuel Maass; Lucía Almeida-Leñero
      Pages: 91 - 100
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 24
      Author(s): Julieta Jujnovsky, Alya Ramos, Ángela Caro-Borrero, Marisa Mazari-Hiriart, Manuel Maass, Lucía Almeida-Leñero
      Among hydrological ecosystem services, water supply is one of the most relevant to society because of its role in human wellbeing; accordingly, it has been significantly modified worldwide. There has been a recent increase in the necessity of combining methods and tools to create interdisciplinary evaluations of water ecosystem services, especially in developing countries where there is a lack of systematized and updated socioenvironmental information. We propose a framework for the assessment of water supply ecosystem services that includes environmental, social and economic dimensions. We describe and develop each of these dimensions with a particular focus on identifying the key variables that are needed to answer them. First, we performed research of the literature regarding the evaluation methods that are sufficiently flexible to apply them to local scales in countries where information is limited. Then, we chose the Magdalena River Watershed to apply this perspective because it is an illustrative area of vital importance to Mexico City’s ecosystem services. We believe that this proposal has outlined basic guidelines to help decision makers improve water management and may provide an opportunity to change public policies on peri-urban ecosystems.

      PubDate: 2017-03-02T15:30:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.02.005
      Issue No: Vol. 24 (2017)
       
  • Valuation of fish production services in river basins: A case study of the
           Columbia River
    • Authors: Cedar Morton; Duncan Knowler; Cecile Brugere; David Lymer; Devin Bartley
      Pages: 101 - 113
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 24
      Author(s): Cedar Morton, Duncan Knowler, Cecile Brugere, David Lymer, Devin Bartley
      This study uses a bio-economic model to assess the capacity of the Columbia River to provide a selection of four ecosystem services and estimates the actual use of those services in terms of net economic welfare. Our findings reinforce the observation that Columbia River habitat supports production of valuable fish species that provide: (i) food production from commercial fishing, (ii) recreational fishing, (iii) tribal subsistence fishing, and (iv) nutrient cycling services. Relative to the status quo, a 10% greater prioritization of salmon conservation via shifts in the flow regime would generate an increase of $4.8million/yr in the net economic benefit from these services. A return to pristine flow conditions would raise this value to $19.5million/yr. Re-prioritizing hydropower production to average 1976–1980 flow levels would result in a $3.5million/yr loss of net economic benefits. Recreational fishing is the most important ecosystem service we assessed. Under some scenarios, this sector generates twice the value of the next largest sector (commercial fishing). Although managers have placed greater emphasis on fish conservation in recent decades, opportunities for gains in economic welfare from fish production in the Columbia River may not be fully exploited, particularly considering that our conservation scenario only minimally alters the flow regime relative to the hydropower priority scenario.

      PubDate: 2017-03-02T15:30:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.02.007
      Issue No: Vol. 24 (2017)
       
  • Economic analysis of mangrove and marine fishery linkages in India
    • Authors: Lavanya Ravikanth Anneboina; K.S. Kavi Kumar
      Pages: 114 - 123
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 24
      Author(s): Lavanya Ravikanth Anneboina, K.S. Kavi Kumar
      Mangroves support and enhance fisheries by serving as a breeding ground and nursery habitat for marine life. The mangrove-fishery link has been well established in the ecological literature. This paper, however, employs an economic analysis to examine the role of mangroves in increasing marine fish output in India. Using secondary data on marine fish production and fishery resources, two distinct but related issues are analysed: i) the effectiveness of mangroves in increasing marine fish production, and ii) the marginal effect of mangroves on fish production or the contribution of a hectare of mangrove area to fish output in India. The results based on econometric analysis indicate that i) mangroves contribute significantly to the enhancement of fish production in the coastal states of India, and ii) the marginal effect of mangroves on total marine fish output is 1.86tonnes per hectare per year, which translates into a percentage contribution of mangroves to commercial marine fisheries output of 23 percent in India in 2011.

      PubDate: 2017-03-02T15:30:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.02.004
      Issue No: Vol. 24 (2017)
       
  • Quantification of the potential impact of nature conservation on ecosystem
           services supply in the Flemish Region: A cascade modelling approach
    • Authors: Jan Staes; Steven Broekx; Katrien Van Der Biest; Dirk Vrebos; Beauchard Olivier; Leo De Nocker; Inge Liekens; Lien Poelmans; Kris Verheyen; Panis Jeroen; Patrick Meire
      Pages: 124 - 137
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 24
      Author(s): Jan Staes, Steven Broekx, Katrien Van Der Biest, Dirk Vrebos, Beauchard Olivier, Leo De Nocker, Inge Liekens, Lien Poelmans, Kris Verheyen, Panis Jeroen, Patrick Meire
      Ecological networks of protected areas are critical elements to protect biodiversity. To achieve a minimal performance of such networks, measures and investments are necessary for nature restoration and management. The concept of ecosystem service (ES) can provide additional arguments for investments in ecological networks. However, ES delivery processes are embedded in a complex array of ecological processes and there is a need to cope with this complexity in a pragmatic manner. As many assessment studies have already been criticized for using oversimplified indicators, too much pragmatism may foreclose credibility and acceptance of ES assessments. Therefore, a cascade ES modelling approach was developed that incorporated ecological processes, multiple off-site effects, feedbacks and trade-off mechanisms through shared variables. The assessment focused on which services the existing network delivers and how these services are influenced after realization of site specific conservation objectives.

      PubDate: 2017-03-02T15:30:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.02.020
      Issue No: Vol. 24 (2017)
       
  • Awareness of greater numbers of ecosystem services affects preferences for
           floodplain management
    • Authors: Daniel R. Richards; Philip H. Warren; Lorraine Maltby; Helen L. Moggridge
      Pages: 138 - 146
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 24
      Author(s): Daniel R. Richards, Philip H. Warren, Lorraine Maltby, Helen L. Moggridge
      People’s preferences for different habitat management scenarios determine the way that floodplain habitats are managed, and the ecosystem services that they provide. Making people aware of a greater number of ecosystem services may encourage them to design habitat management that better balances the provision of conflicting services. To investigate the impacts of ecosystem service information on people’s preferences for floodplain habitat management options, we manipulated the number of ecosystem services that participants knew about, and the level of detail of the information they were provided with. The preferences of participants differed depending on the number of services that were described. Providing people with ecosystem service information had a quantifiable effect on their preferences among different habitat management options, and increased the variability in preferences between people. These findings are consistent with the theory that ecosystem service information should encourage people to consider a wider range of benefits that nature provides, and this in turn may enable habitat management that better balances trade-offs between different services. Simply describing more ecosystem services to people had no effect on their preferences for management options, suggesting that detailed, empirical data on ecosystem services are required to affect decision making.

      PubDate: 2017-03-02T15:30:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.02.001
      Issue No: Vol. 24 (2017)
       
  • Ecosystem service bundles along the urban-rural gradient: Insights for
           landscape planning and management
    • Authors: Francesc Baró; Erik Gómez-Baggethun; Dagmar Haase
      Pages: 147 - 159
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 24
      Author(s): Francesc Baró, Erik Gómez-Baggethun, Dagmar Haase
      A key challenge of landscape planning and management is coping with multiple ecosystem service (ES) potentials and needs in complex social-ecological systems such as urban regions. However, few studies have analyzed both the supply and demand sides of ES bundles, i.e., sets of associated ES that repeatedly appear together across time or space. This paper advances a framework to identify, map and assess ES bundles from a supply-demand approach to inform landscape planning and management. The framework is applied to the Barcelona metropolitan region, Spain, covering five ES and using eleven spatial indicators. Each indicator was quantified and mapped at the municipal level (n =164) combining different proxy- and process-based models. Our results show significant associations among ES, both at the supply and demand sides. Further, we identified five distinct ES supply-demand bundle types and characterized them based on their specific ES relationships and their main underlying social-ecological conditions. From our findings, we contend that land sharing strategies should be prioritized in urban and agricultural areas to increase landscape multifunctionality while assuring the conservation of large periurban forest areas that are critical for delivering a wide range of local ES highly demanded by the urban population.

      PubDate: 2017-03-02T15:30:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.02.021
      Issue No: Vol. 24 (2017)
       
  • Assessing the sensitivity of ecosystem services to changing pressures
    • Authors: Tara Hooper; Nicola Beaumont; Charly Griffiths; Olivia Langmead; Paul J. Somerfield
      Pages: 160 - 169
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 24
      Author(s): Tara Hooper, Nicola Beaumont, Charly Griffiths, Olivia Langmead, Paul J. Somerfield
      The ecosystem services approach is widely recognised as a concept, but more attention must be given to the development of tools to facilitate practical implementation if the approach is to become more widely used to support decision-making. A key component of natural resource management is understanding the implications of changing levels of pressures on ecosystem components, which is achieved through sensitivity assessment. This paper examines how sensitivity assessment could be applied to ecosystem services, as opposed to the underlying habitats and species, by considering the relationship between the sensitivity of a service to the sensitivity of the habitat responsible for its supply. The method is illustrated using a UK case study of supporting and regulating services provided by subtidal sedimentary habitats within the UNESCO Biosphere Reserve in North Devon.

      PubDate: 2017-03-02T15:30:38Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.02.016
      Issue No: Vol. 24 (2017)
       
  • Heterogeneity in resident perceptions of a bio-cultural heritage in Hong
           Kong: A latent class factor analysis
    • Authors: Wendy Y. Chen; Junyi Hua
      Pages: 170 - 179
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 24
      Author(s): Wendy Y. Chen, Junyi Hua
      There is an increasing recognition of ecosystem services provided by urban trees and their importance to urban resilience and sustainability through the preservation and enhancement of biological diversity so as to withstand disturbances and retain ecosystem functions as well as guarantee the well-being of current and future urban dwellers. However, the heterogeneous perceptions that urban residents may hold towards various ecosystem services have seldom been investigated. This study made a unique contribution to the growing body of literature on urban ecosystem services by examining the unobserved heterogeneity in resident perceptions of ecosystem services provided by a distinctive bio-cultural asset, urban heritage trees, in Hong Kong, via a novel application of latent class factor analysis which allows for considering the multidimensionality of latent factors and increases model parsimony. A total of 1075 face-to-face interviews were conducted with a stratified sample of residents about their perceived importance of two categories of distinctive ecosystem services provided by urban heritage trees: biological benefits and cultural benefits. The results indicated that, on average, both biological and cultural benefits of urban heritage trees were perceived to be important. Nevertheless, six classes were identified on the basis of different levels of two latent class factors, which differed markedly with respect to individual’s perceived importance of ecosystem services provided by urban heritage trees, from fairly balanced to very divergent perceptions of biological services and cultural services. This heterogeneity was explained with covariates describing respondents’ sociodemographic characteristics and activities at heritage tree sites. The results have implications for optimally tailoring promoting and participatory approaches, fostering improved communications with the general public, and nurturing overall support for urban heritage tree conservation from heterogeneous resident groups in order to achieve urban resilience and sustainability.

      PubDate: 2017-03-08T12:50:12Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.02.019
      Issue No: Vol. 24 (2017)
       
  • Synergies and trade-offs between nature conservation and climate policy:
           Insights from the “Natural Capital Germany – TEEB DE” study
    • Authors: Henry Wüstemann; Aletta Bonn; Christian Albert; Christine Bertram; Lisa Biber-Freudenberger; Alexandra Dehnhardt; Ralf Döring; Peter Elsasser; Volkmar Hartje; Dietmar Mehl; Jochen Kantelhardt; Katrin Rehdanz; Lena Schaller; Mathias Scholz; Daniela Thrän; Felix Witing; Bernd Hansjürgens
      Pages: 187 - 199
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 24
      Author(s): Henry Wüstemann, Aletta Bonn, Christian Albert, Christine Bertram, Lisa Biber-Freudenberger, Alexandra Dehnhardt, Ralf Döring, Peter Elsasser, Volkmar Hartje, Dietmar Mehl, Jochen Kantelhardt, Katrin Rehdanz, Lena Schaller, Mathias Scholz, Daniela Thrän, Felix Witing, Bernd Hansjürgens
      Ecosystem-based approaches provide opportunities for climate policy to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, to expand the adaptive capacities and resilience of land systems to a changing climate, and to simultaneously protect biodiversity and ecosystems services (ESS). However, knowledge about the economic benefits and cost-efficiency of ecosystem-based approaches is still limited. The objective of this paper is to enhance understanding of synergies and trade-offs between climate policy related measures and nature conservation and how ecosystem-based approaches can contribute to both climate as well as biodiversity and ESS conservation goals, through overall economic analyses to inform balanced decision making. The paper builds upon the current state of knowledge as brought together by contributors to the German national TEEB-study “Natural Capital and Climate Policy – Synergies and Conflicts”. We present options and lessons learned from major land-use sectors of high relevance for ecosystem-based approaches to climate change, namely agriculture, peatlands, forests, wetlands and coastal and marine ecosystems. Based on these assessments, we argue that successful implementation of an ecosystem-based climate policy requires effective coordination and coherence between sectors and their respective policies, for example agriculture, forestry and energy. We identify specific targets for an ecosystem-based climate policy and options for achieving this coherent implementation.

      PubDate: 2017-03-16T15:30:22Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.02.008
      Issue No: Vol. 24 (2017)
       
  • Forest cover loss in Paraguay and perception of ecosystem services: A case
           study of the Upper Parana Forest
    • Authors: Emmanuel Da Ponte; Claudia Kuenzer; Amanda Parker; Oscar Rodas; Natascha Oppelt; Martina Fleckenstein
      Pages: 200 - 212
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 24
      Author(s): Emmanuel Da Ponte, Claudia Kuenzer, Amanda Parker, Oscar Rodas, Natascha Oppelt, Martina Fleckenstein
      The Upper Parana Atlantic Forest (BAAPA) in Paraguay is one of the most threatened tropical forests in the world. Relentless agricultural encroachment has left less than 10% of its original cover intact. Many strategies and programs have been initiated, such as Payment for Ecosystem Services (PES) schemes, to halt forest cover loss. While the approach of ecosystem services (ES) has been continuously applied by policy makers, it has not been perceived strongly by the direct users of the forest. This study provides a comprehensive understanding on how landowners in the BAAPA perceive and benefits from ES derived from the forest and examines the influence of farmers on forest conservation. The results were obtained from an extensive household survey performed in the BAAPA region. An understanding of the high ecological value of the forest is common to all farmers. A strong dependency on forest-related products was observed for small and medium landowners whereas large-scale farmers considered the forest’s main value to be mostly recreational and cultural. PES appears to be well accepted by forest owners, but it must receive stronger promotion. Understanding the importance of ecosystem services is a valuable contribution toward to conserving natural resources.

      PubDate: 2017-03-21T15:45:40Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.03.009
      Issue No: Vol. 24 (2017)
       
  • Determining eco-compensation standards based on the ecosystem services
           value of the mountain ecological forests in Beijing, China
    • Authors: Wenping Sheng; Lin Zhen; Gaodi Xie; Yu Xiao
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 May 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services
      Author(s): Wenping Sheng, Lin Zhen, Gaodi Xie, Yu Xiao
      Ecological forests play a key role in the maintenance of urban ecological security in Beijing, and 91% of these ecosystems are located in mountain areas. To better address the issues that are related to ecological conservation and the environmental, eco-compensation programs that target mountain ecological forests have been implemented by the local government since 2004. However, these eco-compensation programs that are currently conducted in Beijing now are still confronted with issues regarding payment standards. In this study, three eco-compensation standards for the mountain ecological forests in Beijing are presented based on the ecosystem services value and location diversity indicators that include major function oriented zoning, population density, and ecological importance and ecological fragility. The average payment in Beijing varies from 1607RMB/ha/a to 2051RMB/ha/a and is approximately from 0.7 to 1.2 times higher than the current standard. The increase from the current payment standard to the recommended ones is consistent with recent social and economic development in Beijing. The recommended eco-compensation standards also reflect the relative importance of forest ecosystem services that consider geographical location. These recommended standards also have the potential for use in the establishment of differentiated compensation standards based on the different protection results of mountain ecological forests. This study will help policy and decision makers to design eco-compensation initiatives with a high success rate and contribute to the conservation and sustainability of the forest resources in Beijing.

      PubDate: 2017-05-18T23:13:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.04.016
       
  • The benefits and costs of clearing invasive alien plants in northern
           Zululand, South Africa
    • Authors: N.P. Nkambule; J.N. Blignaut; T. Vundla; T. Morokong; S. Mudavanhu
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 May 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services
      Author(s): N.P. Nkambule, J.N. Blignaut, T. Vundla, T. Morokong, S. Mudavanhu
      More than 60% of northern Zululand is tribal land with a substantial area falling within protected areas. Much of the land is invaded by invasive alien plant species (IAPs) such as Chromolaena odorata and Lantana camara. Most of these species do not have any economic value and compromises communal livelihoods and biodiversity. This paper aims to investigate the benefits and costs of clearing IAPs in northern Zululand. A system dynamics model was developed specifically for this analysis. A number of scenarios characterised by various IAP spread rates and clearing investment interventions were formulated and evaluated. The study finds that the highest net returns from clearing the IAPs were generated by value-added products (VAPs), followed by the value of water not consumed by the IAPs. The clearing of IAPs was found to be more cost-effective than augmenting water supply. Supplementing clearing investment operations through private sector co-finance reduces the stock of invasion, increases the area cleared, increases biomass for VAPs, saves more water and clears a greater area for livestock and maize production. The co-finance scenario proved to be the better management option. This scenario generated the most benefits and had a positive net present value (R2.5 million).

      PubDate: 2017-05-18T23:13:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.04.011
       
  • The potential of green infrastructure application in urban runoff control
           for land use planning: A preliminary evaluation from a southern Italy case
           study
    • Authors: Viviana Pappalardo; Daniele La Rosa; Alberto Campisano; Paolo La Greca
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 May 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services
      Author(s): Viviana Pappalardo, Daniele La Rosa, Alberto Campisano, Paolo La Greca
      Among the approaches for run-off regulation, green infrastructure is identified as non-traditional measure to compensate the effects of soil sealing generated from urban development. It is recognized as a way to increase the provision of urban ecosystem services and is increasingly being used in research and practice on storm-water management through Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems (SUDS). The adoption of SUDS in urban planning might protect hydrological and ecological dimensions of landscapes while providing resilient options to face flood risk management. This paper shows the assessment of SUDS potential to increase the regulating service capacity in a dense urban catchment in southern Italy. A comparison between scenarios of pre-implementation and post-implementation of SUDS is performed through catchment simulations with a hydraulic model. Results showed different effectiveness of SUDS options, in terms of variations of the indicator chosen as proxy of the regulating service capacity. Results showed a better performance obtained by green roofs than permeable pavements, highlighting a limited capacity of run-off regulation achieved with SUDS deployment in public areas only. This suggests that innovative policies to encourage private land owners to adopt measures of SUDS could be fundamental for the retrofitting of urban settlements.

      PubDate: 2017-05-18T23:13:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.04.015
       
  • Collaborative learning to unlock investments for functional ecological
           infrastructure: Bridging barriers in social-ecological systems in South
           Africa
    • Authors: Per Angelstam; Garth Barnes; Marine Elbakidze; Christo Marais; Alex Marsh; Sarah Polonsky; David M. Richardson; Nina Rivers; Ross T. Shackleton; William Stafford
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 May 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services
      Author(s): Per Angelstam, Garth Barnes, Marine Elbakidze, Christo Marais, Alex Marsh, Sarah Polonsky, David M. Richardson, Nina Rivers, Ross T. Shackleton, William Stafford
      Maintenance of functional ecological (or green) infrastructure is threatened by habitat conversion, fragmentation and loss, water scarcity, invasive species, climate change, resource extraction, poor policy implementation and societal inequity. Using South Africa as a case study, our transdisciplinary team identified actions likely to be effective in scaling up research and development projects that support implementation of policy about ecological infrastructure by active adaptive management. Based on expert knowledge at three scales, we analysed South Africa's opportunity to active adaptive management and to unlock investments that enhance functional ecological infrastructure. Barriers included lack of trust among actors, limited collaborative governance and integrated planning, including local partnerships; as well as a poor inclusion of evidence-based knowledge based on monitoring of landscape restoration efforts and its social and ecological consequences. Bridges include practicing transdisciplinary knowledge production, enhancing social learning among actors and stakeholders, and advocacy based on improved understanding. We propose a portfolio of place-based actions that could help to facilitate unlocking investments for functional ecological infrastructure by prioritising conservation, management and restoration through integrated cross-scale, collaborative and multi-sector spatial planning. Understanding the structure and dynamics of social-ecological systems, identifying champions, framing key messages for different audiences, and sharing failures and success stories internationally, are crucial requirements to unlock investments.

      PubDate: 2017-05-18T23:13:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.04.012
       
  • Revealed social preference for ecosystem services using the eco-price
    • Authors: Elliott T. Campbell
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 May 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services
      Author(s): Elliott T. Campbell
      Ecosystem services have predominately been valued from the perspective of individual preference, where the willingness to pay of an individual is measured either directly or indirectly. However, when one observes where money is spent on increasing ecosystem services, preserving them, compensating for their loss, or replacing lost services it is almost always through collective action of governments, corporations, or non-governmental organizations. This work suggests that revealed social preference is the most appropriate economic perspective for institutions to use in analyzing the value of ecosystem services, particularly when the scale of inference is large, the decisions to be made are multiple, or the final use of the ecosystem service is uncertain. The eco-price collates instances where society has paid for an increase in ecosystem services, to avoid their loss or restore damages, in the form of $ paid per biophysical unit of ecosystem service. Eco-prices are categorized by type of biophysical work done (i.e. water, carbon, nutrients, soil, and biodiversity). Applying the categorical eco-prices to biophysical ecosystem services flows for average forest and freshwater wetland conditions in Maryland yields an estimate of the annual ecosystem service benefit of $5,767 per hectare of forest and $9,693 per hectare of freshwater wetlands.

      PubDate: 2017-05-13T11:20:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.04.009
       
  • Examining the coherence of legal frameworks for ecosystem services toward
           sustainable mineral development in the Association of Southeast Asian
           Nations
    • Authors: Rene Abcede; Weena Gera
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 April 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services
      Author(s): Rene Abcede, Weena Gera
      Within the context of growing economic integration in the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), recent questions have been raised with regard to how member states employ law as a means of regional integration to promote sustainable development. Taking into account the primacy of ecosystem services for sustainability, this study examines the coherence of legal frameworks for ecosystem services among ASEAN member states toward a unified regional legal agenda for sustainable mineral development. Analyzed along three aspects of the Ecosystem Services Approach, the paper reviews the different mining related legislations and implementing regulations of member states, and examines whether there is convergence in their legal provisions for ecosystem services. The study shows that all member states provide legal mechanisms for ecosystem management in their mining operations. However, the following could be noted: 1) a lack of coherent identification and targeting of ecosystem services despite ‘intermediate’ services being embedded in provisions for ecosystem conservation; 2) a lack of legal provisions for integration of ecosystem services in mining impact assessments, and for ecosystem services valuation, which render environmental impact assessments, compensation structures and royalty regimes inadequate; and 3) a density of legal differentials around how states allocate regulatory authorities for ecosystem management in mining. These represent a prevailing fragmentation among member states’ legal frameworks for ecosystem services, which does not create an enabling condition for legal integration in ASEAN’s regional mineral strategies for sustainable development.

      PubDate: 2017-04-27T12:15:11Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.04.003
       
  • The World Bank’s environmental strategies: Assessing the influence of a
           biased use of New Institutional Economics on legal issues
    • Authors: Benoît Prévost; Audrey Rivaud
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 April 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services
      Author(s): Benoît Prévost, Audrey Rivaud
      The World Bank considers itself as “a leader in piloting payments for ecosystem services”. This article explores how the World Bank gradually integrated environmental and legal issues within its strategic framework with a particular focus on its economic theoretical influences. In the early 1990s, the New Institutional Economics became the main influence concerning the analysis of institutional arrangements and legal issues. We distinguish between different branches within the NIE. One remained very close to the mainstream or orthodox economics and tended to focus on private property rights as the central legal issue. We demonstrate that this branch fitted with both the market-friendly policies supported by the WB, and with the theoretical and statistical tools used by the WB's economists. It induced a very specific analysis of legal and institutional issues. It also involved a kind of theoretical path dependency, which influenced a market-oriented analysis of ecosystem services and impoverished the institutional and legal debates concerning the WB's environmental strategy. We suggest that the other branch of the NIE, as developed by the Bloomington School, offered another framework to tackle environmental issues regarding the diversity of institutional and legal arrangements. We conclude on the ambiguous use of economic theory for addressing environmental and legal issues.

      PubDate: 2017-04-27T12:15:11Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.03.014
       
  • Urban national parks in the global South: Linking management perceptions,
           policies and practices to water-related ecosystem services
    • Authors: Gregg Brill; Pippin Anderson; Patrick O'Farrell
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 April 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services
      Author(s): Gregg Brill, Pippin Anderson, Patrick O'Farrell


      PubDate: 2017-04-19T07:17:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.03.023
       
  • Integrating ecosystem services supply potential from future land-use
           scenarios in protected area management: A Bangladesh case study
    • Authors: Sharif A. Mukul; Md. Shawkat I. Sohel; John Herbohn; Luis Inostroza; Hannes König
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 April 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services
      Author(s): Sharif A. Mukul, Md. Shawkat I. Sohel, John Herbohn, Luis Inostroza, Hannes König
      The establishment of protected areas (PAs) is a key strategy to conserve declining forests and biodiversity worldwide. Due to poor infrastructure and a limited capacity of PA managers, most of the PAs in developing countries fail to achieve their management targets. In this paper, the potential to integrate ecosystem services (ES) into land-use planning was assessed in order to better manage PAs in tropical countries. Firstly, we mapped the relative capacity of different land-use/land cover (LULC) to supply ES in and around the Satchari National Park (SNP) located in northeast Bangladesh. Two alternative scenarios to envisage the likely future supply of ES in the area were then analysed. The study reveals a relatively higher supply of supporting ES from LULC located inside the park compared to the ES supplied from surrounding forests, tea gardens, and oil palm and rubber plantations. Provisioning ES were greater in surrounding forests than from SNP. Both regulating and cultural ES were also higher in LULC within the park. Spatially explicit ES supply assessment and mapping was found to be useful for land use planning and the prioritization of future management actions. Based on our findings, we suggest that PA managers should consider the ES framework as an effective tool for the future-oriented PAs management.

      PubDate: 2017-04-19T07:17:16Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2017.04.001
       
  • The Ecosystems revolution, Mark Everard. Palgrave MacMIllan, ISBN
           978-3-319-31657-4
    • Authors: Leon Braat
      Abstract: Publication date: June 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 25
      Author(s): Leon C. Braat


      PubDate: 2017-03-28T15:56:14Z
       
  • Economic value of ecosystem services, minerals and oil in a melting
           Arctic: A preliminary assessment
    • Authors: Tanya
      Abstract: Publication date: April 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 24
      Author(s): Tanya O’Garra
      The Arctic region is composed of unique marine and terrestrial ecosystems that provide a range of services to local and global populations. However, Arctic sea-ice is melting at an unprecedented rate, threatening many of these ecosystems and the services they provide. This short communication provides a preliminary assessment of the quantity, distribution and economic value of key ecosystem services as well as geological resources such as oil and minerals provided by Arctic ecosystems to beneficiaries in the Arctic region and globally. Using biophysical and economic data from existing studies, preliminary estimates indicate that the Arctic currently provides about $281 billion per year (in 2016 US$) in terms of food, mineral extraction, oil production, tourism, hunting, existence values and climate regulation. However, given predictions of ice-free summers by 2037, many of the ecosystem services may be lost. We hope that this communication stimulates discussion among policy-makers regarding the value of ecosystem services and such geological resources as minerals and oil provided by the Arctic region, and the potential ecosystem losses resulting from Arctic melt, so as to motivate decisions vis a vis climate change mitigation before Arctic ice disappears completely.

      PubDate: 2017-03-08T12:50:12Z
       
 
 
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