for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help
Journal Cover Ecosystem Services
  [SJR: 2.169]   [H-I: 21]   [6 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 2212-0416
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3039 journals]
  • Ecosystem service importance and use vary with socio-environmental
           factors: A study from household-surveys in local communities of South
           Africa
    • Authors: Sylvanus Mensah; Ruan Veldtman; Achille Ephrem Assogbadjo; Cori Ham; Romain Glèlè Kakaï; Thomas Seifert
      Pages: 1 - 8
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 23
      Author(s): Sylvanus Mensah, Ruan Veldtman, Achille Ephrem Assogbadjo, Cori Ham, Romain Glèlè Kakaï, Thomas Seifert
      Ecosystem services (ESs) underpin human livelihoods around the world. Understanding how socio-environmental aspects influence stakeholders’ perceptions and use of ESs, is important for decision-making processes that target the social expectations. In this study, face-to-face interviews were conducted with eighty-six householders in four villages of Limpopo province (South Africa), to assess the importance and use of ESs. Descriptive rank analysis, ordered logistic regression and Poisson generalised linear mixed-effects models were used. Supporting and provisioning ESs were rated the most important, followed by regulating and cultural ESs. Among the provisioning ESs, timber, firewood and edible plants were the most important, the most cited and used. Age, gender, income and prior recreational experiences played important roles in householders’ perceptions. The frequency of collection of provisioning ESs declined with increasing distance to the forest and presence of foothills in landscape, which formed natural barriers. The results further revealed that employed householders benefited more from these services than unemployed householders. However, there was no significant effect of income variable on the use of the provisioning ESs, suggesting that the collection is more likely oriented towards a domestic usage. The implications of the results were discussed in a context of local development planning.

      PubDate: 2016-12-03T21:09:34Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.10.018
      Issue No: Vol. 23 (2016)
       
  • Justifying social values of nature: Economic reasoning beyond
           self-interested preferences
    • Authors: Bernd Hansjürgens; Christoph Schröter-Schlaack; Augustin Berghöfer; Nele Lienhoop
      Pages: 9 - 17
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 23
      Author(s): Bernd Hansjürgens, Christoph Schröter-Schlaack, Augustin Berghöfer, Nele Lienhoop
      Demonstrating that conservation is not only beneficial for nature but also for human well-being is as much desirable as it is challenging. Undoubtedly, using economic numbers hold some great promises, there is, however, a considerable number of critical reflections on using economic thinking to promote nature conservation. A recent aspect within these critics is that economic theory has failed on appreciating the multiple values (not only ‘individual’, but also ‘shared’ and ‘social’ values) of nature. Against this background, we will firstly show that the total economic value-concept covers a broad range of value dimension and that preferences of self-interested rational individuals may well cover also social or group values, although unclear to what degree. Secondly, we will highlight that economic theories on ‘merit goods’ developed by Richard A. Musgrave or the constitutional economics approach related to James M. Buchanan and others provide an as yet neglected but useful strand of arguments for the existence of values beyond individual preferences and that discourse ethics calls for deliberation to disclose those value dimensions. We will thirdly demonstrate how economic valuation methods could be improved by integrating deliberative elements in order to capture social value components in valuation exercises. As methods strongly shape valuation outcomes, it is a question of the practical purpose and of the ethical context of the valuation exercise that should determine which approach to choose.

      PubDate: 2016-12-03T21:09:34Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.11.003
      Issue No: Vol. 23 (2016)
       
  • Physical and monetary ecosystem service accounts for Europe: A case study
           for in-stream nitrogen retention
    • Authors: Alessandra La Notte; Joachim Maes; Silvana Dalmazzone; Neville D. Crossman; Bruna Grizzetti; Giovanni Bidoglio
      Pages: 18 - 29
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 23
      Author(s): Alessandra La Notte, Joachim Maes, Silvana Dalmazzone, Neville D. Crossman, Bruna Grizzetti, Giovanni Bidoglio
      In this paper we present a case study of integrated ecosystem and economic accounting based on the System of Environmental Economic Accounting — Experimental Ecosystem Accounts (SEEA-EEA). We develop accounts, in physical and monetary terms, for the water purification ecosystem service in Europe over a 20-year time period (1985–2005). The estimation of nitrogen retention is based on the GREEN biophysical model, within which we impose a sustainability threshold to obtain the physical indicators of capacity – the ability of an ecosystem to sustainably supply ecosystem services. Key messages of our paper pertain the notion of capacity, operationalized in accounting terms with reference to individual ecosystem services rather than to the ecosystem as a whole, and intended as the stock that provides the sustainable flow of the service. The study clarifies the difference between sustainable flow and actual flow of the service, which should be calculated jointly so as to enable an assessment of the sustainability of current use of ecosystem services. Finally, by distinguishing the notion of ‘process’ (referred to the ecosystem) from that of ‘capacity’ (pertaining specific services) and proposing a methodology to calculate capacity and flow, we suggest an implementable way to operationalize the SEEA-EEA accounts.

      PubDate: 2016-12-03T21:09:34Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.11.002
      Issue No: Vol. 23 (2016)
       
  • Can payments for ecosystem services schemes mimic markets?
    • Authors: Gabriela Scheufele; Jeff Bennett
      Pages: 30 - 37
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 23
      Author(s): Gabriela Scheufele, Jeff Bennett
      A Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) scheme can be understood as a mechanism that performs the role of a ‘market’ for Ecosystem Services (ES) in circumstances where such a market would otherwise fail to develop. We investigate the potential for and limits of PES schemes to act in lieu of competitive markets and propose a PES scheme design that mimics markets. This is achieved by applying their underpinning concepts of demand and supply to the determination of ‘market clearing’ prices, while reducing transaction costs of buyer and supplier engagement through the involvement of agents. The proposed design combines economic valuation techniques to estimate ES demand with a novel tendering process that allows the estimation of individual marginal cost curves of potential ES suppliers. Supply actions and ES are linked through ‘conversion factors’ derived from bio-physical models that act as environmental production functions. Demand and supply so estimated enable the determination of a ‘market clearing’ price which, when offered to suppliers, provides static and dynamic incentives for cost-effective supply. Mutually beneficial exchange between buyers and suppliers, as is facilitated under the PES scheme design, improves resource use efficiency while allowing both the buyers and the suppliers to secure surpluses.

      PubDate: 2016-12-03T21:09:34Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.11.005
      Issue No: Vol. 23 (2016)
       
  • Effects of green space dynamics on urban heat islands: Mitigation and
           diversification
    • Authors: Ranhao Sun; Liding Chen
      Pages: 38 - 46
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 23
      Author(s): Ranhao Sun, Liding Chen
      Understanding how green spaces affect urban temperature is crucial for assessing thermal benefits of landscape planning. This study investigated green space dynamics and land surface temperature (LST) in the Beijing metropolis. Landscape types were classified from QuickBird (2002) and IKONOS (2012) images and LST values were extracted from Landsat TM images. Five landscape types were obtained in this region including impervious land (IL), forest land (FL), grass land (GL), water body (WB), and bare land (BL). Green expansion indicated landscape change from IL and BL to FL and GL. Green loss indicated landscape change from FL and GL to IL. Green exchange indicated landscape change between FL and GL. Results show that (1) the area of green space dynamics accounted for 38.24% of the total research area, including green space losses (108.86km2), expansion (92.49km2), and exchange (53.83km2). (2) LST change was not significant in the unchanged (0–0.19°C) and exchanged green space (in the range of −0.02–0.25°C). However, there were minor decreases of LST in areas of green expansion (in the range of −1.11°C to −0.67°C) and major increases in LST in the areas of green losses (1.64–2.21°C). The results indicated that the number of green spaces is not the only criteria that should be assessed for temperature mitigation. Ecosystem services of temperature mitigation are not equal between the loss and expansion of green spaces even within same area. Greater focus on protecting natural forests in cities might provide greater benefits for climate mitigation.

      PubDate: 2016-12-03T21:09:34Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.11.011
      Issue No: Vol. 23 (2016)
       
  • The impact of land use/land cover change on ecosystem services in the
           central highlands of Ethiopia
    • Authors: Terefe Tolessa; Feyera Senbeta; Moges Kidane
      Pages: 47 - 54
      Abstract: Publication date: February 2017
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 23
      Author(s): Terefe Tolessa, Feyera Senbeta, Moges Kidane
      Ecosystems provide a wide range of services that are important for human-well being. Estimating the multiple services obtained from ecosystems is vital to support decision-making processes at different levels. This study analyzes land use/land cover (LU/LC) dynamics over four decades (i.e., 1973, 1986, 2001, 2015) to assess its impact on ecosystem services. Ecosystem Service Values (ESV) was determined using LU/LC analysis and established global data base. LU/LC analysis showed that forest cover reduced by 54.2% during study period; and settlement, bare land, shrub land and cultivated land increased considerably. The study indicates that due to forest cover change from 1973 to 2015, approximately US$ 3.69 million of ecosystem services values was lost. Among the ecosystem services reduced were: nutrient cycling, provision of raw material and erosion control. The use of LU/LC data along with established global ESV data sets reduce the costs of ground data collection, and help in tracking of past environmental changes and acquisition of quick and reliable results that can be used for decision making processes. We believe that the results obtained can be helpful in designing payment for environmental services and rural development policies.

      PubDate: 2016-12-03T21:09:34Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.11.010
      Issue No: Vol. 23 (2016)
       
  • Insights and opportunities from mapping ecosystem services of urban green
           spaces and potentials in planning
    • Authors: Giuseppe Pulighe; Francesco Fava; Flavio Lupia
      Pages: 1 - 10
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 22, Part A
      Author(s): Giuseppe Pulighe, Francesco Fava, Flavio Lupia
      Urbanization and rapid population growth pose the cities in front of massive challenges in terms of environmental impacts. This paper explores recent progresses in mapping ecosystem services provided by urban green infrastructures (GI) and discuss how GI can contribute to promoting cohesion, resilience and livability toward sustainable and green cities. It also investigates the interlinkages between ecosystem services paradigm, mapping approaches at urban level and benefits provided for human well-being. A literature study focusing on recent research papers is conducted, highlighting new trends on methods and data, unexplored developments and opportunities on literature regarding mapping green infrastructures with respect to planning, management and ecosystem services’ provision. Additionally, an in-depth analysis of selected case studies synthesizes and discusses key insights of quantitative results related to key ecosystem services mapping approaches. The results indicate that mapping efforts integrates multiple disciplines, combining advanced technology and sophisticated models and methods. We argue that mapping ecosystem services would allow urban designers and planning practitioners to help and inform policymakers during the decision process and management of urban landscapes.

      PubDate: 2016-10-01T04:10:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.09.004
      Issue No: Vol. 22 (2016)
       
  • Identifying driving forces of landscape changes: Historical relationships
           and the availability of ecosystem services in the Atlantic forest
    • Authors: Vivian Cristina dos Santos Hackbart; Guilherme Theodoro Nascimento Pereira de Lima; Lidia Sanches Bertolo; Rozely Ferreira dos Santos
      Pages: 11 - 17
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 22, Part A
      Author(s): Guilherme Theodoro Nascimento Pereira de Lima, Vivian Cristina dos Santos Hackbart, Lidia Sanches Bertolo, Rozely Ferreira dos Santos
      We argue that the history of a landscape and the driving forces acting in each of its sectors account for the recent condition of its structure and ecological functions, which, in turn, can be translated into the availability of ecosystem services. Therefore, the present study investigated the historical relationship between the forces that have induced changes in the use and settlement of the island of São Sebastião over five centuries, their resulting impacts and their influences on the availability of regulation, supply, recreation and cultural ecosystem services. We worked with a broad historical survey and maps of land use and natural vegetation from different time periods. Thus, although the historical data were not accurate about the exact areas used for agriculture or forest we could infer about losses and replacement of ecosystem services. Moreover, we observed the occurrence of three driving forces that alternated in intensity and importance over time, leading to forest gains and losses that especially led to the degradation of regulation services.

      PubDate: 2016-10-01T04:10:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.09.009
      Issue No: Vol. 22 (2016)
       
  • Balancing demand and supply of multiple urban ecosystem services on
           different spatial scales
    • Authors: Neele Larondelle; Steffen Lauf
      Pages: 18 - 31
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 22, Part A
      Author(s): Neele Larondelle, Steffen Lauf
      The scientific community has been engaged for some time in valuing and measuring urban ecosystem services (UES). However, methods to value both demand and supply and to balance them on a fine scale are still lacking. The study presents a scheme to assess demand and supply of UES and derive respective budgets by using detailed environmental, urban structural and socio-economic data. We show heterogeneous demand and supply patterns for five highly relevant UES on the block, neighborhood and entire city scale in Berlin, Germany. We detect the most negative budgets along major city highways and in the most compact city structures, which calls for new and creative ways to introduce green and tackle high sealing rates especially in these areas. Due to the above-average green amount in Berlin the UES green space recreation and PM 10 removal showed to be unusually well balanced. The method is able to close a gap in methods for UES demand valuation and consequently develops a transferable methodology for informed planning processes. Furthermore we argue for the usability in planning processes due to its applicability on any relevant scale.

      PubDate: 2016-10-01T04:10:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.09.008
      Issue No: Vol. 22 (2016)
       
  • Enhancing ecosystem services maps combining field and environmental data
    • Authors: María José Martínez-Harms; Sandra Quijas; Adina M. Merenlender; Patricia Balvanera
      Pages: 32 - 40
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 22, Part A
      Author(s): María José Martínez-Harms, Sandra Quijas, Adina M. Merenlender, Patricia Balvanera
      Ecosystem service maps are increasingly being used to prioritize management and conservation decisions. Most of these maps rely on estimates of ecosystem services estimated for individual land cover classes rather than incorporating field data. We developed combined field models (CFM) using regression analysis to estimate ecosystem services based on the observed relationship between environmental and land cover data and field measurements of ecosystem services. Local ecosystem service supply was estimated from vegetation data measured at fifty sites covering the widest range of environmental conditions across a watershed in Mexico. We compared the accuracy of the CFM approach for forage, timber, firewood and carbon storage over a more commonly “look up table” method relying on a uniform estimate of ecosystem service supply by land cover type. The CFM revealed higher accuracy when compared to the “look up table” approach. The resulting CFM models explained a large fraction of the variance (42–89%) using a combination of land cover, remote sensing data, hydrology and distance from developed areas. In addition, mapping residuals from Geographically Weighted Regressions provided an estimate of uncertainty across the CFM model results. This approach provides better estimates of ecosystem service delivery and uncertainty for land managers and decision-makers.

      PubDate: 2016-10-01T04:10:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.09.007
      Issue No: Vol. 22 (2016)
       
  • Effective arguments for ecosystem services in biodiversity conservation
           – A case study on Finnish peatland conservation
    • Authors: Eerika Albrecht; Outi Ratamäki
      Pages: 41 - 50
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 22, Part A
      Author(s): Eerika Albrecht, Outi Ratamäki
      Political and socially constructed arguments about values and benefits originating from ecosystem services (ES) may improve the effectiveness of biodiversity conservation. In this article we show how effective biodiversity conservation is dependent on stakeholders’ rhetorical skills and their ability to introduce persuasive arguments for the target audience. We present a case study of a lengthy conflict to protect a mire area located in Eastern Finland. We follow locally constructed arguments and analyse their effectiveness with different audiences. Research data consist of interviews, newspaper articles and legal documents. Employing content analysis, we study the ES identified by different stakeholders and analyse the effectiveness and sources of arguments presented on behalf of those services. We differentiate between legal and political effectiveness as many ES arguments were effective in sustaining the prolonged conflict locally but ineffective in administrative courts. Legislation and scientific evidence are identified as the main sources for an effective argument in legal proceedings. This case is an example of how local residents require support from scientists in order to formulate effective arguments for legal audiences. Valid arguments for legal institutions are based on the protection of individual species or biotypes whereas political processes are more responsive to local ES valuations.

      PubDate: 2016-10-01T04:10:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.09.003
      Issue No: Vol. 22 (2016)
       
  • Certification of forest watershed services: A Q methodology analysis of
           opportunities and challenges in Lombok, Indonesia
    • Authors: Wanggi Jaung; Louis Putzel; Gary Q. Bull; Robert Kozak; Markum
      Pages: 51 - 59
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 22, Part A
      Author(s): Wanggi Jaung, Louis Putzel, Gary Q. Bull, Robert Kozak, Markum
      This study examines opportunities and challenges of applying certification of forest watershed services to a payment for watershed services (PWS) scheme. The certification has potential to mitigate the problem of incomplete information in a PWS scheme, but necessary enabling conditions remain untested, including stakeholder support. To examine stakeholder perspectives, Q methodology was conducted with intermediaries, buyers, and sellers of a PWS scheme in West Lombok, Indonesia. Stakeholders revealed interest in using certification as a capacity-building tool, towards which they indicated a willingness to bear associated costs. However, their preferences indicated confusion about the meaning of certification and skepticism as to its transparency, as well as a need for as-of-yet unavailable simple but scientific standards. The study contributes to analyzing the feasibility of certification as a tool for disclosure of information.

      PubDate: 2016-10-01T04:10:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.09.010
      Issue No: Vol. 22 (2016)
       
  • Transformative agenda, or lost in the translation? A review of top-cited
           articles in the first four years of Ecosystem Services
    • Authors: Marjan van den Belt; Sharon M. Stevens
      Pages: 60 - 72
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 22, Part A
      Author(s): Marjan van den Belt, Sharon M. Stevens
      “Ecosystem services” (ES) has been described both as a trans-disciplinary bridging concept and as a boundary object for sustainability, indicating ES sutures discourses in ways that are bound to be in tension. Given the international attention that has been accorded to ES, it is subject to considerable pressure from growth-oriented economic thinking and practices. Our concern for a co-opted agenda prompted a qualitative discourse analysis of those articles published during the first four years of Ecosystem Services that have had the most influence on the development of the journal’s discourse, which we operationalized as top-cited articles. We assessed the extent to which these have delivered on the journal’s inaugural, transformative agenda and/or the extent to which this agenda has been lost in translation. Our analysis indicates that the normative goals of strong sustainable development are indeed being served by many (though not all) publications within the journal. There are, however, important research gaps, for example, in the welfare of future generations and ecological thresholds. There is also evidence of a positive trend toward in-context research and outcomes assessment that warrants further development.

      PubDate: 2016-10-01T04:10:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.09.006
      Issue No: Vol. 22 (2016)
       
  • Integrating similarity analysis and ecosystem service value transfer:
           Results from a tropical coastal wetland in India
    • Authors: Andrea Ghermandi; Albert Moses Sheela; Joseph Justus
      Pages: 73 - 82
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 22, Part A
      Author(s): Andrea Ghermandi, Albert Moses Sheela, Joseph Justus
      Policy demand for ecosystem service values in developing countries results in a growing use of value transfer techniques, even in the absence of primary valuations from highly comparable study sites. Current techniques provide limited guidance on how to quantitatively assess the similarity between study and policy sites and control for the effect thereof on transfer accuracy. This paper proposes a methodology for the estimation of a study-policy site similarity index and explores its application to the Akkulam-Veli wetland in Kerala, India. The use of empirical similarity weights in a meta-analytical transfer yields a narrower prediction interval for the policy site value estimate. Estimating the meta-regression model parameters on a subset of primary valuation studies with greater similarity to the policy site application is found to increase value transfer accuracy. The need for further systematic testing and potential implications of the proposed approach for value transfer practitioners are highlighted.

      PubDate: 2016-10-08T04:25:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.09.014
      Issue No: Vol. 22 (2016)
       
  • Payments for ecosystem services in Hoa Binh province, Vietnam: An
           institutional analysis
    • Authors: Thi Thu Huong Tran; Manfred Zeller; Diana Suhardiman
      Pages: 83 - 93
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 22, Part A
      Author(s): Thi Thu Huong Tran, Manfred Zeller, Diana Suhardiman
      This study examines the institutional design and actual performance, of payments for ecosystem services (PES) in Vietnam. Taking Payments for Forest Environmental Services Program (PFES Program) implementation in Da Bac district, Hoa Binh province as a case study, it brings to light how PES program design and implementation contributed to the central government's objectives to: (1) involve stakeholders in forest management; (2) reduce the government's budget burden for forest protection; and (3) maintain political control over forest resources. In Vietnam, the PFES Program is implemented in a top-down manner. Participating households act as government-induced forest guards rather than forest owners. Incomplete design at the central-level results in poorer performance at lower levels and, the lack of strategic management makes it difficult to know whether the program has actually improved ecosystem services and forest management. While the PFES Program complements other institutions at the national- and local-levels, some institutional incompatibilities exist in terms of customary practices. It is unlikely, however, that these will develop into an institutional conflict.

      PubDate: 2016-10-15T10:54:47Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.10.001
      Issue No: Vol. 22 (2016)
       
  • Biodiversity and ecosystem services in life cycle impact assessment –
           Inventory objects or impact categories?
    • Authors: Ingeborg Callesen
      Pages: 94 - 103
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 22, Part A
      Author(s): Ingeborg Callesen
      Biodiversity and ecosystem services are both sensitive to the way we utilize and manage ecosystems and landscapes, but they are not unambiguously linked. It is argued that in Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) the Area Of Protection (AoP) ‘natural environment’ should be divided into two AoP's, namely ‘biodiversity’ and ‘ecosystem services’. The AoP biodiversity has more emphasis on intrinsic (existence) values than on utilitarian, functional value perceptions that are covered by the AoP ecosystem services. Ecosystem services can in some aspects be substituted or restored, whereas certain biodiversity losses (e.g. loss of old-growth forest or extinction of a species) are irreversible and thus require a precautionary, conservationist approach. Further, it is suggested that global environmental change scenarios are used in LCIA in order to assess future pressures and potential damages to biodiversity and ecosystem service supplies as a basis for calculating the contribution of a product life cycle to the overall environmental damage.

      PubDate: 2016-10-22T18:09:45Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.09.021
      Issue No: Vol. 22 (2016)
       
  • A local-scale spatial analysis of ecosystem services and ecosystem service
           bundles in the upper Hun River catchment, China
    • Authors: Jing Yao; Xingyuan He; Wei Chen; Yin Ye; Ruichao Guo; Lizhong Yu
      Pages: 104 - 110
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 22, Part A
      Author(s): Jing Yao, Xingyuan He, Wei Chen, Yin Ye, Ruichao Guo, Lizhong Yu
      Spatially explicit analyses of ecosystem services are needed by policy-makers. The lack of spatial water supply data is an obstacle to spatially explicit analyses. In this study, the spatial water quality is obtained by taking water samples at key sites during key periods. The relationships between water quality and ecosystem services were analyzed at a small watershed scale, using areas ranging from 0.03km2 to 160.19km2. Our results shows that (1) water quality indexes are negatively correlated with the provision of regulating ecosystem services, except for NPP (net primary product). (2) That NPP is positively correlated with water quality indexes and crop field ratio suggests increasing NPP is correlated with degradation of water quality, because of the fertilization in croplands. (3) The growth of crop is the main contribution to the variation in NPP. Therefore, the relationship between NPP and forest area ratios can’t reflect the real relationship between carbon sequestration and forest. (4) The ecosystem services bundles analysis at small watershed scale would benefit the understanding of local characteristics of interactions among ecosystem services and help making targeted policy meets the needs of local conditions in diverse landscapes.

      PubDate: 2016-10-22T18:09:45Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.09.022
      Issue No: Vol. 22 (2016)
       
  • Ecosystem services and urban greenways: What's the public's
           perspective?
    • Authors: Lincoln R. Larson; Samuel J. Keith; Mariela Fernandez; Jeffrey C. Hallo; C. Scott Shafer; Viniece Jennings
      Pages: 111 - 116
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 22, Part A
      Author(s): Lincoln R. Larson, Samuel J. Keith, Mariela Fernandez, Jeffrey C. Hallo, C. Scott Shafer, Viniece Jennings
      Ecosystem services (ES) are an important tool for quantifying the value of nature, yet there are often disconnects between services defined and measured by scientists and those that are realized and appreciated by the general public. Our study explored public perceptions of urban ES by examining benefits associated with greenways in two U.S. cities. Respondents (n =460) recognized all types of ES, though environmental benefits (e.g., air and water quality regulation; acknowledged by 74% of respondents) were less widely recognized than cultural benefits (e.g., economic impacts, social connectivity; 90%) or experiential benefits (e.g., attractive scenery, recreation; 98%). The distinction between these last two categories is rarely made in conventional ES frameworks, but it may be practically significant from the public's perspective. Benefit perceptions varied across geographic and socio-demographic contexts. Enhanced integration of cultural and experiential benefits into urban ES frameworks could lead to more equitable and informed decisions about the provision, management, and valuation of urban green space across diverse settings and populations.

      PubDate: 2016-10-22T18:09:45Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.10.004
      Issue No: Vol. 22 (2016)
       
  • Valuation of ecosystem services in organic cereal crop production systems
           with different management practices in relation to organic matter input
    • Authors: Fan Fan; Christian Bugge Henriksen; John Porter
      Pages: 117 - 127
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 22, Part A
      Author(s): Fan Fan, Christian Bugge Henriksen, John Porter
      As the degradation of global ecosystem services (ES) continues in the last five decades, maintaining or even enhancing the ES of agro-ecosystem is one of the approaches to mitigate the global ES loss. This study provides the first estimate of an economic valuation of ES provided by organic cereal crop production systems with different management practices in relation to organic matter input (low, medium and high). Our results show that organic matter inputs significantly affect the total ES value on organic cereal crop production systems. The system with high organic matter input has the highest gross total ES value (US$ 1969ha−1 yr−1), followed by the low organic matter input system (US$ 1688ha−1 yr−1), and the lowest ES value are found in the medium organic matter input system (US$ 1492ha−1 yr−1). Organic matter inputs have strong positive relationship with non-marketable ES values, while this relationship was not found in marketable ES values. Monetizing the ES can be used by land managers and policy makers to adjust management practices in terms of organic matter input in cereal production system with a long term goal for sustainable agriculture.

      PubDate: 2016-10-29T22:05:29Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.10.007
      Issue No: Vol. 22 (2016)
       
  • Operationalizing payments for ecosystem services in Brazil's sugarcane
           belt: How do stakeholder opinions match with successful cases in Latin
           America?
    • Authors: Rafaela A. Silva; David M. Lapola; Gleiciani B. Patricio; Moara C. Teixeira; Patricia Pinho; Joerg A. Priess
      Pages: 128 - 138
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 22, Part A
      Author(s): Rafaela A. Silva, David M. Lapola, Gleiciani B. Patricio, Moara C. Teixeira, Patricia Pinho, Joerg A. Priess
      In this paper the initial draft design of a payment for ecosystem services (PES) scheme in a municipality within the sugarcane belt of São Paulo state, Brazil (PES-RC), is compared with prevailing characteristics of successful PES cases in Latin America (PES-LA). This systematic comparison is performed by analyzing four major characteristics of PES: identity of traded ecosystem service (ES); spatial scale; type of transaction involved between ES providers and beneficiaries; and the involved actors. Information on the biophysical characteristics, institutional arrangement and financial options of PES-RC were assessed using participatory methods. We found that on the one hand there is an agreement between our case study and the prevailing successful cases of PES-LA regarding the traded ES (water) and the PES spatial scale (local). However, stakeholder opinions diverge from the success cases when it comes to the type of transaction (cash preferred in PES-RC; in-kind in successful PES-LA) and the involved actors. Our results raise the question whether stakeholder opinions or the characteristics of successful (or failure) cases should be prioritized when planning and operationalizing new PES schemes. We argue that stakeholder participation should be considered as an additional success criterion for the construction of public policies directed towards PES implementation.

      PubDate: 2016-10-29T22:05:29Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.09.013
      Issue No: Vol. 22 (2016)
       
  • Local perception of ecosystem service bundles in the Kushiro watershed,
           Northern Japan – Application of a public participation GIS tool
    • Authors: Kikuko Shoyama; Yoshiki Yamagata
      Pages: 139 - 149
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 22, Part A
      Author(s): Kikuko Shoyama, Yoshiki Yamagata
      The sociocultural approach attempts to compensate for values that tend to be obscured by economic valuations of ecosystem services. GIS-based public participation tools are expected to be useful to include public perception into the ecosystem assessments, but there are still problems transforming qualitative information into quantitative values in practical use. This study evaluated stakeholders' subjective valuations of ecosystem service bundles in relation to biophysical and socioeconomic factors in a subject-applicable study area. A mail-based survey was conducted by sending questionnaires to communities in the Kushiro watershed, northern Japan. The respondents were asked to allocate a virtual fund to 10 individual ecosystem services for potential land management and indicate the locations corresponding to their preferred management measures on a provided map. Respondents highly valued provisioning and cultural services, followed by regulating and supporting services. The results of Tobit models indicated the correlational influence of respondents’ characteristics and familiarity with the surrounding environment. In addition, the results of a spatial analysis depicted a considerable degree of spatial heterogeneity in the distribution of the perceived values in relation to landscape structures. Thus, social values of ecosystem service bundles should be analyzed from the perspectives of diverse stakeholders representing a variety of socioecological contexts.

      PubDate: 2016-10-29T22:05:29Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.10.009
      Issue No: Vol. 22 (2016)
       
  • Awareness and perceptions of ecosystem services in relation to land use
           types: Evidence from rural communities in Nigeria
    • Authors: Wei Zhang; Edward Kato; Prapti Bhandary; Ephraim Nkonya; Hassan Ishaq Ibrahim; Mure Agbonlahor; Hussaini Yusuf Ibrahim; Cindy Cox
      Pages: 150 - 160
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 22, Part A
      Author(s): Wei Zhang, Edward Kato, Prapti Bhandary, Ephraim Nkonya, Hassan Ishaq Ibrahim, Mure Agbonlahor, Hussaini Yusuf Ibrahim, Cindy Cox
      For the ecosystem service (ES) paradigm to be relevant to policy and decision-making, it is important to integrate local residents' awareness and perceptions of ES into ES assessment. Using data collected from 102 villages in Nigeria, we assessed communities' awareness and perceptions of a broad range of ES in relation to land use types. We also examined the factors that affected awareness levels across communities. While provisioning services were generally recognized, a majority of the villages also appreciated spiritual values as a cultural service. Awareness of regulating and supporting services, including those that were important for maintaining the stability and productivity of agroecosystems, was generally low. Exposure to forest, unused land, and lowland floodplain was positively correlated with respondents' awareness. In addition, socio-economic and cultural factors such as ethnicity and food intake status had important influence on the awareness levels, whereas adult literacy and government extension programs had limited influence. These results underscore the importance of direct experience and local context in shaping people's awareness about ES. While communities demonstrated diverse ways of using land and deriving ES, much remains to be done to increase awareness and knowledge among communities about the benefits and provision of ES in Nigeria.

      PubDate: 2016-11-06T12:47:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.10.011
      Issue No: Vol. 22 (2016)
       
  • Assessing the service of water quality regulation by quantifying the
           effects of land use on water quality and public health in central
           Veracruz, Mexico
    • Authors: Pierre Mokondoko; Robert H. Manson; Octavio Pérez-Maqueo
      Pages: 161 - 173
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 22, Part A
      Author(s): Pierre Mokondoko, Robert H. Manson, Octavio Pérez-Maqueo
      The effectiveness of Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) in Mexico may be reduced by a lack of guidance on intra-watershed priority zones and an overemphasis on water supply versus other services such as water quality. We explored the links between land use, water quality, and public health in central Veracruz. We identified zones of high and low cholera prevalence and evaluated the effects of land use on water quality at different scales. Production functions were used to evaluate relationships between water quality and public health. Additionally, using mitigation and defensive costs methods and a combined regression model, we estimated a marginal value per hectare of forest in avoiding public health costs associated with contaminated water. Prevalence of cholera was associated with E. coli concentrations in streams. Primary forest cover was the land use most strongly correlated with E. coli, particularly within riparian corridors of 100m width. Our results suggest a value of water quality regulation of at least $US 90 ha−1 in riparian corridors. These results highlight the importance of targeting PES in priority areas within watersheds and considering both water quality and quantity as a means of increasing program efficiency and potencially broadening financial support for these programs.

      PubDate: 2016-11-06T12:47:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.09.001
      Issue No: Vol. 22 (2016)
       
  • Towards mapping and assessing antarctic marine ecosystem services –
           The weddell sea case study
    • Authors: Michaela Deininger; Thomas Koellner; Thomas Brey; Katharina Teschke
      Pages: 174 - 192
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 22, Part A
      Author(s): Michaela Deininger, Thomas Koellner, Thomas Brey, Katharina Teschke
      This study is the first to quantify and to map the provision of ecosystem core services (ES) – tourism, genetic diversity and carbon sequestration – for a large Antarctic marine area, the Weddell Sea. Additionally, synergies and trade-offs between the ES were explored. The analyses conducted during this study covered both spatial and temporal correlations between pairs of ES, and between individual ES and sea ice coverage. Overall, service delivery in the studied seascape is distinctly heterogeneous, albeit there are areas where multiple benefits are provided simultaneously (“super hotspots”). Our findings indicate that in wide parts of the Weddell Sea, small-scale conservation efforts may not achieve their intended goals. They also show that particularly sea ice cover restrains tourism, i.e. this sector may expect strong growth in a future of global warming driven sea ice retreat.

      PubDate: 2016-11-13T12:54:29Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.11.001
      Issue No: Vol. 22 (2016)
       
  • Estimating demand for certification of forest ecosystem services: A choice
           experiment with Forest Stewardship Council certificate holders
    • Authors: Wanggi Jaung; Louis Putzel; Gary Q. Bull; Manuel R. Guariguata; Ussif Rashid Sumaila
      Pages: 193 - 201
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 22, Part A
      Author(s): Wanggi Jaung, Louis Putzel, Gary Q. Bull, Manuel R. Guariguata, Ussif Rashid Sumaila
      The scope of Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certification, a market-based mechanism targeting sustainable forest management, could be expanded to certify delivery of a range of forest ecosystem services (FES). To assess the feasibility of such an undertaking, we examined market demand for FES certification based on the benefits and costs applicable to certification of any FES. We conducted a choice experiment with 188 FSC certificate holders to assess the perspectives of potential FES certification adopters. Our results revealed preferences for FES certification system capable of providing a 50% price premium, technical training for forest owners, and greater global market reach. However, potential adopters showed low willingness to pay for FES certification and limited technical capacity to manage FES. Furthermore, only FES traded at the global scale to date is forest carbon. These findings indicate characteristics of FES certification that forest owners would likely require, as well as a number of challenges in developing such as a scheme.

      PubDate: 2016-11-13T12:54:29Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.10.016
      Issue No: Vol. 22 (2016)
       
  • Can ecosystem services be part of the solution to environmental
           justice?
    • Authors: Kellen A. Marshall; Miquel A. Gonzalez-Meler
      Pages: 202 - 203
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services, Volume 22, Part A
      Author(s): Kellen A. Marshall, Miquel A. Gonzalez-Meler


      PubDate: 2016-11-19T12:46:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.10.008
      Issue No: Vol. 22 (2016)
       
  • Integrating deliberative monetary valuation, systems modelling and
           participatory mapping to assess shared values of ecosystem services
    • Authors: Jasper O. Kenter
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 December 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services
      Author(s): Jasper O. Kenter
      There is increasing recognition of the need to unite analytical and participatory methodologies to establish more comprehensive valuations of ecosystem services and move beyond individual conceptions of value. This research integrates a three-stage choice experiment with participatory systems modelling, participatory mapping and psychometric analysis in a coastal case study in Scotland. It aimed to explore contrasts between individual willingness to pay and shared values expressed as group-deliberated fair prices, how deliberation on social-ecological systems would impact on value formation, and how participatory mapping might elicit distinct values not reflected in the monetary valuation. Results indicated marked differences between individual and deliberated group values, with deliberated individual values falling between the two. The systems modelling intervention combined with explicit discussion of transcendental values (life goals and guiding principles) generated significant learning and helped to better reflect transcendental values in monetary values. The deliberations and fair price framing shifted participants towards a public policy perspective, balancing benefit trade-offs with questions of fairness and responsibility. The highly localised nature of many values expressed through participatory mapping suggests that many of these places-based values would have been under-recognised by monetary valuation alone.

      PubDate: 2016-12-03T21:09:34Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.06.010
       
  • Does slow and steady win the race? Ecosystem services in Canadian and
           Chilean environmental law
    • Authors: Roberto Pastén; Martin Olszynski; Michael Hantke-Domas
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 December 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services
      Author(s): Roberto Pastén, Martin Olszynski, Michael Hantke-Domas
      This paper examines and compares the extent to which ecosystem services have been incorporated in Canadian and Chilean environmental law and policy. The focus is on the adjudication of environmental disputes but the analysis is contextualized by the broader environmental law and policy developments of each country. As will be seen, Canada's judiciary was relatively quick to embrace ecosystem services but subsequent progress has been slow. In Chile, on the other hand, ecosystem services have been referred to only recently but that country's Environment Courts appear intent on giving the concept a greater role in the resolution of environmental disputes.

      PubDate: 2016-12-03T21:09:34Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.11.013
       
  • An arts-led dialogue to elicit shared, plural and cultural values of
           ecosystems
    • Authors: David M. Edwards; Timothy M. Collins; Reiko Goto
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 November 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services
      Author(s): David M. Edwards, Timothy M. Collins, Reiko Goto
      This paper introduces arts-led dialogue as a critical alternative to the prevailing instrumental and deliberative approaches to environmental valuation and decision-making. The dialogue, directed by an artist in collaboration with a community of participants, can comprise a single event, such as a workshop, or unfold over a period of years. Rather than seeking closure on a pre-determined problem, its intentions are typically to explore a subject or problem in original, challenging or provocative ways, which question the truth claims of any one discipline, at times with unexpected, emancipatory outcomes. We locate arts-led dialogue between deliberative and interpretive approaches to environmental decision-making, and within the history and theory of socially-engaged art, and analyse its key features: its purpose, participation, audience, format, content, and changes in values and identities through transformative learning. We illustrate these features by reporting on a creative enquiry into the shared, plural and cultural values associated with the Caledonian pinewoods of Scotland, focusing on the Black Wood of Rannoch in Highland Perthshire. The conclusions highlight two distinctive features: a commitment to critical dialogue and open exchange, and the character and experience of the artist who directs the process.

      PubDate: 2016-12-03T21:09:34Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.09.018
       
  • Editorial: Shared, plural and cultural values
    • Authors: Jasper O. Kenter
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 November 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services
      Author(s): Jasper O. Kenter
      To deeply resolve conflicts between nature conservation and exploitation, we need valuations that result from, and are integrated with, transformative processes that bring together different voices to develop shared understandings of conflicts between ecosystem services and shared values around how to address them. This Special Issue builds on evidence from the second phase of the UK National Ecosystem Assessment to develop a discourse of shared, plural and cultural values in relation to ecosystems. Key themes include the formation and institutionalisation of shared values through socialisation, formal and informal deliberation; deliberative alternatives for aggregating values; understandings and critiques of deliberation; and interrelations between values, place and identity. The importance of institutional factors, such as power issues, and the inevitable subjectivity of valuations around complex and contested issues are highlighted. A wide range of monetary and non-monetary analytical, deliberative, interpretive and psychometric methods are integrated. Shared, plural and cultural values are presented as a knowledge intervention critiqueing the increasing tendency to artificially separate economic and socio-cultural values, monetary and non-monetary valuation and cultural and other ecosystem services. Deliberative valuations are advocated as a means to integrate plural values and as a boundary object between research, practitioner and policy communities, enabling more effective translation of values into decisions and creating new democratic spaces for transformative social change.

      PubDate: 2016-12-03T21:09:34Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.10.010
       
  • Integrating spatial valuation of ecosystem services into regional planning
           and development
    • Authors: Ilpo Tammi; Kaisa Mustajärvi; Jussi Rasinmäki
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 November 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services
      Author(s): Ilpo Tammi, Kaisa Mustajärvi, Jussi Rasinmäki
      The transition of the ecosystem service framework from academic discourse into practical land use management and policy guidance is in the making. Planners and decision makers seek spatial valuation data, comprehensive examples of which are few or hindered by sectoral research traditions. We present a case of linking land use to multimethod spatial ecosystem service valuation aiming at comprehensiveness and commensurability, based on a project run parallel to regional land-use planning in the Tampere region, Finland. A spectrum of ecosystem services was scrutinized, the annual value of which was estimated at €0.8–1B. Compared to land-use planning, core areas of ecological networks proved relatively poor in terms of valuation, but hot-spots of human–nature interaction such as recreational, groundwater and landscape areas immensely valuable. Strong urban-rural trends in ecosystem service value were found, emphasizing the importance of urban nature and the context-specificity of natural capital discourse. We argue that some mismatches exist between the ecosystem service framework and its practical applicability, and that the main problem is not necessarily the transferability of tools and indicators, but the transfer of valuation and the assumptions and choices behind it. Notwithstanding its problems, the applied framework proved valuable in evaluating and guiding future land use.

      PubDate: 2016-12-03T21:09:34Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.11.008
       
  • Shared values and deliberative valuation: Future directions
    • Authors: Jasper O. Kenter; Rosalind Bryce; Michael Christie; Nigel Cooper; Neal Hockley; Katherine N. Irvine; Ioan Fazey; Liz O’Brien; Johanne Orchard-Webb; Neil Ravenscroft; Christopher M. Raymond; Mark S. Reed; Paul Tett; Verity Watson
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 November 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services
      Author(s): Jasper O. Kenter, Rosalind Bryce, Michael Christie, Nigel Cooper, Neal Hockley, Katherine N. Irvine, Ioan Fazey, Liz O’Brien, Johanne Orchard-Webb, Neil Ravenscroft, Christopher M. Raymond, Mark S. Reed, Paul Tett, Verity Watson
      Valuation that focuses only on individual values evades the substantial collective and intersubjective meanings, significance and value from ecosystems. Shared, plural and cultural values of ecosystems constitute a diffuse and interdisciplinary field of research, covering an area that links questions around value ontology, elicitation and aggregation with questions of participation, ethics, and social justice. Synthesising understanding from various contributions to this Special Issue of Ecosystem Services, and with a particular focus on deliberation and deliberative valuation, we discuss key findings and present 35 future research questions in eight topic areas: 1) the ontology of shared values; 2) the role of catalyst and conflict points; 3) shared values and cultural ecosystem services; 4) transcendental values; 5) the process and outcomes of deliberation; 6) deliberative monetary valuation; 7) value aggregation, meta-values and ‘rules of the game’; and 8) integrating valuation methods. The results of this Special Issue and these key questions can help develop a more extensive evidence base to mature the area and develop environmental valuation into a more pluralistic, comprehensive, robust, legitimate and effective way of safeguarding ecosystems and their services for the future.

      PubDate: 2016-11-26T19:58:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.10.006
       
  • Review of decision support tools to operationalize the ecosystem services
           concept
    • Authors: Adrienne Grêt-Regamey; Elina Sirén; Sibyl Hanna Brunner; Bettina Weibel
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 November 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services
      Author(s): Adrienne Grêt-Regamey, Elina Sirén, Sibyl Hanna Brunner, Bettina Weibel
      The ecosystem services concept provides a valuable framework for analyzing and acting on the linkages between people and their environment. By making the values of nature explicit, it allows discussions about trade-offs between services and thus a prioritization of management options. The integration of the ecosystem services concept into decision making remains however challenging. Based on a thorough literature review of 68 tools for integrating ecosystem services into decision making, we analyze the current state, gaps and trends in the operationalization of the ecosystem services concept. We evaluate how well various policy sectors are covered with the tools and highlight gaps where more development is needed. While for some policy sectors such as agriculture or forestry several tools have been developed to support the integration of nature's benefits into concrete decisions, tools are missing where the link between policies and ecosystem services is less evident for example regarding cultural services related to land use policies as well as services supported by soils. Furthermore, the successful implementation of tools requires a good understanding of decision-making processes to bridge gaps in the science-policy interface. Based on the analysis of the application of tools in case studies, we evaluate the establishment of tools over time in different policy sectors and the frequency of their application.

      PubDate: 2016-11-26T19:58:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.10.012
       
  • Quantifying visual landscape quality in rural Wales: A GIS-enabled method
           for extensive monitoring of a valued cultural ecosystem service
    • Authors: R.D. Swetnam; S.K. Harrison-Curran; G.R. Smith
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 November 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services
      Author(s): R.D. Swetnam, S.K. Harrison-Curran, G.R. Smith
      Landscape views and the enjoyment people derive from them, represent an important cultural ecosystem service (CES) as recognised in frameworks such as the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (2005) and TEEB (2010). We present a method to evaluate the quality of the landscape view, created for the assessment and monitoring of Welsh rural landscapes. This consists of: (i) a Visual Quality Index (VQI) and (ii) a viewshed model to calculate a Zone of Visual Influence (ZVI). From existing literature, we selected 19 landscape components commonly found to influence landscape quality ratings. Using vegetation surveys and GIS datasets each component was measured and assigned a numeric value based either on presence or quantity and/or extent for 150, 1km2 survey sites across Wales. Totalling these values, then scaling and weighting them provided an index for each site between 0 and 1 (VQI). Each site was then evaluated for a range of potential users (pedestrians, cyclists, car-users) to calculate a modelled viewshed (ZVI). By combining the VQI and the ZVI, we capture two elements: firstly the intrinsic landscape quality (its aesthetics) and secondly, how much of the landscape can be seen by the public in order to enjoy the view.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2016-11-26T19:58:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.11.004
       
  • Facing the true cost of fracking; social externalities and the role of
           integrated valuation
    • Authors: Anna (Anya) Phelan; Sander Jacobs
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 November 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services
      Author(s): Anna (Anya) Phelan, Sander Jacobs
      This paper is based on a recent study that evaluated social externalities and examined how quality of life has been influenced by coal seam gas (CSG) projects in Southeast Queensland, Australia. CSG projects, also known as unconventional gas pose spatially extensive impacts on rural communities and tend to overlap other land uses, such as agriculture. This paper identifies key themes for evaluating social externalities of major resource projects using mixed-methods approach and structural equation modeling, and provides empirical evidence to support the multi-scale methodological framework for integrated valuation of ecosystem services. The findings demonstrate alignment between cultural, economic and ecological value-domains and factors influencing quality of life and human wellbeing. The analysis shows that unresolved concerns of community residents about environmental and social impacts contribute to lower life-satisfaction and lead to a weaker local economy. This paper argues that integrated valuation of ecosystem services will not only improve project decision-making and planning, but also support efforts to minimize negative social externalities of major resource extraction projects.

      PubDate: 2016-11-26T19:58:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.11.006
       
  • Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis and Cost-Benefit Analysis: Comparing
           alternative frameworks for integrated valuation of ecosystem services
    • Authors: Heli Saarikoski; Jyri Mustajoki; David N. Barton; Davide Geneletti; Johannes Langemeyer; Erik Gomez-Baggethun; Mika Marttunen; Paula Antunes; Hans Keune; Rui Santos
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 November 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services
      Author(s): Heli Saarikoski, Jyri Mustajoki, David N. Barton, Davide Geneletti, Johannes Langemeyer, Erik Gomez-Baggethun, Mika Marttunen, Paula Antunes, Hans Keune, Rui Santos
      Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) methods has been promoted as an alternative approach to monetary economic valuation of ecosystem services in Cost-Benefit Analysis framework (CBA). We discuss the potential of MCDA in providing a framework for integrated valuation of ecosystem services. We conclude that MCDA does in general perform better than CBA and associated monetary valuation techniques in several aspects that are essential in ecosystem service valuation. These include the ability of a valuation method to account for multiple dimensions of well-being, including ecological and economic as well as cultural and moral aspects of a policy or management problem and to facilitate open and transparent public debate on the pros and cons of alternative courses of action, including the distribution of gains and losses across beneficiaries of ecosystem services. The capacity of MCDA to articulate values related to ecosystem services depends on individual methods used in the MCDA process. More importantly, it depends of the ways in which the process is organized and facilitated. However, MCDA cannot provide representative information of the values of wider population. Further empirical and theoretical research is needed on the potential of hybrid methodologies to combine monetary valuation and MCDA in fruitful ways.

      PubDate: 2016-11-19T12:46:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.10.014
       
  • Investigating trade-offs between water quality and agricultural
           productivity using the Land Utilisation and Capability Indicator
           (LUCI)–A New Zealand application
    • Authors: Martha I. Trodahl; Bethanna M. Jackson; Julie R. Deslippe; Alister K. Metherell
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 November 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services
      Author(s): Martha I. Trodahl, Bethanna M. Jackson, Julie R. Deslippe, Alister K. Metherell
      Concern for the impacts of rural land-use intensification on ecosystem services is growing world-wide, especially with regard to water quality management. The Land Utilisation & Capability Indicator (LUCI) is a GIS framework that considers impacts of land use on multiple ecosystem services in a holistic and spatially explicit manner. Due to its fine spatial scale and focus on the rural environment, LUCI is well-placed to help both farm and catchment managers to explore and quantify spatially explicit solutions to improve water quality while also maintaining or enhancing other ecosystem service outcomes. LUCI water quality and agricultural productivity models were applied to a catchment in the Bay of Plenty, New Zealand. Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) sources, sinks and pathways in the landscape were identified and trade-offs and synergies between water quality and agricultural productivity were investigated. Results indicate that interventions to improve water quality are likely to come at the expense of agriculturally productive land. Nonetheless, loss of agriculturally productive land can be minimised by using LUCI to identify, at a fine spatial scale, the most appropriate locations for nutrient intervention. Spatially targeted and strategic nutrient source management and pathway interception can improve water quality, while minimising negative financial impacts on farms. Our results provide spatially explicit solutions to optimize agricultural productivity and water quality, which will inform better farm, land and catchment management as well as national and international policy.

      PubDate: 2016-11-19T12:46:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.10.013
       
  • Lessons from the integrated valuation of ecosystem services in a
           developing country: Three case studies on ecological, socio-cultural and
           economic valuation
    • Authors: Clara Villegas-Palacio; Lina Berrouet; Connie López; Aura Ruiz; Alba Upegui
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 November 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services
      Author(s): Clara Villegas-Palacio, Lina Berrouet, Connie López, Aura Ruiz, Alba Upegui
      Over the last decades a large body of literature has been established on the theoretical and methodological development of the economic valuation of ecosystem services and its application in different contexts. More recently, this literature has proposed the need to carry out integrated valuations in order to inform decision-making processes. An integrated valuation allows for the ecological, socio-cultural and economic values of an ecosystem to be identified. This paper explores the experiences of three integrated valuation of ecosystem services in Colombia. Based on the presented case studies, some lessons and challenges on the development of integrated valuation methodologies are discussed.

      PubDate: 2016-11-19T12:46:31Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.10.017
       
  • Conceptualising cultural ecosystem services: A novel framework for
           research and critical engagement
    • Authors: Robert Fish; Andrew Church; Michael Winter
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 November 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services
      Author(s): Robert Fish, Andrew Church, Michael Winter
      The construction of culture as a class of ecosystem service presents a significant test of the holistic ambitions of an ecosystems approach to decision making. In this paper we explore the theoretical challenges arising from efforts to understand ecosystems as objects of cultural concern and consider the operational complexities associated with understanding how, and with what consequences, knowledge about cultural ecosystem services are created, communicated and accounted for in real world decision making. We specifically forward and develop a conceptual framework for understanding cultural ecosystem services and related benefits in terms of the environmental spaces and cultural practices that arise from interactions between humans and ecosystems. The types of knowledge, and approaches to knowledge production, presumed by this relational, non-linear and place-based perspective on cultural ecosystem services are discussed and reviewed. The framework not only helps navigate more fully the challenge of operationalising ‘cultural ecosystem services’ but points to a more relational understanding of the ecosystem services framework as a whole. Extending and refining understanding through more ambitious engagements in interdisciplinarity remains important.

      PubDate: 2016-11-13T12:54:29Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.09.002
       
  • Deliberative Democratic Monetary Valuation to implement the Ecosystem
           Approach
    • Authors: Johanne Orchard-Webb; Jasper O. Kenter; Ros Bryce; Andrew Church
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 November 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services
      Author(s): Johanne Orchard-Webb, Jasper O. Kenter, Ros Bryce, Andrew Church
      The potential for developing the participatory dimensions of the Ecosystem Approach are examined through the work of Habermas to guide the design of Deliberative Democratic Monetary Valuation (DDMV) and elicit social willingness to pay. DDMV is contrasted with Deliberated Preferences approaches, which are a deliberative adaptation of stated preference techniques and comprise almost all Deliberative Monetary Valuation studies so far. In a detailed case study where coastal and marine cultural ecosystem services were set within a broader societal context, DDMV was undertaken through three iterative workshops involving a single group of participants representing local residents and different interests across the public, private and third sectors. The use of DDMV generates insights into its potential for securing a socially sustainable route to environmental management: sustainable development that brings together values for ecosystem services with other social priorities, is more inclusive of diverse user needs and values, and is sensitive to issues of environmental justice. As well as highlighting the benefits and challenges that a more democratic deliberative valuation presents, we highlight the practical strengths and vulnerabilities of this approach and indicate directions for further methodological evolution of DDMV.

      PubDate: 2016-11-13T12:54:29Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.09.005
       
  • The Deliberative Value Formation model
    • Authors: Jasper O. Kenter; Mark S. Reed; Ioan Fazey
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 November 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services
      Author(s): Jasper O. Kenter, Mark S. Reed, Ioan Fazey
      It is increasingly argued that preferences and values for complex goods such as ecosystem services are not pre-formed but need to be generated through a process of deliberation and learning. While the number of studies incorporating deliberation in monetary and non-monetary valuation of ecosystem services is increasing, there is a limited theoretical basis to how values are influenced and shaped in social valuation processes. In this paper we present the Deliberative Value Formation (DVF) model, a new theoretical model for deliberative valuation informed by social-psychological theory. Anchored within a broader theoretical framework around shared and plural values, the DVF model identifies a range of potential positive (e.g. learning) and negative (e.g. social desirability bias) outcomes of deliberation and key factors that influence outcomes (e.g. ability to deliberate, institutional factors, power dynamics). It also conceptualises how values may be formed by ‘translating’ transcendental values, our principles and life goals, into more specific contextual values. Underpinned by this theoretical model, we present a six-step template for designing deliberative valuation processes. The DVF provides a theoretical and methodological framework for more rigorous monetary and non-monetary deliberative valuation, and enables more effective integration of social learning and plural knowledges and values in valuation and decision-making.

      PubDate: 2016-11-13T12:54:29Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.09.015
       
  • Making space for cultural ecosystem services: Insights from a study of the
           UK nature improvement initiative
    • Authors: Robert Fish; Andrew Church; Cheryl Willis; Michael Winter; Jamie A. Tratalos; Roy Haines-Young; Marion Potschin
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 November 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services
      Author(s): Robert Fish, Andrew Church, Cheryl Willis, Michael Winter, Jamie A. Tratalos, Roy Haines-Young, Marion Potschin
      A study of the cultural ecosystem services (CES) arising from peoples’ interactions with the rural environment is conducted within the context of a landscape scale, ‘nature improvement’ initiative in the United Kingdom. Taking a mixed methodological approach, the research applies, and demonstrates empirically, a framework for CES developed under the UK National Ecosystem Assessment (Fish et al., 2016). Applications of the framework involve the study of the ‘environmental spaces’ and ‘cultural practices’ that contribute to the realisation of benefits to well-being. In this paper empirical work is undertaken to inform the CES evidence base informing management priorities of the Northern Devon Nature Improvement Area (NDNIA) in south west England. Findings from a questionnaire survey, qualitative mapping, group discussion and a participatory arts-based research process are presented to document the many and diverse ways this study area matters to local communities. The paper analyses the qualities that research participants attribute to the environmental space of the NDNIA, the cultural practices conducted and enabled within it, and their associated benefits. The implications of the study for applying this framework through mixed methodological research are discussed, alongside an account of the impact of this approach within the NDNIA itself.

      PubDate: 2016-11-06T12:47:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.09.017
       
  • What's law got to do with it? Why environmental justice is essential to
           ecosystem service valuation
    • Authors: Alexandra Aragão; Sander Jacobs; An Cliquet
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 November 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services
      Author(s): Alexandra Aragão, Sander Jacobs, An Cliquet
      The purpose of this paper is to show that bringing together legal science and other sciences in integrated valuation of ecosystem services can contribute for environmental justice and ensure fair and acceptable answers to complex real life questions. Legal science provides the teleological framework necessary to prevent ethical deadlocks. To this end, different forms of environmental justice are addressed. Distributive justice, commutative justice, retributive justice, restorative justice and procedural justice are five types of environmental justice, the content of which is explained using illustrative examples of environmental “injustices”. Next, these justice forms are applied to fourteen wicked legal questions, covering both public and private law, both international and national law, is presented. The questions demonstrate how Integrated Ecosystem Services valuation can be used to address societal challenges related to humanitarian protection, State responsibility, ecological damage, access to natural resources, use of economic instruments for environmental protection, effective environmental sanctioning, access to information, etc. This paper confirms the potential uses of integrated valuation of ecosystem services in the pursuit of social and environmental goals when legal science and other natural and social sciences are brought together to operationalize ecosystem services.

      PubDate: 2016-11-06T12:47:39Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.09.012
       
  • Forming shared values in conservation management: An
           interpretive-deliberative-democratic approach to including community
           voices
    • Authors: S. Ranger; J.O. Kenter; R. Bryce; G. Cumming; T. Dapling; E. Lawes; P.B. Richardson
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 October 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services
      Author(s): S. Ranger, J.O. Kenter, R. Bryce, G. Cumming, T. Dapling, E. Lawes, P.B. Richardson
      Global recognition of the decline of marine ecosystems and their services has led to rapid designation of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) in recent decades. The complexity of effectively managing protected areas within the context of densely populated, highly used and contested coastlines points to the need for decision-support processes that effectively engage users and incorporate social, cultural and economic considerations alongside ecological objectives. Multi-Criteria Approaches (MCA) are established tools for complex decision-making involving uncertain, multi-scale environmental issues and multiple actors. Working closely with decision-makers, we develop a novel approach that draws on the strengths of MCA, but focuses less on arithmetic outcomes, instead presenting a deliberative-democratic process to facilitate emergence of shared values around effective conservation management. We nest these deliberations within the Community Voice Method (CVM), an interpretive film-based approach. CVM enables reflection on deeper-held values, stepping back from polarised policy debates and fostering conversation around shared values connecting people to place. We discuss how the integrated interpretive-deliberative methodology by a transdisciplinary team improved participation and engagement and provided outputs that supported improved decision-making. The approach made diverse impacts and benefits explicit and highlighted shared values amongst participants as a critical part of establishing robust management.

      PubDate: 2016-10-29T22:05:29Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.09.016
       
  • A comparative analysis of ecosystem services valuation approaches for
           application at the local scale and in data scarce regions
    • Authors: B. Pandeya; W. Buytaert; Z. Zulkafli; T. Karpouzoglou; F. Mao; D.M. Hannah
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 October 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services
      Author(s): B. Pandeya, W. Buytaert, Z. Zulkafli, T. Karpouzoglou, F. Mao, D.M. Hannah
      Despite significant advances in the development of the ecosystem services concept across the science and policy arenas, the valuation of ecosystem services to guide sustainable development remains challenging, especially at a local scale and in data scarce regions. In this paper, we review and compare major past and current valuation approaches and discuss their key strengths and weaknesses for guiding policy decisions. To deal with the complexity of methods used in different valuation approaches, our review uses multiple entry points: data vs simulation, habitat vs system vs place-based, specific vs entire portfolio, local vs regional scale, and monetary vs non-monetary. We find that although most valuation approaches are useful to explain ecosystem services at a macro/system level, an application of locally relevant valuation approaches, which allows for a more integrated valuation relevant to decision making is still hindered by data-scarcity. The advent of spatially explicit policy support systems shows particular promise to make the best use of available data and simulations. Data collection remains crucial for the local scale and in data scarce regions. Leveraging citizen science-based data and knowledge co-generation may support the integrated valuation, while at the same time making the valuation process more inclusive, replicable and policy-oriented.

      PubDate: 2016-10-29T22:05:29Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.10.015
       
  • A proposed framework for assessing ecosystem goods and services from
           planted forests
    • Authors: Himlal Baral; Manuel R. Guariguata; Rodney J. Keenan
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 October 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services
      Author(s): Himlal Baral, Manuel R. Guariguata, Rodney J. Keenan
      The planting of forests has been met with both scepticism and support in international forest policy and management fora. Discussions regarding the values of plantations for extrinsic purposes such as timber supply, carbon sequestration, water quality and biodiversity conservation, reveal widely varying opinions across and within different settings. Recent research highlights the role of planted forests in providing multiple ecosystem services to human society. However, there has been little assessment of ecosystems services, partly due to lack of suitable frameworks and evaluation tools. Planted forests generally have low ecosystem services values initially and are more vulnerable to erosion and other impacts of mismanagement than natural forests. Careful monitoring of change in ecosystem services values over time is therefore vital to investors and all stakeholders in plantations. Drawing on lessons derived from ecosystem services assessment for various land use types, here we propose an easy-to-apply framework to assess ecosystem services from planted forests that could be used in various planted forest types around the world. A necessary next step for researchers and practitioners is to test the proposed framework under various settings.

      PubDate: 2016-10-29T22:05:29Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.10.002
       
  • The ripple effect: Institutionalising pro-environmental values to shift
           societal norms and behaviours
    • Authors: Mark Everard; Mark S. Reed; Jasper O. Kenter
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 October 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services
      Author(s): Mark Everard, Mark S. Reed, Jasper O. Kenter
      Contemporary markets and societal norms externalise many ecosystem services important for a sustainable future. A range of external legal, market, social protocol and other mechanisms, referred to as ‘societal levers’, constrain or otherwise influence the behaviour of resource managers, and the expectations and assumptions of the society within which they operate. These ‘societal levers’ have progressively institutionalised evolving societal values, influencing markets and other choices. We use the STEEP (social, technological, economic, environmental and political) framework to explore case studies of societal transitions, analysing how emergent concerns become shared and ultimately transformed into ‘levers’, shifting societal norms. Emerging concerns become influential only when they are shared across societal sectors, and when broader implications are realised across multiple dimensions of the STEEP framework. We propose and advocate use of a ‘ripple effect’ of values as a means to direct and accelerate the pace at which environmental concerns shape mainstream societal norms and structures, and become institutionalised in the form of ‘societal levers’.

      PubDate: 2016-10-22T18:09:45Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.08.001
       
  • Ecosystem services and the idea of shared values
    • Authors: Katherine N. Irvine; Liz O’Brien; Neil Ravenscroft; Nigel Cooper; Mark Everard; Ioan Fazey; Mark S. Reed; Jasper O. Kenter
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 October 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services
      Author(s): Katherine N. Irvine, Liz O’Brien, Neil Ravenscroft, Nigel Cooper, Mark Everard, Ioan Fazey, Mark S. Reed, Jasper O. Kenter
      Ecosystem services conceptualise the diverse values that ecosystems provide to humanity. This was recognised in the United Kingdom's National Ecosystem Assessment, which noted that appreciation of the full value of ecosystem services requires recognition of values that are shared. By operationalising the shared values concept, it is argued that the contribution of ecosystem services to human well-being can be represented more holistically. This paper considers current understanding of shared values and develops a new metanarrative of shared values beyond the aggregated utilities of individuals. This metanarrative seeks to conceptualise how values can be held both individually and communally, and what this means for identifying their scale and means of enumeration. The paper poses a new reading of the idea of shared values that reconciles the elicitation of pre-formed individual values with the formation and expression of shared social values. The implication is that shared values need to be conceived as normative constructs that are derived through social processes of value formation and expression. Shared values thus do not necessarily exist a priori; they can be deliberated through formal and informal processes through which individuals can separate their own preferences from a broader metanarrative about what values ought to be shared.

      PubDate: 2016-10-22T18:09:45Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.07.001
       
  • Conflicting interests of ecosystem services: Multi-criteria modelling and
           indirect evaluation of trade-offs between monetary and non-monetary
           measures
    • Authors: Hilde Karine Wam; Nils Bunnefeld; Nicholas Clarke; Ole Hofstad
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 October 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services
      Author(s): Hilde Karine Wam, Nils Bunnefeld, Nicholas Clarke, Ole Hofstad
      Ecosystems provide services for many stakeholder groups, often with a conflict of interests that hampers sustainability. Core to these conflicts is the challenge of trading-off monetary and non-monetary measures. Using the boreal forest as a case, we present a socio-ecologically integrated trade-off model for partly competing services (wood, game hunting, livestock grazing). Drawing on multi-criteria analyses (MCA), we found that wood production unequivocally yielded the highest net present value, but led to a substantial reduction in the performance of hunting and grazing. By imposing multiuse conditions set as minimum performance of the less profitable services, we evaluated the opportunity costs of multiuse without directly pricing non-commodities. We also quantified normalized indices of realized performance potential to evaluate the cost of multiuse with a single, joint metric. Both approaches consistently showed that accepting a rather small loss in one service may secure large gains in other services. By democratically providing a combined monetary and non-monetary evaluation, our approach should facilitate broader acceptance for the decisional metrics among stakeholders. It thereby has the potential to mitigate conflicts, feeding into the larger scheme of adaptive management.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2016-10-22T18:09:45Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.10.003
       
  • Developed-developing world partnerships for sustainable development (2):
           
    • Authors: Mark Everard; James Longhurst; John Pontin; Wendy Stephenson; Joss Brooks
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 October 2016
      Source:Ecosystem Services
      Author(s): Mark Everard, James Longhurst, John Pontin, Wendy Stephenson, Joss Brooks
      The Converging World (TCW) developed-developing world partnership model represents a transparent approach to addressing carbon emission management in a mutually beneficial way, with a substantial ‘multiplier effect’ achieved though reinvestment of operating surpluses from energy generation into tropical dry evergreen forest (TDEF) restoration. Carbon dioxide is averted/sequestered at a theoretical cost of £0.0058 £ per t CO2e (≈$US0.01 per t CO2e). For the City and County of Bristol, England, cumulative century-long CO2e emissions of 256,550,000t CO2e could be matched by one-off investment of £3:56 for each of Bristol City's 442,500 population in commissioning a 2.1MW wind turbine in Tamil Nadu under the TCW model. Similar considerations apply at institutional level; indicative contributory investment in turbine installation is calculated for a case study institution. Calculated investments relate to the ‘anchor service’ of climate regulation, though the TCW model also generates multiple co-beneficial ecosystem services serving local people and addressing UN Sustainable Development Goals. Restoration of other bioregional habitats could yield additional socio-ecological benefits. TCW's aspirational investment model positions social return on investment (SROI) as primary ‘interest’, rather than maximisation of financial returns to investors. We test the case for founding developing world investment on the basis for ‘payments for ecosystem services’ (PES).

      PubDate: 2016-10-22T18:09:45Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoser.2016.09.019
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
Home (Search)
Subjects A-Z
Publishers A-Z
Customise
APIs
Your IP address: 54.157.19.94
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-2016