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Journal Cover ACOSS Papers
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   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1326-7124
   Published by Australian Council of Social Service Homepage  [1 journal]
  • Budget Priorities Statement: Federal Budget 2018-19
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      We can reduce poverty, inequality and the budget deficit at the same time as improving essential services, creating opportunity and improving the lives of children and adults. We encourage the government to address these priorities in the May 2018-19 budget.

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Mar 2018 14:58:55 GMT
       
  • Budget Priorities Statement 2017-18
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      The Federal Budget is much more than an accounting exercise. It is ultimately about people and our communities, and the priorities and goals we set for our country. The choices made in the budget tell us what the government of the day stands for and the goals it wishes to pursue on our behalf.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Budget Priorities Statement 2016-17
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      The 2016-17 Budget will be the first budget handed down by the current Treasurer under the leadership of the Prime Minister Turnbull. It will take place in a federal election year, in the context of major reform processes of taxation and federation arrangements and against the backdrop of a broader debate about economic reform. Key stakeholders have worked hard to build some common ground in this debate, including on the need to achieve structural budget balance progressively through a staged reform process over a ten year period. Business, union and community groups have also agreed that this should be achieved through a combination of tax and expenditure reforms, while creating space to address some serious holes in the social safety net including an increase to the unemployment benefit.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Budget analysis 2016-17
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      The 2016-17 Budget comes at a challenging time for public policy. Economic growth remains sluggish as the economy transitions away from the mining boom. Governments face fiscal pressures both from this economic adjustment and from the ageing population. At the same time, core Government services and payments are not meeting the community's needs. Our health, education, disability, aged care and community services are under strain and the gaps in our social security system are leaving many vulnerable people exposed to poverty and financial stress.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Three foundations for a secure retirement: Submission to the Government's
           retirement incomes review
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      In this submission, ACOSS sets out a range of recommendations for tax and related reform that specifically relate to the retirement income system, which is the focus of this stage of submissions to the Tax Discussion Process. In addition, ACOSS sets out proposals regarding health and aged care services, and housing systems, both key foundations to ensuring that everyone to live with dignity in later life.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Re-think, re-engage, re-design: Response to the Federal Government Tax
           Discussion Paper 2015
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      This submission proposes a pathway for securing broad consensus on tax reform in Australia. It identifies seven key challenges which require reform of the tax system. ACOSS proposes a set of high level goals for tax reform and a framework to achieve them. The submission scopes out potential packages for reform to achieve common goals, whilst avoiding detailed proposals at this stage. This is best way to begin an open and inclusive conversation about tax, rather than starting from a set of preferred solutions and working backwards to 'justify' them. The submission aims to build on important work already done, including the Henry Review, and ACOSS' more recent collaboration across sectors, including the business community. .

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Fuel on the fire: Negative gearing, capital gains tax & housing
           affordability
    • Abstract: Davidson, Peter; Evans, RoAustralian Council of Social Service.
      A vital goal for tax reform is to improve the affordability of housing. Australia has among the most expensive housing in the world. From 2002-12, average prices rose by 92% for houses and 40% for flats while average rents rose by 76% for houses and 92% for flats - well above the CPI.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Tax: Are we paying our fair share' The effects of the current tax mix
           on contributions to the tax system
    • Abstract: Davidson, Peter; Goldie, Cassandra; Evans, RoAustralian Council of Social Service.
      This Tax Talks Paper No 1, is the first in the ACOSS series addressing some of the key questions about the direction that tax reform should take. There are several important principles that should drive reform, one of which is the principle of equity or 'fairness'. Fairness or 'equity' should be a key measure against which any tax system is assessed. The Australian public has a keen sense of fairness, as demonstrated by the strong rejection of the recent Federal Budget, which failed the fairness test in a number of important respects. This paper focusses on fairness of our current personal income and consumption tax systems, which are two parts of the system which impact on the broadest segment of the Australian community. If we are to get consensus on reform, it is important that we have a sound understanding of how the tax system operates now.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Payment adequacy: a view from those relying on social security payments
    • Abstract: Phillips, JacquelineAustralian Council of Social Service.
      Research released by ACOSS late last year showed that 2.5 million people in Australia are living below the internationally accepted income poverty line. This figure includes 603,000 children. One of the key factors driving poverty in Australia is the inadequacy of income support payments, particularly for people who are young, unemployed, have a disability or are raising children alone. Specifically, the ACOSS Poverty Report found that the people most likely to be living in poverty are those who are unemployed (61.2%), or in a household that relies on social security as its main source of income (40.1%) and particularly on the Newstart Allowance (55.1%) or Youth Allowance (50.6%). This is largely explained by the fact that many social security payments fall below the poverty line, even with Rent Assistance and other supplementary payments added to household income.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Budget Priorities Statement 2015-16
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      The Federal Government faces a clear choice in approaching the 2015-16 Budget. It can continue down the path it set in the 2014-15 Budget - in which spending cuts were chosen to restore Budget balance, which imposed the heaviest burden on those with the least capacity to carry such a burden. This was the approach ACOSS urged the Government to avoid in our previous Federal Budget Submission 2014-15.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Budget analysis 2015-16
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      The impacts of this Budget must be assessed in light of the previous Budget, which casts a long shadow. While the 2015-16 Budget delivered welcome new investment in early childhood education and care and charted a fairer path on pension reform, the combined effect of the two budgets is to leave people on low incomes to once again bear the burden of Budget restraint.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Submission to the annual wage review 2014
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      ACOSS has a long standing interest in minimum wages. We have made submissions on minimum wage fixation to industrial tribunals since the mid 1990s. ACOSS is an interested party with expertise in poverty, employment policy and income support policy, rather than an advocate for union or employer positions. We have not advocated specific wage increases in the past, and do not do so in this submission.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Australian Community Sector Survey 2014
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      The Australian Community Sector Survey (ACSS) was conducted at a time when changes to social policy were expected to significantly impact the lives of people experiencing poverty in Australia. The release of the Federal Budget 2014-15 included a range of proposed changes to social security payments and social welfare and health services and supports. Prior to the Budget, the Government initiated a National Commission of Audit to recommend ways to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of government expenditure in the face of ongoing fiscal challenges; and had instigated a review of the welfare system.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • ACOSS annual report 2014: Goals and highlights
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      The reduction of poverty and inequality remains a core focus for ACOSS, as we work to increase the participation of all people in our society through the reduction of poverty and inequality. Whilst ACOSS policy is designed to promote the common good, our core responsibility is to improve the living standards of people living in poverty, those who are currently missing out on the benefits of an overall increase in wealth in Australia.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Budget Priorities Statement 2014-15
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      ACOSS recognises the very real fiscal challenges that we face as a nation. With declining revenues and an ageing population, now is the right time for a comprehensive review of government revenue and expenditure. We need to set the Budget on a sustainable path for the future. This work needs to be done carefully and in appropriate stages to avoid negative impacts.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • A Budget that divides the nation: ACOSS 2014-15 Budget analysis
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      Instead of repairing the national finances, the 2014-15 Budget divides our country. Rather than bringing us together in a truly fair, shared effort, this Budget entrenches divisions in our community: between young and old and people on high incomes and those struggling to make ends meet. It threatens to destroy the social safety net that has served our nation well - with severe cuts to essential areas such as health, disability support, income support, community services and housing programs. The budget will damage far more than it repairs.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Federal budget 2013-14: Initial analysis
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      This initial ACOSS briefing on the 2012-13 Federal Budget outlines key measures announced in the Budget in areas of interest to ACOSS members, to assist members in their work. This briefing does not offer extensive comment on the merit or otherwise of these measures.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • 2013-14 budget priority statement: Recommendations for the 2013-14 federal
           budget
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      In this submission, ACOSS outlines policy recommendations for consideration by the Federal Government in its 2013-14 Budget. The submission aims to take the opportunity presented by the temporary deferral of the Government's Budget surplus target to put us on a more sustainable, fairer and inclusive footing on which to build as global economic conditions improve. In particular, it aims to address the most glaring unmet social needs while strengthening the fiscal base and building the role of the community sector as a key part of a resilient economy and inclusive society.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Submission on minimum wages 2013
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      ACOSS takes a long term view of minimum wage fixation and the needs of people on low pay. We are concerned that the federal minimum wage (or its equivalent) has barely kept pace with inflation, and fallen sharply in comparison with median fulltime wage levels, over the last two decades. From 1996 to 2011 the federal minimum wage fell from around 60.6% to 53.6% of median fulltime earnings. This left minimum wage earners and their families at risk of falling below generally accepted minimum living standards, as community living standards and expectations rose.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Partnerships for participation: Submission to Minister for Employment
           Participation on reform of employment services
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      Entrenched unemployment is growing and of great concern at January 2013 more than 500,000 people, or 64 per cent of all Newstart and Youth Allowance recipients, had been unemployed for more than a year. At August 2012, the average duration for people receiving Newstart was two years, or 104 weeks. At the same time, 34 per cent of all those receiving support from JSA providers had been unemployed for more than two years. The system is complex, over-engineered and under-resourced. Most people who are disadvantaged in the labour market do not receive the individual help they need. There is still too much focus on short term employment outcomes and too little on long term intensive work with people and employers to ensure that jobs are sustained. Much of the system is designed for the benefit of Government as 'consumer' of the services, not people looking for paid work or employers.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Submission to Consultation Paper on the development of governance
           standards
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      ACOSS has long supported the establishment of a national regulator for charities and not-for-profit organisations, and we have maintained detailed involvement in this reform leading up to the establishment of the Australian Charities and NFP Commission. Our position has been informed by national consultation with our members that found that ours was a sector that was overly but ineffectively regulated, and that member organisations were spending unreasonable amounts of time and resources meeting duplicated, and often unnecessary, regulatory reporting requirements. Through an extensive process of policy development within the sector and with government, ACOSS has sought to ensure governance standards that support the value and effectiveness of charitable and not-for-profit community services. The Standards outlined in the present Consultation Paper reflect much of this work.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • ACOSS Reconciliation Action Plan: 2013 to 2016
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      The Australian Council of Social Service (ACOSS) has a national leadership role in developing and providing socially, economically and environmentally responsible public policy and action to achieve a fair, inclusive and sustainable Australia. Critical to achieve this vision is the need to act in ways to advance reconciliation and justice for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples. ACOSS' commitment to reconciliation has been demonstrated over many years through mutually respectful relationships with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations and people, joint campaigns and problem solving on complex issues, and a deep respect within ACOSS for the unique contribution of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to Australia and recognition of past and current injustices and disadvantage. ACOSS can advocate for and promote reconciliation within our membership, the health and community services sector, and the broader community by formally demonstrating reconciliation in our attitudes, structures, policies and peak body activities. We have the desire and capacity to turn good intentions into action.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Extreme weather, climate change and the community sector: ACOSS submission
           to the Senate Inquiry into recent trends in and preparedness for extreme
           weather events
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      The Australian Council of Social Service (ACOSS) is the peak body of the community services and welfare sector and the national voice for people affected by poverty and inequality. Our interest in extreme weather preparedness and climate change adaptation is primarily the result of our interest in matters affecting people on low-incomes and experiencing disadvantage and inequality in Australia. Our work in this area flows from clear evidence from research that people facing poverty and inequality will be affected first and worst by the impacts of climate change, including increasingly frequent and intense extreme weather events such as heat waves, drought, bushfires and floods. They have the least capacity to cope, to adapt and to recover.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Australian community sector survey 2013: National report
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      The Australian Community Sector Survey 2013 (ACSS) presents the findings from the ACOSS annual survey of community services across Australia. The ACSS is the only annual national survey collecting data about the non-government, not-for-profit community services and welfare sector. This sector is a major provider of the social services that most people in the community will rely on at some point in their lives, but which are particularly important to people experiencing poverty, inequality and social disadvantage. The survey was conducted between March and June 2013 and covers the period from 1 July 2011 to 30 June 2012. A total of 532 organisations responded to the survey, reporting on service provision, demand for services and unmet need, client demographics, and operational, policy and regulatory issues and challenges facing the community services sector.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Back to basics: Simplifying Australia's family payments system to tackle
           child poverty
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      Child poverty is a measure of a country's fairness and an indication of how well the next generation will fare. But today one in six children (575,000) are living in poverty, in one of the wealthiest countries in the world. The recent annual report of the longitudinal study of households (HILDA) showed that child poverty in lone parent families has increased by 15% since 2001.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • ACOSS annual report 2012 - 2013
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      ACOSS' existence is premised on being able to positively impact on public policy in ways which enhance the wellbeing of those affected by poverty or who experience disadvantage. All that we do should be guided by this outcome and our vision for a fair, inclusive and sustainable Australia.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Balancing the budget: Submission to the Commission of Audit, November 2013
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      ACOSS welcomes this Commission of Audit. As the peak body for the community sector, and the national voice against poverty and inequality in Australia, we strongly support a courageous yet carefully considered audit of what government is trying to achieve, and whether its roles and responsibilities are being fulfilled effectively and efficiently. The Audit is of major significance to the Australian community which holds significant expectations of government. However, the Audit is particularly important to the 2.3 million people - including almost 600,000 children - who are currently living in poverty and the over 700,000 people who are unemployed.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Energy efficiency & people on low incomes: Improving affordability
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      In response to sharp rises in energy prices in recent years, many Australian households have reduced their energy consumption by investing in energy efficient appliances, home upgrades, and installing rooftop solar panels (AEMO 2012). However, persistent barriers have prevented people on low incomes from investing in energy efficiency as a way of reducing costs. These barriers include lack of access to capital for high value energy efficiency upgrades, and the inability of tenants to improve the energy efficiency of rental properties. For people on low incomes, these barriers are evident in the lower incidence of insulation in low income housing and tenanted properties, and higher rates of ownership of inefficient appliances that are cheap to buy but expensive to run.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Supplementary Submission to the Senate Select Committee on Electricity
           Prices
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      This supplementary submission builds on the original submission and responds to a number of the questions asked repeatedly by the Committee during hearings. This supplementary submission has also taken the opportunity to consolidate and emphasise some key points made by community sector organisations in submissions and as witnesses during hearings.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Federal Budget 2012-13: Initial ACOSS analysis
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      This initial ACOSS briefing on the 2012-13 Federal Budget outlines key measures announced in the Budget in areas of interest to ACOSS members, to assist members in their work. This briefing does not offer extensive comment on the merit or otherwise of these measures.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Who is missing out' Material deprivation and income support payments
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      This report presents findings from a new study conducted by Saunders and Wong from the Social Policy Research Centre (SPRC), that measured material deprivation in Australia by asking a random sample of Australian adults in 2010 what goods and services they regarded as essential (for example, a 'decent and secure home'), whether they had those items, and if not whether this was because they could not afford them. For the purpose of this research, 'multiple deprivation' was defined as lacking three or more out of 24 items regarded by the majority of respondents as essential. Respondents were also asked whether they identified their household as 'poor'.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • ACOSS submission to Fair Work Australia on minimum wages
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      ACOSS takes a long term view of minimum wage fixation and the needs of people on low pay. We are concerned that the federal minimum wage (or its equivalent) has barely kept pace with inflation, and fallen sharply in comparison with median fulltime wage levels, over the last two decades. From 1996 to 2010 the federal minimum wage fell from around 60% to 54% of median fulltime earnings3. This left minimum wage earners and their families at risk of falling below generally accepted minimum living standards, as community living standards and expectations rose.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Building super on a fair foundation: Reform of the taxation of
           superannuation contributions
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      We estimate that, in 2007, 17% of all tax breaks for super contributions accrued to the top 5% of taxpayers, just under half (47%) accrued to the top 12%, while the bottom 88% shared the remaining half (52%) between them. The system also extends into retirement and further entrenches the inequalities of income between men and women. In 2007, working age women had on average just over half the retirement savings of men.2

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Waste not, want not: Making room in the budget for essential services
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      This report identifies $8 billion of poorly targeted expenditure programs and tax breaks that could be cut and redirected to other priorities. We also argue for a restructure of $16 billion of annual tax breaks for superannuation contributions so that they go to those who need them most - low and middle income earners.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Towards more efficient and responsive employment services: Submission to
           APESAA
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      ACOSS welcomes the opportunity to make a submission to this important inquiry on how Job Services Australia (JSA) and Disability Employment Services (DES) purchasing arrangements can be streamlined to reduce red tape and improve the responsiveness of these systems to jobseeker and employer circumstances and needs.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Response to the Treasury, Australian Charities, and NFP Commission
           exposure draft and governance arrangements consultation paper: Joint COSS
           submission
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      This submission is in response to the exposure legislation on the establishment of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission and the consultation paper on Governance Arrangements in the sector, both released by the Treasury in 2011. In this submission we set out our key concerns with the exposure draft and consultation paper. We do not seek to propose amendments to their drafting. Rather, we advocate the principles that will ensure the effectiveness of the ACNC and a supportive and engaged sector to work with it. These principles have been developed with our members over several years, including through consultation on and submissions to the Productivity Commission's study into the contribution of the not-for-profit sector (2010), the most recent in a line of processes that have concluded that a national, independent regulator for charities and not-for-profit organisations would be of great benefit.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Submission to independent inquiry into insecure work in Australia
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      Since the 1990s, the labour market in Australia has experienced a change from a platform of secure full‐time employment to a two‐track market comprising secure, full‐time employment and insecure, casual, part‐time or contract employment. According to research conducted by the Australian Council of Trade Unions, up to 40% of the workforce is in insecure forms of employment, including independent contracting; fixed term contracts; labour hire; and casual employment.1 Certain types of employment have a high rate of insecure workers, including construction, retail, and community and health care. Once a worker has commenced insecure employment, it is difficult to move to secure employment.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Sole parents won’t be helped to find employment by cutting their
           payments: Submission to the Senate Community Affairs Committee regarding
           the Social Security Amendment (Fair Incentives to Work) Bill (2012)
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      A submission against Schedule 1 of the amendment which removes access to the Parenting Payment Single (PPS) payment for sole parents whose youngest child is over 7 years of age that was preserved under 'grandfathering' provisions in the 2006 Welfare to Work policy.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Australian Community Sector Survey 2012: National report
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service. Work Wages Welfare Project.
      The Australian Community Sector Survey (ACSS) is the only annual national survey collecting data about the non-government, non-profit community services and welfare sector. This sector is a major provider of the community services that most of us rely on at some point in our lives, but which are particularly important to people on low incomes. The 2012 ACSS was conducted between April and June 2012 and covers the period from 1 July 2010 - 30 June 2011. A total of 665 agencies completed the survey, responding on issues relating to service provision, income and expenditure, and operational, policy, and workforce issues for the community services sector.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • 'Surviving, not living': Submission to Senate Employment Committee on the
           adequacy of 'allowance' payments
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      This inquiry is examining the adequacy of the allowance payment system for jobseekers and others, the appropriateness of the allowance payment system as a support into work and the impact of the changing nature of the labour market.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Submission to the Select Committee on Energy Prices
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      People living on low incomes are experiencing significant pressures as a result of substantial increases in the cost of electricity, without a concomitant increase in income. Low income people are most likely to live in poorly-insulated and inefficient rental accommodation, and spend a higher proportion of their income on energy, water and fuel than others. They are least able to respond to increases in prices and to invest in more efficient homes. Given that energy is an essential service, energy price rises leave the most vulnerable households with little option but to pay the extra.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Poverty in Australia: The first in a series of 'Poverty and Inequality in
           Australia' reports from the Australian Council of Social Service
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      This is the first of a regular series of factual reports on Poverty and Inequality in Australia prepared by ACOSS in partnership with Anglicare Australia, St Vincent de Paul Society, and the Salvation Army. People are concerned about extremes of inequality and poverty but have little information to go by. Most people think that income and wealth are distributed more equally than it is and have little idea who is living below the poverty line. This report aims to fill some of the information gaps by measuring the extent of poverty in Australia and the people most effected.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Treasury consultation paper ‘A definition of charity’: Joint
           COSS submission
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      The COSS network strongly endorsed the 2001 Charities Definition Inquiry recommendations as they were developed in full and detailed consultation with the sector and attracted widespread support. Following the 2001 Inquiry there has long been strong support for a modernised definition of charity. However there is a concern that the current proposal strays from the original recommendations of the 2001 Inquiry.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Tax laws amendment (Stronger, Fairer, Simpler and Other Measures) bill
           2011: reform of the tax treatment of superannuation contributions;
           Submission to the Senate Economics Committee
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      ACOSS participated in the Australia's Future Tax System Review (AFTS) process and advocated reforms to make the personal income tax system and the tax treatment of superannuation fairer and more efficient. On the whole, we strongly supported the recommendations of that review. We believe the AFTS Report is a useful road map for progressive tax reform over the coming decade and advocated a number of its key proposals at the recent Tax Forum.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • 2012-13 budget priority statement: Recommendations for the 2012-13 federal
           budget
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      In this submission, ACOSS outlines policy recommendations for consideration by the Federal Government in its 2012-13 Budget. The submission aims to resolve the tension between the Government's commitment to restore the Budget to surplus from 2012-13 and the urgency of social and economic needs not yet met, of key social and economic reforms not yet completed.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Fairer, more efficient tax and social security system, A
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      As the population ages it is appropriate that governments spend a higher proportion of GDP on health, aged care and pensions. The question remains: how will this be funded'

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Clean Energy Future package, households on low incomes and the community
           services sector: A briefing on the Australian government’s climate
           change plan, The
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      In this report ACOSS reviews those parts of the package which most directly affect people on low incomes and the community service sector. In particular, we assess the adequacy of household assistance proposed to offset higher prices flowing from the package, as forecast in modelling by The Treasury. Based on these data, the package introduces a price on carbon and begins our adjustment to a low carbon economy without adversely affecting people on low incomes.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Submission to the Senate Community Affairs Committee on the Family
           Assistance and Other Legislation Amendment bill 2011
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      The following is our brief submission to your Committee's inquiry into this Bill. In summary, we recommend that: Schedule 3, which would delay access to the Disability Support Pension while applicants participate in a 'program of support' be opposed; The provisions of Schedule 2 that freeze the Family Tax Benefit supplements be opposed; The provisions of Schedule 2 that freeze various family payment income thresholds be supported.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Analysis of proposed changes to family tax benefits
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      ACOSS has argued for many years that family payments for teenagers aged 16 years and over are too low to enable low-income families to meet the rising cost of raising children as they grow older. We therefore strongly support the Government's intention to increase the Family Tax Benefit as proposed in the Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs and Other Legislation Amendment (Election Commitments and Other Measures) Bill 2011. This Bill seeks to raise the maximum rate of Family Tax Benefit Part A (FTB-A) for families with a young person aged 16 to 19.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Federal budget 2011-12: Initial ACOSS analysis
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      This initial ACOSS briefing on the 2011‐12 Federal Budget outlines key measures announced in the Budget in areas of interest to ACOSS members, to assist members in their work. This briefing does not offer extensive comment on the merit or otherwise of these measures.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Submission to Fair Work Australia on minimum wages (2011)
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      ACOSS takes a long term view of minimum wage fixation and the needs of people on low pay. Our main concern with the 2009-10 minimum wage 'freeze' was that the resulting decline in both real and relative minimum wage levels would be permanently embedded in the Australian wages structure unless countered by substantial real increases in minimum wages over the next few years.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • National not-for-profit regulator: ACOSS response to Treasury scoping
           study consultation paper, January 2011, A
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      This submission argues strongly for a national, independent regulator of not‐for‐profit organisations. The success and independence of the regulator depend upon a statutory authority outside of the existing agencies in which some aspects of regulation are currently placed.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Australian Community Sector Survey 2011: Vol. 1 - National
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      The ACSS is the only annual national survey collecting data about the non-government, non-profit community services and welfare sector. This sector is a major provider of the community services that most of us rely on at some point in our lives, but which are particularly important to people on low incomes.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Australian Community Sector Survey 2011: Vol. 9 - Western Australia
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      The ACSS is the only annual national survey collecting data about the non-government, non-profit community services and welfare sector. This sector is a major provider of the community services that most of us rely on at some point in our lives, but which are particularly important to people on low incomes.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Australian Community Sector Survey 2011: Vol. 8 - Victoria
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      The ACSS is the only annual national survey collecting data about the non-government, non-profit community services and welfare sector. This sector is a major provider of the community services that most of us rely on at some point in our lives, but which are particularly important to people on low incomes.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Australian Community Sector Survey 2011: Vol. 7 - Tasmania
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      The ACSS is the only annual national survey collecting data about the non-government, non-profit community services and welfare sector. This sector is a major provider of the community services that most of us rely on at some point in our lives, but which are particularly important to people on low incomes.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Australian Community Sector Survey 2011: Vol. 6 - South Australia
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      The ACSS is the only annual national survey collecting data about the non-government, non-profit community services and welfare sector. This sector is a major provider of the community services that most of us rely on at some point in our lives, but which are particularly important to people on low incomes.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Australian Community Sector Survey 2011: Vol. 5 - Queensland
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      The ACSS is the only annual national survey collecting data about the non-government, non-profit community services and welfare sector. This sector is a major provider of the community services that most of us rely on at some point in our lives, but which are particularly important to people on low incomes.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Australian Community Sector Survey 2011: Vol. 4 - Northern Territory
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      The ACSS is the only annual national survey collecting data about the non-government, non-profit community services and welfare sector. This sector is a major provider of the community services that most of us rely on at some point in our lives, but which are particularly important to people on low incomes.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Australian Community Sector Survey 2011: Vol. 3 - New South Wales
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      The ACSS is the only annual national survey collecting data about the non-government, non-profit community services and welfare sector. This sector is a major provider of the community services that most of us rely on at some point in our lives, but which are particularly important to people on low incomes.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Australian Community Sector Survey 2011: Vol. 2 - Australian Capital
           Territory
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      The ACSS is the only annual national survey collecting data about the non-government, non-profit community services and welfare sector. This sector is a major provider of the community services that most of us rely on at some point in our lives, but which are particularly important to people on low incomes.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Submission to Minister for Employment Participation on the future of Job
           Services Australia
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      ACOSS welcomes the opportunity to provide a submission on the design of the second round of Job Services Australia from 2012-15.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • ACOSS strategic plan July 2010 - June 2013
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      The ACOSS Board of Governors has identified four Key Result Areas in which the organisation will focus over the next three years.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Submission to the independent review of the job seeker compliance
           framework
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      This submission gives our assessment of the new activity test compliance and penalty regime for recipients of Newstart Allowance, Youth Allowance and Parenting Payment that was introduced in July 2009 and recommendations to improve it.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Initial analysis of federal budget 2010-11
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      This initial ACOSS briefing on the 2010-11 Federal Budget outlines key measures announced in the Budget in areas of interest to ACOSS members, to assist them in their work. It does not offer extensive comment on the merit of these measures.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Australia’s future tax system: Social security reform - evaluation
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      This brief summary of the Henry Review's key social security reform proposals compares them with those advanced by ACOSS, and the Government's response. Where there is no Government response to a proposal, the last column is left blank.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Australia’s future tax system: Tax reform - evaluation
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      This brief summary of the Henry Review's key tax reform proposals compares them with those advanced by ACOSS, and the Government's response. Where there is no Government response to a proposal, the last column is left blank.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Out of the maze: A better social security system for people of working age
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      This report proposes 'root and branch' reform of the system of social security payments for people of 'working age' (18 to 64 years), including Newstart Allowance, Disability Support Pension and Parenting Payment.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Contest for a fairer nation: ACOSS 2010 election statement, The
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      In an election year where living standards and quality of life are a major concern, we call on the parties to endorse policies that assist people doing it tough.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Budget priority statement 2010-11: Recommendations for the federal budget
           2010-11
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      In this submission, ACOSS outlines policy recommendations for consideration by the Federal Government in its 2010-11 Budget. These recommendations allow the Government to continue its vital funding for social security payments; for social and community services to alleviate the effects of poverty and its consequent social exclusion; and to prioritise the expenditure of public funds in the context of the global recession and its impact upon revenue.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Australian Community Sector Survey 2010: Vol. 1 - National
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      The 'Australian Community Sector Survey 2010 Report'(ACSS) presents the findings of the Australian Community Sector Survey conducted in November and December of 2009. The report provides information on service provision, income, expenditure, and operational, policy, and workforce issues for the community services and welfare sector.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Reform of family payments
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      An assessment of the current system of family payments suggests that, in general, assistance is fairly well targeted to low income households and relatively effective at reducing child poverty when measured in absolute terms (the percentage point reduction in poverty rates before and after taxes and transfers) and as a proportion of poverty lines. However, these general figures hide some specific inadequacies in the system, which fails to adequately meet the costs of older children or sole parenthood.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Progressive tax reform: Reform of the personal income tax system
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      This report argues that the key to progressive tax reform is to strengthen the personal income tax system and puts forward a set of benchmarks and options for reform. These will be used by ACOSS to evaluate the proposals of the Government's Australia's Future Tax System (AFTS) Review after its report is finalised later this year.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Australian Community Sector Survey 2009; Volume 1 - National
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      This report presents the findings of the 2009 Australian Community Sector Survey. Community services organisations provided assistance to over 3.1 million clients in 2007-2008. Demand for community services across Australia increased by 19% in 2007-2008 compared to the previous year - services in highest demand are long term and crisis housing and health services (including mental health and drug and alcohol services).

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Social inclusion and economic security: Recommendations for the federal
           budget; Budget priority statement 2009-10
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      In this submission to the Australian Treasury, ACOSS outlines policy recommendations for consideration by the Federal Government in its 2009-10 Budget to increase social inclusion at a time of economic uncertainty.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Australian Community Sector Survey 2008
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      This report presents the findings of the 2008 Australian Community Sector Survey. The report provides information on service use, income, expenditure and workforce issues for the community services and welfare sector.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Employment Participation Policies: An International Snapshot of Policies
           and Practices in the UK, Netherlands, New Zealand and USA
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      To contribute to the discussion about 'what works' in improving the job prospects and incomes of people on income support, this report examines the experience of policies in four countries - the UK, Netherlands, New Zealand and the US - which, like Australia, have achieved sustained reductions in unemployment. In order to improve Australia's economic performance and reduce social exclusion simultaneously, the goal of the participation agenda needs to be broadened from simply moving more people from 'welfare' to 'work'. Many income support recipients are not ready for work, others have caring responsibilities, while others cycle between income support and a succession of unstable jobs. We therefore examine the role of systems of income and employment support in the four countries in meeting three goals: improving jobless people's access to secure employment, reducing their need to rely on income support, improving their incomes and living standards. A key conclusion of the report is that while there are tensions between these three goals, they can be alleviated with the right mix of policies, resulting in better living standards and opportunities for jobless people, a better functioning labour market, and lower costs for Government over time.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • ACOSS Federal Budget Briefing 2008
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      ACOSS has prepared this briefing on the 2008-09 Federal Budget. This paper explains the funding announcements made in the Budget in relevant areas of interest to ACOSS members. It does not offer extensive comment on the merit of these measures. It is intended to assist member organisations in their work. For ease of analysis, at times the Budget announcements are set out by population group, even where this crosses Government portfolios. Revenue and expenditure measures are also set out under relevant portfolios, which explain why some programs are repeated. These include policy decisions announced on Budget night and those already announced beforehand (including many of the election promises). Includes budget briefs on: Indigenous services, education, employment, workplace relations and social inclusion, families, housing and community services, health and other portfolios.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Australian Community Sector Survey 2007
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      This report presents the results of the Australian Community Sector Survey 2007 (ACSS). The report provides information on income and expenditure, service use and workforce issues for the non-profit community sector.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Fair go for all Australians: International comparisons, 2007 - 10
           essentials, A
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      Australia Fair held extensive consultations in every State and Territory in 2006 to identify what the public thinks are the 10 essentials to ensure a fair go for all Australians.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Role of Further Education and Training in Welfare to Work Policies, The
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      The focus of this paper is the training and education needs of jobless Australians with limited education and skills: more than half those jobless people affected by the Welfare to Work policy have Year 10 qualifications or less, including more than 60 per cent of jobless Parenting Payment recipients and people with disabilities.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Fairer Australia: Recommendations for the Federal Budget 2007-08, A
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      In this submission to the Australian Treasury, ACOSS outlines policy recommendations for consideration by the Australian Government in its 2007-08 Budget. Expenditure proposals costing an estimated $2,757.20 million ($4,795.40million in 2008-09) are offset by revenue recommendations estimated to raise $770 million ($4,150 million in 2008-09).

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Submission to the Fair Pay Commission on Minimum Wages
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      As the peak national organisation of the community sector, and advocate for low income and disadvantaged Australians, ACOSS has a long standing interest in minimum wages. ACOSS is an interested party with expertise in poverty, employment policy and income support policy, rather than an advocate for union or employer positions. We have not advocated any specific wage increase in the past, and do not do so in this submission.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Australia Fair Learning Circle on Oral Health
    • Abstract: Australia Fair (Organization)
      This kit lets your group to participate in Australia Fair's Oral Health Learning Circle. The focus for this learning circle kit is on fair dental health, and the kit will help your group discuss the state of oral health in Australia and to put your concerns on the table to decision-makers in your community.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Towards a Fairer Australia: ACOSS 2007 Election Statement
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      This paper sets out the principles and policy directions that would serve the needs of low income and disadvantaged Australians. Every year, ACOSS prepares a detailed and costed set of policy calls for the Federal Budget. 'Towards a Fairer Australia' is intended to provide a framework for ongoing assessment of all political parties' proposals and policies.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Australia Fair: Taking Steps Towards a Fair Go for All Australians;
           National Annual Conference 2007; Papers from Thursday 22 and Friday 23
           November 2007
    • Abstract: ACOSS Congress (2007 : Adelaide, S. Aust.)
      "This paper comprises selected papers presented at the annual national ACOSS Congress held in Adelaide 22-23 November 2007"--Foreword.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • ACOSS Submission to Australian Treasury: Proposals to Simplify
           Superannuation
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      As the peak council of the community and welfare sector, concerned about low income and disadvantaged Australians and social inequality, ACOSS welcomes the opportunity to comment on the Government's 'streamlining superannuation' proposals. The context for our comments and suggestions regarding the Government's proposals is that: - The current superannuation system needs reform to better encourage and support saving among low and middle income Australians and to simplify it. - Given the projected increase in the cost of services for an ageing population over the next 30 years, it is vital that Governments make the best possible use of the funds available for both direct expenditures and tax concessions, including the $17 billion per year devoted to supporting saving through superannuation whose cost will rise as the population ages. - Increased participation in the workforce by mature age people would greatly assist people to improve their living standards later on when they retire (because it boosts their savings and reduces the period of retirement those savings have to 'cover'), as well as reducing the costs to Government associated with population ageing and strengthening economic growth.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Re-imagining Australian Society: Visions and Solutions; ACOSS 2005
           Congress Papers
    • Abstract: ACOSS Congress (2005 : Brisbane, Qld.)
      This publication comprises selected papers presented at the annual national ACOSS Congress held in Brisbane 10-11 November 2005.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Australian Community Sector Survey 2006
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      This report presents the results of the Australian Community Sector Survey 2006 (ACSS). The report provides information on income and expenditure, service use and workforce issues for the non-profit community sector.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Australia Fair: Advance or Retreat': ACOSS Annual Congress 2006
           Congress Papers
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      This publication comprises selected papers presented at the annual national ACOSS Congress held in Sydney 23-24 November 2006.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Who Cares' Volume 2: Employment Structure and Incomes in the
           Australian Care Workforce
    • Abstract: Meagher, Gabrielle; Healy, KarenAustralian Council of Social Service.
      In the Census of 2001, approximately 1 in 42 employed Australians reported that their main job was in a caring occupation in a community services industry such as child care or non-residential care services. These 'care workers' assist the hundreds of thousands of Australians, to whom community service organisations provide care and support. Evidence from the Census suggests that there was significant change in the distribution of employment between occupations and industry subdivisions in the community services industry between 1996 and 2001. In this, the second Volume of 'Who Cares'' we examine these and other developments. We present evidence of deinstitutionalisation, deprofessionalisation, functional underemployment, and relatively poor pay in community service industries. These factors appear to be driving care workers out of community services and into other human service industries like health and education.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • For Fairness and Services
    • Abstract: Restoring the Integrity of the Taxation System, (2004 : Sydney)
      Includes: Taxation. Taxation reform. Taxation of working families. Negative gearing. Capital gains tax. Superannuation. Regional development.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • ACOSS Federal Budget Priorities Statement 2005-2006
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      Includes: Taxation. Taxation recommendations. Indigenous communities. Employment, education & training. Income support. Housing. Rural & remote communities. Community services. Health. Law & justice. Community Legal Centres. Unemployment. Oral Health. Mental Health. Community-based health care. Services for families & children. Indigenous reconciliation & rights.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Australian Community Sector Survey 2005
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      This report presents the results of the Australian Community Sector Survey 2005 (ACSS). The report provides information on income and expenditure, service use and workforce issues for the non-profit community sector.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • From the Margins to the Centre: ACOSS 2004 Congress Papers: Selected
           Papers from the ACOSS Congress 28-29 October 2004, Alice Springs
    • Abstract: ACOSS Congress (2004 : Alice Springs, NT)
      This publication comprises selected papers presented at the annual national ACOSS Congress held in Alice Springs 28-29 October 2004.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Who Cares' Volume 1: A Profile of Care Workers in Australia's
           Community Services Industries
    • Abstract: Meagher, Gabrielle; Healy, KarenAustralian Council of Social Service.
      In nursing homes, child care centres, migrant welfare services, group homes for people with disabilities, and elsewhere around Australia, workers are employed to help other people meet their daily needs. These employees perform paid 'care work' in Australia's community service industries. This publication presents a profile of these care workers, using data from the Census of Population and Housing 1996 and 2001.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Australians living on the edge 6: Survey of the community services sector
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      The Australians Living on the Edge Community Sector Confidence Survey is a unique survey of community service organisations which assist low income and disadvantaged Australians. By providing a deeper understanding of the size, shape and experiences of this sector over time, the survey is an important tool for the development of social policy and strategies to support the ongoing work of the sector.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • ACOSS 2003 Congress: Piecing it Together: Equity, Empowerment and Change
    • Abstract: ACOSS Congress (2003 : Canberra, ACT)
      Includes: Women & equality. Social research. Age of anxiety. Aboriginal health. Indigenous disadvantage. Urban & rural communities. Canadian Council on Social Development. Land, environment & indigenous people. Community housing. Public education. People living with AIDS/HIV. Human rights.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Blueprint for a Fairer Australia
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      A blueprint for social and economic investment is needed that effectively grapples with the complexities of contemporary Australia, and that delivers a prosperous, supportive and stable future for us all. The federal Budget provides the opportunity to put a down payment on that much needed investment. The nature of contemporary work and the impact of internationalised and deregulated economies bring particular pressures to the policy and program environment. Marginalised communities with low incomes and limited or no work opportunities continue to grow and the gap between the rich and poor is widening.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
  • Federal Budget Briefing Kit 2004-05
    • Abstract: Australian Council of Social Service.
      Reader's guide: The ACOSS 'Budget Briefing Kit 2004-05' is a summary of key measures likely to be of most interest to the community services sector because they impact directly or indirectly on low income and disadvantaged people. It contains minimal commentary. The Kit focuses on new policy measures. Consequently, the financial figures refer only to the costs or savings which result from the implementation of the change (for example, only to the cost of new funding in health care, not to the cost of the whole health program). Expenditure or savings announced in previous Budgets (contained in the forward estimates) are not new measures and therefore not listed. This Briefing Kit has been produced as soon as practicable following the release of the May 11 Budget. It has been produced with all possible care, relying on information at hand at the time.

      PubDate: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:15:49 GMT
       
 
 
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