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UBC Medical Journal
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  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
     ISSN (Print) 1920-7425 - ISSN (Online) 1920-7417
     Published by University of British Columbia Homepage  [2 journals]
  • Troubles with Diagnostic Tests: Observations from a Clinic in Tanzania

    • Authors: Mirko Manojlovic Kolarski
      Abstract: Following a summer shadowing at a clinic in Tanzania, I observed the difficulties in accurately diagnosing schistosomiasis and typhoid fever. Poor diagnostic tests lead to underdiagnosis, misdiagnosis, and overdiagnosis. Diagnosis and patient outcomes could be improved if these tests were combined with clinical history taking.
      PubDate: 2013-09-23
      Issue No: Vol. 5 (2013)
       
  • Childhood Nutrition in Rural Uganda - A Global Health Commentary

    • Authors: Jane Patricia Anholt
      Abstract: In the summer of 2012, UBC’s Global Health Initiative, ACCESS, travelled to Nakaseke district in Uganda.   We had  amazing experiences while there; however, we were surprised by the prevalence of  childhood malnutrition, especially among children in the hospitals.  Several factors appear to play a role in childhood nutrition in Nakaseke, in particular access to education and resources, cultural beliefs surrounding breastfeeding, and HIV infection in breastfeeding mothers.  Based on our experiences, we plan to further investigate the primary determinants of inappropriate childhood nutrition in the area, in hopes of creating a culturally appropriate childhood nutrition workshop to address this need.

      PubDate: 2013-09-23
      Issue No: Vol. 5 (2013)
       
  • The OSCE as a tool for the evaluation of a Pre-Departure Training program:
           A pilot study

    • Authors: Ammara Ghumman, Audrey Tran, Christopher Foster, Neil Arya
      Abstract: Objective: As the number of medical students completing international electives increases, so does the need for appropriate pre-departure training (PDT) programs. Though PDT programs are currently available across Canada, little information is available on program effectiveness.
      Methods and Results: Five conference attendees completed a video-recorded five-station OSCE the day before and after the 2012 PDT conference. Results showed improvement in the areas of travel safety (+ 22%, p < 0.01) and cultural competency (+19%, p < 0.01) stations.

      Conclusions: Our pilot study observed variable OSCE performance following PDT. Following a review of the literature addressing the use of the OSCE methodology, we conclude that this methodology has great future potential in global health training.
      PubDate: 2013-09-23
      Issue No: Vol. 5 (2013)
       
  • A Therapeutic Waiting Room: medical students run an art group for
           vulnerable populations

    • Authors: Justine Spencer, Lee-Anna Huisman, Melanie Van Soeren, Kalen Leech-Porter
      Abstract: Medical students at UBC's Island Medical Program run an art group in the waiting room of  the Victoria Cool Aid Society’s Access Health Clinic in downtown Victoria.  This program aims to create a calming and inclusive environment by providing art materials, companionship and safe space for populations affected by chronic illness, homelessness, mental health and addictions, all within a space with which they are familiar: the waiting room.  It appears that this relaxing space contributes to increased well-being and provides a positive outlet for expression through writing, drawing, painting and knitting.
      PubDate: 2013-09-23
      Issue No: Vol. 5 (2013)
       
  • Treating more than the tumour: advancements in addressing the whole person
           in cancer care

    • Authors: Brent A Parker
      Abstract: A cancer diagnosis substantially impacts patients and their families, often disrupting life and work routines and intensifying psychological distress.  It is becoming increasingly recognized that support, empowerment and communication are critical components of patient-centered care, and are particularly important within the field of oncology. Health care providers and researchers at the BC Cancer Agency (BCCA) seek to address both the physical and psychosocial aspects of the disease with the novel use of technology. This commentary summarizes the emerging clinical innovations of TeleOncology, brachytherapy, and Internet-based follow up; three new initiatives designed to support cancer patients in British Columbia.
      PubDate: 2013-09-23
      Issue No: Vol. 5 (2013)
       
  • Politics and Public Health: HIV Prevention and The Wisdom of Whores

    • Authors: Quinten Kristoffer Clarke
      Abstract: The Wisdom of Whores, a 2008 non-fiction work on the ongoing HIV epidemic, promptly assess the current state of HIV intervention and many of the political, social and economic barriers that are encountered by public health professionals.  This book notes the usage of peer outreach among at-risk groups which has helped to assuage the spread of this pathogen.  Further its candid documentation of the creation of UNAIDS makes Wisdom a mainstay of any public health worker or epidemiologist’s library.
      PubDate: 2013-09-23
      Issue No: Vol. 5 (2013)
       
  • THE ADVERSE HEALTH EFFECTS OF PERSISTENT CANNABIS USE: A REVIEW

    • Authors: Benjamin J Tuyp
      Abstract: Cannabis is the world's most widely used illicit drug. As its popularity continues to grow, societies are reconsidering its legal status. To enter these discussions, physicians must remain informed of marijuana's adverse effects on health. Established risks include respiratory disease, cardiovascular disease, cognitive impairment, psychotic illness, and motor vehicle collisions. These damages are magnified in heavy users and in those initiating consumption at an early age. This paper focuses on the well-demonstrated harms of persistent marijuana use, providing clinicians with a foundation of knowledge for discussing drug policy or educating patients.
      PubDate: 2013-09-23
      Issue No: Vol. 5 (2013)
       
  • Emergency Ultrasound in Canada

    • Authors: Richard Alexander
      Abstract: The introduction of emergency room ultrasound (EUS) into Canadian emergency departments (EDs) has been a slow and complicated process mired with controversy and barriers to use (1-3,8,9). In the past several years, the evidence behind the benefits of EUS has grown substantially and continues to accumulate. Meanwhile, technological advancement continues to both enhance our ability to capture high quality images and reduce of ultrasound equipment. Combining this with incorporation of EUS training into residency program curricula and increasing access to EUS professional development courses, the integration of EUS into every Canadian ED is now a reality that should soon be realized.  This review will look into the use of ultrasound in Canadian EDs, as well as the inclusion of EUS into emergency medicine training, and continuing medical education. This paper will also examine the current barriers and fears that have stalled the ubiquitous adoption of EUS in EDs across the country.
      PubDate: 2013-09-23
      Issue No: Vol. 5 (2013)
       
  • Hepatitis B: A Concise Review

    • Authors: Harley T Syyong, Eric M Yoshida
      Abstract: Since the introduction of the hepatitis B vaccine and other preventive measures, the worldwide prevalence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has fallen. However, chronic infection remains a major global health problem, with more than 350 million people chronically infected and at risk of hepatic decompensation, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. In developed countries like Canada, the burden of disease is greatest among marginalized populations and immigrants from regions where HBV is endemic, making chronic hepatitis B an important but clinically silent public health issue. The approval of the first potent oral antiviral agent in 1998 has revolutionized hepatitis B treatment, and current treatments such as conventional and pegylated interferon alfa and nucleoside and nucleotide analogues are widely used to suppress virus replication, reduces hepatitis activity, and halt disease progression. However, access to the most effective medicines in Canada remains difficult due to lack of coverage from provincial health plans unless evidence of liver cirrhosis is present. As the immigrant population increases in Canada, opportunities for education, screening, prevention and treatment of hepatitis B should be identified to increase awareness and help limit the spread of HBV. This will improve the outcome of HBV infection and reduce the burden on Canada’s health care system.
      PubDate: 2013-09-23
      Issue No: Vol. 5 (2013)
       
  • A UBC, Vancouver Coastal Health and St. Paul’s Hospital Strategy for
           Education in Addiction Medicine

    • Authors: Evan Wood
      Abstract: n/a
      PubDate: 2013-09-23
      Issue No: Vol. 5 (2013)
       
  • State of Mind – Let’s Talk About It

    • Authors: Ali Cole, Alvin Ip
      PubDate: 2013-09-23
      Issue No: Vol. 5 (2013)
       
  • UBC Medicine/Dentistry Spring Gala 2013 Charity: The Kelty Patrick Dennehy
           Foundation

    • Authors: Kiran Dhillon
      Abstract: N/A
      PubDate: 2013-09-23
      Issue No: Vol. 5 (2013)
       
  • The Benefits and Struggles of a Career in Addictions Medicine: An
           Interview with Dr. Gabor Maté

    • Authors: Maurice Agha
      Abstract: N/A
      PubDate: 2013-09-23
      Issue No: Vol. 5 (2013)
       
  • How to make it in medical school: Pearls of Wisdom From Dr. Salloum

    • Authors: Khatereh Aminoltejari
      Abstract: In a recent interview, Dr. Sharon Salloum, the Associate Dean of Student Affairs kindly shared her experiences in medical school and imparted some pearls of wisdom to ease the journey through medical school and beyond.
      PubDate: 2013-09-23
      Issue No: Vol. 5 (2013)
       
  • The Human Face of Addiction, Recovery and Advocacy

    • Authors: Lorinda Strang, Luke Winckler
      Abstract: n/a
      PubDate: 2013-09-23
      Issue No: Vol. 5 (2013)
       
  • ELECTIVE REPORT: A Hospital-Based Multidisciplinary Approach To Chronic
           Pain Management

    • Authors: Harman Singh Parhar
      Abstract: The Alan Edwards Pain Management Unit at the Montreal General Hospital is a bilingual hospital-based multidisciplinary chronic pain treatment facility. Its members are practitioners in the disciplines of anaesthesiology, physiatry, rheumatology, nursing, psychology, physiotherapy, family practice, psychiatry, palliative medicine and others. The patients who present typically have chronic, often unrelenting, pain for years which progresses to a complex condition that drastically changes their physical, social, mental and emotional level of functioning. The team works together to synthesize both medical and relevant psychological issues to develop individual treatment programs using multiple treatment modalities including pharmacological management, physiotherapy, psychological techniques, clinic based procedures and operating room based interventions. The unit is also dedicated to academic endeavors including conducting pain research, hosting instructional rounds and the teaching of fellows, residents and medical students. As a student welcomed there on a 2 week elective, I had the opportunity to participate in the initial pain assessments and assist in multiple treatment modalities, both in the clinic and in the operating room. Given that chronic pain is among the most common presenting complaints seen by physicians, I am confident that this experience will undoubtedly influence the future practices of any student who takes advantage of this unique opportunity.
      PubDate: 2013-09-23
      Issue No: Vol. 5 (2013)
       
  • A Pilot Study of the effect of exposure to Stand-up Comedy Performed by
           People With Mental Illness on Medical Students' Stigmatization of
           Affected Individuals

    • Authors: Amber L Jarvie, Jane A Buxton, Andrew CH Szeto, Jehannine C Austin
      Abstract: Objective: Previous work shows that many medical professionals hold stigmatizing attitudes towards people with mental illnesses. Medical professionals’ stigmatizing attitudes have been associated with decreased use of needed healthcare services among individuals with mental illness; and this can exacerbate the effects and symptoms of the illness on the individual. Medical professionals’ attitudes are perhaps best modified early in their training. Thus, we aimed to determine whether a novel intervention could decrease medical students’ stigmatizing attitudes towards people with mental illness. Methods: Students attended a presentation about a program which trains individuals with mental illness to perform stand-up comedy, then interacted with the comedians in small groups. Immediately before (T1) and after (T2) the intervention, participants self-rated their comfort with asking patients about mental illness, and completed scales measuring two aspects of stigma: stereotype endorsement, and broad negative attitudes towards people with mental illness. Results: T1 and T2 questionnaires were returned by 49 students. At T2, 52% reported feeling more comfortable asking patients about a history of mental illness. There was no change in broad attitudes towards mental illness, but endorsement of negative stereotypes about mental illness decreased significantly from T1 to T2. Conclusions: These pilot data warrant further investigation of the effects of this novel intervention.
      PubDate: 2013-09-23
      Issue No: Vol. 5 (2013)
       
  • Injury Patterns and Discharge Dispositions in BC Motorcycle Accident
           Victims: A Retrospective Chart Analysis

    • Authors: Shawna Lee Mann
      Abstract: OBJECTIVE: Motorcycle ridership is rising in Canada.  Though motorcycling injuries have been studied in the United States, Europe and Asia, there is a paucity of Canadian studies.  We provide a descriptive analysis of injury patterns in motorcycle crash victims and their relationship to discharge disposition and length of hospital stay. METHODS: We performed a retrospective chart review of all patients involved in a motorcycle crash and admitted to Vancouver General Hospital between April 2001 and December 2009 (N = 567). We extracted data from the ICD-10 coded Discharge Abstract Database, and re-coded injuries into overarching anatomical categories. Discharge dispositions were recorded as they appeared in patient charts. RESULTS: Riders tended to be male (89.2%) and had a mean age of 37.2. The average length of stay was 14.4 days.  The most common injuries were tibial fractures (N = 108, 19% of cases), forearm fractures (N = 105, 18.5%), and rib fractures (N=92%, 16.2%). Most riders were discharged home (N=403, 70.0%), and these patients most commonly sustained tibial and forearm fractures (N=70, 17.4%, for each). Those who remained in hospital were most likely to have sustained injuries to the pelvis (N=43, 29.3%), cervical spine (N=38, 25.9%), or thoracic spine (N=37, 25.2%).  Among the 14 patients (2.5%) who expired, the most common injuries were intracranial haemorrhage, rib fracture, haemothorax, liver injury, and cervical spine fracture (N=5, 35.7% each). CONCLUSION: The results provide a starting point to help physicians predict injuries in motorcycle crash victims as well as predict their dispositions.
      PubDate: 2013-09-23
      Issue No: Vol. 5 (2013)
       
  • Medical Students in Youth Corrections: A Community Service Learning
           Opportunity

    • Authors: Ryan Joseph LeBlanc, Jesse Armstrong Wolfe, Bhupinder Singh Johal, Jayden Dane McIntyre
      Abstract: Four medical students conducted a community service program at a local youth custody center. The program included cooking, exercise, and health-oriented educational discussions. The experience enforced the CanMEDS competencies and allowed the students to develop a greater appreciation of specific health care needs of marginalized populations. This may better prepare students to care for marginalized patients in the future as physicians. Community service learning opportunities are a valuable adjunct to conventional medical education.
      PubDate: 2013-07-17
      Issue No: Vol. 5 (2013)
       
 
 
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