Journal Cover
Active Learning in Higher Education
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.397
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 344  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 1 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 1469-7874 - ISSN (Online) 1741-2625
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1087 journals]
  • The usefulness of feedback
    • Authors: Michael Henderson, Tracii Ryan, David Boud, Phillip Dawson, Michael Phillips, Elizabeth Molloy, Paige Mahoney
      Abstract: Active Learning in Higher Education, Ahead of Print.
      Feedback can occur before and after assessment submission, but needs to be useful in order for students to improve their subsequent performance. Arguably, undergraduate students, and particularly international, online and new students, are especially in need of feedback to effectively engage in academic and disciplinary expectations. Therefore, this article draws on survey data from students, disaggregated by mode of study, citizenship of enrolment and year of study, to explore their experiences of feedback usefulness both before and after assessment submission. Overall, undergraduate students were positive; however, this perception decreased according to their year level. Comparisons between online and international students also revealed key differences. A conclusion is that undergraduate students cannot be treated homogeneously, and educators need to attend to the feedback experiences of different student groups as they progress through their programme.
      Citation: Active Learning in Higher Education
      PubDate: 2019-09-17T05:36:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1469787419872393
       
  • A degree of studying' Approaches to learning and academic performance
           among student ‘consumers’
    • Authors: Louise Bunce, Melanie Bennett
      Abstract: Active Learning in Higher Education, Ahead of Print.
      The marketization of higher education and focus on graduate employability and earnings data has raised questions about how students perceive their roles and responsibilities while studying for their degree. Of particular concern is the extent to which students identify themselves as consumers of their higher education, for example, whether they view their degree as a purchasable commodity to improve future earnings. This is because research has found that a stronger consumer identity is related to lower academic performance. This study examined whether this relation could be explained by the impact of a consumer identity on the extent to which students adopt deep, surface or strategic approaches to learning. The hypotheses were that the relation between consumer identity and academic performance would be mediated by approaches to learning, whereby a consumer identity would be related to adopting a more surface approach, a less deep approach and less strategic approach. Undergraduates completed an online questionnaire that assessed the extent to which they identified as a consumer, their approaches to learning and academic performance. The analysis partly supported the hypotheses: a stronger consumer identity was related to a more surface approach to learning. However, a surface approach to learning did not mediate the relation between consumer identity and academic performance. Conversely, a deep approach to learning mediated the relation between consumer identity and academic performance, whereby a stronger consumer identity was related to lower academic performance through its negative impact on a deep approach to learning. There was no relation between consumer identity and strategic approach to learning. Implications of students identifying themselves as consumers of their higher education are discussed.
      Citation: Active Learning in Higher Education
      PubDate: 2019-08-17T06:31:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1469787419860204
       
  • Educating the deliberate professional and enhancing professional agency
           through peer reflection of work-integrated learning
    • Authors: Franziska Trede, Denise Jackson
      Abstract: Active Learning in Higher Education, Ahead of Print.
      Educating reflexive, socially responsible and action-oriented future professionals who can contribute to a better future remains a core task of higher education. These graduate characteristics describe the deliberate professional. Within this article, we examine the value of a post-work-integrated learning peer reflection activity to foster professional agency and develop the deliberate professional in our students. Students participated in a post-work-integrated learning peer reflection activity, termed a huddle to signpost its informal yet respectful nature, and then completed a written reflection on the nature and value of this reflective experience. Findings demonstrate participants’ engagement with as well as limitations towards becoming deliberate professionals. Implications for future use and further research of this peer reflection activity are offered. This study contributes new evidence that suggests that purposefully structured, dialogic and written post-work-integrated learning peer reflections are an effective approach towards developing professional agency and educating the deliberate professional.
      Citation: Active Learning in Higher Education
      PubDate: 2019-08-13T07:15:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1469787419869125
       
  • Using automated time management enablers to improve self-regulated
           learning
    • Authors: Henry Khiat
      Abstract: Active Learning in Higher Education, Ahead of Print.
      Effective time management is essential for us all, whether students or anyone else. There are many factors which affect how well students manage their time and in what ways. As with everything, some are excellent at managing their time and others are not. As faculty, we can assist our learners to better manage their time, whether this is in the online learning environment or any other. However, studies reveal that the effect of time management training on time management practices varies, and there is therefore a need to explore this further. This study investigates how the practice of time management, an important self-regulated learning enabler, affects learning in the online learning environment. An automated adaptive time management enabling system was used to guide students in managing their time more effectively. The system assisted students in their time management through visual reinforcement, adaptive release, learning monitors and learning motivators. The findings showed that the use of the time management enabling system facilitated and guided the students in studying the course in a consistent manner and aided students in practising more effective time management thus impacting performance. In summary, positive changes were made to their time management behaviours and these subsequently improved their self-regulation.
      Citation: Active Learning in Higher Education
      PubDate: 2019-07-31T09:40:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1469787419866304
       
  • Students’ use of information and communication technologies in the
           classroom: Uses, restriction, and integration
    • Authors: Zahra Vahedi, Lesley Zannella, Stephen C Want
      Abstract: Active Learning in Higher Education, Ahead of Print.
      Research has frequently found that students use their information and communication technologies—such as smartphones and laptops—for non-academic uses in the classroom. These uses include sending messages as well as checking email and social media accounts. This study aimed to examine students’ in-class information and communication technology use, their motivations for it, and perceptions of it, as well as their attitudes toward restriction and integration of information and communication technologies in the classroom. It was found that students most frequently engage in non-academic information and communication technology use when they feel that they would not miss any new class content, or when they feel disengaged. Students perceived that their non-academic information and communication technology use had costs, especially distraction. However, students also reported negative attitudes toward policies that would restrict their information and communication technology use in the classroom but had positive perceptions of attempts to integrate information and communication technology use. We propose that information and communication technology integration can be an effective method of increasing student engagement—and therefore decreasing non-academic information and communication technology use.
      Citation: Active Learning in Higher Education
      PubDate: 2019-07-11T05:13:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1469787419861926
       
  • Flipped pedagogy and student evaluations of teaching
    • Authors: Michelle L Samuel
      Abstract: Active Learning in Higher Education, Ahead of Print.
      A common concern of faculty members is student evaluations of teaching scores. Many factors influence student evaluations of teaching including how the course is designed. This study investigated student evaluations of teaching across three pedagogical techniques: the traditional lecture (where lectures were not recorded), recorded lectures, and a flipped classroom model. A between-subject design was used over three semesters. Student evaluations of teaching showed that students rated the instructor significantly higher in a flipped classroom setting. Students also reported liking the course more using the flipped pedagogical technique. Since the flipped format improved both teaching evaluations and student perceptions of the class, this could be useful for instructors when they are deciding how to set up the format of their class.
      Citation: Active Learning in Higher Education
      PubDate: 2019-06-25T05:30:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1469787419855188
       
  • In-text and rubric-referenced feedback: Differences in focus, level, and
           function

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Kim Dirkx, Desirée Joosten-ten Brinke, Jorik Arts, Migchiel van Diggelen
      Abstract: Active Learning in Higher Education, Ahead of Print.
      Rubrics are often used as tools for criteria-based assessments. Although students indicate that they appreciate comments given as feedback which make reference to the rubric and provided in addition to it, there is little information on how this type of feedback actually differs from in-text comments with respect to focus, level, and function of the feedback. The focus refers to three major questions in evaluating students’ understanding of information: Where am I going' How am I going' and Where to next' That is, feedup, feedback, feedforward. The level refers to the level at which feedback is directed. That is, the level of task performance, the level of the process of understanding how to do a task, the regulatory or metacognitive process level, and/or the self or personal level. Finally, the function refers to the type of content of the feedback. For example, feedback can be a question, suggestion, or correction. More information on this issue could better inform the decisions on how to provide written feedback to students on written coursework/assignments. The study described in this article gathered data from almost 1000 feedback instances. The results revealed that about two-thirds of the feedback instances were provided in-text and about one-third were comments which made reference to the rubric and were provided in addition to it. The results show that comments in both modalities are overrepresented by feedback at the task level, but that comments which made reference to the rubric and provided in addition to it contain somewhat more feedforward and process-related comments. The largest differences were found in the function of feedback. Whereas in-text comments ask for clarifications, provide corrections, and ask questions, written comments which made reference to the rubric and are provided in addition to it include mainly affirmations, argumentations, and suggestions. Implications for practitioners are discussed.
      Citation: Active Learning in Higher Education
      PubDate: 2019-06-19T06:31:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1469787419855208
       
  • Editorial
    • Authors: Lynne Baldwin
      First page: 183
      Abstract: Active Learning in Higher Education, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Active Learning in Higher Education
      PubDate: 2019-07-26T09:16:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1469787419866025
       
 
 
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