Journal Cover
Control Systems
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.983
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 240  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1066-033X
Published by IEEE Homepage  [191 journals]
  • dSpace
    • Abstract: Advertisement.
      PubDate: Oct. 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Training Data [On the Lighter Side]
    • Abstract: Various puzzles, quizzes, games, humorous definitions, or mathematical that should engage the interest of readers.
      PubDate: Oct. 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Mathworks
    • Abstract: Advertisement.
      PubDate: Oct. 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • New STEM and Engineering Education Paradigms [From the Editor]
    • Authors: Jonathan P. How;
      Pages: 3 - 4
      Abstract: Presents the introductory editorial for this issue of the publication.
      PubDate: Oct. 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Adaptive Pressure Control for Variable-Thrust Rockets [About This Issue]
    • Authors: Jonathan P. How;
      Pages: 5 - 7
      Abstract: Presents the introductory editorial for this issue of the publication.
      PubDate: Oct. 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Getting It Write: Tips for Effective Communication [President's Message]
    • Authors: Francesco Bullo;
      Pages: 8 - 9
      Abstract: Presents the President�s message for this issue of the publication.
      PubDate: Oct. 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • [25 Years Ago]
    • Pages: 10 - 11
      Abstract: It is widely believed that balancing an inverted pendulum is a difficult nonlinear control task. Many researchers have used a variant of the inverted pendulum problem, the cartpole, for demonstrating the success of their neural network learning methods. It has been known for a long time that a linear control law, implemented by a single artificial neurone, can control the cartpole. Not noted before was that a random search in weight space can quickly uncover coefficients (weights) for controllers that work over a wide range of initial conditions. This result indicates that success in finding a satisfactory neural controller is not sufficient proof for the effectiveness of unsupervised training methods. By analyzing the dynamics of the linear controller, the cartpole problem is reformulated to make it a more stringent test for neural training methods. A review of the literature on unsupervised training methods for cartpole controllers shows that the published results are difficult to compare and that for most of the methods there is no clear evidence of better performance than the random search method.
      PubDate: Oct. 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • IEEE Control Systems Editorial Board
    • Pages: 10 - 10
      Abstract: Presents a listing of the editorial board, board of governors, current staff, committee members, and/or society editors for this issue of the publication.
      PubDate: Oct. 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Aryabhatta's Identity
    • Pages: 11 - 11
      Abstract: Advertisement.
      PubDate: Oct. 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Technical Committee on Distributed Parameter Systems [Technical
           Activities]
    • Authors: Yann Le Gorrec;
      Pages: 12 - 13
      Abstract: Presents information on the Technical Committee on Distributed power systems.
      PubDate: Oct. 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Technical Committee on Power Generation [Technical Activities]
    • Authors: Joseph Bentsman;
      Pages: 14 - 113
      Abstract: Presents information on the Technical Committee on power generation.
      PubDate: Oct. 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Biao Huang [People in Control]
    • Pages: 16 - 18
      Abstract: Presents an interview with Biao Huang.
      PubDate: Oct. 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Wen-Hua Chen [People in Control]
    • Pages: 18 - 21
      Abstract: Wen-Hua: I came to the control field purely by accident. I was born and grew up in a small village in eastern China. During my childhood, we lived in extreme poverty; we not only lacked food and other basic essentials but also books. My dream job was to become a librarian so that I could not only earn a living but, more importantly, gain free access to books. This was part of the reason I almost failed my first-year university exams, as I spent too much time in the university library reading irrelevant topics.
      PubDate: Oct. 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Haibo He [People in Control]
    • Pages: 21 - 23
      Abstract: Haibo: Since I was a little boy, I have always been very passionate about math and engineering. My mom was a middle school mathematics teacher, so I had the opportunity to sit in the back of her classroom to get a taste of the beauty of math when I was very young. During my undergraduate studies at Huazhong University of Science and Technology, I majored in power-system automation and took many control and optimization courses. As you know, the power system is one of the most complicated man-made complex engineering networks on the planet and requires serious methods and techniques to maintain the reliable and optimized operation of such a giant system. I still remember the professors showing us how to formulate a practical engineering problem in a mathematical way and then find the solutions by maneuvering among the equations.
      PubDate: Oct. 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Tong Zhou [People in Control]
    • Pages: 23 - 116
      Abstract: Tong: I attended university in 1980, roughly three years after the end of the Cultural Revolution in China. Although only approximately 4% of high school graduates could pursue higher education in China at that time and my major was automatic control, I was completely unaware of what control was. My first experience with control was a project related to my bachelor's thesis, in which I was asked to develop a program for a single-chip microcomputer for the temperature control of a furnace in a capacitor production line. Although the project was unsuccessful, I realized for the first time that control was helpful in productquality improvement.
      PubDate: Oct. 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • High-Performance Adaptive Pressure Control in the Presence of Time Delays:
           Pressure Control for Use in Variable-Thrust Rocket Development
    • Authors: Anil Alan;Yildiray Yildiz;Umit Poyraz;
      Pages: 26 - 52
      Abstract: Smart defense systems using missiles that can fine-tune their velocity profiles have significant technological superiority over their conventional counterparts. This tuning is possible, in part, due to the deployment of advanced sensing, actuation, and computation capabilities and sophisticated guidance, navigation, and control algorithms. The capability to alter velocity during operation helps sustain optimum performance for different flight conditions. In addition, it makes it possible to slow down while turning and then speed up along a straight path, rendering the maneuvers more efficient. This ability to modify velocity (known as throttleability) is also known to increase a missile's no-escape zone, which is the maximum range that the missile can outrun its target [1]. As presented in "Summary," this article discusses the advanced control technologies needed to obtain throttleability.
      PubDate: Oct. 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Gaussian Processes for Learning and Control: A Tutorial with Examples
    • Authors: Miao Liu;Girish Chowdhary;Bruno Castra da Silva;Shih-Yuan Liu;Jonathan P. How;
      Pages: 53 - 86
      Abstract: Many challenging real-world control problems require adaptation and learning in the presence of uncertainty. Examples of these challenging domains include aircraft adaptive control under uncertain disturbances [1], [2], multiple-vehicle tracking with space-dependent uncertain dynamics [3], [4], robotic-arm control [5], blimp control [6], [7], mobile robot tracking and localization [8], [9], cart-pole systems and unicycle control [10], gait optimization in legged robots [11] and snake robots [12], and any other system whose dynamics are uncertain and for which limited data are available for model learning. Classical model reference adaptive control (MRAC) [13]-[15] and reinforcement learning (RL) methods [16]-[23] have been developed to address these challenges and rely on parametric adaptive elements or control policies whose number of parameters or features are fixed and determined a priori. One example of such an adaptive model are radial basis function networks (RBFNs), with RBF centers pre-allocated based on expected operating domains [24], [25].
      PubDate: Oct. 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Undershoot and Overshoot: Testing the Limits of Rules of Thumb [Focus on
           Education]
    • Authors: Shlomo Engelberg;
      Pages: 87 - 91
      Abstract: One way of characterizing a system is to consider its response to a unit step function (a function whose value is zero until l t = 0 and is one thereafter). When considering the system's step response, a typical goal is to determine whether it is ever negative (even though the steady-state response is positive), in which case the system suffers from undershoot. An additional goal is to determine whether or not the system's step response ever exceeds its steady-state output, in which case the system suffers from overshoot. For more on the significance of under- and overshoot, see "Why Undershoot and Overshoot Are Significant." This article presents precise conditions under which systems will suffer from undershoot and overshoot. Some easier-to-use rules of thumb are also provided. Although these are useful, it will be shown that the given conditions are not actually necessary and, in the case of overshoot, are not sufficient either.
      PubDate: Oct. 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • IEEE Feedback filler
    • Pages: 91 - 91
      Abstract: Advertisement, IEEE.
      PubDate: Oct. 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Bruce Francis: A Personal Tribute [Historical Perspectives]
    • Authors: Mathukumalli Vidyasagar;
      Pages: 92 - 93
      Abstract: Bruce Allen Francis was born on October 8, 1947 in Toronto to Jim and Eileen and grew up in Hamilton and Grimsby, Ontario, Canada along with his two younger sisters, Lee and Kim. He passed away on March 27, 2018, due to complications brought on by Parkinson's disease. He is survived by his wife Jingwen, his daughter Lian, and his sisters.
      PubDate: Oct. 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Some Personal Reminisces About Bruce Allen Francis [Historical
           Perspectives]
    • Authors: Tryphon T. Georgiou;Allen R. Tannenbaum;
      Pages: 93 - 95
      Abstract: The purpose of this article is to pay tribute to a remarkable colleague who left an indelible mark on the birth and development of the modern theory of robust control and a lasting impact on our own lives and academic careers. We first met Bruce in the early 1980s and have shared wonderful, as well as testing, times together. Thus, we decided to share this space and join in providing personal memories and expressing our deep loss of our dearest friend, Prof. Bruce Allen Francis, of blessed memory.
      PubDate: Oct. 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Bruce Francis-His Influence and My Recollections [Historical Perspectives]
    • Authors: Yutaka Yamamoto;
      Pages: 96 - 98
      Abstract: Bruce Francis passed away in the morning of March 27, 2018. I was notified of this sad fact by an e-mail from Steve Morse. Bruce had battled Parkinson's disease for quite some time, and I heard that his health had deteriorated significantly since March 2017. It was thus not entirely unexpected. Still, sadness fully occupied my heart, and it induced me to recall my memories of him.
      PubDate: Oct. 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Remembering Bruce Francis [Historical Perspectives]
    • Authors: A. Stephen Morse;
      Pages: 98 - 99
      Abstract: Although I can't remember exactly when I first met Bruce Francis, I recall having first learned about his research on the internal model principle while he was a graduate student with Murray Wonham at the University of Toronto. It was clear to me early on that this was one very smart and creative individual. After spending a few years at the University of California at Berkeley, Cambridge University, and McGill University, Bruce decided to accept our invitation in 1979 to join the Yale Engineering faculty as an assistant professor. Unfortunately, I did not have too much technical interaction with Bruce during his two years at Yale because I was having some personal problems. During his time at Yale, Bruce began to move away from the types of research problems he had done at Berkeley and Cambridge. George Zames had a big influence on him, so toward the end of his stay at Yale, Bruce started to work on what was to become H3 optimal control. Just a few years after he left Yale, his first monograph, A First Course in H3 Control Theory, was published.
      PubDate: Oct. 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Bruce Francis and H-infinity Control [Historical Perspectives]
    • Authors: Keith Glover;
      Pages: 100 - 101
      Abstract: I first came across Bruce Francis's work while reading his internal model principle paper [1] as an assistant professor at the University of Southern California. This demonstrated a very mature level of problem formulation together with very clear and precise results. When I moved to Cambridge in 1976, I was delighted to hear that Bruce would be a visiting postdoc for that academic year. At some point, Bruce suggested we look at the problem of bounded peaking, and we discussed it a bit. However, he did all of the heavy lifting but nevertheless generously included me as a coauthor [2]. This heavy lifting even became physical when he and Ian Postlethwaite helped my family move into the house where we have remained ever since.
      PubDate: Oct. 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • A Tribute to Bruce Francis: What I Learned from Him [Historical
           Perspectives]
    • Authors: Hideaki Ishii;
      Pages: 101 - 102
      Abstract: Prof. Bruce Francis was my Ph.D. supervisor at the University of Toronto from 1998 to 2001. It was very sad to learn that he passed away on March 27, 2018. He had a tremendous influence on my life and my academic career over the years.
      PubDate: Oct. 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Remembering Bruce Francis: A Great Scholar and a True Gentleman
           [Historical Perspectives]
    • Authors: Pramod P. Khargonekar;
      Pages: 103 - 104
      Abstract: "The superior man is modest in his speech, but exceeds in his actions"-Confucius. Bruce Francis, indeed, was a superior man.
      PubDate: Oct. 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Remembering My Colleague and Friend Bruce Francis [Historical
           Perspectives]
    • Authors: Raymond Kwong;
      Pages: 104 - 105
      Abstract: Bruce Francis' academic career began at the University of Toronto. It ended at the University of Toronto.
      PubDate: Oct. 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • A Tribute to Bruce Francis [Historical Perspectives]
    • Authors: Tongwen Chen;
      Pages: 106 - 106
      Abstract: I thank Mathukumalli Vidyasagar for inviting me to write this tribute to Bruce Francis. The following was adapted from when I spoke at the event in celebration of Bruce's life on April 28, 2018 at Gallery Grill, Hart House, University of Toronto.
      PubDate: Oct. 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • My Friendship with Bruce Francis: Some Recollections [Historical
           Perspectives]
    • Authors: Ian Postlethwaite;
      Pages: 107 - 108
      Abstract: I first met Bruce in the summer of 1976, when he came to Cambridge University as a postdoctoral researcher. He had a prestigious two-year NSERC Fellowship from Canada, the first year of which he spent at the University of California at Berkeley hosted by Charles Desoer. The second year was spent at Cambridge hosted by Alistair MacFarlane. I was one year into a Ph.D. program, and Alistair was my supervisor.
      PubDate: Oct. 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Practical Methods for Aircraft and Rotorcraft Flight Control Systems: An
           Optimization-Based Approach [Bookshelf]
    • Authors: Kamran Turkoglu;
      Pages: 109 - 110
      Abstract: This book provides information covering the fundamentals of control theory and optimization applied to real-world flight control systems. Covers the following topics: the challenges inherent in flight control system design; an overview of their core approach to flight control system design utilizing multiobjective parametric optimization; the specific software developed called Control Designer’s Unified Interface (CONDUIT); detailed explanations of the tools, plots, language, and four key components involved in defining the problem using CONDUIT; the XV-15 hover/forward flight case study is discussed in sufficient detail for even seasoned veterans to find the presentation informative and useful. Here the authors have done an excellent job of demonstrating many flight control concepts; proprietary specifications; methodologies for developing simulation models of model-based flight control system designs; design of flight control systems; the inner workings of the design optimization approach. The coverage includes specifics of various algorithms, along with their relative advantages and disadvantages. This chapter also provides insights into sequential loop closure strategies, with emphasis on their effectiveness and practical use; nested versus simultaneous multiloop strategies; and design considerations for real-world applications. This book serves as an excellent reference for senior undergraduate and/or graduate students, and it provides a wellbalanced perspective covering the theory, implementation, and practical applications of flight control design.
      PubDate: Oct. 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Book Announcements [Bookshelf]
    • Pages: 111 - 113
      Abstract: Presents a listing and summary of new books released on the topic of control systems.
      PubDate: Oct. 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • [Conference Calendar]
    • Pages: 114 - 114
      Abstract: Presents the CS society calendar of upcoming events and meetings.
      PubDate: Oct. 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • IEEE Control Systems Society
    • Pages: 115 - 115
      Abstract: Presents a listing of the editorial board, board of governors, current staff, committee members, and/or society editors for this issue of the publication.
      PubDate: Oct. 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 5 (2018)
       
  • Advertising Index/Sales Mast
    • Pages: 116 - 116
      Abstract: Presents a listing of advertisers who were included in this issue of the publication.
      PubDate: Oct. 2018
      Issue No: Vol. 38, No. 5 (2018)
       
 
 
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