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Library Trends
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.3
Number of Followers: 428  
 
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ISSN (Print) 0024-2594 - ISSN (Online) 1559-0682
Published by Project MUSE Homepage  [296 journals]
  • Introduction
    • Abstract: When I began teaching graduate-level library and information sciences (LIS) courses in the areas of diversity and social justice, among the resources I relied upon was Dr. Kathleen de la Peña McCook’s issue of Library Trends published in 2000.1 This issue, devoted to ethnic diversity in LIS, honored and gave voice to an important part of the LIS landscape: minority communities and minority library professionals. Of particular significance is Sandra Rios Balderrama’s piece in this issue, “This Trend Called Diversity.” As the title implies, Balderrama says that diversity is trendy, and more importantly, it means different things to different people. She states:“Diversity” is fiery and tame depending on one’s ... Read More
      Keywords: Cultural pluralism; Minorities in library science; Library science; Libraries and society; African Americans; Library education; Library administrators; Sociolinguistics; Classification; Subject headings; Libraries and students; Public libraries; Afr
      PubDate: 2018-10-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Navigating Library Collections, Black Culture, and Current Events
    • Abstract: Librarians have to decide where they want their institutions to be, which raises questions about how politically, socially, and culturally aware librarians are and how they understand themselves within in these contexts.In the past five years, our society has entered into a heightened state of political activism where citizens are demanding that the ideas of social justice and democracy truly permeate our nation’s institutions, policies, and practices. Leading this charge is the Black Lives Matter Movement, which formalized around combating anti-Black policing and policies, specifically the killings of unarmed Black men, women, and children (Lowery 2017). The movement for Black Lives has been vital to helping move ... Read More
      Keywords: Cultural pluralism; Minorities in library science; Library science; Libraries and society; African Americans; Library education; Library administrators; Sociolinguistics; Classification; Subject headings; Libraries and students; Public libraries; Afr
      PubDate: 2018-10-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Race and Leadership in Library and Information Science Education: A Study
           of African American Administrators
    • Abstract: The recent US presidential campaigns and the subsequent election have laid bare many highly charged political and social issues that historically have remained unresolved but over the years have slipped into a sphere of topics avoided in polite and civil conversation. Observance of the media and its impact has also shown how one aspect of a topic can overshadow the bigger picture. For example, the highly debated issue of illegal immigration has eclipsed the broader discussion about the value and necessity of ethnic and cultural diversity in our nation. Social and political rhetoric around the topic of race and issues of difference is now so extreme that the basic respect for diversity often taken for granted in ... Read More
      Keywords: Cultural pluralism; Minorities in library science; Library science; Libraries and society; African Americans; Library education; Library administrators; Sociolinguistics; Classification; Subject headings; Libraries and students; Public libraries; Afr
      PubDate: 2018-10-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Language, Power, and Oppression in the LIS Diversity Void
    • Abstract: The context in which diversity is addressed in organizations is one in which there is likely avoidance of direct communication and attempts to depersonalize the concept, among the other considerations that are likely to limit the fulfillment of diversity-related goals.Power and language—their intersections and deployments—are central to diversity issues and initiatives in libraries and library and information science (LIS) as a field. Indeed, the very phrase “diversity issues” is a linguistic receptacle that requires but rarely receives clear definition and unpacking, even as we supposedly use it to instigate change. Power, who has it, and the ways others are kept from it are at the heart of social and cultural ... Read More
      Keywords: Cultural pluralism; Minorities in library science; Library science; Libraries and society; African Americans; Library education; Library administrators; Sociolinguistics; Classification; Subject headings; Libraries and students; Public libraries; Afr
      PubDate: 2018-10-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Race and Ethnicity in Classification Systems: Teaching Knowledge
           Organization from a Social Justice Perspective
    • Abstract: Literature from the subfield of knowledge organization (KO) in library and information studies (LIS) tends to remain outside of some of the wider conversations about race and ethnicity in libraries, and discussions regarding teaching diversity and social justice generally focus on public service and workplace issues within LIS. Todd Honma, however, convincingly argued in 2005 that ontologies predicated on whiteness across LIS frame the field’s discourses about race and ethnicity. We contend that critical and historical study and teaching of the classifications that organize information about racialized subjects in library catalogs, databases, and commercial search engines offer insights into the “racialized ... Read More
      Keywords: Cultural pluralism; Minorities in library science; Library science; Libraries and society; African Americans; Library education; Library administrators; Sociolinguistics; Classification; Subject headings; Libraries and students; Public libraries; Afr
      PubDate: 2018-10-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Browsing through Bias: The Library of Congress Classification and Subject
           Headings for African American Studies and LGBTQIA Studies
    • Abstract: The neat division of knowledge into tidy silos of scholarly disciplines, each with its own section of a knowledge organization system (KOS), has long characterized the efforts of libraries to arrange their collections of books. The KOS most commonly used in American academic libraries is the Library of Congress Classification (LCC). LCC, developed between 1899 and 1903 by James C. M. Hanson and Charles Martel, is based on the work of Charles Ammi Cutter. Cutter devised his “Expansive Classification” to embody the universe of human knowledge within twenty-seven classes, while Hanson and Martel eventually settled on twenty (Chan 1999, 6–12). Those classes tend to mirror the names of academic departments then ... Read More
      Keywords: Cultural pluralism; Minorities in library science; Library science; Libraries and society; African Americans; Library education; Library administrators; Sociolinguistics; Classification; Subject headings; Libraries and students; Public libraries; Afr
      PubDate: 2018-10-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • Are We Still Transmitting Whiteness' A Case Study of a Southern, Rural
           Library‚Äôs Youth Collections
    • Abstract: Shane Hand (2012) argues that librarians in the early 1900s “fostered the transmission of a racial ideology based on white superiority, privilege, and black subservience” (34). Hand’s historical case study of the New Orleans Public Library at the turn of the century is a provocative read that details the dovetail of the advent of children’s librarianship with the emerging Lost Cause White supremacist ideology prevalent in the American South in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Hand describes the instantiation of this ideology in terms of active collection development that incorporated overtly racist literature into the library collection and active partnerships with community groups, such as the ... Read More
      Keywords: Cultural pluralism; Minorities in library science; Library science; Libraries and society; African Americans; Library education; Library administrators; Sociolinguistics; Classification; Subject headings; Libraries and students; Public libraries; Afr
      PubDate: 2018-10-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • The Reach of a Long-Arm Stapler: Calling in Microaggressions in the LIS
           Field through Zine Work
    • Abstract: The term “microaggression” has become increasingly visible in scholarship, mainstream news sources, and conversations happening in higher education (Pérez Huber and Solórzano 2015b). The most widely recognized definition of the term states that microaggressions are brief and commonplace daily verbal, behavioral, or environmental indignities, whether intentional or unintentional, that communicate hostile, derogatory, or negative slights and insults toward individuals from marginalized communities (Sue et al. 2007). Microaggressions can be difficult to identify because they are more nuanced, subtle forms of prejudice (Orozco 2016). They may be evident in the language we use with our peers, the assumptions or ... Read More
      Keywords: Cultural pluralism; Minorities in library science; Library science; Libraries and society; African Americans; Library education; Library administrators; Sociolinguistics; Classification; Subject headings; Libraries and students; Public libraries; Afr
      PubDate: 2018-10-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • From Hostile to Inclusive: Strategies for Improving the Racial Climate of
           Academic Libraries
    • Abstract: Over the past several decades, librarians have been discussing the need to increase the racial/ethnic diversity of the profession. During this time, a number of programs designed to recruit librarians of color were established, with only a few programs focused on retention. Some of these include the ALA Spectrum Scholarship Program, the ARL Initiative to Recruit a Diverse Workforce, the Knowledge River Institute, and the Minnesota Institute for Early Career Librarians. Individual libraries have also established diversity residency programs designed to provide new librarians of color with work experiences in academic library environments. Despite the development of these programs, however, library and information ... Read More
      Keywords: Cultural pluralism; Minorities in library science; Library science; Libraries and society; African Americans; Library education; Library administrators; Sociolinguistics; Classification; Subject headings; Libraries and students; Public libraries; Afr
      PubDate: 2018-10-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • A Holistic Approach for Inclusive Librarianship: Decentering Whiteness in
           Our Profession
    • Abstract: In 2000, at the second REFORMA conference—the National Association to Promote Library and Information Services to Latinos and the Spanish speaking—librarian Isabel Espinal gave a presentation on the importance of recognizing whiteness as a useful tool in promoting diversity in librarianship. The ensuing article, “A New Vocabulary for Inclusive Librarianship: Applying Whiteness Theory to Our Profession,” made the argument that “unless we address whiteness, unless we identify and name it, many of the problems that plague us collectively and as individual librarians of color will continue” (Espinal 2001, 132–33). Seventeen years ago, librarians of color, including some administrators, enthusiastically greeted this ... Read More
      Keywords: Cultural pluralism; Minorities in library science; Library science; Libraries and society; African Americans; Library education; Library administrators; Sociolinguistics; Classification; Subject headings; Libraries and students; Public libraries; Afr
      PubDate: 2018-10-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
  • We Here: Speaking Our Truth
    • Abstract: I have written elsewhere, and shared in numerous public talks and conversations, that my decisions about writing style, about not using conventional academic formats, are political decisions motivated by the desire to be inclusive, to reach as many readers as possible in as many different locations.Scholars of color continually document the importance of critiquing whiteness and systems of oppression, encouraging “us to question the structures instead of simply trying to succeed within them” (Moore 2017, 204). The authors of this article stand united in voicing how librarianship has feigned political and social neutrality while exploiting the labor of those who exist outside the spectrum of white, able-bodied ... Read More
      Keywords: Cultural pluralism; Minorities in library science; Library science; Libraries and society; African Americans; Library education; Library administrators; Sociolinguistics; Classification; Subject headings; Libraries and students; Public libraries; Afr
      PubDate: 2018-10-27T00:00:00-05:00
       
 
 
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