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Annals of Internal Medicine
Journal Prestige (SJR): 7.466
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 329  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0003-4819 - ISSN (Online) 1539-3704
Published by American College of Physicians Homepage  [4 journals]
  • Annals for Educators - 19 March 2019
    • Authors: Taichman DB.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Annals On Call - Outcomes of Patients Discharged With Anemia
    • Authors: Centor RM; Carson JL.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Annals for Hospitalists Inpatient Notes - Choosing a Central Line in the
           ICU—What's New and What's True'
    • Authors: Govindan S; Simpson SQ.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Annals for Hospitalists - 19 March 2019
    • Authors: Wesorick DH; Chopra V.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Annals Graphic Medicine - Progress Notes: Soapcalls
    • Authors: Natter M.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Annals Consult Guys - Antibiotic Prophylaxis and Aspirin Before Dental
           Procedures: What's Needed'
    • Authors: Merli GJ; Weitz HH.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Nine Rooms
    • Authors: Kittleson MM.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Good Fortunes
    • Authors: Smith J.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Doctors of a Certain Age
    • Authors: Quagliarello V.
      Abstract: You know who we are, but you don't really know us. We're old physicians now—advancing into our fourth, fifth, or sixth decade of doctoring—and you see us everywhere.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • The Egyptian Goddess
    • Authors: Coulehan J.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Why Mobility Matters in the Hospital
    • Authors: Greysen S; Patel MS.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Why Mobility Matters in the Hospital
    • Authors: Mitchell DM.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Storage and Disposal of Opioid Analgesics
    • Authors: Doucette ML; Shields WC, Haring R, et al.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Storage and Disposal of Opioid Analgesics
    • Authors: Liberatore MA; Racoosin JA, Throckmorton DC.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Medication for Opioid Use Disorder After Nonfatal Opioid Overdose and
           Mortality
    • Authors: Larochelle MR; Stopka TJ, Xuan Z, et al.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Medication for Opioid Use Disorder After Nonfatal Opioid Overdose and
           Mortality
    • Authors: Brennan LV.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • How Businessmen May Reform Health Care Cost
    • Authors: Tsega S.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Review: In adults with chest pain, a HEART score ≥ 4 has 96%
           sensitivity and 45% specificity for predicting MACE
    • Authors: Hunter BR; Kirschner JM.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Review: Exercise rehabilitation improves outcomes by a small amount in
           chronic heart failure
    • Authors: Kumbhare D.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • An exercise intervention during acute hospitalization improved function
           and cognition at discharge in older adults
    • Authors: Kumbhare D.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Review: Extra physical therapy improves some outcomes by a small amount in
           acute or subacute health conditions
    • Authors: Kumbhare D.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • During weight-loss maintenance, energy expenditure was higher with
           lower-carbohydrate diets
    • Authors: Kahan S.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • In adults in the emergency department with nausea, neither droperidol nor
           ondansetron improved symptoms
    • Authors: Sampson C.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • In patients with cancer who were starting chemotherapy, apixaban reduced
           VTE and increased major bleeding at 180 d
    • Authors: Chouinard E.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • In patients with previous dilated cardiomyopathy, withdrawal of HF drugs
           increased relapse at 6 months
    • Authors: Van Spall HC.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Guideline: 8 professional organizations recommend percutaneous closure of
           patent foramen ovale in selected patients
    • Authors: Jillella D; Uchino K.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Guideline: Panel recommends maintaining SpO 2 at no higher than 96% in
           most acutely ill hospitalized patients
    • Authors: Aung K.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Annals Graphic Medicine - Watching Time, Body, and Soul View of a Family
           Member on Hospice
    • Authors: Oconnor NM.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Management of Patients With Fever and Neutropenia Through the Arc of Time
           A Narrative Review
    • Authors: Pizzo PA.
      Abstract: The association between fever and neutropenia and the risk for life-threatening infections in patients receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy has been known for 50 years. Indeed, infectious complications have been a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cancer. This review chronicles the progress in defining and developing approaches to the management of fever and neutropenia through observational and controlled clinical trials done by single institutions, as well as by national and international collaborative groups. The resultant data have led to recommendations and guidelines from professional societies and frame the current principles of management. Recommendations include those guiding new treatment options (from monotherapy to oral antibiotic therapy) and use of prophylactic antimicrobial regimens in high-risk patients. Of note, risk factors have changed with the advent of hematopoietic cytokines (especially granulocyte colony-stimulating factor) in shortening the duration of neutropenia, as well as with the discovery of more targeted cancer treatments that do not result in cytotoxicity, although these are still the exception. Most guiding principles that were developed decades ago—about when to begin empirical treatment after a neutropenic patient becomes febrile, whether and how to modify the initial treatment regimen (especially in patients with protracted neutropenia), and how long to continue antimicrobial therapy—are still used today. This review describes how the treatment principles related to the management of fever and neutropenia have responded to changes in the patients at risk, the microbes responsible, and the tools for their treatment, while still being sustained over the arc of time.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Graphical Depiction of Longitudinal Study Designs in Health Care Databases
    • Authors: Schneeweiss S; Rassen JA, Brown JS, et al.
      Abstract: Pharmacoepidemiologic and pharmacoeconomic analysis of health care databases has become a vital source of evidence to support health care decision making and efficient management of health care organizations. However, decision makers often consider studies done in nonrandomized health care databases more difficult to review than randomized trials because many design choices need to be considered. This is perceived as an important barrier to decision making about the effectiveness and safety of medical products. Design flaws in longitudinal database studies are avoidable but can be unintentionally obscured in the convoluted prose of methods sections, which often lack specificity. We propose a simple framework of graphical representation that visualizes study design implementations in a comprehensive, unambiguous, and intuitive way; contains a level of detail that enables reproduction of key study design variables; and uses standardized structure and terminology to simplify review and communication to a broad audience of decision makers. Visualization of design details will make database studies more reproducible, quicker to review, and easier to communicate to a broad audience of decision makers.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Should a Prison Salt Trial Be Federally Funded'
    • Authors: Christopher PP; Stein MD.
      Abstract: Determining whether restricted salt intake improves key health outcomes would require a randomized trial. The authors discuss the ethics of whether such a trial should be done with prisoners.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Comparing the Effectiveness of Depression Treatments for Patients
           Undergoing Maintenance Hemodialysis
    • PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • ASCENDing to New Heights in Our Understanding of the Treatment of
           Depression Among Individuals Receiving Hemodialysis
    • Authors: Flythe JE.
      Abstract: Depression is common among patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis. Mehrotra and colleagues examined the effects of cognitive behavioral therapy versus sertraline on the severity of depressive symptoms in persons receiving dialysis. The editorialist discusses how the findings allow clinicians to improve their approach to depressive symptoms in this patient population.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Are We There Yet' Another Milepost in the Journey to Identify
           Appropriate Candidates for Aspirin Primary Prevention
    • Authors: Whitlock EP; Johnson ES.
      Abstract: Selak and colleagues reported sex-specific models to predict risk for major bleeding events in adults without cardiovascular disease who are not receiving antiplatelet therapy. The editorialists discuss the strengths and limitations of these models and why they believe the models offer a major step toward more evidence-based, individualized decision making about aspirin use to prevent cardiovascular disease (and perhaps colorectal cancer).
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Health Care in 2030: Will Artificial Intelligence Replace Physicians'
    • Authors: Shah NR.
      Abstract: Armed with just the rules of the game, Google's AlphaZero mastered chess after 9 hours of training. The program showed an awesome new kind of intelligence, creativity, beauty, and perhaps even playfulness. What might this tell us about medical practice in the not-so-distant future' Will Google algorithms beat out physicians'
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Predicting Bleeding Risk to Guide Aspirin Use for the Primary Prevention
           of Cardiovascular Disease A Cohort Study
    • Authors: Selak V; Jackson R, Poppe K, et al.
      Abstract: Background:Many prognostic models for cardiovascular risk can be used to estimate aspirin's absolute benefits, but few bleeding risk models are available to estimate its likely harms.Objective:To develop prognostic bleeding risk models among persons in whom aspirin might be considered for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD).Design:Prospective cohort study.Setting:New Zealand primary care.Participants:The study cohort comprised 385 191 persons aged 30 to 79 years whose CVD risk was assessed between 2007 and 2016. Those with indications for or contraindications to aspirin and those who were already receiving antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy were excluded.Measurements:For each sex, Cox proportional hazards models were developed to predict major bleeding risk; participants were censored at the earliest of the date on which they first met an exclusion criterion, date of death, or study end date (30 June 2017). The main models included the following predictors: demographic characteristics (age, ethnicity, and socioeconomic deprivation), clinical measurements (systolic blood pressure and ratio of total–high-density lipoprotein cholesterol), family history of premature CVD, medical history (smoking, diabetes, bleeding, peptic ulcer disease, cancer, chronic liver disease, chronic pancreatitis, or alcohol-related conditions), and medication use (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, corticosteroids, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors).Results:During 1 619 846 person-years of follow-up, 4442 persons had major bleeding events (of which 313 [7%] were fatal). The main models predicted a median 5-year bleeding risk of 1.0% (interquartile range, 0.8% to 1.5%) in women and 1.1% (interquartile range, 0.7% to 1.6%) in men. Plots of predicted-against-observed event rates showed good calibration throughout the risk range.Limitation:Hemoglobin level, platelet count, and body mass index were excluded from the main models because of high numbers of missing values, and the models were not externally validated in non–New Zealand populations.Conclusion:Prognostic bleeding risk models were developed that can be used to estimate the absolute bleeding harms of aspirin among persons in whom aspirin is being considered for the primary prevention of CVD.Primary Funding Source:The Health Research Council of New Zealand.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Comparative Efficacy of Therapies for Treatment of Depression for Patients
           Undergoing Maintenance Hemodialysis A Randomized Clinical Trial
    • Authors: Mehrotra R; Cukor D, Unruh M, et al.
      Abstract: Background:Although depression is common among patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis, data on their acceptance of treatment and on the comparative efficacy of various therapies are limited.Objective:To determine the effect of an engagement interview on treatment acceptance (phase 1) and to compare the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) versus sertraline (phase 2) for treating depression in patients receiving hemodialysis.Design:Multicenter, parallel-group, open-label, randomized controlled trial. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02358343)Setting:41 dialysis facilities in 3 U.S. metropolitan areas.Participants:Patients who had been receiving hemodialysis for at least 3 months and had a Beck Depression Inventory-II score of 15 or greater; 184 patients participated in phase 1, and 120 subsequently participated in phase 2.Intervention:Engagement interview versus control visit (phase 1) and 12 weeks of CBT delivered in the dialysis facility versus sertraline treatment (phase 2).Measurements:The primary outcome for phase 1 was the proportion of participants who started depression treatment within 28 days. For phase 2, the primary outcome was depressive symptoms measured by the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptoms–Clinician-Rated (QIDS-C) at 12 weeks.Results:The proportion of participants who initiated treatment after the engagement or control visit did not differ (66% vs. 64%, respectively; P = 0.77; estimated risk difference, 2.1 [95% CI, −12.1 to 16.4]). Compared with CBT, sertraline treatment resulted in lower QIDS-C depression scores at 12 weeks (effect estimate, −1.84 [CI, −3.54 to −0.13]; P = 0.035). Adverse events were more frequent in the sertraline than the CBT group.Limitation:No randomized comparison was made with no treatment, and persistence of treatment effect was not assessed.Conclusion:An engagement interview with patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis had no effect on their acceptance of treatment for depression. After 12 weeks of treatment, depression scores were modestly better with sertraline treatment than with CBT.Primary Funding Source:Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute, Dialysis Clinic, Kidney Research Institute, and National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Prevention of Shingles: Better Protection and Better Value With
           Recombinant Vaccine
    • Authors: Shafran SD.
      Abstract: Prosser and colleagues evaluated the cost-effectiveness of recombinant zoster vaccine compared with zoster vaccine live and no zoster vaccination. The editorial discusses the findings in light of current immunization recommendations.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Vaccination for Prevention of Herpes
           Zoster and Related Complications: Input for National Recommendations
    • Authors: Prosser LA; Harpaz R, Rose AM, et al.
      Abstract: Background:The U.S. Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recently developed recommendations for use of a new recombinant zoster vaccine (RZV).Objective:To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of vaccination with RZV compared with zoster vaccine live (ZVL) and no vaccination, the cost-effectiveness of vaccination with RZV for persons who have previously received ZVL, and the cost-effectiveness of preferential vaccination with RZV over ZVL.Design:Simulation (state-transition) model using U.S. epidemiologic, clinical, and cost data.Data Sources:Published data.Target Population:Hypothetical cohort of immunocompetent U.S. adults aged 50 years or older.Time Horizon:Lifetime.Perspective:Societal and health care sector.Intervention:Vaccination with RZV (recommended 2-dose regimen), vaccination with ZVL, and no vaccination.Outcome Measures:The primary outcome measure was the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER).Results of Base-Case Analysis:For vaccination with RZV compared with no vaccination, ICERs ranged by age from $10 000 to $47 000 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY), using a societal perspective and assuming 100% completion of the 2-dose RZV regimen. For persons aged 60 years or older, ICERs were less than $60 000 per QALY. Vaccination with ZVL was dominated by vaccination with RZV for all age groups 60 years or older.Results of Sensitivity Analysis:Results were most sensitive to changes in vaccine effectiveness, duration of protection, herpes zoster incidence, and probability of postherpetic neuralgia. Vaccination with RZV after previous administration of ZVL yielded an ICER of less than $60 000 per QALY for persons aged 60 years or older. In probabilistic sensitivity analyses, RZV remained the preferred strategy in at least 95% of simulations, including those with 50% completion of the second dose.Limitation:Few data were available on risk for serious adverse events, adherence to the recommended 2-dose regimen, and probability of recurrent zoster.Conclusion:Vaccination with RZV yields cost-effectiveness ratios lower than those for many recommended adult vaccines, including ZVL. Results are robust over a wide range of plausible values.Primary Funding Source:Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Veterans Health Administration Hospitals Outperform Non–Veterans Health
           Administration Hospitals in Most Health Care Markets
    • Authors: Weeks WB; West AN.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Effect of Liraglutide on Cardiovascular Outcomes in Elderly Patients: A
           Post Hoc Analysis of a Randomized Controlled Trial
    • Authors: Gilbert MP; Bain SC, Franek E, et al.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Mar 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
 
 
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