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Annals of Internal Medicine
Journal Prestige (SJR): 7.466
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 325  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0003-4819 - ISSN (Online) 1539-3704
Published by American College of Physicians Homepage  [4 journals]
  • Annals for Educators - 19 February 2019
    • Authors: Taichman DB.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Annals for Hospitalists - 19 February 2019
    • Authors: Wesorick DH; Chopra V.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Annals On Call - Estimating Stroke Risk in Atrial Fibrillation
    • Authors: Centor RM; Heudebert GR.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Annals Graphic Medicine - Progress Notes: Cancer
    • Authors: Natter M.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Annals Consult Guys - Surgery With Aortic Stenosis'
    • Authors: Merli GJ; Weitz HH.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Annals for Hospitalists Inpatient Notes - Clinical Pearls—Acute
           Pancreatitis
    • Authors: Garg PK.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Bun
    • Authors: Weinberg RB.
      Abstract: “Children don't fear death—they fear pain and abandonment. Even the wee ones can sense who can give them shelter.”
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Hotline: A Poem
    • Authors: Kalidindi S.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Regarding a Letter to a Dying Friend
    • Authors: Hergott LJ.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Being Relevant
    • Authors: Zitter J.
      Abstract: There was relief in knowing that my colleague could offer what this woman needed even when I couldn't—especially when I couldn't.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Maintenance of Certification Status and Performance on a Set of Process
           Measures
    • Authors: Gray B; Vandergrift J, Landon B, et al.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Maintenance of Certification Status and Performance on a Set of Process
           Measures
    • Authors: Jarrett M.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Maintenance of Certification Status and Performance on a Set of Process
           Measures
    • Authors: Glazier JJ; Kaki A.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Maintenance of Certification Status and Performance on a Set of Process
           Measures
    • Authors: Ertle AR.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Peripheral Neuropathy and the Ceruloplasmin Gene
    • Authors: Kushlaf H.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Women's Health Policy in the United States
    • Authors: Daniel H; Erickson SM, Bornstein SS.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Women's Health Policy in the United States
    • Authors: Houghton D.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Women's Health Policy in the United States
    • Authors: Shaniuk PM.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • In middle-aged adults, Astro-CHARM was better than a standard risk factor
           model for predicting 10-year ASCVD risk
    • Authors: Nelson AJ; Granger CB.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Cholecystectomy reduced major complications vs catheter drainage in
           high-risk patients with acute cholecystitis
    • Authors: Rappold JF.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • In Raynaud phenomenon, on-demand sildenafil did not reduce disability or
           frequency or duration of attacks
    • Authors: Mirza R; Guyatt G.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Adding mirtazapine to ongoing SNRIs or SSRIs did not improve symptoms of
           treatment-resistant depression
    • Authors: Simon GE.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Genotypic resistance–guided and medication-guided therapies did not
           differ for eradicating refractory H pylori
    • Authors: Calvet X.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Review: Prophylactic antibiotics reduce exacerbations but do not improve
           quality of life in patients with COPD
    • Authors: McDonald CF; Worsnop CJ.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Review: Thyroid hormone therapy does not improve QoL or symptoms in
           subclinical hypothyroidism
    • Authors: Johnson BE.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • In premenopausal women with recurrent cystitis, increasing water intake
           for 12 months reduced recurrence
    • Authors: Dmochowski RR.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • In high-risk T2DM, canagliflozin reduced CV events regardless of baseline
           renal function
    • Authors: Herrington WG; Zhu D, Haynes R.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Review: Adjuvant recombinant subunit vaccine prevents herpes zoster more
           than live attenuated vaccine in adults ≥ 50 years
    • Authors: Sacks HS.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Annals Graphic Medicine - #ThisIsOurLane
    • Authors: Bennett CL.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Selective Use of Coronary Artery Calcium Testing for Shared Decision
           Making: Guideline Endorsed and Ready for Prime Time
    • Authors: Cardoso R; Nasir K, Blumenthal RS, et al.
      Abstract: This commentary addresses the 2018 American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology risk assessment and cholesterol management recommendations about “risk enhancers” and coronary artery calcium testing.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Fitness and Body Mass Index During Adolescence and Disability Later in
           Life A Cohort Study
    • Authors: Henriksson P; Henriksson H, Tynelius P, et al.
      Abstract: Background:Low physical fitness, obesity, and the combination of the two in adolescence may be related to risk for disability in adulthood, but this has rarely been studied.Objective:To examine individual and combined associations of cardiorespiratory fitness and obesity in male adolescents with later receipt of a disability pension due to all and specific causes.Design:Population-based cohort study.Setting:Sweden.Participants:1 079 128 Swedish adolescents aged 16 to 19 years who were conscripted into the military between 1972 and 1994.Measurements:Cardiorespiratory fitness and body mass index (BMI) were measured at conscription and were related to information on later receipt of a disability pension obtained from the Social Insurance Agency.Results:Over a median follow-up of 28.3 years, 54 304 men were granted a disability pension. Low cardiorespiratory fitness was strongly associated with later receipt of a disability pension due to all causes (hazard ratio, 3.74 [95% CI, 3.55 to 3.95] for lowest vs. highest fitness decile) and specific causes (psychiatric, musculoskeletal, injuries, nervous system, circulatory, and tumors). Obesity was associated with greater risk for receipt of a disability pension due to all and specific causes, with the greatest risks observed for class II and III obesity. Compared with being unfit, being moderately or highly fit was associated with attenuated risk for receipt of a disability pension across BMI categories.Limitation:The cohort did not include women, had data on smoking and alcohol intake only in a subsample, and lacked repeated measures of exposures and covariates.Conclusion:Low cardiorespiratory fitness, obesity, and the combination of the two were strongly associated with later chronic disability due to a wide range of diseases and causes. Although additional well-designed studies are required, these findings support the importance of high cardiorespiratory fitness and healthy body weight during adolescence to prevent later chronic disease.Primary Funding Source:Karolinska Institutet.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Annals Graphic Medicine: Introducing “Dr. Mom” and
           “Progress Notes”
    • Authors: .
      Abstract: The ever-growing popularity of Annals Graphic Medicine has prompted us to expand it to include regular monthly features from 2 talented physician artists. Look for a new installment of “Dr. Mom” on the first Tuesday of the month and “Progress Notes” on the third Tuesday.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Recognizing the Potential for Overdiagnosis: Are High-Sensitivity Cardiac
           Troponin Assays an Example'
    • Authors: Bell KL; Doust J, Glasziou P, et al.
      Abstract: Overdiagnosis is commonly conceptualized as an unintended consequence of early disease detection in asymptomatic persons but can also occur in persons with symptoms. This commentary poses ways to identify this problem and examines the use of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin assays to diagnose type 1 myocardial infarction as an example of the potential for overdiagnosis.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • External Validation of the MEESSI Acute Heart Failure Risk Score A Cohort
           Study
    • Authors: Wussler D; Kozhuharov N, Sabti Z, et al.
      Abstract: Background:The MEESSI-AHF (Multiple Estimation of risk based on the Emergency department Spanish Score In patients with AHF) score was developed to predict 30-day mortality in patients presenting with acute heart failure (AHF) to emergency departments (EDs) in Spain. Whether it performs well in other countries is unknown.Objective:To externally validate the MEESSI-AHF score in another country.Design:Prospective cohort study. (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01831115).Setting:Multicenter recruitment of dyspneic patients presenting to the ED.Participants:The external validation cohort included 1572 patients with AHF.Measurements:Calculation of the MEESSI-AHF score using an established model containing 12 independent risk factors.Results:Among 1572 patients with adjudicated AHF, 1247 had complete data that allowed calculation of the MEESSI-AHF score. Of these, 102 (8.2%) died within 30 days. The score predicted 30-day mortality with excellent discrimination (c-statistic, 0.80). Assessment of cumulative mortality showed a steep gradient in 30-day mortality over 6 predefined risk groups (0 patients in the lowest-risk group vs. 35 [28.5%] in the highest-risk group). Risk was overestimated in the high-risk groups, resulting in a Hosmer–Lemeshow P value of 0.022. However, after adjustment of the intercept, the model showed good concordance between predicted risks and observed outcomes (P = 0.23). Findings were confirmed in sensitivity analyses that used multiple imputation for missing values in the overall cohort of 1572 patients.Limitations:External validation was done using a reduced model. Findings are specific to patients with AHF who present to the ED and are clinically stable enough to provide informed consent. Performance in patients with terminal kidney failure who are receiving long-term dialysis cannot be commented on.Conclusion:External validation of the MEESSI-AHF risk score showed excellent discrimination. Recalibration may be needed when the score is introduced to new populations.Primary Funding Source:The European Union, the Swiss National Science Foundation, the Swiss Heart Foundation, the Cardiovascular Research Foundation Basel, the University of Basel, and University Hospital Basel.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Kidney Transplants in Patients With Lupus Nephritis
    • PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Kidney Transplantation in Lupus Nephritis: Can We Do Even Better'
    • Authors: Goyal N; Weiner DE, Levey AS.
      Abstract: Jorge and colleagues examined data from 1995 to 2014 to assess outcomes of patients with lupus nephritis who initiated dialysis and were placed on the waitlist for a kidney transplant. The editorialists discuss the findings in light of slow progress in the treatment of lupus nephritis. Given higher patient and allograft survival with both preemptive and early kidney transplant, it is essential that transplant be considered as promptly as possible for patients with lupus nephritis.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Perfect Compliance: The 2018 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical
           Education Well-Being Survey
    • Authors: Yuan CM.
      Abstract: Last year, a “well-being survey” was added to the annual faculty survey from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. In this commentary, a program director ponders the survey's purpose and the possible ramifications for faculty who respond to it.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Renal Transplantation and Survival Among Patients With Lupus Nephritis A
           Cohort Study
    • Authors: Jorge A; Wallace ZS, Lu N, et al.
      Abstract: Background:Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) due to lupus nephritis (LN) have high rates of premature death.Objective:To assess the potential effect on survival of renal transplant among patients with ESRD due to LN (LN-ESRD) in the United States.Design:Nationwide cohort study.Setting:United States Renal Data System, the national database of nearly all patients with ESRD.Participants:Patients with incident LN-ESRD who were waitlisted for a renal transplant.Measurements:First renal transplant was analyzed as a time-varying exposure. The primary outcomes were all-cause and cause-specific mortality. Time-dependent Cox regression analysis was used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) of these outcomes associated with renal transplant in the primary analysis. Sequential cohort matching was used in a secondary analysis limited to patients with Medicare, which allowed assessment of time-varying covariates.Results:During the study period, 9659 patients with LN-ESRD were waitlisted for a renal transplant, of whom 5738 (59%) had a transplant. Most were female (82%) and nonwhite (60%). Transplant was associated with reduced all-cause mortality (adjusted HR, 0.30 [95% CI, 0.27 to 0.33]) among waitlisted patients. Adjusted HRs for cause-specific mortality were 0.26 (CI, 0.23 to 0.30) for cardiovascular disease, 0.30 (CI, 0.19 to 0.48) for coronary heart disease, 0.41 (CI, 0.32 to 0.52) for infection, and 0.41 (CI, 0.31 to 0.53) for sepsis.Limitation:Unmeasured factors may contribute to the observed associations; however, the E-value analysis suggested robustness of the results.Conclusion:Renal transplant was associated with a survival benefit, primarily due to reduced deaths from cardiovascular disease and infection. The findings highlight the benefit of timely referral for transplant to improve outcomes in this population.Primary Funding Source:National Institutes of Health.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Note to Our Readers: Erroneous Republication in Print Issue Due to a
           Publisher Error
    • PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • A Pound of Prevention' Assessing the Value of New Cholesterol-Lowering
           Drugs
    • Authors: Hlatky MA.
      Abstract: PCSK9 inhibitors substantially reduce cholesterol levels, but the U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved PCSK9 inhibitors, alirocumab and evolocumab, came to market priced at $14 000 per year—more than 100 times the cost of a generic statin. Kazi and colleagues' cost-effectiveness analysis of alirocumab in secondary prevention is based on new trial results and updated pricing. The editorialist discusses the findings and what it takes for preventive therapies to be cost-effective.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Cost-Effectiveness of Alirocumab A Just-in-Time Analysis Based on the
           ODYSSEY Outcomes Trial
    • Authors: Kazi DS; Penko J, Coxson PG, et al.
      Abstract: Background:The ODYSSEY Outcomes (Evaluation of Cardiovascular Outcomes After an Acute Coronary Syndrome During Treatment With Alirocumab) trial included participants with a recent acute coronary syndrome. Compared with participants receiving statins alone, those receiving a statin plus alirocumab had lower rates of a composite outcome including myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and death.Objective:To determine the cost-effectiveness of alirocumab in these circumstances.Design:Decision analysis using the Cardiovascular Disease Policy Model.Data Sources:Data sources representative of the United States combined with data from the ODYSSEY Outcomes trial.Target Population:U.S. adults with a recent first MI and a baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level of 1.81 mmol/L (70 mg/dL) or greater.Time Horizon:Lifetime.Perspective:U.S. health system.Intervention:Alirocumab or ezetimibe added to statin therapy.Outcome Measures:Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio in 2018 U.S. dollars per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained.Results of Base-Case Analysis:Compared with a statin alone, the addition of ezetimibe cost $81 000 (95% uncertainty interval [UI], $51 000 to $215 000) per QALY. Compared with a statin alone, the addition of alirocumab cost $308 000 (UI, $197 000 to $678 000) per QALY. Compared with the combination of statin and ezetimibe, replacing ezetimibe with alirocumab cost $997 000 (UI, $254 000 to dominated) per QALY.Results of Sensitivity Analysis:The price of alirocumab would have to decrease from its original cost of $14 560 to $1974 annually to be cost-effective relative to ezetimibe.Limitation:Effectiveness estimates were based on a single randomized trial with a median follow-up of 2.8 years and should not be extrapolated to patients with stable coronary heart disease.Conclusion:The price of alirocumab would have to be reduced considerably to be cost-effective. Because substantial reductions already have occurred, we believe that timely, independent cost-effectiveness analyses can inform clinical and policy discussions of new drugs as they enter the market.Primary Funding Source:University of California, San Francisco, and Institute for Clinical and Economic Review.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Antiphospholipid Antibodies in Patients With Myocardial Infarction
    • Authors: Grosso G; Sippl N, Kjellström B, et al.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
  • Antibiotic Prescribing for Respiratory Tract Infections and Encounter
           Length: An Observational Study of Telemedicine
    • Authors: Martinez KA; Rood M, Jhangiani N, et al.
      PubDate: Tue, 19 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
       
 
 
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