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Journal Cover InterActions: UCLA Journal of Education and Information
  [25 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 1548-3320
   Published by eScholarship Homepage  [55 journals]
  • Traversing a Political Pipeline: An Intersectional and Social
           Constructionist Approach Toward Technology Education for Girls of Color.
           Garcia, Patricia; Scott, Kimberly

    • Abstract: First, this paper argues that applications of SCOT in feminist science and technology studies have largely focused on analyzing how gender and technology are coproduced, resulting in lack of scholarship that examines the mutually constitutive relationship between technology, gender and other intersecting categories, such as race, ethnicity, class, sexual orientation, and ability. Second, this paper argues that an intersectional view of technology can dismantle the language of objectivity deeply embedded in technological artifacts by revealing how identity categories, such as gender, race, and ethnicity, are integral components of “the social shaping of technology” and by extension participation in technological initiatives (Faulkner, p. 90, 2001). Finally, through a brief discussion of CompuGirls, a culturally responsive technology program for girls of color, this paper demonstrates how an intersectional, social constructionist approach to technology education can challenge stereotypes of girls of color as pa...
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jan 2016 12:00:00 GMT
       
  • Spring 2016 Editor's Note. Cifor, Marika; Ilano, Lauren; Wood, Stacy

    • Abstract: Spring 2016 Editor's Note
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jan 2016 12:00:00 GMT
       
  • Review: Boundary Objects and Beyond: Working with Leigh Star, Edited by
           Geoffrey C. Bowker, Stefan Timmermans, Adele E. Clarke, and Ellen Balka.
           Montoya, Robert

    • Abstract: Review: Boundary Objects and Beyond: Working with Leigh Star, Edited by Geoffrey C. Bowker, Stefan Timmermans, Adele E. Clarke, and Ellen Balka
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jan 2016 12:00:00 GMT
       
  • The Spatiality of Schooling: A Quest for Equitable Classrooms and High
           Expectations for Low-Income Students of Color. Liou, Daniel D.; Marsh,
           Tyson E.J.; Antrop-Gonzalez, Rene

    • Abstract: A significant missing link in the work of school reform is understanding how students relate with learning spaces and their teachers' beliefs to harness a positive self-concept of academic achievement. This article draws from the traditions of spatiality, educational studies, and the concept of social identity contingency to generate new ways to understand how students interpret and experience their teachers' expectations for learning. Based on a multiple case studies design of two urban classrooms, the researchers discovered the spatial behaviors of students and teachers are greatly influenced by the expectations they had of each other, and by extension, the spatial arrangement of learning opportunities as manifestations of their expectations in learning contexts. In effect, this study aims to shed light on the importance of co-creating classroom spaces with students of color that take into account its multiple dimensions and the salience of teachers' expectations for learning.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jan 2016 12:00:00 GMT
       
  • Rethinking the Ethics of Internationalization: Five Challenges for Higher
           Education. Stein, Sharon

    • Abstract: In this paper I consider the need to rethink existing ethical approaches to the internationalization of higher education. In particular, I consider the risk that the same developmentalist assumptions that reproduce the highly uneven global higher education landscape also shape many of our efforts to address these inequities. To do so, I situate the current moment within a longer history of colonial relations and identify five pressing ethical challenges for higher education scholars and institutions to address. Ultimately, I suggest the need to be more attentive to the harmful investments and colonial frames of reference that keep us from imagining a radically different ethics of internationalization.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jan 2016 12:00:00 GMT
       
  • Rapport at the core: Relationships in service-learning program
           development. Lillo, Sarah

    • Abstract: This in-depth qualitative case study of a unique service-learning director explored the factors that enabled her to cultivate a thriving multi-faceted program at a major research university. Through repeat interviews, participant observation, and document analysis, it became apparent that the relational components of this director’s work were critical in her program framing and successes. This article explores the director’s social orientation and approaches to rapport building. In so doing, it highlights the importance of relationships and rapport-building strategies on service-learning endeavors. The study ultimately underscores the potential of positive rapport and accordingly, calls for more attention to the relational aspects of program facilitation.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jan 2016 12:00:00 GMT
       
  • Identity, Social Activism, and the Pursuit of Higher Education: The
           Journey Stories of Undocumented and Unafraid Community Activists by Susana
           M. Muñoz. Peumsang, Pavitee

    • Abstract: This book explores how undocumented students make meaning of the intersection between their immigration status and their social identities as community activists under historical and current contexts of xenophobia. Susana M. Muñoz draws 39 interviews from 13 self-identified Latina/o undocumented and unafraid students across the United States. Students’ journey stories reveal how undocumented student identities and experiences are complex, fluid, and unique to the individual. The author applies queer and resistance theories to help readers understand how undocumented students engage in the “coming out” process as a strategic political action for recognition and visibility. Findings provide recommendations for K-12 and higher education practice, policy, and future research for the advancement of diversity, equity, and inclusion of undocumented students.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jan 2016 12:00:00 GMT
       
  • Review: Indexing It All: The Subject in the Age of Documentation,
           Information, and Data, by Ronald E. Day. Erickson, Seth

    • Abstract: Day, Ronald E. Indexing It All: The Subject in the Age of Documentation, Information, and Data. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2014. 170 pp. ISBN 978-0-262-02821-9
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jan 2016 12:00:00 GMT
       
  • Special Issue on Gender in Education and Information Studies:
           Interrogating Knowledge Production, Social Structures and Equitable
           Access. Wood, Stacy E.; Cifor, Marika; Ilano, Lauren

    • Abstract: N/A
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jan 2016 12:00:00 GMT
       
  • Textiles of Change: How Arpilleras can Expand Traditional Definitions of
           Records. Doolan, Elizabeth

    • Abstract: In the 1970s, Chilean women began creating textiles known as arpilleras (from the Spanish word for burlap) as a way of documenting their lives and experiences. Under the Pinochet regime (1973-1990), arpilleras depicting the difficult, often violent, experiences of Chilean women began to gain global recognition. Through an internship with the Tower Museum archives in Derry~Londonderry in Northern Ireland, I worked with a collection of arpilleras that had been donated by Roberta Bacic, a Chilean lecturer currently living in Northern Ireland who has focused her research on arpilleras. Considered to be both museum artifacts and archival records, these textile works challenge classical professional distinctions drawn between the two categories. Situating their dual categorizations within a combined museum and archival setting allows us to rethink the ways in which traditional definitions of archival records may not only exclude women's voices but also fail to consider how gendered activities and expressions might ...
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jan 2016 12:00:00 GMT
       
  • "The Myth of Oneness ”: Erasure of Indigenous and Ethnic Identities in
           Digital Feminist Discourse. Pierre, Jennifer

    • Abstract: This paper described numerous issues in traditional and social media representation of the One Billion Rising movement regarding the representation of global feminist agendas. Using this movement as a primary case study, an argument describing the proposed myth of ‘oneness’ embedded within the movement and exposing the issues within this myth are discussed.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jan 2016 12:00:00 GMT
       
  • Mentoring Away the Glass Ceiling in Academia: A Cultured Critique edited
           by Brenda L. H. Marina. Campos, Magali

    • Abstract: Mentoring Away the Glass Ceiling in Academia: A Cultured Critiqued (2015) edited by Brenda L. H. Marina, is a comprehensive examination of women’s experiences in various stages in academia and the way in which mentoring can serve as a tool to break the glass ceiling that keep many women from reaching high positions in academia.Over a qualitative approach this book brings together narratives and counternarratives of women in academia to explore the ways mentorship can help the diversity gap for women by drawing from their own experiences.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jan 2016 12:00:00 GMT
       
  • The Keeper of the Collections and the Delta Collection: Regulating
           Obscenity at the Library of Congress, 1940-1963. Adler, Melissa

    • Abstract: During and after World War II the Library of Congress held one of the largest collections of materials regarding sex and sexuality in the world. Largely composed of erotica and items considered to be pornographic or obscene, including books, motion pictures, photographs, and playing cards, the Library’s Delta Collection was separated from the general collection with highly restricted access. This collection was largely composed of materials seized by the Customs Bureau and the Postal Service, in addition to certain materials obtained through the Copyright Office, as the Library of Congress made the final decision regarding destruction, storage, and circulation of such items. The Delta Collection served to protect the materials from mutilation, preserve the cultural record, protect citizens from harmful obscenity, and function as a repository of sample materials for consultation by federal agencies. From evidence supplied by archival papers of the Keeper of the Collections, the office charged with maintaining ...
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jan 2016 12:00:00 GMT
       
  • Acting up, Talking Back: TITA, TIARA, and the Value of Gossip. Cifor,
           Marika

    • Abstract: This article examines through an archival lens Tell it to ACT UP and TIARA, the weekly internal papers of the New York and Los Angeles chapters of the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power (ACT UP). During their short lives, from 1990 to 1992, the papers published news, suggestions, commentary, complaints, and gossip. In spite it challenge to the core archival concept of reliability, this article asserts that gossip provides unique evidence of affect, sex and sexuality, and offers deeper understandings of the individual and group dynamics that made and unmade ACT UP. Gossip, affect, and bodily experience are all knowledges and ways of knowing that have been feminized are therefore frequently devalued and derided in scholarship and practice. The form, content, and tone of these papers are used to make an argument for the value of gossip as a discursive practice. This article contributes to the growing literature in archival studies on conceptualizing and contending with human experiences—especially affects, sex, and...
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jan 2016 12:00:00 GMT
       
  • Coyolxauhqui: Challenging Patriarchy by Re-imagining her birth story.
           Vega, Christine

    • Abstract: By employing a Chicana Feminist Epistemology (CFE) and Gloria Anzaldúas Coyolxauhqui analysis in theory, I offer a narrative and examination of the ways to challenge patriarchy through birth stories. More importantly, discuss the ways we build on scholarship offered by Chicanas and Indigena identified women who may or may not be mothers of children, but rather as producers of knowledge; academic, spiritual, or self-fulfilling. In addition, I discuss the ways in which women can piece together the fragmented story of Coyolxauhqui, via the multiplicity of complicated, but critical identities, by sharing their stories.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Jan 2016 12:00:00 GMT
       
  • Implementing a Social Justice Framework in an Introduction to Archives
           Course: Lessons from Both Sides of the Classroom. Caswell, Michelle;
           Broman, Giso; Kirmer, Jennifer; Martin, Laura; Sowry, Nathan

    • Abstract: Using the reflections of both the instructor and students on lesson plans from three course sessions, this paper argues that a social justice framework can be practically implemented in an introductory archives classroom such that students are imparted with both the rationale for classical Western archival concepts and functions and the modes to critique such functions from a social justice perspective. After a brief introduction summarizing course logistics and the action research methodology employed, this paper proposes a working definition of social justice and discuss in detail what constitutes a social justice pedagogical framework in archival education. Next, this paper describes and analyzes a small group exercise on the concepts of record, provenance, and creatorship, detailing ways in which students can be both taught prevailing archival concepts and encouraged to critique these concepts from a social justice perspective. This paper then addresses a group discussion concerning power, marginalization...
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jan 2012 12:00:00 GMT
       
  • Recognizing and Escaping the Sham: Authority Moves, Truth Claims and the
           Fiction of Academic Writing About Adult Learning. Hoult, Elizabeth Chapman
           

    • Abstract: This paper seeks to explore the meaning of the sham with regards to academic writing. It challenges the fundamental assumptions that underpin conventional academic writing and suggests that such writing is actually less honest than the other forms of writing that it sets itself against. It is precisely the reliance on what Laurel Richardson calls the “authority moves” (1997, p.167) of academic language that undermines its claim to represent reality in an open and honest way. It is, in fact, a sham. The rejection of the superior truth claims of academic writing is illustrated with reference to two interview transcripts from a completed study and the issues raised are explored theoretically in the light of the work of Hélène Cixous. It is argued that the adoption of Hélène Cixous’ notion of l’écriture feminine provides a way out of the dilemma. Inspired by Cixous, it is argued that it is possible to escape the limitations of conventional academic writing firstly through the incorporation of a...
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jan 2012 12:00:00 GMT
       
  • Editors' Note: Special Section on Archival Education and Human Rights.
           Caswell, Michelle; Lau, Andrew J

    • Abstract: n/a
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jan 2012 12:00:00 GMT
       
  • Featured Commentary: Nelson Mandela, Memory, and the Work of Justice.
           Harris, Verne

    • Abstract: Verne Harris uses the 18th Alan Paton Lecture to reflect on the roles of memory in the reconstruction of South Africa in the wake of the apartheid era.  He addresses three interlinked questions: has post-apartheid memory work only scratched the surface of the country's pain and alienation; does the really hard work remain to be done; and to what extent are the failures of the post-apartheid project failures of memory'  These questions are addressed along five lines of enquiry: metarrative, access to information, healing, reconciliation and learning.  For each Harris suggests a deconstructive interrogation.  While focused on South African specificities, the enquiry speaks to global questions of transitional justice and reckoning with oppressive pasts.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jan 2012 12:00:00 GMT
       
  • Editors' Note. Kasch, David; Lau, Andrew J; Millora, Melissa L.

    • Abstract: n/a
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jan 2012 12:00:00 GMT
       
  • 'Class'ifying Ethnicity/Race and Gender: An Intersectional Critique of
           Bachelor's Degree Completion Research. Lundy-Wagner, Valerie C.

    • Abstract: Over the past fifty years, postsecondary retention-oriented theory, research, policies, and programs have focused on the effect of singular demographic characteristics in isolation, namely gender or ethnicity/race. Given that this approach has not yielded significant decreases in completion disparities, this paper proposes an explicit incorporation of social class. Drawing on Tinto’s Theory of Student Departure, and using data from the Beginning Postsecondary Students (96/01) data set the author shows that lack of attention to social class background (via socioeconomic status) may be severely inhibiting higher education’s ability to conceptualize and improve completion rates. This paper introduces critical race feminist theory as a paradigmatic perspective for use in models of degree completion and retention-related practice, and subsequently reviews extant research on bachelor’s degree completion, highlighting the clear, but complex relationship between ethnicity/race, gender, and socioeconomic status with a...
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jan 2012 12:00:00 GMT
       
  • Book Review: Archival Anxiety and the Vocational Calling. Cachola,
           Ellen-Rae

    • Abstract: This book review covers Richard Cox's exploration on issues of ethics in the archival profession. He suggests that digital technology and information exchange across archival professions can foster change in the field.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jan 2012 12:00:00 GMT
       
  • Book Review: Human Rights, Suffering, and Aesthetics in Political Prison
           Literature. Ahmed, Sumayya

    • Abstract: Human Rights, Suffering and Aesthetics in Political Prison Literature is a collection of essays seeking to explore political prison literature from the vantage point of the beauty and symbolism of the writings. The essays deals with the experiences of political prisoners from countries as diverse as China, Egypt, Syria, Uruguay, Morocco, Romania, the United States and Canada with varying amounts of success.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jan 2012 12:00:00 GMT
       
  • The Making of Violent Masculinities: Exploring the Intersections of
           Cultural, Structural and Direct Violence in Schools. Khoja-Moolji, Shenila
           S.

    • Abstract: This paper employs Johan Galtung’s (1990) typology of violence – direct, structural and cultural – as an analytical lens to examine the ways in which schools, teachers and students draw on aspects of hegemonic masculinity to establish and endorse difference between boys’ and girls’ capacities to be violent, and willfully ignore performances of violent masculinities. It focuses on school values and policies represented in disciplinary structures, contact sports, and curricular knowledges, as well as practices of students and teachers, to explore the ways in which they collectively code violence in the script of masculinity. The conclusion proposes strategies for challenging the cultural violence of hegemonic masculinity in schools.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jan 2012 12:00:00 GMT
       
  • Editors' Note. Kasch, David; Lau, Andrew J; Millora, Melissa L.

    • Abstract: This issue of InterActions features four articles that remind us the world we live in, with all of its inequities, is socially constructed, not a naturally occurring phenomenon. Each article helps us to “see” a particular conglomeration of forces for what they are.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jan 2012 12:00:00 GMT
       
  • An Examination of Institutional Factors Related to the Use of Fees at
           Public Four-Year Universities. Arnott, Alaine

    • Abstract: Despite the plethora of data collected and analyzed about tuition as a primary cost of higher education, little to no attention has been paid to fees as a portion of that cost.  Most of the existing research, including reports from the National Center for Education Statistics, combines tuition and required fees into one entity, and rarely separates fees from tuition.  Framed by the theory of academic capitalism (Slaughter & Rhoades, 2004), this analysis examines the use of required fees as part of the overall price of a higher education institution, at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.  Further, factors related to internal pressures facing public institutions are correlated with the use of fees as a revenue generating strategy.  Findings suggest that sales and services of auxiliaries and gifts and government appropriations are positively related with the use of fees within the overall price of a higher education institution, indicating fees may be a result of universities participating in market...
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jan 2012 12:00:00 GMT
       
  • How Much Knowledge Can They Gain' Women's Information Behavior on
           Government Health Websites in the Context of HIV/AIDS Prevention. Chong,
           Jing

    • Abstract: Using a theoretical framework extended from Rimal and Real’s (2003) Risk Perception Attitude framework, this research examines women’s information behavior, specifically information finding and reaction to information, on government health websites in the context of HIV/AIDS prevention. In the empirical study, think aloud and structured individual interview were used to collect data from 40 female university students in the U.S. in their completion of an information seeking task and an interview. Factors that influence women’s information finding and reaction to information were identified. This research challenges and extends Rimal and Real’s (2003) Risk Perception Attitude framework by proposing an Extended Risk Perception Attitude framework. This research also exemplifies Gupta’s (2000) categories of social construction of gender and sexuality in the HIV/AIDS discourse, and adds new evidence that proves their validity. In addition, this research enriches the literature in health-rel...
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jan 2012 12:00:00 GMT
       
  • Book Review: Alone Together: Why We Expect More from Technology and Less
           from Each Other by Sherry Turkle. Garcia, Patricia

    • PubDate: Sun, 01 Jan 2012 12:00:00 GMT
       
  • Book Review: Merchants of Culture: The Publishing Business in the
           Twenty-First Century by John B. Thompson. Litwin, Rory

    • Abstract: Review of "Merchants of Culture: The Publishing Business in the Twenty-First Century" by John B. Thompson.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jan 2012 12:00:00 GMT
       
  • Book Review: Normal Life: Administrative Violence, Critical Trans
           Politics, and the Limits of Law by Dean Spade. Nicolazzo, Z

    • Abstract: This is a book review for the 2011 book Normal Life: Administrative Violence, Critical Trans Politics, and the Limits of Law by Dean Spade.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jan 2012 12:00:00 GMT
       
  • Book Review of "Gifted and Advanced Black Students in School: An Anthology
           of Critical Works". DeVita, James M

    • Abstract: N/A
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Jan 2012 12:00:00 GMT
       
 
 
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