Journal Cover
British Journal of Criminology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.828
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 619  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0007-0955 - ISSN (Online) 1464-3529
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [411 journals]
  • Editorial
    • Authors: Carrabine E.
      Pages: 1 - 2
      Abstract: This volume marks the 60th anniversary of the British Journal of Criminology and, over this long history, it has established itself as a leading institution in British and international criminology. Although it is unusual for the editor of the journal to provide an editorial for a new issue, this one is the first of my term as Editor in Chief. Like every editor before me, no doubt, I am keenly aware of the responsibility tied to the role and certainly realize I have big shoes to fill. I am privileged to be taking up the reins following the outstanding example set by Sandra Walklate.
      PubDate: Mon, 30 Dec 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjc/azz071
      Issue No: Vol. 60, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • ‘All Knowledge Begins with the Senses’1: Towards a Sensory
           Criminology
    • Authors: Mcclanahan B; South N.
      Pages: 3 - 23
      Abstract: AbstractVisual criminology has established itself as a site of criminological innovation. Its ascendance, though, highlights ways in which the ‘ocularcentrism’ of the social sciences is reproduced in criminology. We respond, arguing for attention to the totality of sensorial modalities. Outlining the possible contours of a criminology concerned with smell, taste, sound and touch—along with the visual—the paper describes moments in which the sensory intersects with various phenomena of crime, harm, justice and power. Noting the primacy of the sensorial in understanding environmental harm, we describe an explicitly sensory green criminology while also suggesting the ways that heightened criminological attention to the non-visual senses might uncover new sites and modes of knowledge and a more richly affective criminology.
      PubDate: Tue, 06 Aug 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjc/azz052
      Issue No: Vol. 60, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • Falsification by Atrophy: The Kuhnian Process of Rejecting Theory in US
           Criminology
    • Authors: Dooley B; Goodison S.
      Pages: 24 - 44
      Abstract: AbstractThomas Kuhn posits that the structure of science promotes revolutionary discovery. The decision of a scientific community to discard the status quo in favour of a revolutionary paradigm is influenced by sociological forces. Karl Popper disagreed, arguing that falsification is required. An examination of a random sample of 501 articles published in 14 peer-reviewed American outlets in criminology and criminal justice from 1993 to 2008 is coupled with oral histories from 17 leading criminologists in determining which approach best characterizes criminology. Twelve per cent of papers falsify theory. When not explicitly falsified, atrophy occurs when theory is overused (exhaustion), ignored (indolence) and subjected to a sustained critique (assault). The intention of the effort is to document and describe falsification and then invite further discourse.
      PubDate: Fri, 26 Apr 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjc/azz026
      Issue No: Vol. 60, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • Response to Dooley and Goodison: Falsification By Atrophy: The Kuhnian
           Process of Rejecting Theory in American Criminology
    • Authors: Farrall S; Sparks R.
      Pages: 45 - 49
      Abstract: We would like to start our response by thanking Brendan Dooley and Sean Goodison for producing such a thought-provoking article. We were the (originally anonymous, now self-outed) peer reviewers for this journal. The stimulus and, we should admit, provocation that we received from Dooley and Goodison’s article encouraged us both into producing two of the longest peer reviews either of us can recall writing. So when Sandra Walklate offered us the opportunity to make those reviews the basis for a response to the article in the British Journal of Criminology we gladly took up the challenge.
      PubDate: Sun, 06 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjc/azz060
      Issue No: Vol. 60, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • Making Crime a Sustainable Development Issue: From ‘Drugs and Thugs’
           to ‘Peaceful and Inclusive Societies’
    • Authors: Blaustein J; Chodor T, Pino N.
      Pages: 50 - 73
      Abstract: AbstractDevelopment has long featured on the United Nations (UN) crime policy agenda; however, crime was only officially recognized by the international community as a global development priority following the adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals in 2015. Adopting a sociological institutionalist perspective, this article sets out to account for how this recognition was achieved. We draw on interviews with senior UN crime policy insiders and documentary sources to analyse the efforts of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) to amplify awareness of the crime-development link following the omission of this issue from the Millenium Development Goals and amidst significant institutional and material pressures to strengthen its ties to the wider UN system. The article accounts for the political construction of the crime-development nexus and the important role that UNODC has historically played in facilitating global governance in this emergent and increasingly expansive sphere of policy and practice.
      PubDate: Thu, 26 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjc/azz050
      Issue No: Vol. 60, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • A Life-Course Analysis of Engagement in Violent Extremist Groups
    • Authors: Carlsson C; Rostami A, Mondani H, et al.
      Pages: 74 - 92
      Abstract: AbstractIn this exploratory study, individuals’ processes of engagement in violent extremist groups are analysed by drawing from criminological life-course theory and narrative-based understandings of crime. Based on interviews with individuals who have participated in violent extremism, it is suggested that the process of engagement consists of three steps: (1) a weakening of informal social controls, followed by (2) an interaction with individuals in proximity to the group and (3) a stage of meaning-making in relation to the group and one’s identity, resulting in an individual’s willingness and capacity to engaging in the group’s activities, including violence. In future theorizing about processes of engagement in violent extremism, the meanings of age, and the life-course stages of late adolescence and emerging adulthood in particular, should be given analytic attention.
      PubDate: Fri, 09 Aug 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjc/azz048
      Issue No: Vol. 60, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • Hate in the Machine: Anti-Black and Anti-Muslim Social Media Posts as
           Predictors of Offline Racially and Religiously Aggravated Crime
    • Authors: Williams M; Burnap P, Javed A, et al.
      Pages: 93 - 117
      Abstract: AbstractNational governments now recognize online hate speech as a pernicious social problem. In the wake of political votes and terror attacks, hate incidents online and offline are known to peak in tandem. This article examines whether an association exists between both forms of hate, independent of ‘trigger’ events. Using Computational Criminology that draws on data science methods, we link police crime, census and Twitter data to establish a temporal and spatial association between online hate speech that targets race and religion, and offline racially and religiously aggravated crimes in London over an eight-month period. The findings renew our understanding of hate crime as a process, rather than as a discrete event, for the digital age.
      PubDate: Tue, 23 Jul 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjc/azz049
      Issue No: Vol. 60, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • The Role of Radical Economic Restructuring in Truancy from School and
           Engagement in Crime
    • Authors: Farrall S; Gray E, Mike Jones P.
      Pages: 118 - 140
      Abstract: AbstractOf late, criminologists have become acutely aware of the relationship between school outcomes and engagement in crime as an adult. This phenomenon—which has come to be known as the ‘school-to-prison-pipeline’—has been studied in North America and the United Kingdom, and requires longitudinal data sets. Typically, these studies approach the phenomenon from an individualist perspective and examine truancy in terms of the truants’ attitudes, academic achievement or their home life. What remains unclear, however, is a consideration of (1) how macro-level social and economic processes may influence the incidence of truancy, and (2) how structural processes fluctuate over time, and in so doing produce variations in truancy rates or the causal processes associated with truancy. Using longitudinal data from two birth cohort studies, we empirically address these blind spots and test the role of social-structural processes in truancy, and how these may change over time.
      PubDate: Sun, 28 Jul 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjc/azz040
      Issue No: Vol. 60, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • Constructing Suspicion Through Forensic DNA Databases in the EU. The Views
           of the Prüm Professionals
    • Authors: Machado H; Granja R, Amelung N.
      Pages: 141 - 159
      Abstract: AbstractThis article explores the fluid and flexible forms of constructing suspicion, which take shape in transnational governance of crime through forensic DNA databases. The empirical examples are the views of professionals engaged with the so-called Prüm system. This technological identification system was developed to enable DNA data exchange across EU Member States in the context of police and judicial cooperation to control cross-border crime and terrorism. We argue that suspicion is constructed through forms of deterritorializing and reterritorializing assumptions about criminality linked to the movements of suspect communities across the European Union. Transnational crime management is configured through narratives of global expansion of criminal mobility, technical neutrality of DNA identification and the reliance on criminal categorizations of particular national populations.
      PubDate: Tue, 27 Aug 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjc/azz057
      Issue No: Vol. 60, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • Putting Coercive Control into Practice: Problems and Possibilities
    • Authors: Barlow C; Johnson K, Walklate S, et al.
      Pages: 160 - 179
      Abstract: AbstractThere is growing international interest in translating Stark’s concept of coercive control into criminal justice policy and practice. In December 2015 an offence of coercive control was introduced in England and Wales. This paper offers an empirical investigation of the problems and possibilities associated with the translation of this offence into practice in one police force area in England. The findings offer some scope for optimism in response to patterns of abuse, but they also support the view that the current gender-neutral version of the legislation requires revision; there is a need for greater resourcing and training to improve understandings of the nature and impact of coercive control at all points of contact within the criminal justice process and finally, it remains the case that effective responses to domestic abuse need to be genuinely holistic.
      PubDate: Mon, 22 Jul 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjc/azz041
      Issue No: Vol. 60, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • The Whole Story: The Dilemma of the Domestic Violence Protection Order
           Narrative
    • Authors: Fitzgerald R; Douglas H.
      Pages: 180 - 197
      Abstract: AbstractThe complaint narrative, in which victims describe their experiences of abuse as part of the domestic violence protection order application process, has been questioned on the basis that quality and outcome might vary depending on who completes the form. Using a mixed-methods narrative analysis approach, we advance this inquiry by examining whether distinct ‘types’ of narratives can be identified across a sample of protection order application narratives from the state of Queensland in Australia. We find three distinct narrative types that are differently associated with who makes the application and the protection order outcome. The results underscore the unevenness in the protection order process and equitable access to justice more broadly.
      PubDate: Mon, 08 Jul 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjc/azz043
      Issue No: Vol. 60, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • The Diffusion of Detriment: Tracking Displacement Using a City-Wide Mixed
           Methods Approach
    • Authors: Hodgkinson T; Saville G, Andresen M.
      Pages: 198 - 218
      Abstract: AbstractCrime reduction strategies are often faced with the criticism of crime displacement. Conversely, criminologists find that reductions in crime in one area have a ‘diffusion of benefits’ to surrounding areas. However, these findings are limited due to a lack of extensive longitudinal data and qualitative data that provide context. We examine a natural experiment in displacement: the removal of a convergence setting in which calls for service immediately declined. However, other areas emerged as problematic and, in some places, crime increased dramatically. Using a qualitatively informed trajectory analysis, we examine whether the removal of a convergence setting results in displacement across the entire city. We discuss the implications for opportunity theories and prevention strategies.
      PubDate: Fri, 19 Apr 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjc/azz025
      Issue No: Vol. 60, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • The Problem with Crime Problem-Solving: Towards a Second Generation
           Pop'
    • Authors: Borrion H; Ekblom P, Alrajeh D, et al.
      Pages: 219 - 240
      Abstract: AbstractIn his 2018 Stockholm prize winner lecture, Goldstein highlighted the need for problem-oriented policing (POP) to be not only effective but also fair. Contributing to the development of POP, this study examines how a wider perspective on problem-solving generally, and scoping in particular, can be adopted to address some of the growing challenges in 21st century policing. We demonstrate that the concept of ‘problem’ was too narrowly defined and that, as a result, many problem-solving models found in criminology are ill-structured to minimize the negative side-effects of interventions and deliver broader benefits. Problem-solving concepts and models are compared across disciplines and recommendations are made to improve POP, drawing on examples in architecture, conservation science, industrial ecology and ethics.
      PubDate: Wed, 22 May 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjc/azz029
      Issue No: Vol. 60, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • The Private Policing of Insurance Claims: Power, Profit and Private
           Justice
    • Authors: Stenström A.
      Pages: 241 - 241
      Abstract: Br J Criminol doi: 10.1093/bjc/azx026
      PubDate: Mon, 18 Nov 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjc/azz074
      Issue No: Vol. 60, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • Corrigendum to: Hate in the Machine: Anti-Black and Anti-Muslim Social
           Media Posts as Predictors of Offline Racially and Religiously Aggravated
           Crime
    • Authors: Williams M; Burnap P, Javed A, et al.
      Pages: 242 - 242
      Abstract: Brit J Criminol doi:10.1093/bjc/azz049
      PubDate: Thu, 19 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjc/azz064
      Issue No: Vol. 60, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • Corrigendum to: The Dynamics of Domestic Abuse and Drug and Alcohol
           Dependency
    • Authors: Gadd D; Henderson J, Radcliffe P, et al.
      Pages: 243 - 243
      Abstract: This manuscript has been amended to correct errors in Table 1 and several minor grammatical mistakes. The author apologies for any confusion caused.
      PubDate: Wed, 16 Oct 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/bjc/azz063
      Issue No: Vol. 60, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • Erratum to: The Role of Radical Economic Restructuring in Truancy from
           School and Engagement in Crime
    • Authors: Farrall S; Gray E, Mike Jones P.
      Pages: 244 - 244
      Abstract:
      DOI : https://doi.org/10.1093/bjc/azz040
      PubDate: Thu, 12 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      Issue No: Vol. 60, No. 1 (2019)
       
 
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