for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help
Followed Journals
Journal you Follow: 0
 
Sign Up to follow journals, search in your chosen journals and, optionally, receive Email Alerts when new issues of your Followed Journals are published.
Already have an account? Sign In to see the journals you follow.
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Trends in Ecology & Evolution
Journal Prestige (SJR): 8.634
Citation Impact (citeScore): 10
Number of Followers: 278  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0169-5347
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3181 journals]
  • Using Soundscapes to Assess Deep-Sea Benthic Ecosystems
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 November 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Tzu-Hao Lin, Chong Chen, Hiromi Kayama Watanabe, Shinsuke Kawagucci, Hiroyuki Yamamoto, Tomonari AkamatsuTargets of deep-sea mining commonly coincide with biodiversity hotspots, such as hydrothermal vents. The resilience of these ecosystems relies on larval dispersal, which may be directed by habitat-specific soundscapes. We urge for a global effort to implement soundscape as a conservation tool to assess anthropogenic disruption to deep-sea benthic ecosystems.
       
  • Transgenerational Plasticity in Human-Altered Environments
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 November 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Sarah C. Donelan, Jennifer K. Hellmann, Alison M. Bell, Barney Luttbeg, John L. Orrock, Michael J. Sheriff, Andrew SihOur ability to predict how species will respond to human-induced rapid environmental change (HIREC) may depend upon our understanding of transgenerational plasticity (TGP), which occurs when environments experienced by previous generations influence phenotypes of subsequent generations. TGP evolved to help organisms cope with environmental stressors when parental environments are highly predictive of offspring environments. HIREC can alter conditions that favored TGP in historical environments by reducing parents’ ability to detect environmental conditions, disrupting previous correlations between parental and offspring environments, and interfering with the transmission of parental cues to offspring. Because of the propensity to produce errors in these processes, TGP will likely generate negative fitness outcomes in response to HIREC, though beneficial fitness outcomes may occur in some cases.
       
  • Understanding Admixture: Haplodiploidy to the Rescue
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 November 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Pierre Nouhaud, Alexandre Blanckaert, Claudia Bank, Jonna KulmuniHybridization has broad evolutionary consequences, from fueling or counteracting speciation to facilitating adaptation to novel environments. Hybridization and subsequent introgression appear widespread along the tree of life. However, our understanding of how distinct evolutionary forces shape admixed genomes and the fate of introgressed genetic variants remains scarce. Most admixture research in animals has focused on diploid organisms. We propose that haplodiploid organisms can help resolve open questions about the genomic consequences of hybridization in natural populations. The ploidy difference between haploid males and diploid females, the availability of genome-wide male haplotypes, and ongoing cases of admixture make haplodiploid organisms promising models to improve our knowledge with regards to the evolution of hybrid genomes.
       
  • Environmental Predictability as a Cause and Consequence of Animal Movement
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 November 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Louise Riotte-Lambert, Jason MatthiopoulosThe impacts of environmental predictability on the ecology and evolution of animal movement have been the subject of vigorous speculation for several decades. Recently, the swell of new biologging technologies has further stimulated their investigation. This advancing research frontier, however, still lacks conceptual unification and has so far focused little on converse effects. Populations of moving animals have ubiquitous effects on processes such as nutrient cycling and seed dispersal and may therefore shape patterns of environmental predictability. Here, we synthesise the main strands of the literature on the feedbacks between environmental predictability and animal movement and discuss how they may react to anthropogenic disruption, leading to unexpected threats for wildlife and the environment.
       
  • Social Barriers in Ecological Landscapes: The Social Resistance Hypothesis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 November 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Nicolette C. Armansin, Adam J. Stow, Mauricio Cantor, Stephan T. Leu, James A. Klarevas-Irby, Anthony A. Chariton, Damien R. FarineAcross animal societies, individuals invest time and energy in social interactions. The social landscape that emerges from these interactions can then generate barriers that limit the ability of individuals to disperse to, and reproduce in, groups or populations. Therefore, social barriers can contribute to the difference between the physical capacity for movement through the habitat and subsequent gene flow. We call this contributing effect ‘social resistance’. We propose that social resistance can act as an agent of selection on key life-history strategies and promote the evolution of social strategies that facilitate effective dispersal. By linking landscape genetics and social behaviour, the social resistance hypothesis generates predictions integrating dispersal, connectivity, and life-history evolution.
       
  • Predicting Landscape Configuration Effects on Agricultural Pest
           Suppression
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 November 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Nathan L. Haan, Yajun Zhang, Douglas A. LandisArthropod predators and parasitoids attack crop pests, providing a valuable ecosystem service. The amount of noncrop habitat surrounding crop fields influences pest suppression, but synthesis of new studies suggests that the spatial configuration of crops and other habitats is similarly important. Natural enemies are often more abundant in fine-grained agricultural landscapes comprising smaller patches and can increase or decrease with the connectivity of crop fields to other habitats. Partitioning organisms by traits has emerged as a promising way to predict the strength and direction of these effects. Furthermore, our ability to predict configurational effects will depend on understanding the potential for indirect effects among trophic levels and the relationship between arthropod dispersal capability and the spatial scale of underlying landscape structure.
       
  • Time to Care More about Wallace
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 November 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Mats Björklund
       
  • Conservation Genomics in a Changing Arctic
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 November 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Jocelyn P. Colella, Sandra L. Talbot, Christian Brochmann, Eric B. Taylor, Eric P. Hoberg, Joseph A. CookAlthough logistically challenging to study, the Arctic is a bellwether for global change and is becoming a model for questions pertinent to the persistence of biodiversity. Disruption of Arctic ecosystems is accelerating, with impacts ranging from mixing of biotic communities to individual behavioral responses. Understanding these changes is crucial for conservation and sustainable economic development. Genomic approaches are providing transformative insights into biotic responses to environmental change, but have seen limited application in the Arctic due to a series of limitations. To meet the promise of genome analyses, we urge rigorous development of biorepositories from high latitudes to provide essential libraries to improve the conservation, monitoring, and management of Arctic ecosystems through genomic approaches.
       
  • Life, Universe, and All the Rest
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 November 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Ulrich R. Ernst
       
  • 3D Imaging Insights into Forests and Coral Reefs
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 November 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Kim Calders, Stuart Phinn, Renata Ferrari, Javier Leon, John Armston, Gregory P. Asner, Mathias DisneyForests and coral reefs are structurally complex ecosystems threatened by climate change. In situ 3D imaging measurements provide unprecedented, quantitative, and detailed structural information that allows testing of hypotheses relating form to function. This affords new insights into both individual organisms and their relationship to their surroundings and neighbours.
       
  • The Components and Spatiotemporal Dimension of Carrion Biomass
           Quantification
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 November 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Marcos Moleón, Nuria Selva, José A. Sánchez-Zapata
       
  • Rainforests Are in Peril, and So Are We
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 October 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Louise Ashton
       
  • Data Integration for Large-Scale Models of Species Distributions
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 October 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Nick J.B. Isaac, Marta A. Jarzyna, Petr Keil, Lea I. Dambly, Philipp H. Boersch-Supan, Ella Browning, Stephen N. Freeman, Nick Golding, Gurutzeta Guillera-Arroita, Peter A. Henrys, Susan Jarvis, José Lahoz-Monfort, Jörn Pagel, Oliver L. Pescott, Reto Schmucki, Emily G. Simmonds, Robert B. O’HaraWith the expansion in the quantity and types of biodiversity data being collected, there is a need to find ways to combine these different sources to provide cohesive summaries of species’ potential and realized distributions in space and time. Recently, model-based data integration has emerged as a means to achieve this by combining datasets in ways that retain the strengths of each. We describe a flexible approach to data integration using point process models, which provide a convenient way to translate across ecological currencies. We highlight recent examples of large-scale ecological models based on data integration and outline the conceptual and technical challenges and opportunities that arise.
       
  • Mathematical Statistics for Biologists and Other Interesting People
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 October 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Laura Melissa Guzman, Matthew W. Pennell
       
  • Subscription and Copyright Information
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, Volume 34, Issue 11Author(s):
       
  • Editorial Board and Contents
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, Volume 34, Issue 11Author(s):
       
  • Beauty on the Mind
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 October 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Stephen P. De Lisle
       
  • Sexual Dimorphism and Species Diversity: from Clades to Sites
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 October 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Kaoru Tsuji, Tadashi FukamiA variety of relationships have been observed between sexual dimorphism and species diversity, from positive to negative and nonsignificant. Although many hypotheses have been proposed to explain these relationships, it has proven difficult to understand why patterns are so variable. Most studies on this topic have used clades as phylogenetically independent replicates for pattern analysis, but a few recent studies took an alternative approach, using sites as spatially independent replicates. We discuss how the new, site-based studies complement the traditional, clade-based studies and argue that the combined use of the two approaches will be more powerful than either alone in understanding environmental factors that produce variation in sexual dimorphism–species diversity relationships.
       
  • Funding Conservation through an Emerging Social Movement
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 October 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Benjamin S. Freeling, Sean D. ConnellPeople will pay to protect our environment. To encourage donations, it is fundamental to understand the values that motivate people. Here, we identify a new opportunity to attract donations from an emerging social movement to deliver benefits to the natural world.
       
  • Hope on the Wing
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 October 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Manu E. Saunders
       
  • The New Tree of Eukaryotes
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 October 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Fabien Burki, Andrew J. Roger, Matthew W. Brown, Alastair G.B. SimpsonFor 15 years, the eukaryote Tree of Life (eToL) has been divided into five to eight major groupings, known as ‘supergroups’. However, the tree has been profoundly rearranged during this time. The new eToL results from the widespread application of phylogenomics and numerous discoveries of major lineages of eukaryotes, mostly free-living heterotrophic protists. The evidence that supports the tree has transitioned from a synthesis of molecular phylogenetics and biological characters to purely molecular phylogenetics. Most current supergroups lack defining morphological or cell-biological characteristics, making the supergroup label even more arbitrary than before. Going forward, the combination of traditional culturing with maturing culture-free approaches and phylogenomics should accelerate the process of completing and resolving the eToL at its deepest levels.
       
  • Starving the Enemy' Feeding Behavior Shapes Host-Parasite Interactions
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 October 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Jessica L. Hite, Alaina C. Pfenning, Clayton E. CresslerThe loss of appetite that typically accompanies infection or mere exposure to parasites is traditionally considered a negative byproduct of infection, benefitting neither the host nor the parasite. Numerous medical and veterinary practices directly or indirectly subvert this ‘illness-mediated anorexia’. However, the ecological factors that influence it, its effects on disease outcomes, and why it evolved remain poorly resolved. We explore how hosts use anorexia to defend against infection and how parasites manipulate anorexia to enhance transmission. Then, we use a coevolutionary model to illustrate how shifts in the magnitude of anorexia (e.g., via drugs) affect disease dynamics and virulence evolution. Anorexia could be exploited to improve disease management; we propose an interdisciplinary approach to minimize unintended consequences.
       
  • Conservation Success through IPBES-Guided Transformative Change
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 October 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Timothy C. Bonebrake, Fengyi Guo, Caroline Dingle, David M. Baker, Roger L. Kitching, Louise A. Ashton
       
  • Resisting Antimicrobial Resistance: Lessons from Fungus Farming Ants
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 September 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Ayush Pathak, Steve Kett, Massimiliano MarvasiAttine ants use antimicrobials produced by commensal bacteria to inhibit parasites on their fungal gardens. However, in this agricultural system, antimicrobial use does not lead to overwhelming resistance, as is typical in clinical settings. Mixtures of continually evolving antimicrobial variants could support these dynamics.
       
  • Subscription and Copyright Information
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, Volume 34, Issue 10Author(s):
       
  • Editorial Board and Contents
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & Evolution, Volume 34, Issue 10Author(s):
       
  • The Pathobiome in Animal and Plant Diseases
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 September 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): David Bass, Grant D. Stentiford, Han-Ching Wang, Britt Koskella, Charles R. TylerA growing awareness of the diversity and ubiquity of microbes (eukaryotes, prokaryotes, and viruses) associated with larger ‘host’ organisms has led to the realisation that many diseases thought to be caused by one primary agent are the result of interactions between multiple taxa and the host. Even where a primary agent can be identified, its effect is often moderated by other symbionts. Therefore, the one pathogen–one disease paradigm is shifting towards the pathobiome concept, integrating the interaction of multiple symbionts, host, and environment in a new understanding of disease aetiology. Taxonomically, pathobiomes are variable across host species, ecology, tissue type, and time. Therefore, a more functionally driven understanding of pathobiotic systems is necessary, based on gene expression, metabolic interactions, and ecological processes.
       
  • The Past and Future of Experimental Speciation
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 September 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Nathan J. White, Rhonda R. Snook, Isobel EyresSpeciation is the result of evolutionary processes that generate barriers to gene flow between populations, facilitating reproductive isolation. Speciation is typically studied via theoretical models and snapshot tests in natural populations. Experimental speciation enables real-time direct tests of speciation theory and has been long touted as a critical complement to other approaches. We argue that, despite its promise to elucidate the evolution of reproductive isolation, experimental speciation has been underutilised and lags behind other contributions to speciation research. We review recent experiments and outline a framework for how experimental speciation can be implemented to address current outstanding questions that are otherwise challenging to answer. Greater uptake of this approach is necessary to rapidly advance understanding of speciation.
       
  • The Evolution of Variance Control
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 September 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Marjolein Bruijning, C. Jessica E. Metcalf, Eelke Jongejans, Julien F. AyrolesGenetically identical individuals can be phenotypically variable, even in constant environmental conditions. The ubiquity of this phenomenon, known as ‘intra-genotypic variability’, is increasingly evident and the relevant mechanistic underpinnings are beginning to be understood. In parallel, theory has delineated a number of formal expectations for contexts in which such a feature would be adaptive. Here, we review empirical evidence across biological systems and theoretical expectations, including nonlinear averaging and bet hedging. We synthesize existing results to illustrate the dependence of selection outcomes both on trait characteristics, features of environmental variability, and species’ demographic context. We conclude by discussing ways to bridge the gap between empirical evidence of intra-genotypic variability, studies demonstrating its genetic component, and evidence that it is adaptive.
       
  • The Trouble with Trees: Afforestation Plans for Africa
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 September 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): William J. Bond, Nicola Stevens, Guy F. Midgley, Caroline E.R. LehmannExtensive tree planting is widely promoted for reducing atmospheric CO2. In Africa, 1 million km2, mostly of grassy biomes, have been targeted for ‘restoration’ by 2030. The target is based on the erroneous assumption that these biomes are deforested and degraded. We discuss the pros and cons of exporting fossil fuel emission problems to Africa.
       
  • Learning from Wild Honey Bees
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 September 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Fabrice Requier, Robin M. Crewe
       
  • Getting Back to Nature: Feralization in Animals and Plants
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 September 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Eben Gering, Darren Incorvaia, Rie Henriksen, Jeffrey Conner, Thomas Getty, Domminic WrightFormerly domesticated organisms and artificially selected genes often escape controlled cultivation, but their subsequent evolution is not well studied. In this review, we examine plant and animal feralization through an evolutionary lens, including how natural selection, artificial selection, and gene flow shape feral genomes, traits, and fitness. Available evidence shows that feralization is not a mere reversal of domestication. Instead, it is shaped by the varied and complex histories of feral populations, and by novel selection pressures. To stimulate further insight we outline several future directions. These include testing how ‘domestication genes’ act in wild settings, studying the brains and behaviors of feral animals, and comparative analyses of feral populations and taxa. This work offers feasible and exciting research opportunities with both theoretical and practical applications.
       
  • Greenbeard Genes: Theory and Reality
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 September 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Philip G. Madgwick, Laurence J. Belcher, Jason B. WolfGreenbeard genes were proposed as a cartoonish thought experiment to explain why altruism can be a selfish strategy from the perspective of genes. The likelihood of finding a real greenbeard gene in nature was thought to be remote because they were believed to require a set of improbable properties. Yet, despite this expectation, there is an ongoing explosion in claimed discoveries of greenbeard genes. Bringing together the latest theory and experimental findings, we argue that there is a need to dispose of the cartoon presentation of a greenbeard to refocus their burgeoning empirical study on the more fundamental concept that the thought experiment was designed to illustrate.
       
  • Collaborative Projects: Unleashing Early Career Scientists’ Power
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 August 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Pascal Bodmer, Katrin Attermeyer, Ada Pastor, Núria CatalánCollaborative research projects exclusively targeted to early career researchers (ECRs) have been initiated in Europe. So far, the first two collaborative projects have united more than 80 ECRs. We describe the structure and benefits of such initiatives for the ECRs and highlight the positive influence on the whole scientific community.
       
  • Six Impossible Things before Breakfast: Assumptions, Models, and Belief in
           Molecular Dating: (Trends in Ecology & Evolution 34, 474–484, 2019)
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 August 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Lindell Bromham
       
  • The Missing Angle: Ecosystem Consequences of Phenological Mismatch
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 August 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Karen H. Beard, Katharine C. Kelsey, A. Joshua Leffler, Jeffrey M. WelkerClimate change leads to unequal shifts in the phenology of interacting species, such as consumers and their resources, leading to potential phenological mismatches. While studies have investigated how phenological mismatch affects wild populations, we still lack studies and a framework for investigating how phenological mismatch affects ecosystems, particularly nutrient cycling.
       
  • Dissecting Trait Variation across Species Barriers
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 August 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Carly V. Weiss, Rachel B. BremDissecting the basis of naturally occurring trait variation is one of the central goals of modern genetics. For eukaryotes, classic methods for this purpose rely on screens of recombinants from matings between distinct parents. These tools cannot be used in studies of species that cannot mate to form recombinant progeny in the first place. However, new approaches are coming online to shuffle the genomes of otherwise incompatible species. With them, geneticists can elucidate how evolution built a new trait, even if it happened millions of years ago, in a lineage that is now reproductively cutoff from its closest relatives.
       
  • IPBES Promotes Integration of Multiple Threats to Biodiversity
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 August 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Nicolas Titeux, Lluís Brotons, Josef Settele
       
  • Climate Change Is Breaking Earth’s Beat
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 August 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Jérôme Sueur, Bernie Krause, Almo FarinaForests, deserts, rivers, and oceans are filled with animal vocalizations and geological sounds. We postulate that climate change is changing the Earth’s natural acoustic fabric. In particular, we identify shifts in acoustic structure that all sound-sensitive organisms, marine and terrestrial, may experience. Only upstream solutions might mitigate these acoustic changes.
       
  • An Ecological Loop: Host Microbiomes across Multitrophic Interactions
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 August 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Hongwei Liu, Catriona A. Macdonald, James Cook, Ian C. Anderson, Brajesh K. SinghOur knowledge of host-associated microorganisms and their role in host functions is rapidly evolving. Stress-affected plants assemble beneficial microbes in their rhizosphere to maximize survival and growth. Similarly, insects have gut microbiomes that extend their functional repertoire in fighting stress. A strong microbial linkage between soil, plants, and pollinators is emerging and this can influence pollination services and overall ecosystem health. Yet, the nature of microbial interactions between different ecosystem components remains poorly understood. Here we highlight the acquisition pathways of beneficial microbes and their functions in protecting hosts against stress. By adopting a new ‘eco-holobiont’ approach, which explicitly incorporates biotic feedbacks, we can significantly expand our ecological understanding and better develop sustainable environmental management.
       
  • Linking Traits across Ecological Scales Determines Functional Resilience
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 August 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Rebecca V. Gladstone-Gallagher, Conrad A. Pilditch, Fabrice Stephenson, Simon F. ThrushUnder globally accelerating rates of ecosystem degradation, maintaining ecosystem function is a priority to avoid loss of valuable ecosystem services. Two factors are important: changes to the disturbance regime (stresses imposed) and resilience of biodiversity and ecosystem functions (the ecosystem’s capacity to respond to change). Various attributes at different scales of ecological organisation confer resilience (from individual species to communities at landscape scales), but it is critical to understand how these attributes interact to inform how ecosystem function changes with disturbances that vary in intensity, spatial extent, and frequency. Individual species attributes influence their resistance, while attributes at the landscape-scale influence recovery of communities and function. Understanding resilience to disturbances requires defining the characteristics of a resilient community at multiple scales.
       
  • Niche Modification, Human Cultural Evolution and the Anthropocene
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 August 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Felicia M. Low, Peter D. Gluckman, Mark A. HansonNiche-constructing organisms actively modify their environments with adaptive consequences, sustaining a new equilibrium. Modern humans are instead niche modifiers, continually changing their environments irrespective of adaptive pressures. The nature, scale, and speed of such modifications have potential ill effects that need to be addressed with multilevel societal initiatives.
       
  • The Cognitive Ecology of Stimulus Ambiguity: A Predator–Prey
           Perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 August 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Brian C. Leavell, Ximena E. BernalOrganisms face the cognitive challenge of making decisions based on imperfect information. Predators and prey, in particular, are confronted with ambiguous stimuli when foraging and avoiding attacks. These challenges are accentuated by variation imposed by environmental, physiological, and cognitive factors. While the cognitive factors influencing perceived ambiguity are often assumed to be fixed, contemporary findings reveal that perceived ambiguity is instead the dynamic outcome of interactive cognitive processes. Here, we present a framework that integrates recent advances in neurophysiology and sensory ecology with a classic decision-making model, signal detection theory (SDT), to understand the cognitive mechanisms that shape perceived stimulus ambiguity in predators and prey. Since stimulus ambiguity is pervasive, the framework discussed here provides insights that extend into nonforaging contexts.
       
  • Aquatic Predators Influence Micronutrients: Important but Understudied
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 August 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Alexander S. Flecker, Cornelia W. Twining, Oswald J. Schmitz, Steven J. Cooke, Neil Hammerschlag
       
  • Unifying Theoretical and Empirical Perspectives on Genomic Differentiation
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 August 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Georgy A. Semenov, Rebecca J. Safran, Chris C.R. Smith, Sheela P. Turbek, Sean P. Mullen, Samuel M. FlaxmanDifferentiation is often heterogeneous across the genomes of diverging populations. Despite substantial recent progress, much work remains to improve our abilities to connect genomic patterns to underlying evolutionary processes. Crosstalk between theoretical and empirical research has shaped the field of evolutionary genetics since its foundation and needs to be greatly enhanced for modern datasets. We leverage recent insights from theoretical and empirical studies to identify existing gaps and suggest pathways across them. We stress the importance of reporting empirical data in standardized ways to enable meta-analyses and to facilitate parameterization of analyses and models. Additionally, a more comprehensive view of potential mechanisms – especially considering variable recombination rates and ubiquitous background selection – and their interactions should replace common, oversimplified assumptions.
       
  • Mechanisms of Fire Seasonality Effects on Plant Populations
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 August 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Russell G. Miller, Ryan Tangney, Neal J. Enright, Joseph B. Fontaine, David J. Merritt, Mark K.J. Ooi, Katinka X. Ruthrof, Ben P. MillerAltered fire regimes resulting from climate change and human activity threaten many terrestrial ecosystems. However, we lack a holistic and detailed understanding of the effects of altering one key fire regime component – season of fire. Altered fire seasonality can strongly affect post-fire recovery of plant populations through interactions with plant phenology. We identify seven key mechanisms of fire seasonality effects under a conceptual demographic framework and review evidence for these. We reveal negative impacts of altered fire seasonality and identify research gaps for mechanisms and climate types for future analyses of fire seasonality effects within the identified demographic framework. This framework and these mechanisms can inform critical decisions for conservation, land management, and fire management policy development globally.
       
  • Is Aichi Target 11 Progress Correctly Measured for Developing
           Countries'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 August 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Pierre Failler, Grégoire Touron-Gardic, Marie-Suzanne TraoreDeveloping countries are struggling to meet Aichi Target 11, which calls for 10% of national marine area under protection. In addition, the official tool to measure their progress, the World Database on Protected Areas (WDPA), tends to overestimate it. To reach this target, developing countries must set up large offshore Marine protected areas.
       
  • Powering Ocean Giants: The Energetics of Shark and Ray Megafauna
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 July 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Christopher L. Lawson, Lewis G. Halsey, Graeme C. Hays, Christine L. Dudgeon, Nicholas L. Payne, Michael B. Bennett, Craig R. White, Anthony J. RichardsonShark and ray megafauna have crucial roles as top predators in many marine ecosystems, but are currently among the most threatened vertebrates and, based on historical extinctions, may be highly susceptible to future environmental perturbations. However, our understanding of their energetics lags behind that of other taxa. Such knowledge is required to answer important ecological questions and predict their responses to ocean warming, which may be limited by expanding ocean deoxygenation and declining prey availability. To develop bioenergetics models for shark and ray megafauna, incremental improvements in respirometry systems are useful but unlikely to accommodate the largest species. Advances in biologging tools and modelling could help answer the most pressing ecological questions about these iconic species.
       
  • Trends in the Ecology and Evolution of Birds
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 July 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Oscar Gonzalez
       
  • Towards Integrating Evolution, Metabolism, and Climate Change Studies of
           Marine Ecosystems
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 July 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Federico Baltar, Barbara Bayer, Nina Bednarsek, Stacy Deppeler, Ruben Escribano, Carolina E. Gonzalez, Roberta L. Hansman, Rajani Kanta Mishra, Mary Ann Moran, Daniel J. Repeta, Carol Robinson, Eva Sintes, Christian Tamburini, Luis E. Valentin, Gerhard J. HerndlGlobal environmental changes are challenging the structure and functioning of ecosystems. However, a mechanistic understanding of how global environmental changes will affect ecosystems is still lacking. The complex and interacting biological and physical processes spanning vast temporal and spatial scales that constitute an ecosystem make this a formidable problem. A unifying framework based on ecological theory, that considers fundamental and realized niches, combined with metabolic, evolutionary, and climate change studies, is needed to provide the mechanistic understanding required to evaluate and forecast the future of marine communities, ecosystems, and their services.
       
  • Measuring Terrestrial Area of Habitat (AOH) and Its Utility for the IUCN
           Red List
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 July 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Thomas M. Brooks, Stuart L. Pimm, H. Resit Akçakaya, Graeme M. Buchanan, Stuart H.M. Butchart, Wendy Foden, Craig Hilton-Taylor, Michael Hoffmann, Clinton N. Jenkins, Lucas Joppa, Binbin V. Li, Vivek Menon, Natalia Ocampo-Peñuela, Carlo RondininiThe International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species includes assessment of extinction risk for 98 512 species, plus documentation of their range, habitat, elevation, and other factors. These range, habitat and elevation data can be matched with terrestrial land cover and elevation datasets to map the species’ area of habitat (AOH; also known as extent of suitable habitat; ESH). This differs from the two spatial metrics used for assessing extinction risk in the IUCN Red List criteria: extent of occurrence (EOO) and area of occupancy (AOO). AOH can guide conservation, for example, through targeting areas for field surveys, assessing proportions of species’ habitat within protected areas, and monitoring habitat loss and fragmentation. We recommend that IUCN Red List assessments document AOH wherever practical.
       
  • Lamarck, the Father of Evolutionary Ecology'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 July 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Mats BjörklundLamarck realized life had evolved from simple to more complex forms, due to adaptation to a changing environment over time. Though he was wrong in many details, he got the overall picture right. Thus, he can be seen as the first evolutionary ecologist, connecting evolutionary change in organisms to their environment.
       
  • The Invasion Criterion: A Common Currency for Ecological Research
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 July 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Tess Nahanni Grainger, Jonathan M. Levine, Benjamin GilbertAccording to the invasion criterion, stable coexistence requires that all species in a community increase in abundance when rare, which occurs when stabilizing mechanisms cause intraspecific competition to be stronger than interspecific competition. This simple principle has traditionally been applied to tests of local coexistence in a narrow range of ecological systems. However, new theory founded on the invasion criterion is emerging across ecological fields ranging from eco-evolutionary dynamics to global change to macroecology. Concurrently, straightforward methods for testing the invasion criterion have been proposed, but remain underused. Here, we identify the invasion criterion as a common thread linking emerging ecological theory, and we bring this theory together with the methods that can be used to test it.
       
  • The Exciting Potential and Remaining Uncertainties of Genetic Rescue
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 July 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Donovan A. Bell, Zachary L. Robinson, W. Chris Funk, Sarah W. Fitzpatrick, Fred W. Allendorf, David A. Tallmon, Andrew R. WhiteleyRestoring gene flow into small, isolated populations can alleviate genetic load and decrease extinction risk (i.e., genetic rescue), yet gene flow is rarely augmented as a conservation strategy. Due to this discrepancy between opportunity and action, ais rarely augmented as a conservation strategy. Due to this discrepancy between opportunity and action, a recent call was made for widespread genetic rescue attempts. However, several aspects of augmenting gene flow are poorly understood, including the magnitude and duration of beneficial effects and when deleterious effects are likely to occur. We discuss the remaining uncertainties of genetic rescue in order to promote and direct future research and to hasten progress toward implementing this potentially powerful conservation strategy on a broader scale.
       
  • Improving Environmental Interventions by Understanding Information Flows
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 July 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Emiel de Lange, E.J. Milner-Gulland, Aidan KeaneConservationists are increasingly interested in changing human behaviour. One understudied aspect of such interventions is information flow. Different patterns of interpersonal communication and social structures within communities influence the adoption of behavioural changes through social influence and social reinforcement. Understanding the structure of information flow in a group, using tools such as social network analysis, can therefore offer important insights for interventions. For example, communications may be targeted to highly connected opinion leaders to leverage their influence, or communication may be facilitated between distinct subgroups to promote peer learning. Incorporating these approaches into conservation interventions can promote more effective behaviour change. This review introduces conservation researchers and practitioners to key concepts underpinning information flows for interventions targeting networks of individuals.
       
  • How Evolution Modifies the Variability of Range Expansion
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 July 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Jennifer L. Williams, Ruth A. Hufbauer, Tom E.X. MillerEco-evolutionary theory suggests that rapid evolution can accelerate range expansion speed. In addition to average speed, recent experimental studies reveal that evolution can also influence the amount of variability across replicates of spreading populations, but in contrasting ways. Here we develop a predictive framework, drawing on ideas from population genetics and spread theory, to understand when, why, and in what direction evolution will modify the variability of range expansion. Our framework revolves around the balance of variance-generating (drift) and variance-reducing (selective) evolutionary processes, and factors that may tip this balance, including population size at the leading edge and mating system. We suggest hypotheses to clarify contrasting experimental results and highlight a way forward for studying eco-evolutionary dynamics of range expansion.
       
  • Aquatic Predators Influence Flux of Essential Micronutrients
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 July 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Libor Závorka, Barbara Koeck, Shaun S. Killen, Martin J. Kainz
       
  • Bark Beetle Population Dynamics in the Anthropocene: Challenges and
           Solutions
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 June 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Peter H.W. Biedermann, Jörg Müller, Jean-Claude Grégoire, Axel Gruppe, Jonas Hagge, Almuth Hammerbacher, Richard W. Hofstetter, Dineshkumar Kandasamy, Miroslav Kolarik, Martin Kostovcik, Paal Krokene, Aurélien Sallé, Diana L. Six, Tabea Turrini, Dan Vanderpool, Michael J. Wingfield, Claus BässlerTree-killing bark beetles are the most economically important insects in conifer forests worldwide. However, despite>200 years of research, the drivers of population eruptions and crashes are still not fully understood and the existing knowledge is thus insufficient to face the challenges posed by the Anthropocene. We critically analyze potential biotic and abiotic drivers of population dynamics of an exemplary species, the European spruce bark beetle (ESBB) (Ips typographus) and present a multivariate approach that integrates the many drivers governing this bark beetle system. We call for hypothesis-driven, large-scale collaborative research efforts to improve our understanding of the population dynamics of this and other bark beetle pests. Our approach can serve as a blueprint for tackling other eruptive forest insects.
       
  • Towards Quantifying Carrion Biomass in Ecosystems
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 June 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Philip S. Barton, Maldwyn J. Evans, Claire N. Foster, Jennifer L. Pechal, Joseph K. Bump, M.-Martina Quaggiotto, M. Eric BenbowThe decomposition of animal biomass (carrion) contributes to the recycling of energy and nutrients through ecosystems. Whereas the role of plant decomposition in ecosystems is broadly recognised, the significance of carrion to ecosystem functioning remains poorly understood. Quantitative data on carrion biomass are lacking and there is no clear pathway towards improved knowledge in this area. Here, we present a framework to show how quantities derived from individual carcasses can be scaled up using population metrics, allowing for comparisons among ecosystems and other forms of biomass. Our framework facilitates the generation of new data that is critical to building a quantitative understanding of the contribution of carrion to trophic processes and ecosystem stocks and flows.
       
  • Untangling the Multiple Ecological Radiations of Early Mammals
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 June 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): David M. Grossnickle, Stephanie M. Smith, Gregory P. WilsonThe ecological diversification of early mammals is one of the most globally transformative events in Earth’s history and the Cretaceous Terrestrial Revolution (KTR) and end-Cretaceous mass extinction are commonly hailed as catalysts. However, a confounding issue when examining this diversification is that it comprised nested radiations of mammalian subclades within the broader scope of mammalian evolution. In the past 200 million years, various independent groups experienced large-scale radiations, each involving ecological diversification from ancestral lineages of small insectivores; examples include Jurassic mammaliaforms, Late Cretaceous metatherians, and Cenozoic placentals. Here, we review these ecological radiations, highlighting the nuanced complexity of early mammal evolution, the value of ecomorphological fossil data, and the importance of phylogenetic context in macroevolutionary studies.
       
  • Temporal Instability of Evidence Base: A Threat to Policy Making'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 June 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): Julia Koricheva, Elena KulinskayaA shift towards evidence-based conservation and environmental management over the last two decades has resulted in an increased use of systematic reviews and meta-analyses as tools to combine existing scientific evidence. However, to guide policy making decisions in conservation and management, the conclusions of meta-analyses need to remain stable for at least some years. Alarmingly, numerous recent studies indicate that the magnitude, statistical significance, and even the sign of the effects reported in the literature might change over relatively short time periods. We argue that such rapid temporal changes in cumulative evidence represent a real threat to policy making in conservation and environmental management and call for systematic monitoring of temporal changes in evidence and exploration of their causes.
       
  • Making Evolutionary Sense of Gaia
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 May 2019Source: Trends in Ecology & EvolutionAuthor(s): W. Ford DoolittleThe Gaia hypothesis in a strong and frequently criticized form assumes that global homeostatic mechanisms have evolved by natural selection favoring the maintenance of conditions suitable for life. Traditional neoDarwinists hold this to be impossible in theory. But the hypothesis does make sense if one treats the clade that comprises the biological component of Gaia as an individual and allows differential persistence – as well as differential reproduction – to be an outcome of evolution by natural selection. Recent developments in theoretical and experimental evolutionary biology may justify both maneuvers.
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
Home (Search)
Subjects A-Z
Publishers A-Z
Customise
APIs
Your IP address: 35.173.234.140
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-