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Theory, Culture & Society
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.002
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 165  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0263-2764 - ISSN (Online) 1460-3616
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1075 journals]
  • Dialogue with John Dunn on Korean Denuclearization
    • Authors: Sang-Jin Han
      Abstract: Theory, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This dialogue addresses the global risk that broke out of the North Korean development of nuclear weapons and missiles. It starts from the brutal consequences of the national division for Korea and asks why North Korea has been so preoccupied with nuclear projects as has been found to be the case since the 1990s, and how much and why Kim Jung-un today differs from his father in terms of his future, and where the fundamental limit lies in Moon Jae-In’s as well as Trump’s approaches to Korean denuclearization and peace. The highlight of this dialogue is to explain the intrinsic difficulties for Donald Trump and Kim Jung-un in finding a reasonable solution to their respective demands for denuclearization and regime security, and explore the likely future of the Korean Peninsula from the vantage point of Kim Dae-jung’s Sunshine Policy and metamorphosis.
      Citation: Theory, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2019-08-08T03:07:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0263276419867465
       
  • The Face Revisited: Using Deleuze and Guattari to Explore the Politics of
           Algorithmic Face Recognition
    • Authors: Claudio Celis Bueno
      Abstract: Theory, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article explores the political dimension of algorithmic face recognition through the prism of Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari’s notion of faciality. It argues that algorithmic face recognition is a technology that expresses a key aspect of contemporary capitalism: the problematic position of the individual in light of new forms of algorithmic and statistical regimes of power. While there is a clear relation between modern disciplinary mechanisms of individualization and the face as a sign of individuality, in control societies this relation appears more as a contradiction. The article contends that Deleuze and Guattari’s concepts of machinic enslavement and social subjection offer a fruitful perspective from where to identify the power mechanisms behind the problematic position of the individual in the specific case of algorithmic face recognition.
      Citation: Theory, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2019-08-08T03:07:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0263276419867752
       
  • Pastoral Power and Algorithmic Governmentality
    • Authors: Rosalind Cooper
      Abstract: Theory, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This paper contributes to inquiries into the genealogy of governmentality and the nature of secularization by arguing that pastoralism continues to operate in the algorithmic register. Drawing on Agamben’s notion of signature, I elucidate a pair of historically distant yet archaeologically proximate affinities: the first between the pastorate and algorithmic control, and the second between the absconded God of late medieval nominalism and the authority of algorithms in the cybernetic age. I support my hypothesis by attending to the signaturial kinships between, on the one hand, temporality and authority in our contemporary conjuncture, and, on the other, obedience and submission in Christian thought from late antiquity and the late Middle Ages. I thereby illustrate the hidden genealogical continuities between theological-pastoral technologies of power and technocratic-algorithmic modalities of governance. I conclude by suggesting that medieval counter-conducts may be redeployed in our present circumstances for emancipatory ends.
      Citation: Theory, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2019-07-31T10:51:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0263276419860576
       
  • The Posthumanities in an Era of Unexpected Consequences
    • Authors: Rosi Braidotti, Matthew Fuller
      Abstract: Theory, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The posthumanities constitute an affirmative, expanded development of the traditional humanities embedded within the posthuman convergence. Numerous changes impel recognition of wider forms and constituents of conditions no longer nameable simply as human, also implying mature relations to technology and science. The posthuman condition – in fields as diverse as military strategy, health, education and machine learning – brings entities and processes into transversal relation in ways that are normatively neutral but loaded with implications. Working in this condition is a task of the posthumanities. Being transversal implies risk. One such risk is the unexpected consequence. The article builds on Jevons, Merton, Guattari and Braidotti, to examine how transversality maps unexpected consequences (such as pollution). Transversality is also a pragmatic method to render problems multi-dimensional: expressing active forces and capacities under the radar of established forms of articulation. Short summaries of articles by contributing authors complete this introduction.
      Citation: Theory, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2019-07-31T09:31:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0263276419860567
       
  • The Pluralistic Problematic: William James and the Pragmatics of the
           Pluriverse
    • Authors: Martin Savransky
      Abstract: Theory, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In his lectures on pragmatism, William James famously proposed that the question of ‘the one and the many’ constitutes the most central of all philosophic problems, and that it is ‘central because so pregnant’. Prompted by James’ proposition, this article explores the intimately political connection in James’ thought between his pluralistic metaphysics and the nature of the problematic as a generative force that impregnates worlds and thoughts with differences: what I here call ‘the pluralistic problematic’. Exploring the generative significance of the problematic in James’ philosophy, I propose that, where James is concerned, the pluriverse has a thoroughly problematic mode of existence. And pluralism, rather than a celebration of the many, rather than a philosophical exposition on multiple worlds and ontologies, or a theory of the organisation of a diverse polis, is first and foremost a pragmatics of the pluriverse – a political, experimental and pragmatic response to the ongoing insistence of the pluralistic problematic.
      Citation: Theory, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2019-07-18T06:58:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0263276419848030
       
  • Vitalism Now – A Problematic
    • Authors: Monica Greco
      Abstract: Theory, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This paper considers whether and how ‘vitalism’ might be considered relevant as a concept today; whether its relevance should be expressed in terms of disciplinary demarcations between the life sciences and the natural sciences; and whether there is a fundamental incompatibility between a ‘vitalism of process’ and a ‘vitalism as pathos’. I argue that the relevance of vitalism as an epistemological and ontological problem concerning the categorical distinction between living and non-living beings must be contextualized historically, and referred exclusively to the epistemic horizon defined by classical physics. In contrast to this, drawing on the philosophies of Canguilhem, Whitehead, and Atlan, I propose an appreciation of the contemporary relevance of vitalism premised on the pathic and indeterminate character of nature as a whole. From this perspective vitalism expresses a politically significant ethos concerning the relationship between life, knowledge, problems and their solutions.
      Citation: Theory, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2019-07-16T05:13:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0263276419848034
       
  • Putting Problematization to the Test of Our Present
    • Authors: Isabelle Stengers
      Abstract: Theory, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      At the end of his life, Michel Foucault wrote of ‘problematization’ as what he had done all along. Yet some commentators see a ‘new’ Foucault emerging together with this term. This essay accepts the last hypothesis and connects it with the French scene, where problematization was already familiar, and its use under tension. Starting with Bachelard, problematization was related with a polemic epistemological stance, but its reprise by Gilles Deleuze turned it into an affirmative theme dramatizing the creation of problems. Situating Foucault’s problematization in this philosophical line permits us to develop the relation he proposed between problematization and the test of contemporary reality on the thinker. This paper will put problematization itself to the test of our present, that is, to the prospect of the social-ecological devastation associated with climate disorder. Both following and betraying Foucault with the help of Whitehead and Haraway, problematization will then be related to the power of sensible events, a power which requires allowing oneself to be touched, and allowing what touches us the power to modify the relation we entertain to our own reasons.
      Citation: Theory, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2019-07-16T05:13:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0263276419848061
       
  • Wormy Collaborations in Practices of Soil Construction
    • Authors: Germain Meulemans
      Abstract: Theory, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This paper studies the capture of organisms and materials in soil construction – a branch of ecological engineering dedicated to making soil in order to compensate for soil degradation. This approach takes all organisms to be ‘ecosystem engineers’, and often refers to earthworms as ‘collaborators’ in making soil. I examine the claim that such a convocation of worms amounts to a redistribution of agency and the underlying assumption that form-taking is the shaping of raw matter according to pre-existing forms. Drawing on processual anthropology, I question the distinction between living and material components of soils, and between growing and making. I elaborate on soil scientists’ description of soil growth as pedogenesis in order to propose a view in which soil materials, along with organisms, participate in soil’s transformative and generative fluxes. I envisage the process as a concrescence, an experimentation that brings humans, worms, and soil materials together in new ways.
      Citation: Theory, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2019-07-07T12:04:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0263276419851857
       
  • Doubt and the Algorithm: On the Partial Accounts of Machine Learning
    • Authors: Louise Amoore
      Abstract: Theory, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      In a 1955 lecture the physicist Richard Feynman reflected on the place of doubt within scientific practice. ‘Permit us to question, to doubt, to not be sure’, proposed Feynman, ‘it is possible to live and not to know’. In our contemporary world, the science of machine learning algorithms appears to transform the relations between science, knowledge and doubt, to make even the most doubtful event amenable to action. What might it mean to ‘leave room for doubt’ or ‘to live and not to know’ in our contemporary culture, where the algorithm plays a major role in the calculability of doubts' I propose a posthuman mode of doubt that decentres the liberal humanist subject. In the science of machine learning algorithms the doubts of human and technological beings nonetheless dwell together, opening onto a future that is never fully reduced to the single output signal, to the optimised target.
      Citation: Theory, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2019-06-26T04:42:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0263276419851846
       
  • Governmentality and Statification: Towards a Foucauldian Theory of the
           State
    • Authors: Mathias Hein Jessen, Nicolai von Eggers
      Abstract: Theory, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article contributes to governmentality studies and state theory by discussing how to understand the centrality and importance of the state from a governmentality perspective. It uses Giorgio Agamben’s critique of Michel Foucault’s governmentality approach as a point of departure for re-investigating Foucault as a thinker of the state. It focuses on Foucault’s notion of the state as a process of ‘statification’ which emphasizes the state as something constantly produced and reproduced by processes and practices of government, administration and acclamation. As a result of this, the state appears as a given entity which is necessary for the multiplicity of governmental technologies and practices in modern society to function. Only by reference to the state can governmental practices be effective and legitimized. Finally, the article conceptualizes the centrality of the state through Foucault’s (preliminary) notions of the state as a ‘practico-reflexive prism’ and a ‘principle of intelligibility’.
      Citation: Theory, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2019-06-13T06:34:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0263276419849099
       
  • Media Ontology and Transcendental Instrumentality
    • Authors: Luciana Parisi
      Abstract: Theory, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Theory, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2019-05-23T05:40:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0263276419843582
       
  • A Counter-Forensic Audit Trail: Disassembling the Case of The Hateful
           Eight
    • Authors: Matthew Fuller, Nikita Mazurov
      Abstract: Theory, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Theory, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2019-05-16T05:31:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0263276419840418
       
  • Reimagining the Iconic in New Media Art: Mobile Digital Screens and
           Chôra as Interactive Space
    • Authors: Adrian Gor
      Abstract: Theory, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Theory, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2019-05-07T05:20:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0263276419836481
       
  • Peter Sloterdijk and the ‘Security Architecture of Existence’:
           Immunity, Autochthony, and Ontological Nativism
    • Authors: Thomas Sutherland
      Abstract: Theory, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Theory, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2019-05-07T05:20:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0263276419839119
       
  • The Digital Subject: People as Data as Persons
    • Authors: Olga Goriunova
      Abstract: Theory, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Theory, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2019-04-17T04:34:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0263276419840409
       
  • Quantifying the World and Its Webs: Mathematical Discrete vs Continua in
           Knowledge Construction
    • Authors: Giuseppe Longo
      Abstract: Theory, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Theory, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2019-04-17T04:34:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0263276419840414
       
  • The Art Opening: Proximity and Potentiality at Events
    • Authors: Martin Fuller, Julie Ren
      Abstract: Theory, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Theory, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2019-03-07T01:35:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0263276419834638
       
  • Gilles Deleuze’s Philosophy of Nature: System and Method in What is
           Philosophy'
    • Authors: Mathias Schönher
      Abstract: Theory, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Theory, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2019-02-15T04:54:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0263276418820954
       
  • Generational Conflict and the Sociology of Generations: Mannheim and Elias
           Reconsidered
    • Authors: John Connolly
      Abstract: Theory, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Theory, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2019-02-14T01:49:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0263276419827085
       
  • Platform Seeing: Image Ensembles and Their Invisualities
    • Authors: Adrian MacKenzie, Anna Munster
      First page: 3
      Abstract: Theory, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Theory, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2019-06-04T05:11:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0263276419847508
       
  • What's Observed in a Rating' Rankings as Orientation in the Face of
           Uncertainty
    • Authors: Elena Esposito, David Stark
      First page: 3
      Abstract: Theory, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Theory, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2019-02-28T04:25:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0263276419826276
       
  • Comparative Global Humanities After Man: Alternatives to the Coloniality
           of Knowledge
    • Authors: Lisa Lowe, Kris Manjapra
      First page: 23
      Abstract: Theory, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      The core concept of ‘the human’ that anchors so many humanities disciplines – history, literature, art history, philosophy, religion, anthropology, political theory, and others – issues from a very particular modern European definition of Man ‘over-represented’ as the human. The history of modernity and of modern disciplinary knowledge formations are, in this sense, a history of modern European forms monopolizing the definition of the human and placing other variations at a distance from the human. This article is an interdisciplinary research that decenters Man-as-human as the subject/object of inquiry, and proposes a relational analytic that reframes established orthodoxies of area, geography, history and temporality. It also involves new readings of traditional archives, finding alternative repositories and practices of knowledge and collection to radically redistribute our ways of understanding the meaning of the human.
      Citation: Theory, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2019-07-20T02:56:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0263276419854795
       
  • Neuroliberalism in Action: The Finnish Experiment with Basic Income
    • Authors: Mona Mannevuo
      First page: 27
      Abstract: Theory, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Theory, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2019-03-07T01:35:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0263276419834066
       
  • The Socio-Technological Lives of Bitcoin
    • Authors: Adam Hayes
      First page: 49
      Abstract: Theory, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Theory, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2019-02-24T09:34:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0263276419826218
       
  • Palestine in Deleuze
    • Authors: Kathryn Medien
      First page: 49
      Abstract: Theory, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Theory, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2019-01-13T03:54:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0263276418816369
       
  • Georg Simmel’s Logic of the Future: ‘The Stranger’, Zionism, and
           ‘Bounded Contingency’
    • Authors: Amos Morris-Reich
      First page: 71
      Abstract: Theory, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Theory, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2019-04-11T05:12:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0263276419839117
       
  • Measuring Vulnerability and Deferring Responsibility: Quantifying the
           Anthropocene
    • Authors: Scott W. Schwartz
      First page: 73
      Abstract: Theory, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Theory, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2019-01-26T04:15:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0263276418820961
       
  • Facebook Rules: Structures of Governance in Digital Capitalism and the
           Control of Generalized Social Capital
    • Authors: Ori Schwarz
      First page: 117
      Abstract: Theory, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Theory, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2019-02-24T09:34:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0263276419826249
       
  • Groundwater in California: From Juridical and Biopolitical Governmentality
           to a Political Physics of Vital Processes
    • Authors: Razvan Amironesei, Caleb Scoville
      First page: 133
      Abstract: Theory, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.
      This article analyzes the emergence of a political rationality of groundwater in contemporary California. It contrasts a new government of nature that we call a ‘political physics of vital processes’, operative in the case of the Orange County Water District, with juridical and biopolitical rationalities of groundwater governance. To do so, we propose a genealogical account grounded in a reading of a key concept in Aristotle’s first book of Politics. The case is analyzed along the axes of subjectivity, space, and temporality, opening to a novel way of conceptualizing the relation between power and nature.
      Citation: Theory, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2019-06-22T06:44:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0263276419850277
       
  • Policing Atmospheres: Crowds, Protest and ‘Atmotechnics’
    • Authors: Illan rua Wall
      First page: 143
      Abstract: Theory, Culture & Society, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Theory, Culture & Society
      PubDate: 2019-03-07T01:35:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0263276419829200
       
 
 
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