for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help
Followed Journals
Journal you Follow: 0
 
Sign Up to follow journals, search in your chosen journals and, optionally, receive Email Alerts when new issues of your Followed Journals are published.
Already have an account? Sign In to see the journals you follow.
Journal Cover
New Scientist
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.105
Number of Followers: 758  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0262-4079
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3162 journals]
  • Molar Twinge
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s): What is that weird feeling I get when I place a metal spoon on my teeth'
       
  • Skipping Time
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s): My 9-year-old son and I have noticed that skipping seems like a more efficient form of locomotion than jogging. It is quicker, less tiring and hurts the knees less. Are we imagining this or is there an explanation' And can we make it socially acceptable for me to skip around our neighbourhood'
       
  • Big beasts
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s): After the dinosaurs died out, why didn't the remaining animals grow as big as dinosaurs again'
       
  • Woolly ideas
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s): On a recent visit to Peru, I went to a street market and bought a sweater billed as being made of alpaca wool. Whenever I take it off, it crackles with static electricity. I had thought that this could not happen with a natural fibre like wool, but would need an insulating material like a synthetic fibre. I am not so naive as to believe that the sweater is pure alpaca, but what proportion of synthetic fibre would it need to produce the crackles I experience'
       
  • Inadvertent omnivore
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s): I'm unsure if this is more philosophy than science, but is it wrong for a vegetarian to eat a meat-eating plant'
       
  • Feedback
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s):
       
  • Compiled by Richard Smyth
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s):
       
  • Letters
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s):
       
  • Darwin's early evolution
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s): Shaoni BhattacharyaSophisticated puppets bring a play about HMS Beagle to life, says Shaoni Bhattacharya
       
  • Don't miss
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s):
       
  • A radiant blockbuster
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s): Sumit Paul-ChoudhurySumit Paul-Choudhury stalks the sun at a major exhibition
       
  • Eating our way to hell
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s): Nic Fleming
       
  • The tiger who came for me
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s): Graham LawtonPavel Fomenko has spent his life protecting tigers. But no one was there to protect him when one attacked, he tells Graham Lawton
       
  • And now for the exoweather…
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s): Ryan MacDonaldThe first weather forecasts from alien worlds are coming in – and it's wild out there, says astronomer Ryan MacDonald
       
  • Why are there so few women in physics'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s): Valerie JamiesonWomen are wildly under-represented in physics, which isn't surprising to any woman who has worked in the field, says Valerie Jamieson. But there are solutions
       
  • Control yourself
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s): David RobsonSelf-control isn't the magic bullet we once thought. David Robson examines its dark side
       
  • Crowd-puller
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s): Sam Wong
       
  • Is screen time bad for young doctors'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s): Tom Chivers
       
  • A noteworthy scientist
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s): Alice BellDorothy Hodgkin should be on the Bank of England's new £50 note, says Alice Bell
       
  • Now the real fight begins
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s): Mary Menton, Felipe MilanezBrazil's new president could be a disaster for the Amazon. His opponents must unite, say Mary Menton and Felipe Milanez
       
  • Lost in the smoke
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s): Sam WongThere is rising concern over the number of teens vaping. How worried should we be, asks Sam Wong
       
  • Dinosaurs put the colour in bird eggs
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s):
       
  • Parkinson's might begin in the gut
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s):
       
  • Spinal implants can partially reverse paralysis within days
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s):
       
  • The sound of two pandas breeding
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s):
       
  • Galaxy next door is withering away
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s):
       
  • Neonatal risks rise with older fathers
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s):
       
  • How to tame an extreme weather future
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s):
       
  • AI historian gets to grips with mysteries of Buddhist murals
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s):
       
  • Autoinjector gives antidote to poison attack
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s): David Hambling
       
  • AI design factory is full of weird ideas
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s): Leah Crane
       
  • Neanderthals breastfed for years
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s): Alice Klein, Colin Barras
       
  • Quantum bit zap boosts computers
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s): Michael Brooks
       
  • Binned clothes made into tiles for home decor
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s): Alice Klein
       
  • Mass air travel may thwart pandemics
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s): Clare Wilson
       
  • Towards a world without landfill
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s): Graham Lawton
       
  • Medical waste chemicals found in beetles
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s): Alice Klein
       
  • Neurons in the gut are replaced every two weeks
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s): Chelsea Whyte
       
  • Farewell to Kepler, finder of worlds
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s): Daniel Cossins
       
  • Elon Musk's space internet
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s): Douglas HeavenThousands of satellites could speed up connections, finds Douglas Heaven
       
  • Environment fears spark street protest
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s):
       
  • Sunscreen ban to protect coral reefs
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s):
       
  • LIGO will explain data analyses
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s):
       
  • Fines for data misuse
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s):
       
  • Come Join us as a Trainee Subeditor
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s):
       
  • Girls allowed
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3203Author(s): Physics is still a boys' club. Here's how to fix it
       
  • Clearing the air
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s): The odour of a selection of cheeses in our fridge was so overpowering that I looked online for a solution. As suggested, I left a small plate of ground coffee in the fridge. It worked like magic, absorbing all the odours in a matter of hours. How does this work'
       
  • Icy grip
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s): When water freezes on the surface of rock, metal, plastic and many other materials, it can be very difficult to remove. What makes the bonds so strong' What materials bond most strongly with ice'
       
  • Dangerous current
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s): In a bin full of old batteries awaiting recycling, what is the probability that a closed circuit will form, allowing electrical current to flow and potentially cause a fire'
       
  • Feedback
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s):
       
  • 50 Years Ago
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s): Julia Brown
       
  • Letters
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s):
       
  • It's a long road to Mars
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s): Simon IngsCreating a space epic is an enormously detailed and soul-searching job, discovers Simon Ings
       
  • Don't miss
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s):
       
  • VR without helmets
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s): Douglas HeavenWill superblack paint create virtual reality 2.0' Douglas Heaven tries it out with Call of Duty
       
  • The rise of technopower
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s): Ben CollyerHow do we tackle forces that transcend frontiers' Ben Collyer explores
       
  • Hey, teacher! Leave those kids alone
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s): Bob HolmesIn a Delhi slum two decades ago, Sugata Mitra discovered that a computer with an internet connection was enough to harness children's curiosity and capacity to learn. We should learn the lesson, he tells Bob Holmes
       
  • From beyond the stars
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s): Natalie StarkeyCould Earth's water be older than Earth itself, asks geochemist Natalie Starkey
       
  • Brain tingles
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s): Michael MarshallVideos of people folding towels or painting can trigger a mysterious state of relaxation in some people, including Michael Marshall. What's going on'
       
  • Help, I'm in a black hole!
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s): Liz Else
       
  • Why Trump's ‘cleanest air’ boast is just wrong
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s): Chelsea Whyte
       
  • Petro dollars
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s): Brett ScottVenezuela's cryptocurrency isn't just about keeping the economy afloat, says Brett Scott
       
  • Holding it together
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s): Ehsan MasoodEurope's scientific elite say a hard Brexit will damage science. They should be supporting those who face much worse consequences, says Ehsan Masood
       
  • Kicking up storms
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s): Michael Le PageTropical storms are becoming more intense and less predictable – and there is little doubt remaining that we are to blame, says Michael Le Page
       
  • Fish evolution soared in the shallows
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s):
       
  • Liquid metal puts wheels in motion
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s):
       
  • Exercise hormone may lead to drug to prevent memory loss
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s):
       
  • A day in the shade builds up a tan
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s):
       
  • Shipping puts a halt to whale songs
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s):
       
  • AI can find people from descriptions
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s):
       
  • Pregnancy length linked to breast cancer
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s):
       
  • Bird breaths may show how dinosaurs ruled the planet
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s):
       
  • Fossil reopens debate over the first bird
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s): Michael Marshall
       
  • Did Higgs bosons save the universe'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s): Leah Crane
       
  • Rubbing off years of sun exposure
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s): Alice Klein
       
  • Huddling makes vole gut more energy efficient
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s): Yvaine Ye
       
  • Lewis Carroll's equation helps physicists
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s): Gilead Amit
       
  • NATO tests battle tech of the future
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s): Chris Baraniuk
       
  • Orangutan mothers may be best in world
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s): Michael Marshall
       
  • The hunt for Earth's ghost moons
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s): Leah Crane
       
  • Freak climate event that killed millions explained
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s): Michael Marshall
       
  • Smoking a joint makes your memory hazy
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s): Clare Wilson
       
  • Rigid light is a strange new state of matter
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s): Leah Crane
       
  • Fast evolution of purring crickets
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s): Colin Barras
       
  • AI to interrogate travellers
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s): Douglas HeavenTrial of automated lie-detector test set to begin at some EU borders, reports Douglas Heaven
       
  • Low breastfeeding rates in England
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s):
       
  • Fracking quakes pause operations
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s):
       
  • Massive drop in animal numbers
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s):
       
  • Brazil's climate blow
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s):
       
  • AI turns to border control
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s):
       
  • Beyond question'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 November 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 240, Issue 3202Author(s): The LIGO collaboration must fully respond to criticism of its methods
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
Home (Search)
Subjects A-Z
Publishers A-Z
Customise
APIs
Your IP address: 54.167.18.170
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-