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New Scientist
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.105
Number of Followers: 794  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0262-4079
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3184 journals]
  • Me and my telescope
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): Judith GriselNeuroscientist Judith Grisel is exploring why some people are more prone to drug addiction than others – using her own experience of addiction to help
       
  • Star quality
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): Star quality With the enormous pressure and temperatures within Jupiter, what's the chance that one day it could ignite and turn itself into a star'
       
  • Special effects
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): Nettle effect How is it that stinging nettles don't seem to affect my dog's sensitive nose and ears or his relatively fur-free belly while I respond rapidly with a very painful skin rash' Jan Jones, Bramcote, Nottinghamshire
       
  • Find yourself
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): This tree, in the grounds of Anglesey Abbey, Cambridgeshire, UK, has a branch growing in a loop, apparently reabsorbed by the tree. Is this common, and how can it happen'
       
  • Wind economics
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): What is the carbon payback period for a large wind farm, taking into account the energy and resources used for materials, manufacture and the construction of supporting infrastructure' If it is long, say 30 years, are they worth it'
       
  • Feedback
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s):
       
  • Puzzle
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): set by Angus Walker
       
  • Cryptic crossword #14
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): Set by Wingding
       
  • How to be a maker 2: Sparrows in, squirrels out
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): Hannah JoshuaIf squirrels are stealing the bird food, Hannah Joshua's discerning feeder will stop them in their tracks
       
  • ‘We need to realise that we are ignorant about our ignorance’
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): Jacob AronWe can only make the world a better place if we base our views on facts rather than intuitive guesses, Ola Rosling tells Jacob Aron
       
  • The last-mile revolution
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): Chris Stokel-WalkerOur love of online shopping has caused a pile-up of polluting vans. Chris Stokel-Walker navigates the technology that can reinvent home delivery
       
  • Hidden hotspots
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): Kate RaviliousTo preserve the diversity of the world's wildlife, Kate Ravilious finds we should focus on unusual terrain, not animals and plants
       
  • Eat your way to happiness
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): Helen ThomsonDietician Megan Rossi tells Helen Thomson how the food we eat can have a big effect on our mental and physical health
       
  • The psychobiotic revolution
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): Scott AndersonThe discovery that gut bacteria influence our emotions should make us all happy. Scott Anderson reports
       
  • Nowhere to run Aniara
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): Simon Ingsthe story of an interplanetary cruiser thrown off course, is one of the smartest movies of the year because it understands that the best way to portray the future is as though it were the present, says Simon Ings
       
  • Don't miss
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s):
       
  • Pieces of brilliance
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): Chris BaraniukThe machineries of empire can sometimes be unnervingly beautiful, finds Chris Baraniuk
       
  • Can Zen explain physics'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): Gilead Amit
       
  • Fire clouds
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): Michael Le Page
       
  • From the archives
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): Simon Ingswas bidding goodbye to a symbol of international space cooperation
       
  • Letters
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s):
       
  • When is a black hole not a black hole'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): Chanda Prescod-WeinsteinWhen it's an astrophysical black hole, of course. These massive, mysterious objects encapsulate the majesty of the cosmos for Chanda Prescod-Weinstein
       
  • Time for a sea change
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): Bertrand PiccardThe global shipping industry has a huge emissions problem. We must work together to solve it, says Bertrand Piccard
       
  • Working hypothesis
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): Sorting the week's supernovae from the absolute zeros
       
  • A raft of technologies will soon be monitoring a driver's every move. Is
           that a good thing, asks Chris Stokel-Walker
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): Chris Stokel-Walker
       
  • Lab brains behave like those of early babies
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): RPS
       
  • Bananas' boost from climate change will end as it heats up
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): RPS
       
  • Illusion makes fabric seem to move faster
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): Ruby Prosser Scully
       
  • Gel helps tooth enamel to regrow
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s):
       
  • Worm robot wiggles through the brain
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s):
       
  • Red wine linked to diverse microbiome
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s):
       
  • Low-energy nanotube chip says ‘hello world’
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): CW
       
  • DNA mutation lets people thrive on just 4 hours' sleep
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): Alice Klein
       
  • Deepwater Horizon oil spill still hitting sea life
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): Chelsea Whyte
       
  • Giant virus has its own kind of CRISPR to destroy invaders
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): Michael Le Page
       
  • Double cosmic signal is a puzzle
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): Leah CraneTwo gravitational waves picked up in quick succession could have the same source
       
  • Robot pilot gets its wings and takes to the skies
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): David Hambling
       
  • More protections for wildlife
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): Adam VaughanA major conference on conservation brought both good and bad news for species, says Adam Vaughan
       
  • Skull from one of our early ancestors found at last
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): Michael Marshall
       
  • Quantum X-ray machine takes super-sharp snaps
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): Leah Crane
       
  • CRISPR could fix one form of male infertility
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): Michael Le Page
       
  • AI learns to deblur faces
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): Donna LuMethod may help identify people from low-quality CCTV images
       
  • Amber mining resumes in Myanmar
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): Graham Lawton
       
  • Seal pups thrive in Thames
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): Clare WilsonLandmark survey finds harbour seals are breeding in estuary
       
  • Fat cells are more active in people who stay slim
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): Alice Klein
       
  • Have we seen signs of a volcanic exomoon'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): Jonathan O'Callaghan
       
  • There is no such thing as a ‘gay gene’
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): Jessica Hamzelou
       
  • Rampage of the super pest
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): Michael MarshallA crop-gobbling caterpillar known as the fall armyworm now threatens much of the world. Can we stop it, asks Michael Marshall
       
  • Dorian's devastation
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): Michael Le PageGrand Bahama may have endured the longest pummelling ever by the worst winds a hurricane can unleash. Michael Le Page reports
       
  • Mood boosters
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7 September 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3246Author(s): Mental health researchers are looking to the gut for answers
       
  • Me and my telescope
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): Niamh Nic DaeidAs a forensic scientist, Niamh Nic Daeid does research that helps justice be done – from how fires start to how DNA transfers between objects
       
  • Run the world
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): Run the world If the world's population all met in one place and all ran in the same direction, would this affect Earth's rotation'
       
  • Once upon a time
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): Once upon a time Why does my brain like fictional stories'
       
  • In the ink
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): Why do blue highlighter markers never seem to have the high luminosity of pink, yellow, orange and light green highlighters'
       
  • Roll of honour
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): Roll of honour: Why do dogs and horses roll on their backs when happy'
       
  • Seven litres a day
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): If we drink a lot of it we only pass it as excess waste
       
  • Feedback
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s):
       
  • Puzzle
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): Set by Richard Smyth
       
  • Quick crossword #39
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): Set by Richard Smyth
       
  • How to be a maker 2: How's the weather'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): Hannah JoshuaWith two micro:bits you can make a mini weather station that sends you up-to-the-minute reports, says Hannah Joshua
       
  • Is there anybody out there'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): Sarah RugheimerAfter millennia of guesswork, we can finally start finding out for certain, says astrobiologist Sarah Rugheimer
       
  • Arctic rescue squad
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): Rowan HooperIf we want to save the Arctic, we might have to intervene directly. Rowan Hooper investigates three ambitious projects to bring back the ice
       
  • Back story
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): Helen ThomsonChronic back pain is on the rise, and the most common treatments may be making matters worse, finds Helen Thomson
       
  • A surfeit of snake oil
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): Helen Marshall
       
  • Don't miss
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s):
       
  • Driving forces
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): Simon IngsNothing can be taken for granted in an autonomous future, finds Simon Ings
       
  • The selling of happiness
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): Douglas Heaven
       
  • Channel vision
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): Richard Webb
       
  • Letters
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s):
       
  • Now that's fruitloopery
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): James WongEver heard the one about how zoos stopping monkeys eating bananas tells us that fruit isn't good for us' Pull the other one, says James Wong
       
  • The right (not) to know
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): Laura Spinney
       
  • Working hypothesis
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): Our regular column sorting the week's supernovae from the absolute zeros
       
  • Dawn of the pyrocene
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): Adam VaughanWildfires raging in the normally wet Arctic could spur a powerful feedback loop releasing yet more emissions, discovers Adam Vaughan
       
  • App designed to spot winter vomiting bug
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): DL
       
  • Two-child policy in China sees millions more babies born
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): Donna Luin
       
  • This material will self-destruct
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): Chelsea Whyte
       
  • Blood pressure linked to brain size
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s):
       
  • Time to get up and move around a bit
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s):
       
  • Honey can tell us all about lead pollution
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s):
       
  • Space rock Ryugu is a dustless oddity
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): Abigail Beall
       
  • How airborne microbes conquered Mars-like desert
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): Michael Marshall
       
  • Cells could become computers in body
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): Ruby Prosser Scully
       
  • Volcano behind huge eruption that kick-started mini ice age identified
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): Chris Baraniuk
       
  • Why is pollution linked to schizophrenia and depression'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): Adam Vaughan
       
  • A black hole has been seen eating a neutron star
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): James Mitchell Crow
       
  • Tests at 3 years old could predict brain ageing in later life
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): Jessica Hamzelou
       
  • Quantum teleportation win
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): Physicists have used the rules of quantum entanglement to teleport a richer package of information than ever before, reports Leah Crane
       
  • Facebook's data collection may put gay people at risk
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): Chris Stokel-Walker
       
  • Revealing why posts are moderated helps us comply with rules
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): Chris Stokel-Walker
       
  • LIGO could solve space expansion mystery
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): Stuart Clark
       
  • Koala microbiome shift
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): Ruby Prosser ScullyFaecal transplants help the marsupials change their diets
       
  • Moving away from the coast
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): Adam VaughanMoving away from the coast Rising sea levels mean that a managed retreat for coastal communities is no longer a case of if, but when and how. Adam Vaughan reports
       
  • Wild polio virus eradicated in Nigeria, but battle isn't over yet
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): Debora MacKenzie
       
  • City crows may have high cholesterol thanks to fast food
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): Jake Buehler
       
  • Predicting Brexit-related hate crimes
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): As the UK's exit from the EU nears, government agencies are trying to pinpoint hotspots of race-related hate speech, reports Donna Lu
       
  • Amazon fires are on the rise
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): Fires raging across the Amazon have renewed efforts from some countries, companies and individuals to protect the rainforest. Michael Le Page and Adam Vaughan report
       
  • The climate tipping point
    • Abstract: Publication date: 31 August 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 243, Issue 3245Author(s): Two crises mean irreversible change is no longer an abstract concept
       
 
 
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