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New Scientist
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.105
Number of Followers: 777  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0262-4079
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3161 journals]
  • Take a bite
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s): Why aren't hit-and-run attacks common in the animal kingdom' Surely a barracuda or shark could take a meal-sized chunk out of the back or belly of a whale before it could respond. The same goes for smaller pairings of animals.
       
  • Puddle puzzle
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s): My cat used to drink from the garden pond and never seemed to suffer any ill effects, and you often see dogs drinking from muddy puddles. So why do humans have to be so careful and only drink clean water' (Continued)
       
  • The sound of vinyl
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s): We often hear from enthusiasts that analogue vinyl audio sounds better and fuller than that of digital systems. If this is a real difference, why isn't the digital signal tweaked to mimic the characteristics of a vinyl disc'
       
  • Feedback
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s):
       
  • From the archives
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s): Donna LuThirty years ago came the first public announcement that human-made climate change was real
       
  • Letters
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s):
       
  • Making celestial mischief
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s): Boyd TonkinKatie Paterson's sublime raids on infinity make space-time sensible, says Boyd Tonkin
       
  • Don't miss
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s):
       
  • After the flood
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s): Rowan Hooper
       
  • Saving Earth by changing us
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s): Adrian Barnett
       
  • Angels and demons
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s): Richard WranghamHumans are both the best of species and the worst. Richard Wrangham knows why
       
  • Hidden in plain sight
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s): Justin EureWe could be sitting on proof of revolutionary new physics, says Justin Eure, if we only knew how to look for it
       
  • Cheese meltdown
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s): Graham LawtonFor those who think eating cheese is guilt free in comparison to meat, the truth is hard to swallow, as Graham Lawton discovers
       
  • Blasts from the past
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s): Jon White
       
  • The US could end HIV infections by 2030
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s): Chelsea Whyte
       
  • Brexit blame game
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s): Petros SekerisGame theory explains why the UK and the EU are still negotiating, says Petros Sekeris
       
  • Let's fight sexism with data
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s): Jessica WadeScientists react to peer-review science, making journal pages the perfect venue to fight science's equity issues, says Jessica Wade
       
  • Parking charge
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s): Michael Le PageThe rise of wireless charging for electric cars may mean you never have to worry about plugging in again, says Michael Le Page
       
  • How Skippy got a spring in her stride
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s):
       
  • Oil slick' Just peel some pomelos
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s):
       
  • Radioactive material has weird magnetic powers
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s):
       
  • You'll be cooler in the latest threads
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s):
       
  • Treated mice can regenerate toes
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s):
       
  • Viral smear tests to begin in the UK
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s):
       
  • You AI paediatrician will see you soon
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s):
       
  • Bees pass their maths exam with flying colours
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s):
       
  • T. rex was an accidental gardener
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s): Yvaine Ye
       
  • Let the loser win to keep people happy
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s): Donna Lu
       
  • Beer before wine' Ignore the rhyme
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s): Sam Wong
       
  • DNA-munching life lurks in the ocean
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s): Colin Barras
       
  • Pill full of tiny needles could replace injections
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s): Michael Le Page
       
  • Sea levels look set for even higher rise
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s): Michael Le Page
       
  • Most rigorous test of basic income yet
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s): Joshua Howgego
       
  • Autonomous submarines to launch drone swarms
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s): David Hambling
       
  • Fad for stone monuments began in France
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s): Alison George
       
  • Bad memories of former Valentines
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s): David Adam
       
  • DNA test could boost IVF success
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s): Clare Wilson
       
  • AI helps rescue trafficked children
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s): Donna LuAnalysing millions of online travel photos aids the hunt for traffickers
       
  • Younger breast cancer screening
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s):
       
  • Many insects are facing extinction
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s):
       
  • Mars rover named Rosalind Franklin
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s):
       
  • A climate of change
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s):
       
  • Nature's alarm bell rings
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s):
       
  • The trouble with cheese
    • Abstract: Publication date: 16 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3217Author(s): It isn't the guilt-free food many think it is
       
  • You say tomato
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s): What creates accents' Is it purely psychological, or is there some physiological element in play'
       
  • Many ridges to cross
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s): Back roads in Australia often have hundreds of metres of gravel corrugations, or ridges. They are always a few centimetres high, spaced about 30 centimetres apart… and annoying for vehicle occupants. What causes them'
       
  • Skipping time
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s): My 9-year-old son and I have noticed that skipping seems like a more efficient form of locomotion than jogging. It is quicker, less tiring and hurts the knees less. Are we imagining this or is there an explanation' And can we make it socially acceptable for me to skip around our neighbourhood'
       
  • Molar twinge
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s): What is that weird feeling I get when I place a metal spoon on my teeth'
       
  • Feedback
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s):
       
  • Set by Richard Smyth
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s):
       
  • Letters
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s):
       
  • Kew's orchids go carnival
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s): Shaoni BhattacharyaColombia's biodiversity fuels a mid-winter extravaganza, says Shaoni Bhattacharya
       
  • Don't miss
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s):
       
  • Hunting for life in the machine
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s): Simon IngsGet it wrong and living with smart machines will be hell. Designer Yamanaka Shunji tells Simon Ings why art, not engineering, is key
       
  • The impossible proof
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s): Benjamin SkuseThe solution to one of maths' trickiest riddles could revolutionise computing – if we can understand it, says Benjamin Skuse
       
  • Confused about cancer'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s): Jonathan R. GoodmanHow can you best judge cancer risks when even the experts don't always agree, wonders Jonathan R. Goodman
       
  • Stone Age homemakers
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s): Laura SpinneyNeanderthals aren't known as paragons of domesticity, but perhaps they should be, says Laura Spinney
       
  • Tiger vs bear
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s): Chris Simms
       
  • Will rising food prices in the UK lead to deaths'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s): Michael Le Page
       
  • Sea green
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s): Olive HeffernanWe have a chance to limit damage from deep-sea mining before it begins, says Olive Heffernan
       
  • Ready payer one
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s): Rebecca CassidyGambling has weaved its way into children's video games. Regulators must take action, says Rebecca Cassidy
       
  • Are millennials that special'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s): Amelia TaitWe increasingly form opinions about people based on the generation they belong to, but do these labels really mean anything, asks Amelia Tait
       
  • Hack allows us to probe Mars mystery
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s):
       
  • Destructive power of quake explained
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s):
       
  • Self-growing gel bulks up like a muscle and gets tougher
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s):
       
  • Capture carbon like a scuba diver
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s):
       
  • Vaping better for quitting smoking
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s):
       
  • Microbiome could affect depression
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s):
       
  • Mind-reading implant tells what you hear
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s):
       
  • Rewriting fruit's DNA may be way to halt bananapocalypse
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s):
       
  • Black holes may guzzle negative energy particles
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s): Leah Crane
       
  • Popular teenagers take more risks
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s): Clare Wilson
       
  • Your microbes mimic your blood group
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s): Yvaine Ye
       
  • CRISPR could limit male calf births
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s): Michael Marshall
       
  • Milky Way may be devouring a ghostly galaxy
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s): Leah Crane
       
  • Epigenetic testing for the masses
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s): Graham Lawton
       
  • The benefits of being scared
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s): Chelsea Whyte
       
  • Life's universal ancestor may not have liked it hot
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s): Michael Marshall
       
  • Robot welder controlled by thought
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s): Donna Lu
       
  • The secrets of how sperm really swim
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s): Clare Wilson
       
  • Building an asteroid space station
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s): Leah Crane
       
  • Prehistoric climate change revealed
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s): Michael MarshallNew study suggests possible impacts on human evolution
       
  • Climate change shrank our chips
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s):
       
  • Brain ages differ in men and women
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s):
       
  • Producing bitcoin is becoming costly
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s):
       
  • Nuclear argument
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s):
       
  • Lessons from the deep past
    • Abstract: Publication date: 9 February 2019Source: New Scientist, Volume 241, Issue 3216Author(s): The planet's ecosystems are sensitive to climate change
       
 
 
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