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Journal Cover New Scientist
  [SJR: 0.106]   [H-I: 15]   [711 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0262-4079
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3120 journals]
  • Birth of a new era
    • Authors: Alice Klein
      Pages: 6 - 7
      Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164
      Author(s): Alice Klein
      Whole-genome sequencing in the womb could tell us all about our children before they are born – but could it be misused' Alice Klein investigates

      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s0262-4079(18)30230-6
       
  • Rock art reveals lost wildlife
    • Authors: Jake Buehler
      First page: 8
      Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164
      Author(s): Jake Buehler


      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s0262-4079(18)30235-5
       
  • Virtual psych lab seeks flaws in digital minds
    • Authors: Chris Baraniuk
      First page: 8
      Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164
      Author(s): Chris Baraniuk


      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s0262-4079(18)30236-7
       
  • Have we seen planets outside our galaxy'
    • Authors: John Wenz
      First page: 9
      Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164
      Author(s): John Wenz


      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s0262-4079(18)30237-9
       
  • How to think yourself out of a seizure
    • Authors: Clare Wilson
      First page: 9
      Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164
      Author(s): Clare Wilson


      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s0262-4079(18)30238-0
       
  • Modern society looks unworkable
    • Authors: Andy Coghlan
      First page: 10
      Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164
      Author(s): Andy Coghlan


      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s0262-4079(18)30239-2
       
  • China may have a hypersonic railgun
    • Authors: Chris Baraniuk
      First page: 12
      Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164
      Author(s): Chris Baraniuk


      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s0262-4079(18)30240-9
       
  • Blocking senses could improve stroke recovery
    • Authors: Jessica Hamzelou
      First page: 12
      Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164
      Author(s): Jessica Hamzelou


      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s0262-4079(18)30241-0
       
  • Shrinking black holes may ooze information
    • Authors: Adam Mann
      First page: 15
      Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164
      Author(s): Adam Mann


      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s0262-4079(18)30242-2
       
  • Neanderthals used fire to make tools
    • Authors: Michael Marshall
      First page: 15
      Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164
      Author(s): Michael Marshall


      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s0262-4079(18)30243-4
       
  • Pre-life molecules found floating in nearby galaxy
    • Authors: John Wenz
      First page: 16
      Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164
      Author(s): John Wenz


      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s0262-4079(18)30244-6
       
  • Bitcoin blows your cover on the dark web
    • Authors: Chris Stokel-Walker
      First page: 16
      Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164
      Author(s): Chris Stokel-Walker


      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s0262-4079(18)30245-8
       
  • Friend not foe
    • Authors: Lesley Evans Ogden
      Pages: 24 - 25
      Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164
      Author(s): Lesley Evans Ogden
      What we now know about sharks suggests their extinction would be an ecological disaster, says Lesley Evans Ogden

      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s0262-4079(18)30255-0
       
  • Earth at risk
    • Authors: Olive Heffernan
      Pages: 24 - 25
      Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164
      Author(s): Olive Heffernan
      Our best way to geoengineer the climate may well trash the planet, warns Olive Heffernan

      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s0262-4079(18)30256-2
       
  • Pregnant and in pain' The advice is confusing
    • Authors: Jessica Hamzelou
      First page: 25
      Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164
      Author(s): Jessica Hamzelou


      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s0262-4079(18)30257-4
       
  • Sun flowers
    • Authors: Jon White
      Pages: 26 - 27
      Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164
      Author(s): Jon White


      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s0262-4079(18)30258-6
       
  • The survivalists
    • Authors: Fred Pearce
      Pages: 32 - 35
      Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164
      Author(s): Fred Pearce
      Polar bear numbers are doing odd things. Is the species marching to safety or disaster, asks Fred Pearce

      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s0262-4079(18)30260-4
       
  • The ultimate family tree
    • Authors: Stephen Battersby
      Pages: 36 - 40
      Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164
      Author(s): Stephen Battersby
      Our sun is part of a sprawling, chaotic, transgalactic family, finds Stephen Battersby

      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s0262-4079(18)30261-6
       
  • Facing down the wolves in white coats
    • Authors: Fred Pearce
      Pages: 42 - 43
      Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164
      Author(s): Fred Pearce
      Whistle-blower Maurice Pappworth refused to look the other way when doctors were taking fatal liberties in the name of research

      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s0262-4079(18)30262-8
       
  • Natural lessons
    • Authors: Adrian Barnett
      First page: 44
      Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164
      Author(s): Adrian Barnett


      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s0262-4079(18)30263-x
       
  • Curb your scepticism
    • Authors: Graham Lawton
      First page: 45
      Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164
      Author(s): Graham Lawton
      Great stand-up, shame about the science, says Graham Lawton

      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s0262-4079(18)30264-1
       
  • Ordering the world
    • Authors: Jonathon Keats
      First page: 46
      Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164
      Author(s): Jonathon Keats
      A new exhibition puts Jonathon Keats in his rightful place

      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s0262-4079(18)30265-3
       
  • Children get new ears
    • Authors: Jessica Hamzelou
      Pages: 6 - 7
      Abstract: Publication date: 3 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3163
      Author(s): Jessica Hamzelou
      In a world first, children's own cells have been used to create replacement ears

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T04:25:54Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s0262-4079(18)30189-1
       
  • Taming the big tech beasts
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164
      They are unpopular, but we mostly have ourselves to blame

      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
       
  • SpaceX to launch Tesla car into orbit
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164


      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
       
  • LHC finds hints of odd particle
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164


      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
       
  • Three-parent baby on the way in UK'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164


      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
       
  • Another bad week for bitcoin
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164


      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
       
  • Bacterial link to bowel cancer
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164


      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
       
  • Galaxies do a surprising synchronised dance
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164


      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
       
  • Tiny claws snatch pathogens from blood
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164


      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
       
  • Twins hint at why Zika harms brains
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164


      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
       
  • Art-ificial historian sees shifts in style
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164


      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
       
  • Sound could warn of tsunamis earlier
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164


      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
       
  • Plants are blooming thanks to greenhouse gas
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164


      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
       
  • Polar bears run up a high energy bill
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164


      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
       
  • Ban the buzz'
    • Authors: Andy Coghlan
      Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164
      Author(s): Andy Coghlan
      Campaigners in the UK want a ban on energy drinks for under-16s, and scientific evidence backs them, says Andy Coghlan

      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
       
  • Techlash
    • Authors: Douglas Heaven
      Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164
      Author(s): Douglas Heaven
      Have the big tech companies really got too big, asks Douglas Heaven

      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
       
  • Spring events
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164


      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
       
  • Letters
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164


      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
       
  • Compiled by Richard Smyth
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164


      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
       
  • Feedback
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164


      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
       
  • Running battle
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164
      Runners have long debated the difference between training on a treadmill and training on solid ground. “Belt turnover” is commonly cited as a factor that helps to move your foot backwards and thereby makes running on a treadmill easier than running on the road. At constant velocity, is this a real effect' If so, wouldn't it be felt on any “moving” surface you walk on, such as a train or plane – or even Earth' (Continued)

      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
       
  • Shadow of a doubt
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164
      Sitting outside with my back to the sun, I noticed that the shadow cast by each clear lens of my glasses was equally as dark as that cast by the frame and my head. Why' Surely the clear lens would let the light through rather than casting a shadow'

      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
       
  • Dazzle Hassle'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164
      Are the bright lights that cyclists now use safe for the eyes of onlookers'

      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
       
  • Push me, Pull You
    • Abstract: Publication date: 10 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3164
      Does it require more or less effort to push a loaded wheelbarrow over hard level ground than to turn around and pull it' What about when the ground is soft'

      PubDate: 2018-02-14T04:43:18Z
       
  • Standing up for the world
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3163
      Science journalism has to be about more than pure science

      PubDate: 2018-02-05T04:25:54Z
       
  • A meaty issue
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3163


      PubDate: 2018-02-05T04:25:54Z
       
  • EU renewables outpace coal
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3163


      PubDate: 2018-02-05T04:25:54Z
       
  • Satellite double trouble
    • Abstract: Publication date: 3 February 2018
      Source:New Scientist, Volume 237, Issue 3163


      PubDate: 2018-02-05T04:25:54Z
       
 
 
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