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New Scientist
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.105
Number of Followers: 747  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0262-4079
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3161 journals]
  • Height of summer
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s): Most of us in the UK enjoyed the weather this summer. I remember the fine summers of 1976 and 1987 when temperatures reached above 30°C. What is the hottest temperature we could have at the UK's latitude given ideal conditions' Could it exceed 40°C' Not that I'm hoping it would.
       
  • Wing Commander
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s): Is there a pecking order in a flock of birds and which are the stragglers at the end'
       
  • Food for thought
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s): Ignoring the idiom that variety is the spice of life, what single dish could I make that would provide all my nutritional needs forever more' A vegetarian option would be good too.
       
  • Hot sauce
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s): Why is there no insulation for saucepans' Or around kitchen sinks or bathtubs' Is it difficult and expensive, or just a lazy tradition inherited from wasteful innocent times'
       
  • Feedback
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s):
       
  • Where it all began
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s): Mick O'Hare
       
  • Letters
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s):
       
  • The last Trump
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s): Jacob Aron
       
  • Don''t miss
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s):
       
  • Prudery isn't justice
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s): Simon Ings
       
  • Giving voice to a planet's suffering
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s): Niall FirthPoetry can express our environmental crisis in a more human way, says Niall Firth
       
  • AI, warbot
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s): Kenneth PayneArtificial intelligence is set to rewrite the rules of warfare in subtle and terrifying ways, says Kenneth Payne
       
  • The horror of Hasanlu
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s): Catherine BrahicThe truth about this once great Iron Age city lay buried for three millennia. Now, at last, the story of ‘the Pompeii of Iran’ can be told. Catherine Brahic reports
       
  • What to eat for a Healthy Gut
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s): There are plenty of claims about foods to boost gut health, but not all of them stand up to scrutiny
       
  • Is your microbiome making you sick'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s):
       
  • What's up with your gut'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s): Chloe LambertForget gluten – there are more surprising culprits behind our digestive problems, says Chloe Lambert
       
  • ‘I want to make a chemical brain’
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s): Rowan HooperChemist Lee Cronin's ambition to understand life's deepest questions is matched only by the unorthodoxy of his methods, Rowan Hooper discovers
       
  • Stargazers' paradise
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s): Yvaine Ye
       
  • In space, no one can hear you drill
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s): Leah Crane
       
  • A bubble set to burst'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s): Simon OxenhamA decade after the financial crash, theory says the surge in populism that followed it should end. Will it, asks Simon Oxenham
       
  • Invasion of the face snatchers
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s): Frank SwainFace recognition has rapidly wormed its way into everything from policing to shopping. Is it too late to hold back the tide' Frank Swain reports
       
  • Butcherbirds use whiplash to kill
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s):
       
  • Shark likes some veg with its meat
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s):
       
  • Taking probiotics may be useless or might cause harm
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s):
       
  • Robot uses its ears to ‘see’ like a bat
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s):
       
  • Jupiter's iconic red spot has a blue rival
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s):
       
  • Ancient mega mill fed Roman sailors
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s):
       
  • Expect more tsunamis in a warmer world
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s):
       
  • Image made by million artists illustrates cultural evolution
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s):
       
  • Solar and wind farms may bring rain to Sahara
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s): Michael Le Page
       
  • The woman who heard stars spin
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s): Leah Crane
       
  • Glass box of atomic vapour is a tiny radio
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s): Leah Crane
       
  • Brain's emotion code is cracked
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s): Andy Coghlan
       
  • It is easy to fool a hate speech detector
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s): Frank Swain
       
  • Sheep culture seen in migration routes
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s): Frank Swain
       
  • Biology's greatest hits pull a crowd
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s): Graham Lawton
       
  • Volcano could have helped doom hobbits
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s): Michael Marshall
       
  • Control a real space robot with VR
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s): Leah Crane
       
  • How falsehoods spread after a mass shooting
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s): Chris Baraniuk
       
  • Antimatter seen in two places at once
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s): Leah Crane
       
  • The oldest human drawing
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s): Clare WilsonArchaeologists say they have found a 73,000-year-old drawing. Clare Wilson reports
       
  • … but elsewhere there's progress
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s):
       
  • Climate talks hit sticking points…
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s):
       
  • English health body in alcohol row
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s):
       
  • Bracing for Florence
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s):
       
  • Smashing achievement
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3195Author(s): The Large Hadron Collider is a decade old – and it's not done yet
       
  • Clean cut
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s): Every so often, my adopted cat brings home geckos in two pieces, namely the still-moving tail and the rest of the body (also still moving). But there is never any obvious blood. Why'
       
  • Eggstraordinary claim
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s): I've just read that eggs should not be stored in a rack on the back of a fridge door, the exact place where most fridge manufacturers put the egg rack. Before I revamp my fridge, is there any truth to this' And if so, what could it be'
       
  • Feedback
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s):
       
  • Compiled by Richard Smyth
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s):
       
  • Letters
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s):
       
  • A fantastical experiment
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s): Simon IngsCeramic art acts as a cunning foil for a collection of scientific curios, finds Simon Ings
       
  • Don't miss
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s):
       
  • Among the cruel stars
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s): Yvaine YeChina's leading sci-fi author Cixin Liu tells Yvaine Ye that the future is bright for our species – partly because we kill everything in our path
       
  • Lessons from early Earth
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s): Kelly OakesOur deepest history could hold the key to the search for life on other planets. Kelly Oakes reports
       
  • The surgeon fixing a scandal
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s): Julia BrownThe worst consequences of vaginal mesh could have been avoided if doctors had taken women's reports of pain seriously, surgeon and campaigner Sohier Elneil tells Julia Brown
       
  • The briny deep
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s): Katherine BourzacOcean desalination would provide drinking water for all – if only we knew what to do with the waste salt. Katherine Bourzac reports
       
  • The why of me
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s): Sofia DelenivIs having a sense of self really the hallmark of a sophisticated brain or simply an accident of evolution' Sofia Deleniv investigates
       
  • Eye to eye
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s): Yvaine Ye
       
  • Are modern teens hurting or happy'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s): Clare Wilson
       
  • A vote for reason
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s): Shaughnessy NaughtonIf they value facts, Americans can elect a scientist, says Shaughnessy Naughton
       
  • Sheer lunacy
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s): Robert ZubrinThe US plan to build a habitable station orbiting the moon is the worst idea of the new space age, says Robert Zubrin
       
  • Gassed up and ready to go
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s): Alice KleinVehicles that run on hydrogen have been dismissed by the likes of Elon Musk, but they're making a comeback, says Alice Klein
       
  • Print with sound using honey as ink
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s):
       
  • MS drug halves loss of brain tissue
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s):
       
  • AI could help doctors stay one step ahead of cancer
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s):
       
  • A machine to split the electron
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s):
       
  • Serengeti shaped by ancient herders
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s):
       
  • Opioid blocks pain and addiction
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s):
       
  • Warm-water time bomb threatens Arctic
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s):
       
  • Wolves may have influenced when elk shed their antlers
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s):
       
  • Fish passes mirror test for first time
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s): Yvaine Ye
       
  • CRISPR helps dogs' muscle disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s): Chelsea Whyte
       
  • Brains at full capacity stop noticing things
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s): Clare Wilsonn
       
  • Pram design can cut air pollution risk
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s): Inga Vesper
       
  • Some corals are beginning to beat the heat
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s): Katarina Zimmer
       
  • AI takes ‘marble’ theory-of-mind test
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s): Timothy Revell
       
  • Your typing could reveal Parkinson's
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s): Chris Baraniuk
       
  • Mystery cold spot found on Europa
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s): Leah Crane
       
  • DNA editing before birth may bring healthier lives
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s): Michael Le Page
       
  • Drone can fly indefinitely by laser power
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s): David Hambling
       
  • Star explosions could explain misfit galaxies
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s): Leah Crane
       
  • Graveyard is a bad omen for penguins
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s): Michael Marshall
       
  • Crunch time for Ebola in the DRC
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s): Debora MacKenzieWar zones may thwart efforts to halt virus, reports Debora MacKenzie
       
  • Doubts raised over online heart test
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s):
       
  • Race to save Mars rover Opportunity
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s):
       
  • American dream is slipping away
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s):
       
  • Treasured artefacts lost
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s):
       
  • Like looking in a mirror
    • Abstract: Publication date: 8 September 2018Source: New Scientist, Volume 239, Issue 3194Author(s): We're not unique – lots of species can recognise themselves
       
 
 
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