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Journal Cover The Leadership Quarterly
  [SJR: 2.77]   [H-I: 98]   [441 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1048-9843
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3089 journals]
  • Performance feedback, power retention, and the gender gap in leadership
    • Authors: Julia B. Bear; Lily Cushenbery; Manuel London; Gary D. Sherman
      Pages: 721 - 740
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 6
      Author(s): Julia B. Bear, Lily Cushenbery, Manuel London, Gary D. Sherman
      We propose that performance feedback can be a power retention mechanism that puts women at a relative disadvantage and contributes to the lack of women in leadership positions. Feedback is an evaluative process, with the (typically higher-power) source often having considerable discretion and means to deliver feedback and the feedback recipient often being at the mercy of the will of the source. The feedback process, therefore, has a built-in power component that preserves and amplifies existing power differences in organizations (e.g., differences in organizational authority and rank) and disproportionately harms women's leadership development. We develop a theoretical model concerning how power retention conditions (e.g., when giving feedback advances the source's personal status goals) lead to power retention mechanisms in the feedback process, such as patronizing feedback, particularly for female recipients. We discuss how gender moderates feedback delivery and reactions to feedback, which influence the persistent gender gap in leadership, subsequently reinforcing the power retention conditions. We conclude by discussing areas for future research, potential power equalization forces, and practical suggestions for how organizations can change this cycle.

      PubDate: 2017-11-02T20:46:10Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.leaqua.2017.02.003
       
  • Top management team faultlines and firm performance: Examining the CEO-TMT
           interface
    • Authors: Dimitrios Georgakakis; Peder Greve; Winfried Ruigrok
      Pages: 741 - 758
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 6
      Author(s): Dimitrios Georgakakis, Peder Greve, Winfried Ruigrok
      Prior research indicates that the relationship between top management team (TMT) faultlines and firm performance is equivocal. We shed new light on this topic by highlighting the moderating role of the CEO–TMT interface. Analyzing data from large international firms over the period 2005–2009 (347 firm-year combinations), we find that the performance effect of knowledge-based TMT faultlines is significantly altered when the leader of the TMT (i.e., the CEO): (a) socio-demographically resembles incumbent executives, (b) possesses a diverse career background, and (c) shares common socialization experience with other TMT members. Overall, our research reveals that different dimensions of the CEO-TMT interface play a pivotal role in determining the performance effects of knowledge-based TMT subgroups. Implications for upper echelons theory, team diversity, and strategic leadership research are discussed.

      PubDate: 2017-11-02T20:46:10Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.leaqua.2017.03.004
       
  • Working with creative leaders: Exploring the relationship between
           supervisors' and subordinates' creativity
    • Authors: Gamze Koseoglu; Yi Liu; Christina E. Shalley
      Pages: 798 - 811
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 6
      Author(s): Gamze Koseoglu, Yi Liu, Christina E. Shalley
      We propose that supervisors' own level of creativity is a core component of effective leadership that can be associated with subordinates' self-concept and creativity. Specifically, drawing on the identity theory framework, and role identity theory in particular, we argue that subordinates' creative role identity is an important underlying mechanism in the relationship between supervisors' level of creativity and their subordinates' creativity. Using a sample of 443 employees working with 44 supervisors in an IT firm, we hypothesized and found support for a moderated mediation model. There was a positive indirect relationship between supervisors' creativity and their subordinates' creativity via the subordinates' creative role identity, and this indirect relationship was stronger when employees perceived higher levels of organizational support for creativity.

      PubDate: 2017-11-02T20:46:10Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.leaqua.2017.03.002
       
  • Charismatic rhetoric, integrative complexity and the U.S. Presidency: An
           analysis of the State of the Union Address (SOTU) from George Washington
           to Barack Obama
    • Authors: Ben Wasike
      Pages: 812 - 826
      Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 6
      Author(s): Ben Wasike
      This study advances Thoemmes and Conway's seminal work on integrative complexity (IC) of U.S. presidents by examining the relationship between IC and charisma in the State of the Union address. I examined a census of SOTU addresses given from George Washington to Barack Obama using Boas Shamir's self-concept based motivational charisma construct. IC and charisma were positively related for presidents in the first terms in office; however, this relation only held for presidents who eventually won reelection. Data also confirmed a positive correlation between charisma and the likelihood of reelection. I describe various trends in the data with respect to charisma and IC for time in office. Overall, findings show that using IC in leadership studies may be a worthwhile endeavor, as is measuring charisma by computer given that this measure correlated reasonably well with measures of charisma derived from other sources.

      PubDate: 2017-11-02T20:46:10Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.leaqua.2017.04.002
       
  • CEO humility, narcissism and firm innovation: A paradox perspective on CEO
           traits
    • Authors: Hongyu Zhang; Amy Y. Ou; Anne S. Tsui; Hui Wang
      Pages: 585 - 604
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 5
      Author(s): Hongyu Zhang, Amy Y. Ou, Anne S. Tsui, Hui Wang
      We examine how two seemingly contradictory yet potentially complementary CEO traits—humility and narcissism—interact to affect firm innovation. We adopt a paradox perspective and propose that individuals can have paradoxical traits and that, in particular, humility and narcissism can coexist harmoniously, especially among the Chinese, whose philosophical tradition embraces paradoxical thinking and behaving. CEOs that are both humble and narcissistic are hypothesized to be more likely to have socialized charisma, to cultivate an innovative culture, and to deliver innovative performance. Two studies using multisource data involving 63 CEOs, 328 top managers, and 645 middle managers in Study 1 and 143 CEOs and 190 top managers in Study 2 support the hypotheses and point to new directions for studying CEO traits and their effects on firm outcomes.

      PubDate: 2017-09-27T14:56:20Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.leaqua.2017.01.003
       
  • Am I a leader' Examining leader identity development over time
    • Authors: Darja Miscenko; Hannes Guenter; David V. Day
      Pages: 605 - 620
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 5
      Author(s): Darja Miscenko, Hannes Guenter, David V. Day
      The extent to which someone thinks of him- or herself as a leader (i.e., leader identity) is subject to change in a dynamic manner because of experience and structured intervention, but is rarely studied as such. In this study, we map the trajectories of leader identity development over a course of a seven-week leader development program. Drawing upon identity theory (Kegan, 1983) and self-perception theory (Bem, 1972), we propose that changes in self-perceived leadership skills are associated with changes in leader identity. Using latent growth curve modeling and latent change score analyses as our primary analytical approaches, we analyzed longitudinal data across seven measurement points (N =98). We find leader identity to develop in a J-shaped pattern. As hypothesized, we find that these changes in leader identity are associated with, and potentially shaped by, changes in leadership skills across time.

      PubDate: 2017-09-27T14:56:20Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.leaqua.2017.01.004
       
  • Take it to the top: Imagined interactions with leaders elevates
           organizational identification
    • Authors: Rose Meleady; Richard J Crisp
      Pages: 621 - 638
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 5
      Author(s): Rose Meleady, Richard J Crisp
      Organizational identification is an important predictor of workplace behavior. The more strongly an individual identifies with their employing organization, the more motivated they will be to behave in ways that promote its success. In this paper we develop a new approach to fostering organizational identification based on principles of mental simulation. Across seven experiments we demonstrate that imagining positive contact with an organizational leader increases identification with the organization they represent. Experiments 1A, 1B, 2A, 2B, 3A and 3B replicated the basic effect against progressively varied control conditions, utilizing both scenario and field experiments. Experiment 4 demonstrated that as a consequence of heightened organizational identification following the imagined contact task, participants reported greater intentions to engage in organizational citizenship behaviors. We conclude by discussing the potential application of this technique as a simple and effective way for organizations to foster employees' motivation and performance.

      PubDate: 2017-09-27T14:56:20Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.leaqua.2017.01.008
       
  • The impact of a workplace terrorist attack on employees' perceptions of
           leadership: A longitudinal study from pre- to postdisaster
    • Authors: Marianne Skogbrott Birkeland; Morten Birkeland Nielsen; Marianne Bang Hansen; Stein Knardahl; Trond Heir
      Pages: 659 - 671
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 5
      Author(s): Marianne Skogbrott Birkeland, Morten Birkeland Nielsen, Marianne Bang Hansen, Stein Knardahl, Trond Heir
      A terrorist attack targeting a workplace represents an organizational crisis that requires the leaders to manage emerging threats. The changing roles and expectations of the leaders are reflected in the employees' perceptions of them over time. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the 2011 Oslo bombing attack affected the targeted employees' perceptions of the leadership behaviors of their immediate superiors or the organizational managers' interest in the health and well-being of their workers. Ministerial employees (n≈180) completed questionnaires on fair, empowering, and supportive leadership, in addition to human resource primacy, on two occasions several years prior to the terrorist attack. Assessments were then repeated one, two, and three years after the attack. Changes in the course of perceived leadership from predisaster to postdisaster were examined using bootstrapped t-tests and latent growth curve models. Furthermore, the general course of perceived leadership was compared with a nonexposed control sample of matched employees. Results showed that employees with high levels of posttraumatic stress perceived their immediate leader to be less supportive. However, overall perceptions of leadership were remarkably stable, which suggests that the effects of critical incidents on perceptions of leadership may be negligible.

      PubDate: 2017-09-27T14:56:20Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.leaqua.2017.01.002
       
  • The aura of charisma: A review on the embodiment perspective as signaling
    • Authors: Susan Reh; Niels Van Quaquebeke; Steffen R. Giessner
      Pages: 486 - 507
      Abstract: Publication date: August 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 4
      Author(s): Susan Reh, Niels Van Quaquebeke, Steffen R. Giessner
      Charismatic leaders have consistently been shown to affect followers' performance, motivation, and satisfaction. Yet, what precisely constitutes charisma still remains somewhat enigmatic. So far, research has mainly focused on leader traits, leader behaviors, or the leader follower-relationship, and the subsequent consequences of each on followers' self-concepts. All of these approaches share the notion that leader charisma depends on an explicit interaction between leader and follower. With the present review paper, we extend extant theorizing by arguing that charisma is additionally informed by embodied signals that flow directly from either the leader or the immediate environment. We introduce the embodiment perspective on human perception and describe its utility for theoretically understanding the charismatic effect. Correspondingly, we review studies that show which concrete embodied cues can support the charismatic effect. Finally, we discuss the variety of new theoretical and practical implications that arise from this research and how they can complement existing approaches to charismatic leadership.

      PubDate: 2017-09-02T19:16:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.leaqua.2017.01.001
       
  • A meta-analytic review and future research agenda of charismatic
           leadership
    • Authors: George C. Banks; Krista N. Engemann; Courtney E. Williams; Janaki Gooty; Kelly Davis McCauley; Melissa R. Medaugh
      Pages: 508 - 529
      Abstract: Publication date: August 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 4
      Author(s): George C. Banks, Krista N. Engemann, Courtney E. Williams, Janaki Gooty, Kelly Davis McCauley, Melissa R. Medaugh
      Charismatic leadership is a critical construct that draws much attention from both academic and practitioner literatures. Despite the positive attention received by the charisma construct, some have criticized its conceptualization and measurement. These critiques have, in turn, cast doubt on what we know regarding the antecedents and outcomes of charismatic leadership. In this review, we adopt a recently developed definition of charismatic leadership and then conduct a meta-analysis of its antecedents and objective outcomes. Following an examination of 76 independent studies and 36,031 individuals, results indicate that the Big Five traits and cognitive ability vary in their association with charismatic leadership. Other findings show that dimensions of charismatic leadership predict outcomes of interest, such as supervisor-rated task performance, supervisor-rated citizenship behaviors, and group or organization performance. Several shortcomings are identified, however, in testing theoretical and methodological moderating variables. The present research ultimately provides a roadmap for new frontiers in theoretical, measurement and empirical work on charismatic leadership.

      PubDate: 2017-09-02T19:16:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.leaqua.2016.12.003
       
  • Dying for charisma: Leaders' inspirational appeal increases post-mortem
    • Authors: Niklas K. Steffens; Kim Peters; S. Alexander Haslam; Rolf van Dick
      Pages: 530 - 542
      Abstract: Publication date: August 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 4
      Author(s): Niklas K. Steffens, Kim Peters, S. Alexander Haslam, Rolf van Dick
      In the present research, we shed light on the nature and origins of charisma by examining changes in a person's perceived charisma that follow their death. We propose that death is an event that will strengthen the connection between the leader and the group they belong to, which in turn will increase perceptions of leaders' charisma. In Study 1, results from an experimental study show that a scientist who is believed to be dead is regarded as more charismatic than the same scientist believed to be alive. Moreover, this effect was accounted for by people's perceptions that the dead scientist's fate is more strongly connected with the fate of the groups that they represent. In Study 2, a large-scale archival analysis of Heads of States who died in office in the 21st century shows that the proportion of published news items about Heads of State that include references to charisma increases significantly after their death. These results suggest that charisma is, at least in part, a social inference that increases after death. Moreover, they suggest that social influence and inspiration can be understood as products of people's capacity to embody valued social groups.

      PubDate: 2017-09-02T19:16:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.leaqua.2016.09.001
       
  • Boas Shamir: The person, his impact and legacy
    • Authors: Galit Eilam-Shamir; Ronit Kark; Micha Popper
      Pages: 563 - 577
      Abstract: Publication date: August 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 4
      Author(s): Galit Eilam-Shamir, Ronit Kark, Micha Popper
      This article is divided into three parts. In the first part, Galit, Boas's spouse, chronologically reviews the five periods of Boas's professional life—describing what is special to each period and what connects them—while relating to the centrality of values and the secret of charisma according to Boas Shamir. In the second part, Ronit, Boas's colleague, and his first doctoral student, relates to his role as mentor and presents the unique and novel theoretical perspectives that Boas developed concerning the identities of leaders and followers, and how they interact within the charismatic relationship. In the third part, Micha, Boas's friend and colleague, analyzes the relationship between Boas's personal history, the psycho-historical background in which he grew up, and the origins and uniqueness of his oeuvre.

      PubDate: 2017-09-02T19:16:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.leaqua.2016.03.004
       
  • Blazing new trails or opportunity lost' Evaluating research at the
           intersection of leadership and entrepreneurship
    • Authors: Shane W. Reid; Aaron H. Anglin; John E. Baur; Jeremy C. Short; M. Ronald Buckley
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 December 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly
      Author(s): Shane W. Reid, Aaron H. Anglin, John E. Baur, Jeremy C. Short, M. Ronald Buckley
      More than a decade ago, scholars formally conceptualized the potential synergy between leadership and entrepreneurship scholarship. Our work highlights research accomplishments occurring at the interface of these two intellectual areas as well as identifying untapped possibilities for continued research. We highlight how recent efforts have witnessed a mutual exchange of ideas that present opportunities benefiting both fields. Drawing from four key domains of entrepreneurship previously proposed to mutually inform future leadership research efforts, we make suggestions for integrating entrepreneurial opportunities, the roles of individual and entrepreneurial teams, the modes of organizing entrepreneurial ventures, and differing entrepreneurial environments with key trends important to leadership research, such as servant leadership and leader-member exchange theory. Overall, our work provides an assessment of the state of the art surrounding the coalescence of leadership and entrepreneurship research and sets an agenda for the next decade of research at this intersection.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T20:55:46Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.leaqua.2017.11.005
       
  • Leader-member exchange and organizational citizenship behaviors:
           Contextual effects of leader power distance and group task interdependence
           
    • Authors: Smriti Anand; Prajya Vidyarthi; Sandra Rolnicki
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly
      Author(s): Smriti Anand, Prajya Vidyarthi, Sandra Rolnicki
      In this paper we explore the context of the relationship between leader-member exchange and organizational citizenship behaviors (OCB). We maintain that workgroup leader's power distance and the extent of task interdependence in the group exert cross-level effects on the LMX-OCB relationship. We assert that leader power distance attenuates the relationship between LMX and OCB, and this effect is stronger in workgroups with high degree of task interdependence. Results of hierarchical linear modeling analysis of data gathered from 245 employees nested in 54 workgroups supported our hypotheses. LMX-OCB relationship was weaker in workgroups led by high power distance leaders. Further, the three-way cross-level interaction between LMX, leader power distance and group task interdependence demonstrated that the tendency for LMX to have a stronger positive effect on OCB when leader power distance was low rather than high was more pronounced in high task interdependence teams.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T20:55:46Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.leaqua.2017.11.002
       
  • In the eye of the beholder' An eye-tracking experiment on emergent
           leadership in team interactions
    • Authors: Fabiola H. Gerpott; Nale Lehmann-Willenbrock; Jeroen D. Silvis; Mark Van Vugt
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 November 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly
      Author(s): Fabiola H. Gerpott, Nale Lehmann-Willenbrock, Jeroen D. Silvis, Mark Van Vugt
      Integrating evolutionary signaling theory with a social attention approach, we argue that individuals possess a fast, automated mechanism for detecting leadership signals in fellow humans that is reflected in higher visual attention toward emergent leaders compared to non-leaders. To test this notion, we first videotaped meetings of project teams and collected leadership ratings for the team members from three rating sources. Second, we provided 18 naïve observers with 42 brief, muted video clips of the team meetings and analyzed their eye gazing patterns. Observers gazed at emergent leaders more often, and for an average longer duration, than at non-leaders. Gender effects occurred such that male emergent leaders received a higher number of fixations than female emergent leaders. Non-verbal behavior analysis indicated that emergent leaders showed a higher amount of active gestures and less passive facial expressions than non-leaders. We discuss theoretical and methodological directions for emergent leadership research in teams.

      PubDate: 2017-12-11T20:55:46Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.leaqua.2017.11.003
       
  • Leader negative feedback-seeking and leader effectiveness in
           leader-subordinate relationships: The paradoxical role of subordinate
           expertise
    • Authors: Jae Uk Chun; Dongseop Lee; John J. Sosik
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 November 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly
      Author(s): Jae Uk Chun, Dongseop Lee, John J. Sosik
      From a motivational perspective of feedback-seeking behavior, we examined the mediating role of leaders' negative feedback-seeking from subordinates in the relationship between the quality of leader-member exchange (LMX) and subordinates' evaluation of leader effectiveness, along with the moderating role of subordinate expertise in the mediated relationship. Using 151 unique matched sets of leader and subordinate reports obtained from 5 large Korean companies, we found that the positive relationship between LMX and leader effectiveness was mediated by leaders' negative feedback-seeking. Additionally, the positive relationship between LMX and leader negative feedback-seeking was stronger when perceived subordinate expertise was lower. Lastly, the indirect effect of LMX on leader effectiveness through leader negative feedback-seeking was stronger when perceived subordinate expertise was lower. These findings were obtained after controlling for leaders' power distance and goal orientations that might influence their motives to seek or avoid feedback. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

      PubDate: 2017-11-17T00:16:00Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.leaqua.2017.11.001
       
  • Inside front cover - Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 6


      PubDate: 2017-11-02T20:46:10Z
       
  • Call for papers - Economics and Leadership
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 6


      PubDate: 2017-11-02T20:46:10Z
       
  • Call for papers - Evolution and Biology of Leadership: A New Synthesis
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 6


      PubDate: 2017-11-02T20:46:10Z
       
  • Call for papers Yearly review
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 6


      PubDate: 2017-11-02T20:46:10Z
       
  • Call for papers Special Registered Report Issue on Replication and
           Rigorous Retesting of Leadership Models
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 6


      PubDate: 2017-11-02T20:46:10Z
       
  • Acting with the best of intentions… or not: A typology and model of
           impression management in leadership
    • Authors: Jessica A. Peck; Mary Hogue
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 October 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly
      Author(s): Jessica A. Peck, Mary Hogue
      Impression management (IM) is important for effective leadership. Followers accept influence from individuals who meet their perceptions of what it means to be a leader, and IM is an important way of impacting those perceptions. Yet, the extant literature on leader IM is fragmented. We unify the literature in this area by creating a multi-dimensional typology and multi-level model of IM in leadership. We examine the multi-dimensional nature of IM as a construct composed of information processing, communicative, and goal-directed components, thereby creating eight IM archetypes. Then, we examine how IM can be used to impact follower perceptions of the leader through the lenses of transformational/charismatic, authentic, and leader categorization theories. This research unites a currently fragmented area of research and sparks new questions about how leader behaviors can be used to influence followers toward multi-level leadership outcomes.

      PubDate: 2017-11-02T20:46:10Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.leaqua.2017.10.001
       
  • Affect and leader-member exchange in the new millennium: A state-of-art
           review and guiding framework
    • Authors: Herman H.M. Tse; Ashlea C. Troth; Neal M. Ashkanasy; Amy L. Collins
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 October 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly
      Author(s): Herman H.M. Tse, Ashlea C. Troth, Neal M. Ashkanasy, Amy L. Collins
      The idea that affect plays a key role in leader-member exchange (LMX) processes is not new, but it has become a subject of considerable research attention since the turn of the Millennium. This interest has, however, resulted in a multiplicity of views that have tended to obfuscate rather than clarify the affect-LMX nexus. To deal with this lack of clarity, we conducted a systematic integration of affect-LMX literature published in leading journals since 2000, including the role of personal affectivity, discrete affect, emotional intelligence, emotional labor, and affective climate. We structured our review using a multilevel framework of affect that encompasses five levels of analysis: (1) within-person, (2) between persons, (3) interpersonal, (4) team, and (5) organizational levels; as well as consideration of cross-level effects. We address in particular three fundamental issues that we argue may have hampered the development of the affect-LMX nexus in the literature: theoretical diversity, problems of data analysis, and measurement issues. We conclude by discussing opportunities for future research across the different levels and develop a set of research questions that we hope will help to promote research into the role of affect in LMX.

      PubDate: 2017-10-26T12:39:35Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.leaqua.2017.10.002
       
  • Leadership and generations at work: A critical review
    • Authors: Cort W. Rudolph; Rachel S. Rauvola; Hannes Zacher
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 October 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly
      Author(s): Cort W. Rudolph, Rachel S. Rauvola, Hannes Zacher
      We present a critical review of theory, empirical research, and practical applications regarding generational differences in leadership phenomena. First, we consider the concept of generations both historically and through contemporary arguments related to leadership. Second, we outline and refute various myths surrounding the idea of generational differences in general, and critique leadership theories that have been influenced by these myths. Third, we describe the results of a literature review of primary empirical studies that have invoked the notion of generational differences to understand leadership phenomena. Finally, we argue that the lifespan developmental perspective represents a useful alternative to generational representations, as it better captures age-related dynamics that are relevant to leadership, followership, and leadership development. Ultimately, our work serves as a formal call for a moratorium to be placed upon the application of the ideas of generations and generational differences to leadership theory, research, and practice.

      PubDate: 2017-10-05T08:19:21Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.leaqua.2017.09.004
       
  • We can do it! Inclusive leader language promotes voice behavior in
           multi-professional teams
    • Authors: Mona Weiss; Michaela Kolbe; Gudela Grote; Donat R. Spahn; Bastian Grande
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 October 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly
      Author(s): Mona Weiss, Michaela Kolbe, Gudela Grote, Donat R. Spahn, Bastian Grande
      Although it is known that leaders can have a strong impact on whether employees voice work-related ideas or concerns, no research has investigated the impact of leader language on voice—particularly in professionally diverse contexts. Based on a social identity approach as well as on collectivistic leadership theories, we distinguish between implicit (i.e., First-Person Plural pronouns) and explicit (i.e., invitations and appreciations) inclusive leader language and test its effects on voice in multi-professional teams. We hypothesized that implicit inclusive leader language promotes voice especially among team members sharing the same professional group membership as the leader (in-group team members) while explicit inclusive leader language promotes voice especially among team members belonging to a different professional group (out-group team members). These hypotheses were tested in a field setting in which 126 health care professionals (i.e., nurses, resident and attending physicians), organized in 26 teams, managed medical emergencies. Behavioral coding and leader language analyses supported our hypotheses: Leaders' “WE”-references were more strongly related to residents' (in-group) and explicit invitations related more strongly to nurses' (out-group) voice behavior. We discuss how inclusive leader language promotes employee voice and explain why group membership functions as an important moderator in professionally diverse teams.

      PubDate: 2017-10-05T08:19:21Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.leaqua.2017.09.002
       
  • Leader-employee congruence of expected contributions in the
           employee-organization relationship
    • Authors: Mieke Audenaert; Philippe Carette; Lynn M. Shore; Thomas Lange; Thomas Van Waeyenberg; Adelien Decramer
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 September 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly
      Author(s): Mieke Audenaert, Philippe Carette, Lynn M. Shore, Thomas Lange, Thomas Van Waeyenberg, Adelien Decramer
      Employees' expected contributions can be incongruent with those of their leader. We examine the congruence effect of leaders' and employees' expected contributions on job satisfaction. Results of cross-level polynomial regressions on 947 employees and 224 leaders support the congruence effect. When expected contributions are congruent, employees are more satisfied with their job. Our findings suggest that employees enjoy high challenges, as long as these challenges are in harmony with the expected contributions of their leaders. Employees are less satisfied with their jobs both when their expected contributions were higher than their leaders' and when their expected contributions were lower than those of their leaders. Beyond the relevance of having high expected contributions, the findings highlight the crucial role played by the congruence of expected contributions of leaders and employees.

      PubDate: 2017-10-05T08:19:21Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.leaqua.2017.09.003
       
  • Inside front cover - Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 5


      PubDate: 2017-09-27T14:56:20Z
       
  • Call for papers - Economics and Leadership
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 5


      PubDate: 2017-09-27T14:56:20Z
       
  • Call for papers - Evolution and Biology of Leadership: A New Synthesis
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 5


      PubDate: 2017-09-27T14:56:20Z
       
  • Call for papers Yearly review
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 5


      PubDate: 2017-09-27T14:56:20Z
       
  • Call for papers Special Registered Report Issue on Replication and
           Rigorous Retesting of Leadership Models
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 5


      PubDate: 2017-09-27T14:56:20Z
       
  • A moderated mediation model of the relationship between abusive
           supervision and knowledge sharing
    • Authors: Soojin Lee; Seckyoung Loretta Kim; Seokhwa Yun
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 September 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly
      Author(s): Soojin Lee, Seckyoung Loretta Kim, Seokhwa Yun
      This study uses the conservation of resources theory to examine the influence of a leader's destructive behaviors by investigating how emotional exhaustion resulting from abusive supervision affects employees' knowledge-sharing behaviors. Using a moderated mediation framework, this study suggests that organizational justice moderates the positive relationship between abusive supervision and employees' emotional exhaustion and attenuates the negative indirect effect of abusive supervision on employees' knowledge-sharing behaviors. The results of this study, drawn from a sample of 202 dyads comprising full-time employees and their immediate supervisors, support most of its hypotheses. The implications and limitations of the study, as well as directions for future research, are discussed.

      PubDate: 2017-09-14T13:27:27Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.leaqua.2017.09.001
       
  • Investor response to appointment of female CEOs and CFOs
    • Authors: Eline Brinkhuis; Bert Scholtens
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 September 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly
      Author(s): Eline Brinkhuis, Bert Scholtens
      We study the impact of appointing women to top executive positions from an investor perspective. We analyze whether shareholders value announcement of appointment of women to top positions differently than they do appointment of men. This study uses an international sample of 100 announcements of top executive appointments of women who replace men and investigates how shareholders respond to such appointments. This research combines an event study with a matched pair analysis to compare the response from investors regarding appointment of female versus male CEOs and CFOs. We establish that investors do not seem to value appointment of women significantly differently from that of men. This finding suggests that, from the investor perspective, there appears to be no business case for a particular gender when it comes to appointing a CEO or CFO.

      PubDate: 2017-09-02T19:16:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.leaqua.2017.08.002
       
  • Capturing hearts and minds: The influence of relational identification
           with the leader on followers' mobilization and cardiovascular reactivity
    • Authors: Matthew J. Slater; Martin J. Turner; Andrew L. Evans; Marc V. Jones
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 August 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly
      Author(s): Matthew J. Slater, Martin J. Turner, Andrew L. Evans, Marc V. Jones
      The influence of relational identification (RI) on leadership processes and the effects of social identity leadership on followers' responses to stress have received scant theoretical and research attention. The present research advances theoretical understanding by testing the assertion that high RI with the leader drives follower mobilization of effort and psychophysiological responses to stress. Two experimental scenario studies (Study 1 and Study 2) support the hypothesis that being led by an individual with whom followers perceive high RI increases follower intentional mobilization. Study 2 additionally showed that high (vs. low) RI increases follower resource appraisals and cognitive task performance. A laboratory experiment (Study 3) assessing cardiovascular (CV) reactivity showed that, compared to neutral (i.e., non-affiliated) leadership, being led by an individual with whom participants felt low RI elicited a maladaptive (i.e., threat) response to a pressurized task. In addition, relative to the low RI and neutral conditions, high RI with the leader did not engender greater challenge or threat reactivity. In conclusion, advancing social identity leadership and challenge and threat theory, findings suggest that leaders should be mindful of the deleterious effects (i.e., reduced mobilization and greater threat state) of low RI to optimize follower mobilization of effort and psychophysiological responses to stress.

      PubDate: 2017-09-02T19:16:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.leaqua.2017.08.003
       
  • Inside front cover - Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 4


      PubDate: 2017-09-02T19:16:08Z
       
  • Call for papers - Economics and Leadership
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 4


      PubDate: 2017-09-02T19:16:08Z
       
  • Call for papers - Evolution and Biology of Leadership: A New Synthesis
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 4


      PubDate: 2017-09-02T19:16:08Z
       
  • Call for papers Yearly review
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 4


      PubDate: 2017-09-02T19:16:08Z
       
  • Reflections on leadership, authority, and lessons learned
    • Authors: Boas Shamir; Galit Eilam-Shamir
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 June 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly
      Author(s): Boas Shamir, Galit Eilam-Shamir


      PubDate: 2017-07-03T07:18:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.leaqua.2017.06.004
       
  • Charisma: New frontiers
    • Authors: John Antonakis; William L. Gardner
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 June 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly
      Author(s): John Antonakis, William L. Gardner


      PubDate: 2017-07-03T07:18:33Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.leaqua.2017.06.003
       
  • Saying sorry: Ethical leadership and the act of public apology
    • Authors: Sanderijn Cels
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 June 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly
      Author(s): Sanderijn Cels
      How do top representatives exercise ethical leadership in the context of public apologies? This paper examines public apologies made by corporate and government leaders for organizational wrongdoing. Conducting qualitative case-research, our deductive inquiry demonstrates that ethical leadership strategies that have been formulated for organizational contexts are utilized in the public arena and adapted to meet the particular demands of this context. We also inductively derive four aggregate strategies that leaders employ: “articulating values in relation to past and future”; “defining the wrongdoing”; “constructing moral communities” and “differentiating responsibilities”. We discuss the findings vis-à-vis the body of literature on ethical leadership, and identify some thorny ethical issues for further investigation.

      PubDate: 2017-06-16T21:00:50Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.leaqua.2017.04.001
       
  • Authentic leadership extends beyond work: A multilevel model of
           work-family conflict and enrichment
    • Authors: Susanne Braun; Karolina W.A.M. Nieberle
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 May 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly
      Author(s): Susanne Braun, Karolina W.A.M. Nieberle
      Drawing on the work-home resources model, we develop a multilevel framework of individual and team perceptions of authentic leadership in relation to followers' work-family conflict (WFC) and enrichment (WFE). Our model suggests that authentic leadership buffers followers' WFC and drives their WFE. In addition, leaders' WFC and WFE are examined as moderators to test the boundary conditions of these relationships. We collected data from 33 leaders and 128 followers at two points of measurement and analyzed them with hierarchical linear modeling. At the individual level, authentic leadership related negatively to WFC and positively to WFE. At the team level, authentic leadership related positively to WFE, but not to WFC. Cross-level interactions indicated that leaders' WFC strengthens the relationship between authentic leadership and followers' WFC. These findings contribute to the theoretical understanding of authentic leadership as a resource at multiple levels in organizations and demonstrate its outcomes beyond work.

      PubDate: 2017-06-02T16:48:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.leaqua.2017.04.003
       
  • Charisma as signal: An evolutionary perspective on charismatic leadership
    • Authors: Allen Grabo; Brian Spisak; Mark van Vugt
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 May 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly
      Author(s): Allen Grabo, Brian Spisak, Mark van Vugt
      We present an evolutionary perspective on charismatic leadership, arguing that charisma has evolved as a credible signal of a person's ability to solve a coordination challenge requiring urgent collective action from group members. We suggest that a better understanding of charisma's evolutionary and biological origins and functions can provide a broader perspective in which to situate current debates surrounding the utility and validity of charismatic leadership as a construct in the social sciences. We outline several key challenges which have shaped our followership psychology, and argue that the benefits of successful coordination in ancestral environments has led to the evolution of context-dependent psychological mechanisms which are especially attuned to cues and signals of outstanding personal leadership qualities. We elaborate on several implications of this signaling hypothesis of charismatic leadership, including opportunities for deception (dishonest signaling) and for large-scale coordination.

      PubDate: 2017-06-02T16:48:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.leaqua.2017.05.001
       
  • Perceptions of charisma from thin slices of behavior predict leadership
           prototypicality judgments
    • Authors: Konstantin O. Tskhay; Rebecca Zhu; Nicholas O. Rule
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 March 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly
      Author(s): Konstantin O. Tskhay, Rebecca Zhu, Nicholas O. Rule
      Signaling theory suggests that people use cues transmitted by leaders to form impressions of charisma but the validity of these impressions remains unexplored. Here, we examined whether perceptions of charisma from thin slices of nonverbal behavior relate to inferences based on more information. We tested whether ratings of charisma from 5-, 15-, and 30-s clips (with no audio) of speakers delivering a message predicted evaluations of vision articulation and leadership prototypicality made from 60-s multimedia clips (with audio). The results indicated that thin-slice charisma judgments predicted the criterion scores for leadership prototypicality but not vision articulation from all of the 5-, 15-, and 30-s silent clips. The current data therefore suggest that thin slices of charisma can be valid indicators of leadership.

      PubDate: 2017-03-16T04:50:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.leaqua.2017.03.003
       
  • How leader humility helps teams to be humbler, psychologically stronger,
           and more effective: A moderated mediation model
    • Authors: Arménio Rego; Bradley Owens; Susana Leal; Ana Melo; Miguel Pina e Cunha; Lurdes Gonçalves; Paula Ribeiro
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 February 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly
      Author(s): Arménio Rego, Bradley Owens, Susana Leal, Ana Melo, Miguel Pina e Cunha, Lurdes Gonçalves, Paula Ribeiro
      We hypothesize that (a) the level of humility expressed by leaders predicts team performance through, serially, team humility and team PsyCap, and (b) the strength (i.e., consensus within the team) of the leader humility, team humility and team PsyCap moderates the paths of that hypothesized model. A sample comprising 82 teams (82 leaders; 332 team members) was collected. Team members reported leader humility, team humility and team PsyCap. Leaders reported team performance. To handle the risks of common method bias, each mediating path of the hypothesized model is based on data from two different subsamples within each team. Our model's most novel theoretical contribution is the (moderated mediated) connection between leader humility, collective humility, and team PsyCap, and this was consistently supported in our data. Our inconsistent findings dealing with the relationship between team PsyCap and performance is well established in the literature and our results in both sub-samples were in the theorized direction. The study contributes to understand why, how and when humble leaders are more effective.

      PubDate: 2017-02-17T09:08:45Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.leaqua.2017.02.002
       
  • Supervisor's HEXACO personality traits and subordinate perceptions of
           abusive supervision
    • Authors: Kimberley Breevaart; Reinout E. de Vries
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 February 2017
      Source:The Leadership Quarterly
      Author(s): Kimberley Breevaart, Reinout E. de Vries
      Abusive supervision is detrimental to both subordinates and organizations. Knowledge about individual differences in personality related to abusive supervision may improve personnel selection and potentially reduce the harmful effects of this type of leadership. Using the HEXACO personality framework, we hypothesized that subordinates perceive leaders high on Agreeableness and Honesty-Humility as less abusive. In a sample of 107 unique supervisor-subordinate dyads that filled out the online questionnaire, we found that both Agreeableness and Honesty-Humility were negatively related to subordinate perceptions of abusive supervision. Our findings contribute to our understanding of the origins of abusive supervision and hopefully stimulate future research on supervisor personality and abusive supervision.

      PubDate: 2017-02-17T09:08:45Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.leaqua.2017.02.001
       
 
 
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