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The Lancet Infectious Diseases
Journal Prestige (SJR): 9.963
Citation Impact (citeScore): 7
Number of Followers: 214  
 
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ISSN (Print) 1473-3099
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3181 journals]
  • Congenital viral infections continue to affect neonates
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Karen B Fowler, Shannon A Ross
       
  • Correction to Lancet Infect Dis 2019; published online Oct 30, 2019.
           https://doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(19)30540-7
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s):
       
  • The public health crisis of underimmunisation: a global plan of action
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Lawrence O Gostin, James G Hodge, Barry R Bloom, Ayman El-Mohandes, Jonathan Fielding, Peter Hotez, Ann Kurth, Heidi J Larson, Walter A Orenstein, Kenneth Rabin, Scott C Ratzan, Daniel SalmonSummaryVaccination is one of public health's greatest achievements, responsible for saving billions of lives. Yet, 20% of children worldwide are not fully protected, leading to 1·5 million child deaths annually from vaccine-preventable diseases. Millions more people have severe disabling illnesses, cancers, and disabilities stemming from underimmunisation. Reasons for falling vaccination rates globally include low public trust in vaccines, constraints on affordability or access, and insufficient governmental vaccine investments. Consequently, an emerging crisis in vaccine hesitancy ranges from hyperlocal to national and worldwide. Outbreaks often originate in small, insular communities with low immunisation rates. Local outbreaks can spread rapidly, however, transcending borders. Following an assessment of underlying determinants of low vaccination rates, we offer an action based on scientific evidence, ethics, and human rights that spans multiple governments, organisations, disciplines, and sectors.
       
  • Narkomania: Drugs, HIV, and Citizenship in Ukraine, Jennifer Carroll.
           Cornell University Press (2019), 256, £18·82, ISBN: 978-1501736926
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Talha Burki
       
  • Infectious Diseases and Arthropods Paperback, Jerome Goddard. Humana
           (2018), 296, £119.99, ISBN: 978-3030093464
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Constantianus J M Koenraadt
       
  • Correction to Lancet Infect Dis 2019; 19: 802–03
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 10Author(s):
       
  • Melioidosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 10Author(s): Prasanta R Mohapatra, Bijayini Behera, Srujana Mohanty, Sourin Bhuniya, Baijayantimala Mishra
       
  • Melioidosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 10Author(s): Jérémie Pasquier, Claude Olive, Guillaume Hurtrel, Jean-Marie Turmel, André Cabié
       
  • The OVIVA trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 10Author(s): Philip A Bejon, Ho Kwong Li, Ines Rombach, Sarah Walker, Matthew Scarborough
       
  • Sustained transmission of Ebola in new locations: more likely than
           previously thought
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 10Author(s): Robin N Thompson, Katri Jalava, Uri Obolski
       
  • Treating Ebola in eastern DRC
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 10Author(s): David S Fedson
       
  • Correction to Lancet Infect Dis 2019; published online Aug 6.
           https://doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(19)30310-X
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 10Author(s):
       
  • Sales reps in India push unnecessary antibiotics
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 10Author(s): Madlen Davies, Rahul Meesaraganda, Ben Stockton
       
  • Trends in the global burden of paediatric lower respiratory infections
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Carina King, Eric D McCollum
       
  • What makes a score a winner'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Jonathon R Campbell, Dick Menzies
       
  • Tuberculosis: an instrument of early mortality in life course
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Barbara Reis-Santos, Marli Souza Rocha
       
  • Early childhood diarrhoea: from data to interventions
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Karen H Keddy
       
  • Test-and-not-treat: importance for mass drug administration
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Jesica Herrick
       
  • Long-term survival and cause-specific mortality of patients newly
           diagnosed with tuberculosis in São Paulo state, Brazil, 2010–15: a
           population-based, longitudinal study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Otavio T Ranzani, Laura C Rodrigues, Sidney Bombarda, Cátia M Minto, Eliseu A Waldman, Carlos R R CarvalhoSummaryBackgroundLong-term survival and cause-specific mortality of patients who start tuberculosis treatment is rarely described. We aimed to assess the long-term survival of these patients and evaluate the association between vulnerable conditions (social, health behaviours, and comorbidities) and cause-specific mortality in a country with a high burden of tuberculosis.MethodsIn this population-based, longitudinal study in São Paulo state, Brazil, we described the 5-year survival of patients who were newly diagnosed with tuberculosis in 2010. We included patients with newly-diagnosed tuberculosis, aged 15 years or older, and notified to the São Paulo State Tuberculosis Program in 2010. We excluded patients whose diagnosis had changed during follow-up (ie, they did not have tuberculosis) and patients who had multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis. We selected our population with tuberculosis from the dedicated electronic system TBweb. Our primary objective was to estimate the excess mortality over 5 years and within the group who survived the first year, compared with the general São Paulo state population. We also estimated the association between social vulnerability (imprisonment and homelessness), health behaviours (alcohol and drug use), and comorbidities (diabetes and mental disorders) with all-cause and cause-specific mortality. We used the competing risk analysis framework, estimating cause-specific hazard ratios (HRs) adjusted for potential confounding factors.FindingsIn 2010, there were 19 252 notifications of tuberculosis cases. We excluded 550 cases as patients were younger than 15 years, 556 cases that were not tuberculosis, 2597 retreatments, and 48 cases of MDR tuberculosis, resulting in a final cohort of 15 501 patients with tuberculosis. Over a period of 5 years from tuberculosis diagnosis, 2660 (17%) of 15 501 patients died. Compared with the source population, matched by age, sex, and calendar year, the standardised mortality ratio was 6·47 (95% CI 6·22–6·73) over 5 years and 3·93 (3·71–4·17) among those who survived the first year. 1197 (45%) of 2660 deaths were due to infection. Homelessness and alcohol and drug use were associated with death from infection (adjusted cause-specific HR 1·60, 95% CI 1·39–1·85), cardiovascular (1·43, 1·06–1·95), and external or ill-defined causes of death (1·80, 1·37–2·36). Diabetes was associated with deaths from cardiovascular causes (1·70, 1·23–2·35).InterpretationPatients newly diagnosed with tuberculosis were at a higher risk of death than were the source population, even after tuberculosis treatment. Post-tuberculosis sequelae and vulnerability are associated with excess mortality and must be addressed to mitigate the tuberculosis burden worldwide.FundingWellcome Trust.
       
  • Meatal cleaning: discrepancies in need of explanation – Authors'
           reply
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 11Author(s): Allen C Cheng, Brett G Mitchell, Oyebola Fasugba, Nicholas Graves, Jane Koerner, Peter Collignon
       
  • Borrelial lymphocytoma of the lip
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 11Author(s): Halil Yildiz, Liliane Marot
       
  • Disseminated sporotrichosis following iatrogenic immunosuppression for
           suspected pyoderma gangrenosum
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 11Author(s): Marissa White, La'Tonzia Adams, Casey Phan, Gulsun Erdag, Marissa Totten, Richard Lee, Xuelian Lu, Seema Mehta, Lloyd S Miller, Sean X ZhangSummarySporotrichosis is an infection caused by the dimorphic fungus Sporothrix schenckii and related species that often arises from traumatic inoculation of inhabited soil and organic debris into skin. The infection is usually limited to the skin in immunocompetent patients, usually as lymphocutaneous sporotrichosis. Accurate diagnosis rests on clinical data and culture, and might be facilitated by biopsy identification of suppurative and granulomatous inflammation with fungal elements. In this Grand Round, we present a dramatic case of cutaneous sporotrichosis initially presented with an atypical large ulcer without associated lymphocutaneous spread, clinically mimicking pyoderma gangrenosum, and subsequently progressed to disseminated sporotrichosis in the setting of iatrogenic immunosuppression. We further review the clinical features, risk factors, and treatment of these disseminated sporotrichosis cases, and discuss the need for improved awareness of this fungus' potential link to cause disseminated and invasive fungal infections.
       
  • Prevalence, estimated incidence, risk behaviours, and genotypic
           distribution of hepatitis C virus among people who inject drugs accessing
           harm-reduction services in Kenya: a retrospective cohort study
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 11Author(s): Matthew J Akiyama, Charles M Cleland, John A Lizcano, Peter Cherutich, Ann E KurthSummaryBackgroundSub-Saharan Africa has a large population of people with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, yet little is known about HCV among people who inject drugs this region. We assessed the prevalence of HCV mono-infection and HIV–HCV co-infection, and the estimated incidence, genotypes, and risk behaviours associated with HCV among people who inject drugs in Kenya.MethodsPeople aged 18 years or older who were living in Nairobi, coastal Kenya, or western Kenya, had a history of injection drug use, and had used any illicit drugs in the past 12 months were recruited at needle and syringe programme sites using respondent-driven sampling. Participants were screened for the presence of an anti-HCV antibody. Those who were anti-HCV positive underwent confirmatory HCV RNA testing, and those with detectable HCV RNA were genotyped. Participants were interviewed regarding parenteral risk behaviours and exposure to services received at the needle and syringe programme sites. We examined correlates of HCV infection and HIV–HCV co-infection using bivariate and multivariate regression, and estimated HCV incidence.FindingsOf 2188 enrolled participants, 291 (13%) were anti-HCV positive: 183 (22%) of 842 participants in coastal Kenya, 105 (13%) of 817 in Nairobi, and three (1%) of 529 in western Kenya. 284 anti-HCV-positive participants underwent successful HCV RNA testing, of whom 230 (81%) were viraemic. Estimated incidence rates of anti-HCV positivity per 100 person-years were 6·31 in coastal Kenya, 3·19 in Nairobi, and 0·22 in western Kenya. HCV incidence rate was greater in coastal Kenya compared with Nairobi (incidence rate ratio 1·97 [95% CI 1·35–2·93], p=0·0001) and the western region (28·17 [7·55–236·58], p
       
  • Effectiveness of pre-entry active tuberculosis and post-entry latent
           tuberculosis screening in new entrants to the UK: a retrospective,
           population-based cohort study
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 11Author(s): Luis C Berrocal-Almanza, Ross Harris, Maeve K Lalor, Morris C Muzyamba, John Were, Anne-Marie O'Connell, Adil Mirza, Onn-Min Kon, Ajit Lalvani, Dominik ZennerSummaryBackgroundEvaluating interventions that might lead to a reduction in tuberculosis in high-income countries with a low incidence of the disease is key to accelerate progress towards its elimination. In such countries, migrants are known to contribute a large proportion of tuberculosis cases to the burden. We assessed the effectiveness of screening for active tuberculosis before entry to the UK and for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) post-entry for reduction of tuberculosis in new-entrant migrants to the UK. Additionally, we investigated the effect of access to primary care on tuberculosis incidence in this population.MethodsWe did a retrospective, population-based cohort study of migrants from 66 countries who were negative for active tuberculosis at pre-entry screening between Jan 1, 2011, and Dec 31, 2014, and eligible for LTBI screening. We used record linkage to track their first contact with primary care, uptake of LTBI screening, and development of active tuberculosis in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland. To assess the effectiveness of the pre-entry screening programme, we identified a control group of migrants who were not screened for active tuberculosis using the specific code for new entrants to the UK registering in primary care within the National Health Service patient registration data system. Our primary outcome was development of active tuberculosis notified to the National Enhanced Tuberculosis Surveillance System.FindingsOur cohort comprised 224 234 migrants who were screened for active tuberculosis before entry to the UK and a control group of 118 738 migrants who were not. 103 990 (50%) migrants who were screened for active tuberculosis registered in primary care; all individuals in the control group were registered in primary care. 1828 tuberculosis cases were identified during the cohort time, of which 31 were prevalent. There were 26 incident active tuberculosis cases in migrants with no evidence of primary care registration, and 1771 cases in the entire cohort of migrants who registered in primary care (n=222 728), giving an incidence rate of 174 (95% CI 166–182) per 100 000 person-years. 672 (1%) of 103 990 migrants who were screened for active tuberculosis went on to develop tuberculosis compared with 1099 (1%) of 118 738 not screened for active tuberculosis (incidence rate ratio [IRR] 1·49, 95% CI 1·33–1·67; p
       
  • The Perfect Predator: A Scientist's Race to Save Her Husband from a Deadly
           Superbug: A Memoir, Steffanie Strathdee, Thomas Patterson, Teresa Baker.
           Hachette Books (2019), 352, £20, ISBN: 978-0316418089
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 11Author(s): Robert Stirrups
       
  • Stuart Levy
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 11Author(s): Talha Burki
       
  • Research brief
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 11Author(s): Dara Mohammadi
       
  • Infectious disease surveillance update
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 11Author(s): Ruth Zwizwai
       
  • DRC getting ready to introduce a second Ebola vaccine
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 11Author(s): Talha Burki
       
  • Valley fever on the rise after years of decline in the USA
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 11Author(s): Roxanne Nelson
       
  • Correction to Lancet Infect Dis 2019; 19: 750–58
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 11Author(s):
       
  • Correction to Lancet Infect Dis 2019; published online Aug 28.
           https://doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(19)30421-9
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 11Author(s):
       
  • Living in the shadows of hepatitis
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 11Author(s): Vahdat Poortahmasebi, Hossein Bannazadeh Baghi
       
  • Effective prison-based treatment and linkage to care after release
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 11Author(s): Timothy J Papaluca, George Tambakis, David Iser, Alexander J Thompson
       
  • The long shadow post-tuberculosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 11Author(s): Brian Allwood, Marieke van der Zalm, Goodman Makanda, Kevin Mortimer, Amaral Andre F.S., Egere Uzochukwu, Evans Denise, Gray Diane, Hoddinott Graeme, Ivanova Olena, Jones Rupert, Marx Florian M., Meghji Jamilah, Mpagama Stellah, van Kampen Sanne, Rachow Andrea, Schoeman Ingrid, Stek Cari, von Delft Dalene, Walker Naomi
       
  • No measles cases during the 2019 Hajj
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 11Author(s): Saber Yezli, Kingsley Bieh, Anas Khan
       
  • Plasmodium falciparum resistance to piperaquine driven by PfCRT
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 11Author(s): Satish K Dhingra, Jennifer L Small-Saunders, Didier Ménard, David A Fidock
       
  • Suboptimal dosing triggers artemisinin partner drug resistance
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 11Author(s): Jigang Wang, Chengchao Xu, Fu Long Liao, Tingliang Jiang, Sanjeev Krishna, Youyou Tu
       
  • Sustainable actions needed to mitigate dengue outbreak in Bangladesh
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 11Author(s): Fabia Hannan Mone, Sahadat Hossain, M Tasdik Hasan, Gule Tajkia, Fahad Ahmed
       
  • A case of imported Monkeypox in Singapore
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 11Author(s): Oon Tek Ng, Vernon Lee, Kalisvar Marimuthu, Shawn Vasoo, Guanhao Chan, Raymond Tzer Pin Lin, Yee Sin Leo
       
  • Improving the estimation of the global burden of antimicrobial resistant
           infections
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 11Author(s): Direk Limmathurotsakul, Susanna Dunachie, Keiji Fukuda, Nicholas A Feasey, Iruka N Okeke, Alison H Holmes, Catrin E Moore, Christiane Dolecek, H Rogier van Doorn, Nandini Shetty, Alan D Lopez, Sharon J Peacock, Surveillance and Epidemiology of Drug Resistant Infections Consortium (SEDRIC)SummaryEstimating the global burden of disease from infections caused by pathogens that have acquired antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is essential for resource allocation and to inform AMR action plans at national and global levels. However, the scarcity of robust and accepted methods to determine burden is widely acknowledged. In this Personal View, we discuss the underlying assumptions, characteristics, limitations, and comparability of the approaches used to quantify mortality from AMR bacterial infections. We show that the global burdens of AMR estimated in previous studies are not comparable because of their different methodological approaches, assumptions, and data used to generate the estimates. The analytical frameworks from previous studies are inadequate, and we conclude that a new approach to the estimation of deaths caused by AMR infection is needed. The innovation of a new approach will require the development of mechanisms to systematically collect a clinical dataset of substantial breadth and quality to support the accurate assessment of burden, combined with decision-making and resource allocation for interventions against AMR. We define key actions required and call for innovative thinking and solutions to address these problems.
       
  • Meatal cleaning: discrepancies in need of explanation
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 11Author(s): Johannes C van der Wouden, Ivo Smeele
       
  • Standardising the reporting of microbiology and antimicrobial
           susceptibility data
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 11Author(s): Paul Turner, Elizabeth A Ashley
       
  • A necessary discussion after transmission of multidrug-resistant organisms
           through faecal microbiota transplantations
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 11Author(s): Ed J Kuijper, Jessica Allegretii, Peter Hawkey, Harry Sokol, Simon Goldenberg, Gianluca Ianiro, Antonio Gasbarrini, Patrizia Kump, Samuel P Costello, Josbert Keller, Maria J G T Vehreschild
       
  • Updating the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 11Author(s): Stephen Obaro
       
  • HCV, injection drug use, and the importance of harm reduction in Kenya
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 11Author(s): Nickolas Zaller, Bayla Ostrach
       
  • Early vaccination: a provisional measure to prevent measles in infants
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 11Author(s): Nicola Principi, Susanna Esposito
       
  • Essential metrics for high-quality reporting of neonatal sepsis research
           in low-resource settings
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 11Author(s): Helena Rabie, Mark Cotton, Angela Dramowski
       
  • Scarlet fever changes its spots
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 11Author(s): Stephan Brouwer, Jake A Lacey, Yuanhai You, Mark R Davies, Mark J Walker
       
  • Increased mortality in survivors of Ebola virus disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 11Author(s): Hugues Fausther-Bovendo, Gary Kobinger
       
  • Tuberculosis testing and migrant health
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 11Author(s): Martin Gulliford, Aphra Garner-Purkis
       
  • Dracunculiasis—a case study for infection eradication
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 11Author(s): The Lancet Infectious Diseases
       
  • Outbreak response as an essential component of vaccine development
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 11Author(s): Richard Hatchett, Nicole LurieSummaryThe Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI) was created as a result of an emerging global consensus that a coordinated, international, and intergovernmental effort was needed to develop and deploy new vaccines to prevent future epidemics. Although some disease outbreaks can be relatively brief, early outbreak response activities can provide important opportunities to make progress on vaccine development. CEPI has identified six such areas and is prepared to work with other organisations in the global community to combat WHO priority pathogens, including the hypothetical Disease X, by supporting early activities in these areas, even when vaccine candidates are not yet available.
       
  • Extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli in human-derived
           and foodchain-derived samples from England, Wales, and Scotland: an
           epidemiological surveillance and typing study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Michaela J Day, Katie L Hopkins, David W Wareham, Mark A Toleman, Nicola Elviss, Luke Randall, Christopher Teale, Paul Cleary, Camilla Wiuff, Michel Doumith, Matthew J Ellington, Neil Woodford, David M LivermoreSummaryBackgroundExtended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli isolates (ESBL-E coli) cause more than 5000 cases of bacteraemias annually in the UK. The contribution of the food chain to these infections is debated. We aimed to identify the most important reservoirs of ESBL-E coli that colonise and infect humans to identify strategic intervention points.MethodsSampling for ESBL-E coli was done between Aug 1, 2013, and Dec 15, 2014. We used selective media to seek ESBL-E coli in routinely submitted samples from human faeces, and prospectively collected samples from sewage, farm slurry, and retail foodstuffs in London, East Anglia, northwest England, Scotland, and Wales. We sequenced recovered isolates and compared these isolates with 293 bloodstream and 83 veterinary surveillance ESBL-E coli isolates from the same regions.Findings2157 (11%) of 20 243 human faeces samples contained ESBL-E coli, including 678 (17%) of 3995 in London. ESBL-E coli also were frequent in sewage and retail chicken (104 [65%] of 159 meat samples), but were rare in other meats and absent from plant-based foods (0 of 400 fruit and vegetable samples). Sequence type (ST) 131 dominated among ESBL-E coli from human blood (188 [64%] of 293 isolates), faeces (128 [36%] of 360), and sewage (14 [22%] of 65) with STs 38 and 648 also widespread; CTX-M-15 was the predominant ESBL in these lineages (319 [77%] of 416). By contrast, STs 602, 23, and 117—mostly with CTX-M-1 ESBL—dominated among food and veterinary isolates (68 [31%] of 218), with only two ST131 organisms recovered. ST10 occurred in both animals and humans, being frequent in surveillance bovines (11 [22%] of 51 cattle) and representing 15 (4%) of 360 human faecal isolates (but only three [1%] of 293 from bacteraemias); however, both human and animal ST10 isolates were diverse in serotype.InterpretationMost human bacteraemias with ESBL-E coli in the UK involve internationally prevalent human-associated STs, particularly ST131; non-human reservoirs made little contribution to invasive human disease. Any interventions that seek to target food or livestock can affect the numbers of human infections caused by ESBL-E coli; prevention of the spread of resistant lineages among humans is more vital.FundingNIHR Policy Research.
       
  • Escherichia coli causing bloodstream and other extraintestinal infections:
           tracking the next pandemic
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Amee R Manges
       
  • HTLV-1: the silent impact revealed
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Lucy B M Cook, Graham P Taylor
       
  • Turning influenza vaccinology on its head to reveal the stalk
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Sophie A Valkenburg, Benjamin J Cowling
       
  • Current gaps in sepsis immunology: new opportunities for translational
           research
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Ignacio Rubio, Marcin F Osuchowski, Manu Shankar-Hari, Tomasz Skirecki, Martin Sebastian Winkler, Gunnar Lachmann, Paul La Rosée, Guillaume Monneret, Fabienne Venet, Michael Bauer, Frank M Brunkhorst, Matthijs Kox, Jean-Marc Cavaillon, Florian Uhle, Markus A Weigand, Stefanie B Flohé, W Joost Wiersinga, Marta Martin-Fernandez, Raquel Almansa, Ignacio Martin-LoechesSummaryIncreasing evidence supports a central role of the immune system in sepsis, but the current view of how sepsis affects immunity, and vice versa, is still rudimentary. The European Group on Immunology of Sepsis has identified major gaps that should be addressed with high priority, such as understanding how immunological alterations predispose to sepsis, key aspects of the immunopathological events during sepsis, and the long-term consequences of sepsis on patient's immunity. We discuss major unmet topics in those three categories, including the role of key immune cells, the cause of lymphopenia, organ-specific immunology, the dynamics of sepsis-associated immunological alterations, the role of the microbiome, the standardisation of immunological tests, the development of better animal models, and the opportunities offered by immunotherapy. Addressing these gaps should help us to better understand sepsis physiopathology, offering translational opportunities to improve its prevention, diagnosis, and care.
       
  • A positive attitude
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Chris Wortley
       
  • Alternative hepatitis B vaccine strategies in healthy non-responders to a
           first standard vaccination scheme
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Paul Loubet, Odile Launay
       
  • Correction to Lancet Infect Dis 2019; published online Oct 3.
           https://doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(19)30324-X
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s):
       
  • Correction to Lancet Infect Dis 2019; 19: 429–38
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s):
       
  • Implications of non-prescription antibiotic sales in China
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Aubrey Kalungia, Brian Godman
       
  • Structural Interventions for HIV Prevention: Optimizing Strategies for
           Reducing New Infections and Improving Care, Richard A Crosby, Ralph J
           DiClemente. Oxford University Press, USA (2019), 376, £65·00, ISBN:
           978-0190675486
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Matthew J Mimiaga
       
  • A governance framework for development and assessment of national action
           plans on antimicrobial resistance
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Michael Anderson, Kai Schulze, Alessandro Cassini, Diamantis Plachouras, Elias MossialosSummaryStrengthening governance is an essential strategy to tackling antimicrobial resistance (AMR) at all levels: global, national, regional, and local. To date, no systematic approach to governance of national action plans on AMR exists. To address this issue, we aimed to develop the first governance framework to offer guidance for both the development and assessment of national action plans on AMR. We reviewed health system governance framework reviews to inform the basic structure of our framework, international guidance documents from WHO, the Food and Agriculture Organization, the World Organisation for Animal Health, and the European Commission, and sought the input of 25 experts from international organisations, government ministries, policy institutes, and academic institutions to develop and refine our framework. The framework consists of 18 domains with 52 indicators that are contained within three governance areas: policy design, implementation tools, and monitoring and evaluation. To consider the dynamic nature of AMR, the framework is conceptualised as a cyclical process, which is responsive to the context and allows for continuous improvement and adaptation of national action plans on AMR.
       
  • Correction to Lancet Infect Dis 2019; 19: 429–38
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s):
       
  • Resilience: One Family's Story of Hope and Triumph over Evil, Judy Stone.
           Mountainside MD Press (2019), 392, £14·54, ISBN: 978-0974917825
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Marco De Ambrogi
       
  • Complex task to estimate immune responses to various poliovirus vaccines
           and vaccination schedules
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 10Author(s): Khalequ Zaman, Abhijeet Anand
       
  • Cerebrospinal meningitis: lessons learnt from Africa
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 10Author(s): Fabrice Simon, Jean-Paul Boutin, Jean-Marie Milleliri, Jean-Nicolas Tournier
       
  • Early N-acetylcysteine for hospitalised patients with yellow fever
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 10Author(s): Philippe Ichai, Moana Gelu-Simeon, François Durand, Didier Samuel, Jacques Bernuau
       
  • Vaccine against Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 10Author(s): Alimuddin Zumla, Ziad A Memish, David S Hui, Stanley Perlman
       
  • Vaccine against Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 10Author(s): Xuejuan Shen, Jamal S M Sabir, David M Irwin, Yongyi Shen
       
  • Lipoarabinomannan point-of-care tests: evaluation with fresh samples
           needed
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 10Author(s): John T Connelly, Benjamin Grant, Vanisha Munsamy, Alexander Pym, Akos Somoskovi
       
  • Precision public health and HIV in Africa
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 10Author(s): Sally Blower, Justin T Okano
       
  • Revisiting gonorrhoea transmission
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 10Author(s): Onisillos Sekkides
       
  • Better surveillance to protect mothers and infants from Zika
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 10Author(s): Suzanne M Gilboa, Christopher J Gregory, Margaret A Honein
       
  • Healthy survival after tuberculosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 10Author(s): Sumona Datta, Carlton A Evans
       
  • Time for Helicobacter pylori eradication
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 10Author(s): Julie Parsonnet
       
  • Moving towards equitable access to vaccination
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 10Author(s): The Lancet Infectious Diseases
       
  • A single dose of ivermectin is sufficient for strongyloidiasis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 September 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Eveline Hürlimann, Jennifer Keiser
       
  • Enriching the antibiotic armamentarium for acute bacterial skin and skin
           structure infections
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 August 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Matteo Bassetti, Elda Righi
       
  • Simplified control measures for ESBL-producing Enterobacteriacae'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 August 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Jean-Christophe Lucet, Jean-Ralph Zahar
       
  • Cost-effectiveness of outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy for
           children with cellulitis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 August 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Raymond Oppong, Shahela Kodabuckus
       
  • First genital chlamydia vaccine enters in-human clinical trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 August 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Taylor B Poston, Toni Darville
       
  • Ebola in eastern DRC
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 August 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Pierre E Rollin
       
 
 
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