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The Lancet Infectious Diseases
Journal Prestige (SJR): 9.963
Citation Impact (citeScore): 7
Number of Followers: 202  
 
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ISSN (Print) 1473-3099
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3185 journals]
  • The evolving research agenda for paediatric tuberculosis infection
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 June 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): James A Seddon, Elizabeth Whittaker, Beate Kampmann, Deborah A Lewinsohn, Muhammad Osman, Anneke C Hesseling, Roxana Rustomjee, Farhana AmanullahSummaryFollowing exposure to tuberculosis and subsequent infection, children often progress to tuberculosis disease more rapidly than adults. And yet the natural history of tuberculosis in children, as a continuum from exposure to infection and then to disease, is poorly understood. Children are rarely diagnosed with tuberculosis infection in routine care in international settings and few receive tuberculosis infection treatment. In this Personal View, we review the most up-to-date knowledge in three areas of childhood tuberculosis infection—namely, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment. We then outline what is missing in each of these three areas to generate a priority research agenda. Finally, we suggest potential study designs that might answer these questions. Understanding of pathophysiology could be improved through animal models, laboratory studies assessing the immunological responses of blood or respiratory samples to Mycobacterium spp in vitro, as well as investigating immune responses in children exposed to tuberculosis. Identification of children with sub-clinical disease and at high risk of progression to clinically overt disease, would allow treatment to be targeted at those most likely to benefit. Optimisation and discovery of novel treatments for tuberculosis infection in children should account for mechanisms of action of tuberculosis drugs, as well as child-specific factors including pharmacokinetics and appropriate formulations. To conduct these studies, a change in mindset is required, with a recognition that the diagnosis and treatment of tuberculosis infection in children is a necessary component in addressing the overall tuberculosis epidemic. Collaboration between stakeholders will be required and funding will need to increase, both for research and implementation. The consequences of inaction, however, will lead to further decades of children suffering from what should increasingly be recognised as a preventable disease.
       
  • Ebola in your living room
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 June 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): George Pappas
       
  • Anal cancer risk: HPV-based cervical screening programmes
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 June 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Ulrike Wieland, Alexander Kreuter
       
  • Correction to Lancet Infect Dis 2019; 19: 347–48
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 June 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s):
       
  • PCR-based routine diagnostics uncover hidden burden of Legionnaires'
           disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 June 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Mathias W Pletz, Santiago Ewig, Tobias Welte
       
  • Novel insights into pneumococcal lineages in the vaccine era
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 June 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Emmanuelle Varon, Robert Cohen
       
  • Pneumococcal lineages associated with serotype replacement and antibiotic
           resistance in childhood invasive pneumococcal disease in the post-PCV13
           era: an international whole-genome sequencing study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 June 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Stephanie W Lo, Rebecca A Gladstone, Andries J van Tonder, John A Lees, Mignon du Plessis, Rachel Benisty, Noga Givon-Lavi, Paulina A Hawkins, Jennifer E Cornick, Brenda Kwambana-Adams, Pierra Y Law, Pak Leung Ho, Martin Antonio, Dean B Everett, Ron Dagan, Anne von Gottberg, Keith P Klugman, Lesley McGee, Robert F Breiman, Stephen D BentleySummaryBackgroundInvasive pneumococcal disease remains an important health priority owing to increasing disease incidence caused by pneumococci expressing non-vaccine serotypes. We previously defined 621 Global Pneumococcal Sequence Clusters (GPSCs) by analysing 20 027 pneumococcal isolates collected worldwide and from previously published genomic data. In this study, we aimed to investigate the pneumococcal lineages behind the predominant serotypes, the mechanism of serotype replacement in disease, as well as the major pneumococcal lineages contributing to invasive pneumococcal disease in the post-vaccine era and their antibiotic resistant traits.MethodsWe whole-genome sequenced 3233 invasive pneumococcal disease isolates from laboratory-based surveillance programmes in Hong Kong (n=78), Israel (n=701), Malawi (n=226), South Africa (n=1351), The Gambia (n=203), and the USA (n=674). The genomes represented pneumococci from before and after pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) introductions and were from children younger than 3 years. We identified predominant serotypes by prevalence and their major contributing lineages in each country, and assessed any serotype replacement by comparing the incidence rate between the pre-PCV and PCV periods for Israel, South Africa, and the USA. We defined the status of a lineage as vaccine-type GPSC (≥50% 13-valent PCV [PCV13] serotypes) or non-vaccine-type GPSC (>50% non-PCV13 serotypes) on the basis of its initial serotype composition detected in the earliest vaccine period to measure their individual contribution toward serotype replacement in each country. Major pneumococcal lineages in the PCV period were identified by pooled incidence rate using a random effects model.FindingsThe five most prevalent serotypes in the PCV13 period varied between countries, with only serotypes 5, 12F, 15B/C, 19A, 33F, and 35B/D common to two or more countries. The five most prevalent serotypes in the PCV13 period varied between countries, with only serotypes 5, 12F, 15B/C, 19A, 33F, and 35B/D common to two or more countries. These serotypes were associated with more than one lineage, except for serotype 5 (GPSC8). Serotype replacement was mainly mediated by expansion of non-vaccine serotypes within vaccine-type GPSCs and, to a lesser extent, by increases in non-vaccine-type GPSCs. A globally spreading lineage, GPSC3, expressing invasive serotypes 8 in South Africa and 33F in the USA and Israel, was the most common lineage causing non-vaccine serotype invasive pneumococcal disease in the PCV13 period. We observed that same prevalent non-vaccine serotypes could be associated with distinctive lineages in different countries, which exhibited dissimilar antibiotic resistance profiles. In non-vaccine serotype isolates, we detected significant increases in the prevalence of resistance to penicillin (52 [21%] of 249 vs 169 [29%] of 575, p=0·0016) and erythromycin (three [1%] of 249 vs 65 [11%] of 575, p=0·0031) in the PCV13 period compared with the pre-PCV period.InterpretationGlobally spreading lineages expressing invasive serotypes have an important role in serotype replacement, and emerging non-vaccine serotypes associated with different pneumococcal lineages in different countries might be explained by local antibiotic-selective pressures. Continued genomic surveillance of the dynamics of the pneumococcal population with increased geographical representation in the post-vaccine period will generate further knowledge for optimising future vaccine design.FundingBill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Wellcome Sanger Institute, and the US Centers for Disease Control.
       
  • Solithromycin for the treatment of drug-resistant gonorrhoea
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 June 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Henry J C de Vries, Maarten F Schim-van der Loeff
       
  • Severe disseminated tuberculosis in HIV-negative refugees
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 June 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Isabelle Suárez, Sarah Maria Fünger, Norma Jung, Clara Lehmann, Robert Peter Reimer, Dennis Mehrkens, Anne Bunte, Georg Plum, Natalie Jaspers, Matthias Schmidt, Gerd Fätkenheuer, Jan RybnikerSummaryIn high-income countries, the presentation of tuberculosis is changing, primarily because of migration, and understanding the specific health needs of susceptible populations is becoming increasingly important. Although disseminated tuberculosis is well documented in HIV-positive patients, the disease is poorly described and less expected in HIV-negative individuals. In this Grand Round, we report eight HIV-negative refugees, who presented with extensively disseminated tuberculosis. We discuss the multifactorial causes, such as deprivations during long journeys, precarious living conditions, and the experience of violence, which might add to nutritional factors and chronic disorders, eventually resulting in a state of predisposition to immune deficiency. We also show that disseminated tuberculosis is often difficult to diagnose when pulmonary symptoms are absent. Communication difficulties between refugees and health-care workers are another major hurdle, and every effort should be made to get a valid patient history. This medical history is crucial to guide imaging and other diagnostic procedures to establish a definite diagnosis, which should be confirmed by a positive tuberculosis culture. Because many of these patients are at risk for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, drug susceptibility testing is imperative to guide therapy. In the absence of treatment guidelines for this entity, clinicians can determine treatment duration according to recommendations provided for extrapulmonary tuberculosis and affected organs. Paradoxical expansion of tuberculous lesions during therapy should be treated with corticosteroids. In many cases, treatment duration must be individualised and might even exceed 12 months.
       
  • Rotavirus vaccine protection in low-income and middle-income countries
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 June 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Girija Ramakrishnan, Jennie Z Ma, Rashidul Haque, William A Petri
       
  • More medicines alone cannot ensure the treatment of neglected tropical
           diseases
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 May 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Goylette F Chami, Donald A P BundySummaryNeglected tropical diseases afflict more than 1 billion of the world's poorest people. Pharmaceutical donations of preventive chemotherapy for neglected tropical diseases enable the largest en masse treatment campaigns globally with respect to the number of people targeted for treatment. However, the blanket distribution of medicines at no cost to individuals in need of treatment does not guarantee that those individuals are treated. In this Personal View, we aim to examine the next steps that need to be taken towards ensuring equitable treatment access, including health system integration and the role of endemic countries in ensuring medicines are delivered to patients. We argue that the expansion of medicine donation programmes and the development of new medicines are not the primary solutions to sustaining and expanding the growth of neglected tropical disease programmes. Treatment is often not verified by a medical professional, independent surveyor, or national programme officer. Additionally, access to medicines might not be equitable across at-risk populations, and treatment targets for disease control remain largely unmet within many endemic countries. To enable equitable access and efficient use of existing medicines, research is needed now on how best to integrate the treatment of neglected tropical diseases into local health systems. A comprehensive approach should be used, which combines mass drug administration with on-demand access to treatment. Increased commitment by endemic countries, when possible, around the ownership of treatment campaigns is essential to improve access to medicines for neglected tropical diseases.
       
  • Risk factors associated with revision for prosthetic joint infection
           following knee replacement: an observational cohort study from England and
           Wales
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 6Author(s): Erik Lenguerrand, Michael R Whitehouse, Andrew D Beswick, Setor K Kunutsor, Pedro Foguet, Martyn Porter, Ashley W Blom, National Joint Registry for England, Wales, Northern Ireland and the Isle of ManSummaryBackgroundProsthetic joint infection is a devastating complication of knee replacement. The risk of developing a prosthetic joint infection is affected by patient, surgical, and health-care system factors. Existing evidence is limited by heterogeneity in populations studied, short follow-up, inadequate power, and does not differentiate early prosthetic joint infection, most likely related to the intervention, from late infection, more likely to occur due to haematogenous bacterial spread. We aimed to assess the overall and time-specific associations of these factors with the risk of revision due to prosthetic joint infection following primary knee replacement.MethodsIn this cohort study, we analysed primary knee replacements done between 2003 and 2013 in England and Wales and the procedures subsequently revised for prosthetic joint infection between 2003 and 2014. Data were obtained from the National Joint Registry linked to the Hospital Episode Statistics data in England and the Patient Episode Database for Wales. Each primary replacement was followed for a minimum of 12 months until the end of the observation period (Dec 31, 2014) or until the date of revision for prosthetic joint infection, revision for another indication, or death (whichever occurred first). We analysed the data using Poisson and piecewise exponential multilevel models to assess the associations between patient, surgical, and health-care system factors and risk of revision for prosthetic joint infection.FindingsOf 679 010 primary knee replacements done between 2003 and 2013 in England and Wales, 3659 were subsequently revised for an indication of prosthetic joint infection between 2003 and 2014, after a median follow-up of 4·6 years (IQR 2·6–6·9). Male sex (rate ratio [RR] for male vs female patients 1·8 [95% CI 1·7–2·0]), younger age (RR for age ≥80 years vs
       
  • A new point-of-care test to diagnose tuberculosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 May 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Paul K Drain, Karen A Heichman, Douglas Wilson
       
  • Menstrual toxic shock syndrome: case report and systematic review of the
           literature
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 May 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Selina Berger, Anika Kunerl, Stefan Wasmuth, Philip Tierno, Karoline Wagner, Jan BrüggerSummaryMenstrual toxic shock syndrome (mTSS) is a life-threatening disease caused by superantigen-producing Staphylococcus aureus. Incidence ranges from 0·03 to 0·50 cases per 100 000 people, with overall mortality around 8%. In this Grand Round, we present the case of a previously healthy 23-year-old menstruating woman who was diagnosed with mTSS after she presented at our hospital with a septic condition for the second time. The diagnosis was confirmed by fulfilment of the clinical criteria outlined by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC; fever, rash, desquamation, hypotension, and multi-system involvement) as well as a nasal swab positive for the S aureus strain and presence of the gene encoding for toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1). In the early 1980s, when mTSS was first described, use of tampons was considered the main risk factor. Today, the complex interplay between pathogenic factors of S aureus, immunological mechanisms of the host, and changes in the vaginal ecosystem during menstruation has broadened current understanding of the disease, and the CDC criteria have appreciable limitations in everyday clinical practice.
       
  • Revolutionary new treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 6Author(s): Sarah Meredith, Andrew Nunn, I D Russen
       
  • Cutaneous and pulmonary botryomycosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 6Author(s): Sophia Bender-Saebelkampf, Ingolf Franke, Mareike Alter, Thomas Tueting, Evelyn Gaffal
       
  • Vaccination of haemopoietic stem cell transplant recipients: guidelines of
           the 2017 European Conference on Infections in Leukaemia (ECIL 7)
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 6Author(s): Catherine Cordonnier, Sigrun Einarsdottir, Simone Cesaro, Roberta Di Blasi, Malgorzata Mikulska, Christina Rieger, Hugues de Lavallade, Giuseppe Gallo, Thomas Lehrnbecher, Dan Engelhard, Per Ljungman, European Conference on Infections in Leukaemia groupSummaryInfection is a main concern after haemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and a major cause of transplant-related mortality. Some of these infections are preventable by vaccination. Most HSCT recipients lose their immunity to various pathogens as soon as the first months after transplant, irrespective of the pre-transplant donor or recipient vaccinations. Vaccination with inactivated vaccines is safe after transplantation and is an effective way to reinstate protection from various pathogens (eg, influenza virus and Streptococcus pneumoniae), especially for pathogens whose risk of infection is increased by the transplant procedure. The response to vaccines in patients with transplants is usually lower than that in healthy individuals of the same age during the first months or years after transplant, but it improves over time to become close to normal 2–3 years after the procedure. However, because immunogenic vaccines have been found to induce a response in a substantial proportion of the patients as early as 3 months after transplant, we recommend to start crucial vaccinations with inactivated vaccines from 3 months after transplant, irrespectively of whether the patient has or has not developed graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) or received immunosuppressants. Patients with GvHD have higher risk of infection and are likely to benefit from vaccination. Another challenge is to provide HSCT recipients the same level of vaccine protection as healthy individuals of the same age in a given country. The use of live attenuated vaccines should be limited to specific situations because of the risk of vaccine-induced disease.
       
  • Vaccination of patients with haematological malignancies who did not have
           transplantations: guidelines from the 2017 European Conference on
           Infections in Leukaemia (ECIL 7)
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 6Author(s): Malgorzata Mikulska, Simone Cesaro, Hugues de Lavallade, Roberta Di Blasi, Sigrun Einarsdottir, Giuseppe Gallo, Christina Rieger, Dan Engelhard, Thomas Lehrnbecher, Per Ljungman, Catherine Cordonnier, European Conference on Infections in Leukaemia groupSummaryPatients with haematological malignancies are at high risk of infection because of various mechanisms of humoral and cell-mediated immune deficiencies, which mainly depend on underlying disease and specific therapies. Some of these infections are vaccine preventable. However, these malignancies are different from each other, and the treatment approaches are diverse and rapidly evolving, so it is difficult to have a common programme for vaccination in a haematology ward. Additionally, because of insufficient training about the topic, vaccination is an area often neglected by haematologists, and influenced by cultural differences, even among health-care workers, in compliance to vaccines. Several issues are encountered when addressing vaccination in haematology: the small size of the cohorts that makes it difficult to show the clinical benefits of vaccination, the subsequent need to rely on biological parameters, their clinical pertinence not being established in immunocompromised patients, scarcity of clarity on the optimal timing of vaccination in complex treatment schedules, and the scarcity of data on long-term protection in patients receiving treatments. Moreover, the risk of vaccine-induced disease with live-attenuated vaccines strongly limits their use. Here we summarise guidelines for patients without transplantations, and address the issue by the haematological group—myeloid and lymphoid—of diseases, with a special consideration for children with acute leukaemia.
       
  • Souha Kanj
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 6Author(s): Tony Kirby
       
  • Research brief
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 6Author(s): Sean Cleghorn
       
  • Infectious disease surveillance update
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 6Author(s): Ruth Zwizwai
       
  • Millions of health-care facilities lack WASH services
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 6Author(s): Talha Burki
       
  • Highlights from ECCMID 2019
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 6Author(s): Phoebe Hall
       
  • Echinococcosis in Pakistan: a call for research
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 6Author(s): Aisha Khan, Haroon Ahmed, Christine M Budke
       
  • New environmental reservoir of CPE in hospitals
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 6Author(s): Annick Smismans, Erwin Ho, Davy Daniels, Sara Ombelet, Bea Mellaerts, Dagmar Obbels, Hanne Valgaeren, Anja Goovaerts, Eline Huybrechts, Ilke Montag, Johan Frans
       
  • Trained dogs identify people with malaria parasites by their odour
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 6Author(s): Claire Guest, Margaret Pinder, Mark Doggett, Chelci Squires, Muna Affara, Balla Kandeh, Sarah Dewhirst, Steven V Morant, Umberto D'Alessandro, James G Logan, Steve W Lindsay
       
  • New conceptual framework for tuberculosis transmission
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 6Author(s): Justin T Okano, Sally Blower
       
  • Diagnosis and treatment of human sparganosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 6Author(s): Hong Li, Jianping Hu, Peizeng Yang
       
  • Pertussis immunisation in newborn babies
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 6Author(s): Maurizio Bonati, Antonio Clavenna
       
  • Making sense of differences in pneumococcal serotype replacement
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 6Author(s): Joseph A Lewnard, William P HanageSummarySerotype replacement in invasive pneumococcal disease threatens to undermine the most costly vaccination programme currently undertaken. However, the effects of replacement on public health have varied geographically. Striking differences have emerged between the UK and USA, countries that otherwise often resemble each other epidemiologically. Similar to other European settings, the UK has had rising non-vaccine serotype invasive pneumococcal disease, most notably in older adults, since introducing a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine to the paediatric immunisation schedule. Such impacts of serotype replacement have not been reported in the USA, where incidence of non-vaccine serotype invasive pneumococcal disease in young children and older people has been stable since the introduction of the same vaccine. Here, we explore factors that have been suggested to account for these differences, including surveillance practices, transmission dynamics, population risk factors, and pathogen evolution. We contend that none of these factors individually appears sufficient to account for the observed differences. Assessing the existing evidence, we define priorities for research and data collection to discern causes and inform future pneumococcal vaccine policy.
       
  • STREAM: a pragmatic and explanatory trial for MDR-TB treatment
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 6Author(s): Ibrahim Abubakar, Sarah Meredith, Andrew J Nunn, Patrick P J Phillips, I D Rusen
       
  • Possible pitfalls of the 2017 ECIL guidelines
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 6Author(s): Laura Sticchi, Giovanni Gabutti, Elio Castagnola
       
  • Hard to study, hard to treat: putting children at the centre of antibiotic
           research and development
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 6Author(s): Manica Balasegaram, Bernard Pécoul, Glenda Gray, Mike Sharland, Soumya Swaminathan
       
  • The use of vaccines to safeguard patients with haematological malignancies
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 6Author(s): Onisillos Sekkides
       
  • Malaria vaccination: a major milestone
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 6Author(s): The Lancet Infectious Diseases
       
  • Assessing a drug for an eradicated human disease: US Food and Drug
           Administration review of tecovirimat for the treatment of smallpox
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 6Author(s): Kirk M Chan-Tack, Patrick R Harrington, Su-Young Choi, Laine Myers, Julian O'Rear, Shirley Seo, David McMillan, Hanan Ghantous, Debra Birnkrant, Adam I SherwatSummaryThe development and ultimate approval of tecovirimat for the antiviral treatment of smallpox, a disease that has been eradicated from the world for nearly 40 years, required a unique regulatory approach based on the US Food and Drug Administration's Animal Rule. We summarise the regulatory pathway and describe the challenges involved.
       
  • All for one and one for all: the true potential of whole-genome sequencing
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 May 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Marc W Allard, Eric L Stevens, Eric W Brown
       
  • The economic case for typhoid conjugate vaccines in countries with medium
           and high incidence of infection
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 May 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Youngji Jo, David W Dowdy
       
  • The flightpath of genetically modified insects
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 May 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Peter Ranscombe
       
  • Chikungunya Virus: Advances in Biology, Pathogenesis, and Treatment,
           Chioma M Okeoma (Ed.). Springer (2018), 208, £129·99, ISBN:
           978-3319429564
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 May 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Patricia Brasil, Claudia Raja Gabaglia
       
  • Correction to Lancet Infect Dis 2019; published online May 9.
           https://doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(19)30231-2
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 May 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s):
       
  • Improving clinical management of patients with severe yellow fever
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 May 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Annelies Wilder-Smith, Lin H Chen, Adelino Melo, Leo G Visser
       
  • Correction to Lancet Infect Dis 2019; 19: 344–45
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 May 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s):
       
  • Revisiting the Prussian pioneers of infectious diseases
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 May 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Desmond O'Neill
       
  • Measles resurgence in the USA: how international travel compounds vaccine
           resistance
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 May 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Sahotra Sarkar, Aleksa Zlojutro, Kamran Khan, Lauren Gardner
       
  • A step further in a vaccine for Escherichia coli
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 May 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Florian ME Wagenlehner, Kurt G Naber
       
  • Dengvaxia researcher charged
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 May 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Patralekha Chatterjee
       
  • One step closer to precision medicine for infectious diseases
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 May 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Mathias W Pletz, Michael Bauer, Axel A Brakhage
       
  • Correction to Lancet Infect Dis 2019; 19: 449
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 April 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s):
       
  • Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae: global action required
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 April 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Federico Perez, Robert A Bonomo
       
  • Mimicking oesophageal cancer: oesophageal actinomycosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 5Author(s): Yannick Deswysen, Laura Van Ginderachter, Helene Dano, Leila Belkhir
       
  • Epidemic preparedness: why is there a need to accelerate the development
           of diagnostics'
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 5Author(s): Rosanna W Peeling, Maurine Murtagh, Piero L OlliaroSummaryGlobal epidemics of infectious diseases are increasing in frequency and severity. Diagnostics are needed for rapid identification of the cause of the epidemic to facilitate effective control and prevention. Lessons learned from the recent Ebola virus and Zika virus epidemics are that delay in developing the right diagnostic for the right population at the right time has been a costly barrier to disease control and prevention. We believe that it is possible to accelerate and optimise diagnostic development through a five-pronged strategy: by doing a global landscape analysis of diagnostic availability worldwide; through strategic partnerships for accelerating test development, in particular with vaccine companies to identify novel diagnostic targets; by creating and sharing repositories of data, reagents, and well characterised specimens for advancing the development process; by involving key public and private stakeholders, including appropriate regulatory bodies and policy makers, to ensure rapid access for researchers to diagnostics; and last, by fostering an enabling environment for research and access to diagnostics in the countries that need them. The need is great, but not insurmountable and innovative and faster development pathways are urgently required to address current shortfalls.
       
  • Serocorrelates of protection against infant group B streptococcus disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 5Author(s): Kirsty Le Doare, Beate Kampmann, Johan Vekemans, Paul T Heath, David Goldblatt, Moon H Nahm, Carol Baker, Morven S Edwards, Gaurav Kwatra, Nick Andrews, Shabir A Madhi, Ajoke Sobanjo ter Meulen, Annaliesa S Anderson, Bart Corsaro, Per Fischer, Andrew GorringeSummaryGroup B streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of young infant mortality and morbidity globally, with vaccines being developed for over four decades but none licensed to date. A serocorrelate of protection against invasive disease in young infants is being considered to facilitate vaccine early licensure, followed by demonstration of efficacy assessed postlicensure. In this Review, we synthesise the available scientific evidence to define an immune correlate associated with GBS disease risk reduction on the basis of studies of natural infection. We summarise studies that have investigated GBS serum anticapsular or anti-protein antibodies, and studies measuring the association between antibody function and disease risk reduction. We highlight how knowledge on the development of correlates of protection from existing vaccines could be harnessed to facilitate GBS vaccine development. These lessons include aggregation of serocorrelates of protection for individual serotypes, understanding the relationship between immunity derived from natural exposure of adults and vaccine-induced immunity, or using extrapolation of protection from in-vitro immunoassay results. We also highlight key considerations for the assessment of the role of antibodies to derive a serocorrelate of risk reduction in future seroepidemiological studies of GBS disease.
       
  • Oxford Specialist Handbook: Infection in the immunocompromised host, Simon
           Fox, Brian Angus, Angela Minassian, Thomas Rowlinson. Oxford University
           Press (2018), 384, £39·99, ISBN: 978-0198789987
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 5Author(s): Mark Thomas
       
  • Research brief
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 5Author(s): Dara Mohammadi
       
  • Infectious disease surveillance update
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 5Author(s): Ruth Zwizwai
       
  • A new social sciences network for infectious threats
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 5Author(s): Tamara Giles-Vernick, Ruth Kutalek, David Napier, David Kaawa-Mafigiri, Michel Dückers, John Paget, Syed Masud Ahmed, Phaik Yeong Cheah, Alice Desclaux, Daniel De Vries, Anita Hardon, Hayley MacGregor, Christopher Pell, Sabina F Rashid, Roman Rodyna, Constance Schultsz, Khoudia Sow, Annie Wilkinson
       
  • C difficile—a rose by any other name…
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 5Author(s): The Lancet Infectious Diseases
       
  • Residual cavity hydrops initially misdiagnosed as recurrent hepatic
           echinococcosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 19, Issue 5Author(s): Kan Wu, Xi Feng, Xu Liu, Wentao Wang
       
  • Point-of-care tests to reduce the burden of sexually transmitted
           infections
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 April 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Rosanna Wai Wan Peeling, David Mabey
       
  • Still fighting prosthetic joint infection after knee replacement
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 April 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Thorsten Gehrke, Christian Lausmann, Mustafa Citak
       
  • Correction to Lancet Infect Dis 2019; 19: e110–19
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 April 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s):
       
  • Polio Across the Iron Curtain: Hungary's Cold War with an Epidemic, Dóra
           Vargha. Cambridge University Press (2018), 320, £67·50, ISBN:
           978-1108420846
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 April 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Edward Parker
       
  • Preparing for the next Ebola outbreak: in-country genomic capacity in
           Africa
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 April 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Anise N Happi, Chinedu A Ugwu, Christian T Happi
       
  • Retrospective versus real-time Ebola virus sequencing
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 April 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Miles W Carroll
       
  • Non-antibiotic prevention strategies against catheter-associated urinary
           tract infections
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 April 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Bart J Laan, Suzanne E Geerlings
       
  • The duopoly of ten-valent and 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines:
           do they differ'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 April 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Shabir A Madhi, David Goldblatt
       
  • Control of scabies and secondary impetigo: optimising treatment
           effectiveness in endemic settings
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 April 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Olivier Chosidow, Roderick J Hay
       
  • Epidemics of plague past, present, and future
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 March 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Paul Mead
       
  • Ebola: public trust, intermediaries, and rumour in the DR Congo
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 March 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Joe Trapido
       
  • The remarkable tenacity of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 March 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Titus H Divala, Lauren M Cohee, Miriam K Laufer
       
  • Tuberculosis active case-finding: more than just finding cases
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 March 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Carole D Mitnick, Courtney M Yuen
       
  • A solution to the problem of antibiotic induced collateral damage to the
           gut microbiome
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 March 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Simon D Goldenberg
       
  • OPAT for avoidance of hospitalisation in children
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 March 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Nathan M Krah, Adam L Hersh
       
 
 
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