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The Lancet Infectious Diseases
Journal Prestige (SJR): 9.963
Citation Impact (citeScore): 7
Number of Followers: 218  
 
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ISSN (Print) 1473-3099
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3206 journals]
  • Efficient transmission of viral gastroenteritis in Dutch households
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Paul A Gastañaduy, Umesh D Parashar
       
  • Correction to Lancet Infect Dis 2020; 20: 259
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s):
       
  • Open access epidemiological data from the COVID-19 outbreak
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Bo Xu, Moritz U G Kraemer, Bo Xu, Bernardo Gutierrez, Sumiko Mekaru, Kara Sewalk, Alyssa Loskill, Lin Wang, Emily Cohn, Sarah Hill, Alexander Zarebski, Sabrina Li, Chieh-His Wu, Erin Hulland, Julia Morgan, Samuel Scarpino, John Brownstein, Oliver Pybus, David Pigott, Moritz Kraemer
       
  • Asymptomatic cases in a family cluster with SARS-CoV-2 infection
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Xingfei Pan, Dexiong Chen, Yong Xia, Xinwei Wu, Tangsheng Li, Xueting Ou, Liyang Zhou, Jing Liu
       
  • An interactive web-based dashboard to track COVID-19 in real time
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Ensheng Dong, Hongru Du, Lauren Gardner
       
  • Contact precautions: no benefits, no indication
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Lena M Biehl, Maria J G T Vehreschild
       
  • Initiation of a new infection control system for the COVID-19 outbreak
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Xuejiao Chen, Junzhang Tian, Guanming Li, Guowei Li
       
  • The first Vietnamese case of COVID-19 acquired from China
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Le Van Cuong, Hoang Thi Nam Giang, Le Khac Linh, Jaffer Shah, Le Van Sy, Trinh Huu Hung, Abdullah Reda, Luong Ngoc Truong, Do Xuan Tien, Nguyen Tien Huy
       
  • Face-mask sampling or sputum to diagnose lung tuberculosis'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Graham H Bothamley, Viktoria Spong
       
  • No Matter Where the Journey Takes Me: One Man's Quest for a Leprosy-Free
           World, Yohei Sasakawa. C Hurst & Co Publishers Ltd (2019), 232, £21·25,
           ISBN: 978-1787381377
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Vijay Shankar Balakrishnan
       
  • Challenges of coronavirus disease 2019
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): The Lancet Infectious Diseases
       
  • Outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Talha Burki
       
  • Correction to Lancet Infect Dis 2019; 19: 903–12
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s):
       
  • Correction to Lancet Infect Dis 2019; published online Oct 30.
           https://doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(19)30540-7
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 1Author(s):
       
  • Adaptive trials of new antimicrobials for infections with
           carbapenem-resistant, Gram-negative bacteria
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 1Author(s): Milo Gatti, Maddalena Giannella, Luigia Scudeller, Pierluigi Viale
       
  • 8-year M type surveillance of Streptococcus pyogenes in China
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 1Author(s): Yuanhai You, Xiaomin Peng, Peng Yang, Quanyi Wang, Jianzhong Zhang
       
  • 1 year after acute Zika virus infection in men
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 1Author(s): Louis Bujan, Jean-Michel Mansuy, Safouane Hamdi, Christophe Pasquier, Guillaume Joguet
       
  • Multigenic architecture of piperaquine resistance trait in Plasmodium
           falciparum
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 1Author(s): Miguel Silva, Carla Calçada, Miguel Teixeira, Maria Isabel Veiga, Pedro Eduardo Ferreira
       
  • Naegleria fowleri in Pakistan
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 1Author(s): Mahwish Ali, Syed Babar Jamal, Syeda Mehpara Farhat
       
  • Correction to Lancet Infect Dis 2019; published online Nov 18.
           https://doi.org/10.1016/S1473-3099(19)30552-3
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 1Author(s):
       
  • Correction to Lancet Infect Dis 2019; 19: 988–1000
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 1Author(s):
       
  • A conditional cash transfer programme in Brazil improves leprosy treatment
           outcomes
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Alberto Novaes Ramos, Jorg Heukelbach, Maria Leide Wand-Del-Rey Oliveira
       
  • Effect of a conditional cash transfer programme on leprosy treatment
           adherence and cure in patients from the nationwide 100 Million Brazilian
           Cohort: a quasi-experimental study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Julia M Pescarini, Elizabeth Williamson, Joilda S Nery, Anna Ramond, Maria Yury Ichihara, Rosemeire L Fiaccone, Maria Lucia F Penna, Liam Smeeth, Laura C Rodrigues, Gerson O Penna, Elizabeth B Brickley, Mauricio L BarretoSummaryBackgroundIndirect financial costs and barriers to health-care access might contribute to leprosy treatment non-adherence. We estimated the association of the Brazilian conditional cash transfer programme, the Programa Bolsa Família (PBF), on leprosy treatment adherence and cure in patients in Brazil.MethodsIn this quasi-experimental study, we linked baseline demographic and socioeconomic information for individuals who entered the 100 Million Brazilian Cohort between Jan 1, 2007, and Dec 31, 2014, with the PBF payroll database and the Information System for Notifiable Diseases, which includes nationwide leprosy registries. Individuals were eligible for inclusion if they had a household member older than 15 years and had not received PBF aid or been diagnosed with leprosy before entering the 100 Million Brazilian Cohort; they were excluded if they were partial receivers of PBF benefits, had missing data, or had a monthly per-capita income greater than BRL200 (US$50). Individuals who were PBF beneficiaries before leprosy diagnosis were matched to those who were not beneficiaries through propensity-score matching (1:1) with replacement on the basis of baseline covariates, including sex, age, race or ethnicity, education, work, income, place of residence, and household characteristics. We used logistic regression to assess the average treatment effect on the treated of receipt of PBF benefits on leprosy treatment adherence (six or more multidrug therapy doses for paucibacillary cases or 12 or more doses for multibacillary cases) and cure in individuals of all ages. We stratified our analysis according to operational disease classification (paucibacillary or multibacillary). We also did a subgroup analysis of paediatric leprosy restricted to children aged up to 15 years.FindingsWe included 11 456 new leprosy cases, of whom 8750 (76·3%) had received PBF before diagnosis and 2706 (23·6%) had not. Overall, 9508 (83·0%) patients adhered to treatment and 10 077 (88·0%) were cured. After propensity score matching, receiving PBF before diagnosis was associated with adherence to treatment (OR 1·22, 95% CI 1·01–1·48) and cure (1·26, 1·01–1·58). PBF receipt did not significantly improve treatment adherence (1·37, 0·98–1·91) or cure (1·12, 0·75–1·67) in patients with paucibacillary leprosy. For patients with multibacillary disease, PBF beneficiaries had better treatment adherence (1·37, 1·08–1·74) and cure (1·43, 1·09–1·90) than non-beneficiaries. In the propensity score-matched analysis in 2654 children younger than 15 years with leprosy, PBF exposure was not associated with leprosy treatment adherence (1·55, 0·89–2·68) or cure (1·57, 0·83–2·97).InterpretationOur results suggest that being a beneficiary of the PBF, which facilitates cash transfers and improved access to health care, is associated with greater leprosy multidrug therapy adherence and cure in multibacillary cases. These results are especially relevant for patients with multibacillary disease, who are treated for a longer period and have lower cure rates than those with paucibacillary disease.FundingCONFAP/ESRC/MRC/BBSRC/CNPq/FAPDF–Doenças Negligenciadas, the UK Medical Research Council, the Wellcome Trust, and Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior–Brazil (CAPES).
       
  • These are love(d) letters, Ames Hawkins. Wayne State University Press
           (2019), 288, £22·95, ISBN: 978-0814347263
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Marco De Ambrogi
       
  • The first 2019 novel coronavirus case in Nepal
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Anup Bastola, Ranjit Sah, Alfonso J Rodriguez-Morales, Bibek Kumar Lal, Runa Jha, Hemant Chanda Ojha, Bikesh Shrestha, Daniel K W Chu, Leo L M Poon, Anthony Costello, Kouichi Morita, Basu Dev Pandey
       
  • Pandemic potential of 2019-nCoV
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Robin Thompson
       
  • Game consumption and the 2019 novel coronavirus
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Jie Li, Jun Li, Xiaoru Xie, Xiaomei Cai, Jian Huang, Xuemei Tian, Hong Zhu
       
  • Towards protective immune responses against malaria in pregnant women
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Claudia A Daubenberger
       
  • A trial for post-exposure prophylaxis against henipaviruses
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Hossain M S Sazzad
       
  • Incentivising antibiotic research and development: is the UK's
           subscription payment model part of the solution'
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 2Author(s): Michael Anderson, Elias Mossialos
       
  • Invasive oral and nasal aspergillosis in an immunocompetent child
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 2Author(s): Soliel Shandy Costa Paiva, Ana Paula Viana de Siqueira, Lusmaia Damaceno Costa, Teresa Cristina Saddi Godinho, Patricia Marques Fortes, Paulo Sucasas Costa
       
  • Tuberculosis, HIV, and viral hepatitis diagnostics in eastern Europe and
           central Asia: high time for integrated and people-centred services
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 2Author(s): Masoud Dara, Soudeh Ehsani, Antons Mozalevskis, Elena Vovc, Daniel Simões, Ana Avellon Calvo, Jordi Casabona i Barbarà, Otar Chokoshvili, Irina Felker, Sven Hoffner, Gulmira Kalmambetova, Ecatarina Noroc, Natalia Shubladze, Alena Skrahina, Rasim Tahirli, Tengiz Tsertsvadze, Francis DrobniewskiSummaryGlobally, high rates (and in the WHO European region an increasing prevalence) of co-infection with tuberculosis and HIV and HIV and hepatitis C virus exist. In eastern European and central Asian countries, the tuberculosis, HIV, and viral hepatitis programmes, including diagnostic services, are separate vertical structures. In this Personal View, we consider underlying reasons for the poor integration for these diseases, particularly in the WHO European region, and how to address this with an initial focus on diagnostic services. In part, this low integration has reflected different diagnostic development histories, global funding sources, and sample types used for diagnosis (eg, typically sputum for tuberculosis and blood for HIV and hepatitis C). Cooperation between services improved as patients with tuberculosis needed routine testing for HIV and vice versa, but financial, infection control, and logistical barriers remain. Multidisease diagnostic platforms exist, but to be used optimally, appropriate staff training and sensible understanding of different laboratory and infection control risks needs rapid implementation. Technically these ideas are all feasible. Poor coordination between these vertical systems remains unhelpful. There is a need to increase political and operational integration of diagnostic and treatment services and bring them closer to patients.
       
  • Zoonotic causes of febrile illness in malaria endemic countries: a
           systematic review
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 2Author(s): Jo E B Halliday, Manuela Carugati, Michael E Snavely, Kathryn J Allan, Julia Beamesderfer, Georgia A F Ladbury, Deborah V Hoyle, Paul Holland, John A Crump, Sarah Cleaveland, Matthew P RubachSummaryFever is one of the most common reasons for seeking health care globally and most human pathogens are zoonotic. We conducted a systematic review to describe the occurrence and distribution of zoonotic causes of human febrile illness reported in malaria endemic countries. We included data from 53 (48·2%) of 110 malaria endemic countries and 244 articles that described diagnosis of 30 zoonoses in febrile people. The majority (17) of zoonoses were bacterial, with nine viruses, three protozoa, and one helminth also identified. Leptospira species and non-typhoidal salmonella serovars were the most frequently reported pathogens. Despite evidence of profound data gaps, this Review reveals widespread distribution of multiple zoonoses that cause febrile illness. Greater understanding of the epidemiology of zoonoses in different settings is needed to improve awareness about these pathogens and the management of febrile illness.
       
  • Longitudinal, strain-specific Staphylococcus aureus introduction and
           transmission events in households of children with community-associated
           meticillin-resistant S aureus skin and soft tissue infection: a
           prospective cohort study
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 2Author(s): Ryan L Mork, Patrick G Hogan, Carol E Muenks, Mary G Boyle, Ryley M Thompson, Melanie L Sullivan, John J Morelli, Jennifer Seigel, Rachel C Orscheln, Juliane Bubeck Wardenburg, Sarah J Gehlert, Carey-Ann D Burnham, Andrey Rzhetsky, Stephanie A FritzSummaryBackgroundDevising effective, targeted approaches to prevent recurrent meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) skin and soft tissue infection requires an understanding of factors driving MRSA acquisition. We comprehensively defined household longitudinal, strain-level S aureus transmission dynamics in households of children with community-associated MRSA skin and soft tissue infection.MethodsFrom 2012–15, otherwise healthy paediatric patients with culture-confirmed, community-onset MRSA infections were recruited for the Household Observation of MRSA in the Environment (HOME) prospective cohort study from hospitals and community practices in metropolitan St Louis (MO, USA). Children with health-care-related risk factors were excluded, as determined by evidence of recent hospital admission, an invasive medical device, or residence in a long-term care facility. Household contacts (individuals sleeping in the home ≥four nights per week) and indoor dogs and cats were also enrolled. A baseline visit took place at the index patient's primary home, followed by four quarterly visits over 12 months. At each visit, interviews were done and serial cultures were collected, to detect S aureus from three anatomic sites of household members, two anatomic sites on dogs and cats, and 21 environmental surfaces. Molecular typing was done by repetitive-sequence PCR to define distinct S aureus strains within each household. Longitudinal, multivariable generalised mixed-effects logistic regression models identified factors associated with S aureus acquisition.FindingsAcross household members, pets, and environmental surfaces, 1267 strain acquisition events were observed. Acquisitions were driven equally by 510 introductions of novel strains into households and 602 transmissions within households, each associated with distinct factors. Frequent handwashing decreased the likelihood of novel strain introduction into the household (odds ratio [OR] 0·86, credible interval [CrI] 0·74–1·01). Transmission recipients were less likely to own their homes (OR 0·77, CrI 0·63–0·94) and were more likely to share bedrooms with strain-colonised individuals (OR 1·33, CrI 1·12–1·58), live in homes with higher environmental S aureus contamination burden (OR 3·97, CrI 1·96–8·20), and report interval skin and soft tissue infection (OR 1·32, CrI 1·07–1·64). Transmission sources were more likely to share bath towels (OR 1·25, CrI 1·01–1·57). Pets were often transmission recipients, but rarely the sole transmission source.InterpretationThe household environment plays a key role in transmission, a factor associated with skin and soft tissue infection. Future interventions should inclusively target household members and the environment, focusing on straightforward changes in hand hygiene and household sharing behaviours.FundingNational Institutes of Health, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Children's Discovery Institute, Burroughs Wellcome Foundation, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.
       
  • Research brief
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 2Author(s): Dara Mohammadi
       
  • Infectious disease surveillance update
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 2Author(s): Ruth Zwizwai
       
  • Gender disparities in neglected tropical diseases
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 2Author(s): Talha Burki
       
  • WHO celebrates 40 years since eradication of smallpox
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 2Author(s): Tony Kirby
       
  • Mysterious pneumonia in China
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 2Author(s): Sanjeet Bagcchi
       
  • Preparing for yellow fever vaccination
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 2Author(s): Sharmila Devi
       
  • Correction to Lancet Infect Dis 2019; 19: 287–97
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 2Author(s):
       
  • Vibrio vulnificus casualties during the American Civil War
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 2Author(s): Rémi Barbieri, Gérard Aboudharam, Didier Raoult, Michel Drancourt
       
  • Aedes aegypti carrying triple knockdown resistance mutations in
           Beijing, China
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 2Author(s): Xinghui Qiu, Nian Liu, Chan Yang, Xiaojie Zhou
       
  • Tackling the global non-prescription use of antibiotics
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 2Author(s): Jinxin Liu
       
  • Long-term surveillance needed to detect Zika virus outbreaks in endemic
           regions
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 2Author(s): Shashika Lavangi Wijesooriya, Co Thach Nguyen, T Thi Thuy Nguyen, Thi Bich Hau Vu, Takemura Taichiro, Kouichi Morita, Thi Quynh Mai Le, Duc Anh Dang, Futoshi Hasebe, Meng Ling Moi
       
  • Staff surveys will unlock the key to better hand hygiene performance
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 2Author(s): Richard P D Cooke, Charlotte Corke
       
  • Stablity of yellow fever virus neutralising antibody titres –
           Authors' reply
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 2Author(s): Cristina Domingo, Niranjan Bhat, Patrick Ansah, José E Mejía
       
  • Stablity of yellow fever virus neutralising antibody titres
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 2Author(s): Lifeng Zhao, Faming Miao, Teng Chen, Haijun Du, Jinghui Zhao
       
  • Infectious disease consultation for candidaemia – Authors' reply
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 2Author(s): Carlos Mejia-Chew, Jane A O'Halloran, Margaret A Olsen, Dustin Stwalley, Amber Salter, William G Powderly, Andrej Spec
       
  • Infectious disease consultation for candidaemia
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 2Author(s): Jerome Lambert, Maja von Cube, Lucie Biard, Siegbert Rieg, Martin Wolkewitz
       
  • Infectious disease consultation for candidaemia
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 2Author(s): Russell E Lewis, Dimitrios P Kontoyiannis
       
  • (Inter)nationalising the antibiotic research and development pipeline
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 2Author(s): Andrew C Singer, Claas Kirchhelle, Adam P RobertsSummaryIn this Personal View, we critically examine the wider context of international efforts to stimulate commercial antibiotic research and development via public–private initiatives. Despite these efforts, antibiotics remain a global resource without an international support structure that is commensurate to the risks from antibiotic-resistant infections and the long-term nature of required solutions. To protect this resource, we propose a two-pronged antibiotic research and development strategy based on a short-term strengthening of incentives (such as market entry rewards) to maximise the delivery of existing opportunities in the pipeline, and on a concurrent medium-term to long-term establishment of a global, publicly funded antibiotic research and development institute. Designed sustainably to deliver novel and first-in-class antibiotics targeting key human health gaps, the institute and its staff would become a global resource that, unlike the private pharmaceutical sector, would be managed as an open science platform. Our model of internationalised public research and development would maximise scientific synergy and cross-fertilisation, minimise replication of effort, acquire and preserve existing know-how, and ensure equitable and sustainable access to novel and effective antibiotics. Its genuinely global focus would also help counteract tendencies to equate donor with global health priorities. Our proposal is not radical. Historical precedent and developments in other research areas show that sustained international funding of publicly owned research can hasten the delivery of critically needed drugs and lower barriers to access.
       
  • Amoebic liver abscess: a neglected tropical disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 2Author(s): Thirunavukarasu Kumanan, Vathulan Sujanitha, Nadarajah Sreeharan
       
  • Confronting the persisting threat of the Middle East respiratory syndrome
           to global health security
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 2Author(s): Stanley Perlman, Esam I Azhar, Ziad A Memish, David S Hui, Alimuddin Zumla
       
  • Preventing drug-resistant tuberculosis transmission
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 2Author(s): Anastasia Koch, Helen Cox
       
  • Rethinking the population attributable fraction for infectious diseases
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 2Author(s): Sharmistha Mishra, Stefan D Baral
       
  • Enteroviruses: the elephants in the room
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 2Author(s): Carol Glaser, Michael R Wilson
       
  • Congenital viral infections continue to affect neonates
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 2Author(s): Karen B Fowler, Shannon A Ross
       
  • Development of effective vaccines for enterotoxigenic Escherichia
           coli
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 2Author(s): Hyesuk Seo, Weiping Zhang
       
  • Reducing antibiotic resistance through antibiotic stewardship in the
           ambulatory setting
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 2Author(s): Sara C Keller, Sara E Cosgrove
       
  • MRSA transmission in the community: emerging from under the radar
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 2Author(s): Jan Kluytmans, Stephan Harbarth
       
  • Implications of antibiotic exposure among children in low-income and
           middle-income countries
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 2Author(s): Ioana D Olaru, Dan Kibuule, Brian Godman
       
  • Staying on target
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 2Author(s): The Lancet Infectious Diseases
       
  • Late presentation of amoebic liver abscess
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 2Author(s): Ankush Dhariwal, Tihana Bicanic, Jonathan Youngs, Alberto SanFrancisco
       
  • The status of tuberculosis vaccine development
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 January 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Lewis K Schrager, Johan Vekemens, Nick Drager, David M Lewinsohn, Ole F OlesenSummaryTuberculosis represents the leading global cause of death from an infectious agent. Controlling the tuberculosis epidemic thus represents an urgent global public health priority. Epidemiological modelling suggests that, although drug treatments for tuberculosis continue to improve, WHO timelines to control the spread of the disease require a new vaccine capable of preventing tuberculosis, particularly in adolescents and adults. The spread of strains resistant to multiple drugs adds additional urgency to the vaccine development effort yet attempts to develop new vaccines with wider applicability and better, longer-lasting efficacy than BCG—the only tuberculosis vaccine licensed for use globally—have proven challenging. Results from clinical efficacy trials, particularly a completed, phase 2b trial for preventing tuberculosis disease in people infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis using the adjuvanted protein subunit vaccine M72/AS01E give hope. We review the current status of tuberculosis vaccine candidates and outline the diversified vaccine development that are underway.
       
  • Re-examining causes of surgical site infections following elective surgery
           in the era of asepsis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 January 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): John C Alverdy, Neil Hyman, Jack GilbertSummaryThe currently accepted assumption that most surgical site infections (SSIs) occurring after elective surgery under standard methods of antisepsis are due to an intraoperative contamination event, remains unproven. We examined the available evidence in which microbial cultures of surgical wounds were taken at the conclusion of an operation and determined that such studies provide more evidence to refute that an SSI is due to intraoperative contamination than support it. We propose that alternative mechanisms of SSI development should be considered, such as when a sterile postoperative wound becomes infected by a pathogen originating from a site remote from the operative wound—eg, from the gums or intestinal tract (ie, the Trojan Horse mechanism). We offer a path forward to reduce SSI rates after elective surgery that includes undertaking genomic-based microbial tracking from the built environment (ie, the operating room and hospital bed), to the patient's own microbiome, and then to the surgical site. Finally, we posit that only by generating this dynamic microbial map can the true pathogenesis of SSIs be understood enough to inform novel preventive strategies against infection following elective surgery in the current era of asepsis.
       
  • The Stockholm Paradigm: Climate Change and Emerging Disease, Daniel
           Brooks, Eric Hoberg, Walter Boeger. University of Chicago Press (2019),
           400, £27·00, ISBN: 978-0226632308
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 January 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Joanne Cable
       
  • Doripenem for treating nosocomial pneumonia and ventilator-associated
           pneumonia
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 1Author(s): Hung-Jen Tang, Chih-Cheng Lai
       
  • Measles outbreaks at mass gathering mostly occur at youth events
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 1Author(s): Van Thuan Hoang, Philippe Gautret
       
  • Tuberculosis test results using fresh versus biobanked urine samples with
           FujiLAM
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 1Author(s): Tobias Broger, Monde Muyoyeta, Andrew D Kerkhoff, Claudia M Denkinger, Emmanuel Moreau
       
  • Preventing paralytic polio caused by vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 1Author(s): Carlos Franco-Paredes, Jose I Santos-Preciado, Andres F Henao-Martinez, Alfonso J Rodriguez-Morales, Peter Carrasco
       
  • Doripenem for treating nosocomial pneumonia and ventilator-associated
           pneumonia – Authors' reply
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 1Author(s): Marin H Kollef, Álvaro Réa-Neto, Richard G Wunderink, Christopher J Bruno, Elizabeth G Rhee
       
  • Preparedness for emerging epidemic threats: a Lancet Infectious
           Diseases
    Commission
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 1Author(s): Vernon J Lee, Ximena Aguilera, David Heymann, Annelies Wilder-Smith, Vernon J. Lee, Ximena Aguilera, David L. Heymann, Annelies Wilder-Smith, Daniel G. Bausch, Sylvie Briand, Christianne Bruschke, Eduardo H. Carmo, Sean Cleghorn, Lalit Dandona, Christl Donnelly, Ibrahima Socé Fall, Jane Halton, Richard Hatchett, Felicia Hong, Peter Horby
       
  • Viral emergence and immune interplay in flavivirus vaccines
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 1Author(s): Carlo Fischer, Edmilson F de Oliveira-Filho, Jan Felix Drexler
       
  • Is there a silver lining to the Zika virus epidemic in the Americas'
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 1Author(s): Sylvia Becker-Dreps, Elizabeth M Stringer, Filemon Bucardo, Natalie M Bowman, Michael J Boivin
       
  • HTLV-1: the silent impact revealed
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 1Author(s): Lucy B M Cook, Graham P Taylor
       
  • Tuberculosis: an instrument of early mortality in life course
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 1Author(s): Barbara Reis-Santos, Marli Souza Rocha
       
  • What makes a score a winner'
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 1Author(s): Jonathon R Campbell, Dick Menzies
       
  • Test-and-not-treat: importance for mass drug administration
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 1Author(s): Jesica Herrick
       
  • Alternative hepatitis B vaccine strategies in healthy non-responders to a
           first standard vaccination scheme
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 1Author(s): Paul Loubet, Odile Launay
       
  • Turning influenza vaccinology on its head to reveal the stalk
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 1Author(s): Sophie A Valkenburg, Benjamin J Cowling
       
  • Trends in the global burden of paediatric lower respiratory infections
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 1Author(s): Carina King, Eric D McCollum
       
  • Early childhood diarrhoea: from data to interventions
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 1Author(s): Karen H Keddy
       
  • Cover artist for 2020
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 1Author(s): Marco De Ambrogi
       
  • Dare we dream of the end of malaria'
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Volume 20, Issue 1Author(s): The Lancet Infectious Diseases
       
  • New WHO guidelines for treatment of gambiense human African
           trypanosomiasis including fexinidazole: substantial changes for clinical
           practice
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 December 2019Source: The Lancet Infectious DiseasesAuthor(s): Andreas K Lindner, Veerle Lejon, François Chappuis, Jorge Seixas, Leon Kazumba, Michael P Barrett, Erick Mwamba, Olema Erphas, Elie A Akl, Gemma Villanueva, Hanna Bergman, Pere Simarro, Augustin Kadima Ebeja, Gerardo Priotto, Jose Ramon FrancoSummaryHuman African trypanosomiasis caused by Trypanosoma brucei gambiense is a parasitic infection that usually progresses to coma and death unless treated. WHO has updated its guidelines for the treatment of this infection on the basis of independent literature reviews and using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology. The first-line treatment options, pentamidine and nifurtimox–eflornithine combination therapy, have been expanded to include fexinidazole, an oral monotherapy given a positive opinion from the European Medicines Agency. Fexinidazole is recommended for individuals who are aged 6 years and older with a bodyweight of 20 kg or more, who have first-stage or second-stage gambiense human African trypanosomiasis and a cerebrospinal fluid leucocyte count less than 100 per μL. Nifurtimox–eflornithine combination therapy remains recommended for patients with 100 leucocytes per μL or more. Without clinical suspicion of severe second-stage disease, lumbar puncture can be avoided and fexinidazole can be given. Fexinidazole should only be administered under supervision of trained health staff. Because these recommendations are expected to change clinical practice considerably, health professionals should consult the detailed WHO guidelines. These guidelines will be updated as evidence accrues.
       
 
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