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The Lancet
Journal Prestige (SJR): 14.934
Citation Impact (citeScore): 9
Number of Followers: 2446  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0140-6736 - ISSN (Online) 1474-547X
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3163 journals]
  • Building the case for embedding global health security into universal
           health coverage: a proposal for a unified health system that includes
           public health
    • Abstract: Publication date: 20–26 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10156Author(s): Ngozi A Erondu, Jerry Martin, Robert Marten, Gorik Ooms, Robert Yates, David L HeymannSummaryIn the wake of the recent west African Ebola epidemic, there is global consensus on the need for strong health systems; however, agreement is less apparent on effective mechanisms for establishing and maintaining these systems, particularly in resource-constrained settings and in the presence of multiple and sustained stresses (eg, conflict, famine, climate change, and globalisation). The construction of the International Health Regulations (2005) guidelines and the WHO health systems framework, has resulted in the separation of public health functions and health-care services, which are interdependent in actuality and must be integrated to ensure a continuous, unbroken national health system. By analysing efforts to strengthen health systems towards attaining universal health coverage and investments to improve global health security, we examine areas of overlap and offer recommendations for construction of a unified national health system that includes public health. One way towards achieving universal health coverage is to broaden the definition of a health system.
       
  • Alma-Ata at 40 years: reflections from the Lancet Commission on
           Investing in Health
    • Abstract: Publication date: 20–26 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10156Author(s): David A Watkins, Gavin Yamey, Marco Schäferhoff, Olusoji Adeyi, George Alleyne, Ala Alwan, Seth Berkley, Richard Feachem, Julio Frenk, Gargee Ghosh, Sue J Goldie, Yan Guo, Sanjeev Gupta, Felicia Knaul, Margaret Kruk, Rachel Nugent, Osondu Ogbuoji, Jinyuan Qi, Srinath Reddy, Helen Saxenian
       
  • External left atrium compression by spinal osteophytes
    • Abstract: Publication date: 20–26 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10156Author(s): Hourmazd Haghbayan, Eric A Coomes, Asim N Cheema
       
  • Efficacy and cost-effectiveness of nurse-led care involving education and
           engagement of patients and a treat-to-target urate-lowering strategy
           versus usual care for gout: a randomised controlled trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: 20–26 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10156Author(s): Michael Doherty, Wendy Jenkins, Helen Richardson, Aliya Sarmanova, Abhishek Abhishek, Deborah Ashton, Christine Barclay, Sally Doherty, Lelia Duley, Rachael Hatton, Frances Rees, Matthew Stevenson, Weiya ZhangSummaryBackgroundIn the UK, gout management is suboptimum, with only 40% of patients receiving urate-lowering therapy, usually without titration to achieve a target serum urate concentration. Nurses successfully manage many diseases in primary care. We compared nurse-led gout care to usual care led by general practitioners (GPs) for people in the community.MethodsResearch nurses were trained in best practice management of gout, including providing individualised information and engaging patients in shared decision making. Adults who had experienced a gout flare in the previous 12 months were randomly assigned 1:1 to receive nurse-led care or continue with GP-led usual care. We assessed patients at baseline and after 1 and 2 years. The primary outcome was the percentage of participants who achieved serum urate concentrations less than 360 μmol/L (6 mg/dL) at 2 years. Secondary outcomes were flare frequency in year 2, presence of tophi, quality of life, and cost per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained. Risk ratios (RRs) and 95% CIs were calculated based on intention to treat with multiple imputation. This study is registered with www.ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01477346.Findings517 patients were enrolled, of whom 255 were assigned nurse-led care and 262 usual care. Nurse-led care was associated with high uptake of and adherence to urate-lowering therapy. More patients receiving nurse-led care had serum urate concentrations less than 360 μmol/L at 2 years than those receiving usual care (95% vs 30%, RR 3·18, 95% CI 2·42–4·18, p
       
  • Department of Error
    • Abstract: Publication date: 20–26 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10156Author(s):
       
  • Department of Error
    • Abstract: Publication date: 20–26 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10156Author(s):
       
  • Partnerships with the alcohol industry: opportunities and risks
    • Abstract: Publication date: 20–26 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10156Author(s): John N Newton, Paul Cosford
       
  • SHERPA: a new model for clinical decision making in patients with
           multimorbidity
    • Abstract: Publication date: 20–26 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10156Author(s): Edmund Jack, Neal Maskrey, Richard Byng
       
  • Picturing health: global primary health care
    • Abstract: Publication date: 20–26 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10156Author(s): Alexander Kumar
       
  • Yelzhan Birtanov: leading Kazakhstan to universal health coverage
    • Abstract: Publication date: 20–26 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10156Author(s): Richard Lane
       
  • Offline: The fetishisation of “global”
    • Abstract: Publication date: 20–26 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10156Author(s): Richard Horton
       
  • Revisiting Alma-Ata: what is the role of primary health care in achieving
           the Sustainable Development Goals'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 20–26 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10156Author(s): Thomas Hone, James Macinko, Christopher MillettSummaryThe Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are now steering the global health and development agendas. Notably, the SDGs contain no mention of primary health care, reflecting the disappointing implementation of the Alma-Ata declaration of 1978 over the past four decades. The draft Astana declaration (Alma-Ata 2·0), released in June, 2018, restates the key principles of primary health care and renews these as driving forces for achieving the SDGs, emphasising universal health coverage. We use accumulating evidence to show that countries that reoriente their health systems towards primary care are better placed to achieve the SDGs than those with hospital-focused systems or low investment in health. We then argue that an even bolder approach, which fully embraces the Alma-Ata vision of primary health care, could deliver substantially greater SDG progress, by addressing the wider determinants of health, promoting equity and social justice throughout society, empowering communities, and being a catalyst for advancing and amplifying universal health coverage and synergies among SDGs.
       
  • Steroid injection or wrist splint for first-time carpal tunnel
           syndrome'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 20–26 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10156Author(s): Isam Atroshi
       
  • No benefit of chlamydia screening in primary care'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 20–26 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10156Author(s): Paul C Adamson, Jeffrey D Klausner
       
  • Patient education and engagement in treat-to-target gout care
    • Abstract: Publication date: 20–26 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10156Author(s): Tuhina Neogi, Nicola Dalbeth
       
  • Putting nursing and midwifery at the heart of the Alma-Ata vision
    • Abstract: Publication date: 20–26 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10156Author(s): Nigel Crisp, Elizabeth Iro
       
  • Reform of primary health care in Pakistan
    • Abstract: Publication date: 20–26 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10156Author(s): Sadia M Malik, Zulfiqar A Bhutta
       
  • Primary health care and universal health coverage: competing
           discourses'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 20–26 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10156Author(s): Peter S Hill
       
  • How primary health care can make universal health coverage a reality,
           ensure healthy lives, and promote wellbeing for all
    • Abstract: Publication date: 20–26 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10156Author(s): Hans Kluge, Ed Kelley, Shannon Barkley, Pavlos N Theodorakis, Naoko Yamamoto, Alexey Tsoy, Ainur Aiypkhanova, Vidhya Ganesh, David B Hipgrave, Stefan Swartling Peterson, Jose M Valderas, Elias Mossialos
       
  • Primary health care for the 21st century, universal health coverage, and
           the Sustainable Development Goals
    • Abstract: Publication date: 20–26 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10156Author(s): Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Henrietta Fore, Yelzhan Birtanov, Zsuzsanna Jakab
       
  • Patient safety in vaginal mesh surgery
    • Abstract: Publication date: 20–26 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10156Author(s): The Lancet
       
  • A good first step
    • Abstract: Publication date: 20–26 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10156Author(s): The Lancet
       
  • The Astana Declaration: the future of primary health care'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 20–26 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10156Author(s): The Lancet
       
  • Effectiveness and sustainability of a diagonal investment approach to
           strengthen the primary health-care system in Ethiopia
    • Abstract: Publication date: 20–26 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10156Author(s): Yibeltal Assefa, Dessalegn Tesfaye, Wim Van Damme, Peter S HillSummaryWeakness of primary health-care (PHC) systems has represented a challenge to the achievement of the targets of disease control programmes (DCPs) despite the availability of substantial development assistance for health, in resource-poor settings. Since 2005, Ethiopia has embraced a diagonal investment approach to strengthen its PHC systems and concurrently scale up DCPs. This approach has led to a substantial improvement in PHC-system capacity that has contributed to increased coverage of DCPs and improved health status, although gaps in equity and quality in health services remain to be addressed. Since 2013, Ethiopia has had a decline in development assistance for health. Nevertheless, the Ethiopian Government has been able to compensate for this decline by increasing domestic resources. We argue that the diagonal investment approach can effectively strengthen PHC systems, achieve DCP targets, and sustain the gains. These goals can be achieved if a visionary and committed leadership coordinates its development partners and mobilises the local community, to ensure financial support to health services and improve population health. The lessons learnt from Ethiopia's efforts to improve its health services indicate that global-health initiatives should have a proactive and balanced investment approach to concurrently strengthen PHC systems, achieve programme targets, and sustain the gains, in resource-poor settings.
       
  • Encouraging awareness of fetal movements is harmful
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 September 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Kate F Walker, Jim G Thornton
       
  • Stillbirths count, but it is now time to count them all
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 September 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Marleen Temmerman, Joy E Lawn
       
  • Encouraging data from ABSORB IV pave the way to new scaffolds
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 September 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Antonio Colombo, Francesco Giannini
       
  • Potential harms of isolated arthroscopic partial meniscectomy
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 September 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Kim L Bennell, Jeffrey N Katz
       
  • Major strides in forecasting future health
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 October 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Tony Blakely
       
  • Drinkaware: unequivocally committed to reducing alcohol harm
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 October 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Sir Leigh Lewis
       
  • Department of Error
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 October 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s):
       
  • Early clindamycin for bacterial vaginosis in pregnancy (PREMEVA): a
           multicentre, double-blind, randomised controlled trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 October 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Damien Subtil, Gilles Brabant, Emma Tilloy, Patrick Devos, Frédérique Canis, Annie Fruchart, Marie-Christine Bissinger, Jean-Charles Dugimont, Catherine Nolf, Christophe Hacot, Sophie Gautier, Jérôme Chantrel, Marielle Jousse, David Desseauve, Jean Louis Plennevaux, Christine Delaeter, Sylvie Deghilage, Anne Personne, Emmanuelle Joyez, Elisabeth GuinardSummaryBackgroundPreterm delivery during pregnancy (
       
  • Treatment of bacterial vaginosis to prevent preterm birth
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 October 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Mark A Klebanoff, Rebecca M Brotman
       
  • Fighting Ebola in conflict in the DR Congo
    • Abstract: Publication date: 13–19 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10155Author(s): Benedict Moran
       
  • Interventions to reduce unnecessary caesarean sections in healthy women
           and babies
    • Abstract: Publication date: 13–19 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10155Author(s): Ana Pilar Betrán, Marleen Temmerman, Carol Kingdon, Abdu Mohiddin, Newton Opiyo, Maria Regina Torloni, Jun Zhang, Othiniel Musana, Sikolia Z Wanyonyi, Ahmet Metin Gülmezoglu, Soo DowneSummaryOptimising the use of caesarean section (CS) is of global concern. Underuse leads to maternal and perinatal mortality and morbidity. Conversely, overuse of CS has not shown benefits and can create harm. Worldwide, the frequency of CS continues to increase, and interventions to reduce unnecessary CSs have shown little success. Identifying the underlying factors for the continuing increase in CS use could improve the efficacy of interventions. In this Series paper, we describe the factors for CS use that are associated with women, families, health professionals, and health-care organisations and systems, and we examine behavioural, psychosocial, health system, and financial factors. We also outline the type and effects of interventions to reduce CS use that have been investigated. Clinical interventions, such as external cephalic version for breech delivery at term, vaginal breech delivery in appropriately selected women, and vaginal birth after CS, could reduce the frequency of CS use. Approaches such as labour companionship and midwife-led care have been associated with higher proportions of physiological births, safer outcomes, and lower health-care costs relative to control groups without these interventions, and with positive maternal experiences, in high-income countries. Such approaches need to be assessed in middle-income and low-income countries. Educational interventions for women should be complemented with meaningful dialogue with health professionals and effective emotional support for women and families. Investing in the training of health professionals, eliminating financial incentives for CS use, and reducing fear of litigation is fundamental. Safe, private, welcoming, and adequately resourced facilities are needed. At the country level, effective medical leadership is essential to ensure CS is used only when indicated. We conclude that interventions to reduce overuse must be multicomponent and locally tailored, addressing women's and health professionals' concerns, as well as health system and financial factors.
       
  • Woe sushi: gastric anisakiasis
    • Abstract: Publication date: 13–19 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10155Author(s): Takeshi Kondo
       
  • Department of Error
    • Abstract: Publication date: 13–19 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10155Author(s):
       
  • Department of Error
    • Abstract: Publication date: 13–19 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10155Author(s):
       
  • The proposed health bill in South Africa
    • Abstract: Publication date: 13–19 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10155Author(s): Gower Wisdom
       
  • Madagascar should introduce typhoid conjugate vaccines now
    • Abstract: Publication date: 13–19 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10155Author(s): Florian Marks, Jerome H Kim, Raphaël Rakotozandrindrainy
       
  • Essential need for quality in surgical health-care systems
    • Abstract: Publication date: 13–19 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10155Author(s): Vatshalan Santhirapala, Walter D Johnson, John G Meara
       
  • Improve access to quality primary care for patients with anxiety or
           depression – Authors' reply
    • Abstract: Publication date: 13–19 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10155Author(s): Graham Thornicroft, Andre Tylee
       
  • Improve access to quality primary care for patients with anxiety or
           depression
    • Abstract: Publication date: 13–19 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10155Author(s): Tony Kendrick
       
  • VLCD for weight loss and remission of type 2 diabetes' –
           Authors' reply
    • Abstract: Publication date: 13–19 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10155Author(s): Roy Taylor, Ashley J Adamson, Naveed Sattar, Michael E J Lean, John C Mathers, DiRECT team
       
  • VLCD for weight loss and remission of type 2 diabetes'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 13–19 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10155Author(s): Nadia Ahmad, Nasreen Alfaris
       
  • Prevalence and control of hypertension – Authors' reply
    • Abstract: Publication date: 13–19 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10155Author(s): Jiapeng Lu, Yuan Lu, Harlan M Krumholz, Lixin Jiang
       
  • Prevalence and control of hypertension
    • Abstract: Publication date: 13–19 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10155Author(s): Pascal Bovet, Arnaud Chiolero
       
  • World Restart a Heart initiative: all citizens of the world can save a
           life
    • Abstract: Publication date: 13–19 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10155Author(s): Bernd W Böttiger, Andrew Lockey
       
  • Alfred Alberts
    • Abstract: Publication date: 13–19 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10155Author(s): Ivan Oransky, Adam Marcus
       
  • Feminist science: who needs it'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 13–19 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10155Author(s): Cordelia Fine
       
  • Ana Pilar Betrán: seeking the optimum use of caesarean section
    • Abstract: Publication date: 13–19 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10155Author(s): Geoff Watts
       
  • Gothic revival
    • Abstract: Publication date: 13–19 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10155Author(s): Sarah Ditum
       
  • Yvonne Sylvain: women's health pioneer in Haiti
    • Abstract: Publication date: 13–19 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10155Author(s): Georgina Ferry
       
  • 2018 World Food Prize recognises advances in nutrition
    • Abstract: Publication date: 13–19 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10155Author(s): Talha Burki
       
  • Nobel Prizes: cancer, phages, and fighting sexual violence
    • Abstract: Publication date: 13–19 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10155Author(s): Talha Burki
       
  • Offline: The media—“from utopia to dystopia”
    • Abstract: Publication date: 13–19 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10155Author(s): Richard Horton
       
  • Lancet Commission on the Value of Death
    • Abstract: Publication date: 13–19 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10155Author(s): Richard Smith, Jane Blazeby, Tracey Bleakley, Jocalyn Clark, Yali Cong, Robin Durie, Eric Finkelstein, Nahla Gafer, Sam Gugliani, Richard Horton, Malcolm Johnson, Celia Kitzinger, Jenny Kitzinger, Felicia Knaul, Arnoldo Kraus, Julia Neuberger, Mark O'Connell, Seamus O'Mahony, MR Rajagopal, Eriko Sase
       
  • Strategic measures to reduce the caesarean section rate in Brazil
    • Abstract: Publication date: 13–19 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10155Author(s): Gilberto Magalhães Occhi, Thereza de Lamare Franco Netto, Mônica Almeida Neri, Euzi Adriana Bonifácio Rodrigues, Ana de Lourdes Vieira Fernandes
       
  • Appropriate use of caesarean section globally requires a different
           approach
    • Abstract: Publication date: 13–19 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10155Author(s): Ingela Wiklund, Address Mauakowa Malata, Ngai Fen Cheung, Franka Cadée
       
  • FIGO position paper: how to stop the caesarean section epidemic
    • Abstract: Publication date: 13–19 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10155Author(s): Gerard H A Visser, Diogo Ayres-de-Campos, Eytan R Barnea, Luc de Bernis, Gian Carlo Di Renzo, Maria Fernanda Escobar Vidarte, Isabel Lloyd, Anwar H Nassar, Wanda Nicholson, P K Shah, William Stones, Luming Sun, Gerhard B Theron, Salimah Walani
       
  • Serão as eleições no Brasil saudáveis, sem um plano para o direito
           universal à saúde'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 13–19 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10155Author(s): The Lancet
       
  • Are Brazilian elections healthy without a plan for UHC'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 13–19 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10155Author(s): The Lancet
       
  • DR Congo: managing Ebola virus in war
    • Abstract: Publication date: 13–19 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10155Author(s): The Lancet
       
  • Stemming the global caesarean section epidemic
    • Abstract: Publication date: 13–19 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10155Author(s): The Lancet
       
  • Short-term and long-term effects of caesarean section on the health of
           women and children
    • Abstract: Publication date: 13–19 October 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10155Author(s): Jane Sandall, Rachel M Tribe, Lisa Avery, Glen Mola, Gerard HA Visser, Caroline SE Homer, Deena Gibbons, Niamh M Kelly, Holly Powell Kennedy, Hussein Kidanto, Paul Taylor, Marleen TemmermanSummaryA caesarean section (CS) can be a life-saving intervention when medically indicated, but this procedure can also lead to short-term and long-term health effects for women and children. Given the increasing use of CS, particularly without medical indication, an increased understanding of its health effects on women and children has become crucial, which we discuss in this Series paper. The prevalence of maternal mortality and maternal morbidity is higher after CS than after vaginal birth. CS is associated with an increased risk of uterine rupture, abnormal placentation, ectopic pregnancy, stillbirth, and preterm birth, and these risks increase in a dose–response manner. There is emerging evidence that babies born by CS have different hormonal, physical, bacterial, and medical exposures, and that these exposures can subtly alter neonatal physiology. Short-term risks of CS include altered immune development, an increased likelihood of allergy, atopy, and asthma, and reduced intestinal gut microbiome diversity. The persistence of these risks into later life is less well investigated, although an association between CS use and greater incidence of late childhood obesity and asthma are frequently reported. There are few studies that focus on the effects of CS on cognitive and educational outcomes. Understanding potential mechanisms that link CS with childhood outcomes, such as the role of the developing neonatal microbiome, has potential to inform novel strategies and research for optimising CS use and promote optimal physiological processes and development.
       
  • The fate of medicine in the time of AI
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 October 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Enrico Coiera
       
  • From silos to sustainability: transition through a UHC lens
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 October 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Joseph Kutzin, Susan Sparkes, Agnès Soucat, Hélène Barroy
       
  • Time for a new obesity narrative
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 October 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Johanna Ralston, Hannah Brinsden, Kent Buse, Vanessa Candeias, Ian Caterson, Trevor Hassell, Shiriki Kumanyika, Patricia Nece, Sania Nishtar, Ian Patton, Joseph Proietto, Ximena Ramos Salas, Srinath Reddy, Donna Ryan, Arya M Sharma, Boyd Swinburn, John Wilding, Euan Woodward
       
  • Prevention, detection, intervention: the big wins for mental health
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 October 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Matt Hancock
       
  • Mental health for all: a global goal
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 October 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Helen Frankish, Niall Boyce, Richard Horton
       
  • Towards a new era for mental health
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 October 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Prabha S Chandra, Prabhat Chand
       
  • The Lancet Commission on global mental health and sustainable
           development
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 October 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Vikram Patel, Shekhar Saxena, Crick Lund, Graham Thornicroft, Florence Baingana, Paul Bolton, Dan Chisholm, Pamela Y Collins, Janice L Cooper, Julian Eaton, Helen Herrman, Mohammad M Herzallah, Yueqin Huang, Mark J D Jordans, Arthur Kleinman, Maria Elena Medina-Mora, Ellen Morgan, Unaiza Niaz, Olayinka Omigbodun, Martin Prince
       
  • Implementing sustainable global mental health in a fragmenting world
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 October 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Sarah Carr
       
  • Shekhar Saxena: making mental health a development priority
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 October 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Rachael Davies
       
  • Implementation research: new imperatives and opportunities in global
           health
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 October 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Sally Theobald, Neal Brandes, Margaret Gyapong, Sameh El-Saharty, Enola Proctor, Theresa Diaz, Samuel Wanji, Soraya Elloker, Joanna Raven, Helen Elsey, Sushil Bharal, David Pelletier, David H PetersSummaryImplementation research is important in global health because it addresses the challenges of the know–do gap in real-world settings and the practicalities of achieving national and global health goals. Implementation research is an integrated concept that links research and practice to accelerate the development and delivery of public health approaches. Implementation research involves the creation and application of knowledge to improve the implementation of health policies, programmes, and practices. This type of research uses multiple disciplines and methods and emphasises partnerships between community members, implementers, researchers, and policy makers. Implementation research focuses on practical approaches to improve implementation and to enhance equity, efficiency, scale-up, and sustainability, and ultimately to improve people's health. There is growing interest in the principles of implementation research and a range of perspectives on its purposes and appropriate methods. However, limited efforts have been made to systematically document and review learning from the practice of implementation research across different countries and technical areas. Drawing on an expert review process, this Health Policy paper presents purposively selected case studies to illustrate the essential characteristics of implementation research and its application in low-income and middle-income countries. The case studies are organised into four categories related to the purposes of using implementation research, including improving people's health, informing policy design and implementation, strengthening health service delivery, and empowering communities and beneficiaries. Each of the case studies addresses implementation problems, involves partnerships to co-create solutions, uses tacit knowledge and research, and is based on a shared commitment towards improving health outcomes. The case studies reveal the complex adaptive nature of health systems, emphasise the importance of understanding context, and highlight the role of multidisciplinary, rigorous, and adaptive processes that allow for course correction to ensure interventions have an impact. This Health Policy paper is part of a call to action to increase the use of implementation research in global health, build the field of implementation research inclusive of research utilisation efforts, and accelerate efforts to bridge the gap between research, policy, and practice to improve health outcomes.
       
  • Universal health coverage: breakthrough or great white elephant'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 October 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Irene A AgyepongSummaryWill the Sustainable Development Goal 3 sub-goal “Achieve universal health coverage, including financial risk protection, access to quality essential health care services and…safe, effective, quality and affordable essential medicines and vaccines for all” be judged a breakthrough or a great white elephant in implementation, when we look back with the clear eyes of hindsight in 2030' What are the ways in which this agenda might play out in implementation and why might it do so' Drawing on a desk review, this Essay explores dominant ideas, ideology, institutions, and interests in relation to global versus Ghana national health priorities since the WHO constitution came into effect in 1948, to reflect on these questions.
       
  • Notions from Kavanaugh hearings contradict medical facts
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 October 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Homer Venters
       
  • Ebola virus epidemic in war-torn eastern DR Congo
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 October 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Kasereka Masumbuko Claude, Jack Underschultz, Michael T Hawkes
       
  • Baseline and on-statin treatment lipoprotein(a) levels for prediction of
           cardiovascular events: individual patient-data meta-analysis of statin
           outcome trials
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 October 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Peter Willeit, Paul M Ridker, Paul J Nestel, John Simes, Andrew M Tonkin, Terje R Pedersen, Gregory G Schwartz, Anders G Olsson, Helen M Colhoun, Florian Kronenberg, Christiane Drechsler, Christoph Wanner, Samia Mora, Anastasia Lesogor, Sotirios TsimikasSummaryBackgroundElevated lipoprotein(a) is a genetic risk factor for cardiovascular disease in general population studies. However, its contribution to risk for cardiovascular events in patients with established cardiovascular disease or on statin therapy is uncertain.MethodsPatient-level data from seven randomised, placebo-controlled, statin outcomes trials were collated and harmonised to calculate hazard ratios (HRs) for cardiovascular events, defined as fatal or non-fatal coronary heart disease, stroke, or revascularisation procedures. HRs for cardiovascular events were estimated within each trial across predefined lipoprotein(a) groups (15 to
       
  • Lorcaserin: balancing efficacy with potential risks
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 October 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Xabier Unamuno, Gema Frühbeck
       
  • Lipoprotein(a): lodestar for future clinical trials
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 October 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Gerald F Watts, Michael B Boffa
       
  • Twice the benefits with twincretins'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 October 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Michael Stumvoll, Matthias Tschöp
       
  • Department of Error
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 October 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s):
       
  • Enlarging the loop: closed-loop insulin delivery for type 1 diabetes
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