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The Lancet
Journal Prestige (SJR): 14.934
Citation Impact (citeScore): 9
Number of Followers: 2691  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0140-6736 - ISSN (Online) 1474-547X
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3184 journals]
  • Healthy diets and sustainable food systems
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 June 2019Source: The LancetAuthor(s): William J McCarthy, Zhaoping Li
       
  • Healthy diets and sustainable food systems
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 June 2019Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Edward Archer, Carl J Lavie
       
  • Healthy diets and sustainable food systems
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 June 2019Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Rasmus Einarsson, Gavin McCrory, U Martin Persson
       
  • EAT-Lancet score and major health outcomes: the EPIC-Oxford study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 June 2019Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Anika Knuppel, Keren Papier, Timothy J Key, Ruth C Travis
       
  • Healthy diets and sustainable food systems – Authors' reply
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 June 2019Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Walter Willett, Johan Rockström, Brent Loken
       
  • India: health workers strike after attack on junior doctor
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s): Dinesh C Sharma
       
  • Gender equality and gender norms: framing the opportunities for health
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s): Geeta Rao Gupta, Nandini Oomman, Caren Grown, Kathryn Conn, Sarah Hawkes, Yusra Ribhi Shawar, Jeremy Shiffman, Kent Buse, Rekha Mehra, Chernor A Bah, Lori Heise, Margaret E Greene, Ann M Weber, Jody Heymann, Katherine Hay, Anita Raj, Sarah Henry, Jeni Klugman, Gary L Darmstadt, Gender Equality, Norms, and Health Steering CommitteeSummaryThe Sustainable Development Goals offer the global health community a strategic opportunity to promote human rights, advance gender equality, and achieve health for all. The inability of the health sector to accelerate progress on a range of health outcomes brings into sharp focus the substantial impact of gender inequalities and restrictive gender norms on health risks and behaviours. In this paper, the fifth in a Series on gender equality, norms, and health, we draw on evidence to dispel three myths on gender and health and describe persistent barriers to progress. We propose an agenda for action to reduce gender inequality and shift gender norms for improved health outcomes, calling on leaders in national governments, global health institutions, civil society organisations, academic settings, and the corporate sector to focus on health outcomes and engage actors across sectors to achieve them; reform the workplace and workforce to be more gender-equitable; fill gaps in data and eliminate gender bias in research; fund civil-society actors and social movements; and strengthen accountability mechanisms.
       
  • Atypical presentation of classic Kaposi's sarcoma
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s): Yue-Tong Qian, Dong-Lai Ma
       
  • Department of Error
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s):
       
  • Department of Error
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s):
       
  • Department of Error
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s):
       
  • Department of Error
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s):
       
  • Department of Error
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s):
       
  • Department of Error
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s):
       
  • Department of Error
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s):
       
  • Department of Error
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s):
       
  • Department of Error
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s):
       
  • Department of Error
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s):
       
  • Department of Error
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s):
       
  • Department of Error
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s):
       
  • Boosting quality diagnostics could give Africa better health
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s): Leith Greenslade, Amy Sarah Ginsburg
       
  • The Paris Fire Brigade response to the 2018 Champs-Elysées riots
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s): Bertrand Prunet, Clement Derkenne, Benoit Frattini, Xavier Lesaffre, Michel Bignand
       
  • The rise of clinical neuroscience in Haiti
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s): Ernest J Barthélemy
       
  • Key points to consider in the IMPERIAL trial – Author's reply
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s): William A Gray, IMPERIAL trial
       
  • Key points to consider in the IMPERIAL trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s): Jim A Reekers
       
  • Children of jihadists: a medical framework for returnees in France
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s): Alessandra Mapelli, Maurween Veyret-Morau, Dalila Rezzoug, Anaelle Klein, Thierry Baubet
       
  • International drug control system: public health guiding principles
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s): Khalid Tinasti, Nora Kronig-Romero, João Goulão, Camilla Stoltenberg, Michel Kazatchkine, Helen Clark
       
  • The Philip Morris-funded Foundation for a Smoke-Free World: tax return
           sheds light on funding activities
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s): Tess Legg, Silvy Peeters, Phil Chamberlain, Anna B Gilmore
       
  • Waun Ki Hong
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s): Geoff Watts
       
  • The case for desegregation
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s): Rhea W Boyd
       
  • Rebecca Katz: leading light in global health security
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s): Richard Lane
       
  • Trudeau signals support for Canadian pharmacare
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s): Paul Webster
       
  • Head of Indian Affairs Foundation fired in Brazil
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s): Barbara Fraser
       
  • Improving health with programmatic, legal, and policy approaches to reduce
           gender inequality and change restrictive gender norms
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s): Jody Heymann, Jessica K Levy, Bijetri Bose, Vanessa Ríos-Salas, Yehualashet Mekonen, Hema Swaminathan, Negar Omidakhsh, Adva Gadoth, Kate Huh, Margaret E Greene, Gary L Darmstadt, Gary L Darmstadt, Margaret Eleanor Greene, Sarah Hawkes, Lori Heise, Sarah Henry, Jody Heymann, Jeni Klugman, Ruth Levine, Anita RajSummaryEvidence that gender inequalities and restrictive norms adversely affect health is extensive; however, far less research has focused on testing solutions. We first comprehensively reviewed the peer-reviewed and grey literature for rigorously evaluated programmes that aimed to reduce gender inequality and restrictive gender norms and improve health. We identified four mutually reinforcing factors underpinning change: (1) multisectoral action, (2) multilevel, multistakeholder involvement, (3) diversified programming, and (4) social participation and empowerment. Following this review, because little research has investigated the effects of national-level law and policy reforms, we conducted original quasi-experimental studies on laws and policies related to education, work, and income, all social determinants of health in which deep gender inequalities exist. We examined whether the laws and policies significantly affected health outcomes and gender norms, and whether law-induced and policy-induced changes in gender norms mediated the health effects, in areas for which longitudinal data existed. Laws and policies that made primary education tuition-free (13 intervention countries with the law and/or policy and ten control countries without) and that provided paid maternity and parental leave (seven intervention and 15 control countries) significantly improved women's and their children's health (odds ratios [OR] of 1·16–2·10, depending on health outcome) and gender equality in household decision making (OR 1·46 for tuition-free and 1·45 for paid maternity and parental leave) as a proxy indicator of gender norms. Increased equality partially mediated the positive effects on health outcomes. We conclude by discussing examples of how improved governance can support gender-equitable laws, policies, and programmes, immediate next steps, and future research needs.
       
  • Ebola outbreak not a PHEIC, says WHO
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s): John Zarocostas
       
  • Offline: Prescriptions for an Age of Apprehension
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s): Richard Horton
       
  • Blockchain in health care: hype, trust, and digital health
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s): Gary Leeming, John Ainsworth, David A Clifton
       
  • Gentamicin as an alternative treatment for gonorrhoea
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s): Robert D Kirkcaldy, Kimberly A Workowski
       
  • Are drug-eluting stents safer than bare-metal stents'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s): Lisette Okkels Jensen, Evald Høj Christiansen
       
  • Increases in alcohol consumption in middle-income countries will lead to
           increased harms
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s): Sarah Callinan, Michael Livingston
       
  • Gross negligence manslaughter
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s): The Lancet
       
  • The politics of PHEIC
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s): The Lancet
       
  • Stonewall: 50 years of fighting for their lives
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s): The Lancet
       
  • Disrupting gender norms in health systems: making the case for change
    • Abstract: Publication date: 22–28 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10190Author(s): Katherine Hay, Lotus McDougal, Valerie Percival, Sarah Henry, Jeni Klugman, Haja Wurie, Joanna Raven, Fortunate Shabalala, Rebecca Fielding-Miller, Arnab Dey, Nabamallika Dehingia, Rosemary Morgan, Yamini Atmavilas, Niranjan Saggurti, Jennifer Yore, Elena Blokhina, Rumana Huque, Edwine Barasa, Nandita Bhan, Chandani KharelSummaryRestrictive gender norms and gender inequalities are replicated and reinforced in health systems, contributing to gender inequalities in health. In this Series paper, we explore how to address all three through recognition and then with disruptive solutions. We used intersectional feminist theory to guide our systematic reviews, qualitative case studies based on lived experiences, and quantitative analyses based on cross-sectional and evaluation research. We found that health systems reinforce patients' traditional gender roles and neglect gender inequalities in health, health system models and clinic-based programmes are rarely gender responsive, and women have less authority as health workers than men and are often devalued and abused. With regard to potential for disruption, we found that gender equality policies are associated with greater representation of female physicians, which in turn is associated with better health outcomes, but that gender parity is insufficient to achieve gender equality. We found that institutional support and respect of nurses improves quality of care, and that women's empowerment collectives can increase health-care access and provider responsiveness. We see promise from social movements in supporting women's reproductive rights and policies. Our findings suggest we must view gender as a fundamental factor that predetermines and shapes health systems and outcomes. Without addressing the role of restrictive gender norms and gender inequalities within and outside health systems, we will not reach our collective ambitions of universal health coverage and the Sustainable Development Goals. We propose action to systematically identify and address restrictive gender norms and gender inequalities in health systems.
       
  • Sexual and reproductive health and rights and population policies: from
           “either/or” to “both/and”
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 June 2019Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Carmen Barroso, Steven W Sinding
       
  • Department of Error
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 June 2019Source: The LancetAuthor(s):
       
  • Prevalence and burden of asthma in China: time to act
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 June 2019Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Guy G Brusselle, Fanny Wai-San Ko
       
  • Department of Error
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 June 2019Source: The LancetAuthor(s):
       
  • Global mental health – Authors' reply
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 June 2019Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Vikram Patel, Shekhar Saxena, Charlene Sunkel, Crick Lund, Graham Thornicroft
       
  • Plan S: the final cut—response from cOAlition S
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 June 2019Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Robert Kiley
       
  • New malaria maps
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 June 2019Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Francois H Nosten, Aung Paye Phyo
       
  • Global mental health
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 June 2019Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Anna R Walder, Roxanne Keynejad, Stania Kamara, Helen Hopwood
       
  • Systemic treatment of tenosynovial giant cell tumours in context
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 June 2019Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Floortje G M Verspoor, Gerjon Hannink
       
  • Global mental health
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 June 2019Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Lisa Cosgrove, China Mills, Jay Amsterdam, Iona Heath, Akriti Mehta, Jayasree Kalathil, Allen Shaughnessy
       
  • Global mental health
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 June 2019Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Richard M Duffy, Brendan D Kelly
       
  • Rising suicide rates among adolescents
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 June 2019Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Helen Bould, Becky Mars, Paul Moran, Lucy Biddle, David Gunnell
       
  • Septoplasty—a surgical or political challenge'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 June 2019Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Fabian Sommer, Thomas K Hoffmann
       
  • The evolution of fractionated prostate cancer radiotherapy
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 June 2019Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Charles Catton, Himu Lukka
       
  • Five national academies call for global compact on air pollution and
           health
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 June 2019Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Jacqueline McGlade, Philip J Landrigan
       
  • Department of Error
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15–21 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10189Author(s):
       
  • Department of Error
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15–21 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10189Author(s):
       
  • Department of Error
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15–21 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10189Author(s):
       
  • How can we avoid making universal health coverage a white elephant'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15–21 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10189Author(s): Masamine Jimba, Maya Sophia Fujimura, Ken Ing Cherng Ong
       
  • Dyspnoea in the GLOBAL LEADERS trial – Authors' reply
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15–21 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10189Author(s): Peter Jüni, Pascal Vranckx, Marco Valgimgli, Patrick Serruys, Stephan Windecker, GLOBAL LEADERS Investigators
       
  • Dyspnoea in the GLOBAL LEADERS trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15–21 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10189Author(s): David Martí, Marcelo Sanmartín
       
  • Pharma blockchains AI for drug development
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15–21 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10189Author(s): Talha Burki
       
  • Trump administration limits fetal tissue research
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15–21 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10189Author(s): Susan Jaffe
       
  • Health targeted in Sudan's political transition
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15–21 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10189Author(s): Sharmila Devi
       
  • Reducing the global burden of depression: a Lancet–World Psychiatric
           Association Commission
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15–21 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10189Author(s): Helen Herrman, Christian Kieling, Patrick McGorry, Richard Horton, Jennifer Sargent, Vikram Patel
       
  • Offline: A Chief Medical Officer—unplugged
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15–21 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10189Author(s): Richard Horton
       
  • Isolated cardiac cysticercosis: treatment with or without steroids'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15–21 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10189Author(s): Dinesh K Kalra, Anupama Rao, Andrew Simms, Alain Pierre-Louis
       
  • Successful treatment of HIV eliminates sexual transmission
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15–21 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10189Author(s): Myron S Cohen
       
  • Burosumab treatment of children with X-linked hypophosphataemic rickets
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15–21 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10189Author(s): Rebecca J Gordon, Michael A Levine
       
  • Durable complete response in renal cell carcinoma clinical trials
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15–21 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10189Author(s): Patrick G Pilié, Eric Jonasch
       
  • Antibiotics for operative vaginal delivery: practice-changing data
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15–21 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10189Author(s): Vincenzo Berghella, Federica Bellussi
       
  • Venezuela: food and medicines used as weapons
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15–21 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10189Author(s): The Lancet
       
  • Recognising physicians with impairment
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15–21 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10189Author(s): The Lancet
       
  • The devastating impact of Trump's global gag rule
    • Abstract: Publication date: 15–21 June 2019Source: The Lancet, Volume 393, Issue 10189Author(s): The Lancet
       
  • Alcohol policy in the UK: where next'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 June 2019Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Ian Gilmore, Roger Williams
       
  • Department of Error
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 May 2019Source: The LancetAuthor(s):
       
  • A coming of age for gender in global health
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 May 2019Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Jocalyn Clark, Richard Horton
       
  • Gender equality and health: laying the foundations for change
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 May 2019Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Asha S George, Avni Amin, Claudia GarcÍa-Moreno, Gita Sen
       
  • Doing gender better: can the UN step up'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 May 2019Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Pascale Allotey, Michelle Remme, Selina Lo
       
  • Why now for a Series on gender equality, norms, and health'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 May 2019Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Gary L Darmstadt, Lori Heise, Geeta Rao Gupta, Sarah Henry, Beniamino Cislaghi, Margaret E Greene, Sarah Hawkes, Katherine Hay, Jody Heymann, Jeni Klugman, Jessica K Levy, Anita Raj, Ann M Weber
       
  • A new normal: addressing gender to improve health
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 May 2019Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Melinda Gates
       
  • Gender inequality and restrictive gender norms: framing the challenges to
           health
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 May 2019Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Lori Heise, Margaret E Greene, Neisha Opper, Maria Stavropoulou, Caroline Harper, Marcos Nascimento, Debrework Zewdie, Gary L Darmstadt, Margaret Eleanor Greene, Sarah Hawkes, Lori Heise, Sarah Henry, Jody Heymann, Jeni Klugman, Ruth Levine, Anita Raj, Geeta Rao GuptaSummaryGender is not accurately captured by the traditional male and female dichotomy of sex. Instead, it is a complex social system that structures the life experience of all human beings. This paper, the first in a Series of five papers, investigates the relationships between gender inequality, restrictive gender norms, and health and wellbeing. Building upon past work, we offer a consolidated conceptual framework that shows how individuals born biologically male or female develop into gendered beings, and how sexism and patriarchy intersect with other forms of discrimination, such as racism, classism, and homophobia, to structure pathways to poor health. We discuss the ample evidence showing the far-reaching consequences of these pathways, including how gender inequality and restrictive gender norms impact health through differential exposures, health-related behaviours and access to care, as well as how gender-biased health research and health-care systems reinforce and reproduce gender inequalities, with serious implications for health. The cumulative consequences of structured disadvantage, mediated through discriminatory laws, policies, and institutions, as well as diet, stress, substance use, and environmental toxins, have triggered important discussions about the role of social injustice in the creation and maintenance of health inequities, especially along racial and socioeconomic lines. This Series paper raises the parallel question of whether discrimination based on gender likewise becomes embodied, with negative consequences for health. For decades, advocates have worked to eliminate gender discrimination in global health, with only modest success. A new plan and new political commitment are needed if these global health aspirations and the wider Sustainable Development Goals of the UN are to be achieved.
       
  • Gender norms and health: insights from global survey data
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 May 2019Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Ann M Weber, Beniamino Cislaghi, Valerie Meausoone, Safa Abdalla, Iván Mejía-Guevara, Pooja Loftus, Emma Hallgren, Ilana Seff, Lindsay Stark, Cesar G Victora, Romina Buffarini, Aluísio J D Barros, Benjamin W Domingue, Devika Bhushan, Ribhav Gupta, Jason M Nagata, Holly B Shakya, Linda M Richter, Shane A Norris, Thoai D NgoSummaryDespite global commitments to achieving gender equality and improving health and wellbeing for all, quantitative data and methods to precisely estimate the effect of gender norms on health inequities are underdeveloped. Nonetheless, existing global, national, and subnational data provide some key opportunities for testing associations between gender norms and health. Using innovative approaches to analysing proxies for gender norms, we generated evidence that gender norms impact the health of women and men across life stages, health sectors, and world regions. Six case studies showed that: (1) gender norms are complex and can intersect with other social factors to impact health over the life course; (2) early gender-normative influences by parents and peers can have multiple and differing health consequences for girls and boys; (3) non-conformity with, and transgression of, gender norms can be harmful to health, particularly when they trigger negative sanctions; and (4) the impact of gender norms on health can be context-specific, demanding care when designing effective gender-transformative health policies and programmes. Limitations of survey-based data are described that resulted in missed opportunities for investigating certain populations and domains. Recommendations for optimising and advancing research on the health impacts of gender norms are made.
       
 
 
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