Journal Cover
The Lancet
Journal Prestige (SJR): 14.934
Citation Impact (citeScore): 9
Number of Followers: 2364  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0140-6736 - ISSN (Online) 1474-547X
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3162 journals]
  • Global child and adolescent health: a call for papers
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 July 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Jane Godsland, Udani Samarasekera, Esther Lau, Richard Horton
       
  • Effects of aspirin on risks of vascular events and cancer according to
           bodyweight and dose: analysis of individual patient data from randomised
           trials
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 July 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Peter M Rothwell, Nancy R Cook, J Michael Gaziano, Jacqueline F Price, Jill F F Belch, Maria Carla Roncaglioni, Takeshi Morimoto, Ziyah MehtaSummaryBackgroundA one-dose-fits-all approach to use of aspirin has yielded only modest benefits in long-term prevention of cardiovascular events, possibly due to underdosing in patients of large body size and excess dosing in patients of small body size, which might also affect other outcomes.MethodsUsing individual patient data, we analysed the modifying effects of bodyweight (10 kg bands) and height (10 cm bands) on the effects of low doses (≤100 mg) and higher doses (300–325 mg or ≥500 mg) of aspirin in randomised trials of aspirin in primary prevention of cardiovascular events. We stratified the findings by age, sex, and vascular risk factors, and validated them in trials of aspirin in secondary prevention of stroke. Additionally, we assessed whether any weight or height dependence was evident for the effect of aspirin on 20-year risk of colorectal cancer or any in-trial cancer.ResultsAmong ten eligible trials of aspirin in primary prevention (including 117 279 participants), bodyweight varied four-fold and trial median weight ranged from 60·0 kg to 81·2 kg (p
       
  • Health, transatlantic trade, and President Trump's populism: what American
           Patients First has to do with Brexit and the NHS
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 July 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Holly Jarman, Martin McKee, Tamara K Hervey
       
  • Addressing the global challenge of snake envenoming
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 July 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Geoffrey K Isbister, Anjana Silva
       
  • Weight-adjusted aspirin for cardiovascular prevention
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 July 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Katherine N Theken, Tilo Grosser
       
  • The need for transparency of clinical evidence for medical devices in
           Europe
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 July 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Alan G Fraser, Eric G Butchart, Piotr Szymański, Enrico G Caiani, Scott Crosby, Peter Kearney, Frans Van de WerfSummaryTo use medical devices rationally, health-care professionals must base their choices of which devices to recommend for individual patients on an objective appraisal of their safety and clinical efficacy. The evidence submitted by manufacturers when seeking approval of their high-risk devices must be publicly available, including technical performance and premarket clinical studies. Giving physicians access to this information supplements the peer-reviewed scientific literature and might be essential for comparing alternative devices within any class. Interested patients should be encouraged to review the evidence for any device that has been recommended for them. The new EU law on medical devices states that the manufacturer is to prepare a summary of the evidence for any implantable or high-risk device. Defining its content, however, has been delegated to implementing legislation, which is now being considered. From a clinical perspective, it is imperative that all evidence reviewed by notified bodies and regulatory authorities is disclosed—with the exception, if justified, only of technical specifications that are considered confidential or manufacturing details that are protected as intellectual property—and public access to this evidence must be guaranteed by EU law. From ethical and other perspectives, there are no grounds for less clinical evidence being available to health-care professionals about the medical devices that they use than is already available for new pharmaceutical products. Full transparency is needed; without it, informed decisions relating to the use of new medical devices will remain impossible.
       
  • Vulnerability to snakebite envenoming: a global mapping of hotspots
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 July 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Joshua Longbottom, Freya M Shearer, Maria Devine, Gabriel Alcoba, Francois Chappuis, Daniel J Weiss, Sarah E Ray, Nicolas Ray, David A Warrell, Rafael Ruiz de Castañeda, David J Williams, Simon I Hay, David M PigottSummaryBackgroundSnakebite envenoming is a frequently overlooked cause of mortality and morbidity. Data for snake ecology and existing snakebite interventions are scarce, limiting accurate burden estimation initiatives. Low global awareness stunts new interventions, adequate health resources, and available health care. Therefore, we aimed to synthesise currently available data to identify the most vulnerable populations at risk of snakebite, and where additional data to manage this global problem are needed.MethodsWe assembled a list of snake species using WHO guidelines. Where relevant, we obtained expert opinion range (EOR) maps from WHO or the Clinical Toxinology Resources. We also obtained occurrence data for each snake species from a variety of websites, such as VertNet and iNaturalist, using the spocc R package (version 0.7.0). We removed duplicate occurrence data and categorised snakes into three groups: group A (no available EOR map or species occurrence records), group B (EOR map but
       
  • End immigration detention: an open letter
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 July 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Michaela Beder, Michelle Cohen, Katrina Hui, Carolina Jimenez, 2002 individual and 34 organisational signatories
       
  • Ahmed Salim Saif Al-Mandhari: bridge-builder from Oman
    • Abstract: Publication date: 14–20 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10142Author(s): John Zarocostas
       
  • Equity in the gender equality movement in global health
    • Abstract: Publication date: 14–20 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10142Author(s): Catherine M Jones, Lara Gautier, Kadidiatou Kadio, Muriel Mac-Seing, Érica Miranda, Charity Omenka, Samiratou Ouédraogo, Myriam Cielo Pérez, Anne-Marie Turcotte-Tremblay, Stella Tiné, WGH Francophone Working Group
       
  • Canadian Women in Global Health #CWIGH: call for nominations
    • Abstract: Publication date: 14–20 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10142Author(s): Jocalyn Clark, Sameera Hussain, Eva Slawecki, Sarah Lawley, Margo Greenwood, Janet Hatcher-Roberts, Kelley Lee, CWIGH Group
       
  • Women in Global Health—Germany network
    • Abstract: Publication date: 14–20 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10142Author(s): Sabine Ludwig, Roopa Dhatt, Ilona Kickbusch
       
  • Metformin as first-line treatment for type 2 diabetes
    • Abstract: Publication date: 14–20 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10142Author(s): Suetonia C Palmer, Giovanni F M Strippoli
       
  • Should hydroxyethyl starch be banned' – Authors' reply
    • Abstract: Publication date: 14–20 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10142Author(s): Ian Roberts, Haleema Shakur, Rinaldo Bellomo, Julian Bion, Simon Finfer, Beverley Hunt, John Myburgh, Anders Perner, Konrad Reinhart
       
  • Should hydroxyethyl starch be banned'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 14–20 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10142Author(s): Michael Frank James, Guy A Richards, P D Gopalan, Andrew I Levin, A C Lundgren
       
  • Should hydroxyethyl starch be banned'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 14–20 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10142Author(s): Daniel Chappell, Matthias Jacob
       
  • Should hydroxyethyl starch be banned'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 14–20 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10142Author(s): Hans-Joachim Priebe
       
  • Ogobara Doumbo
    • Abstract: Publication date: 14–20 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10142Author(s): Andrew Green
       
  • A woman revolts
    • Abstract: Publication date: 14–20 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10142Author(s): Marco De Ambrogi
       
  • Defiant gardens: from Helmand to Headley Court
    • Abstract: Publication date: 14–20 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10142Author(s): Emily Mayhew
       
  • Continuous positive airway pressure device detects atrial fibrillation
           induced central sleep apnoea
    • Abstract: Publication date: 14–20 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10142Author(s): Matthew Light, Jeremy E Orr, Atul Malhotra, Robert L Owens
       
  • Trepanned cranium
    • Abstract: Publication date: 14–20 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10142Author(s): Bill Bynum, Helen Bynum
       
  • A fellowship of error
    • Abstract: Publication date: 14–20 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10142Author(s): Roger Kneebone
       
  • Devastation in Yemen ongoing
    • Abstract: Publication date: 14–20 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10142Author(s): Sharmila Devi
       
  • African Union launches a pan-African anti-malaria campaign
    • Abstract: Publication date: 14–20 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10142Author(s): John Zarocostas
       
  • Proposed regulation of oxytocin in India causes concern
    • Abstract: Publication date: 14–20 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10142Author(s): Sophie Cousins
       
  • Prospects for health in Mexico after the presidential election
    • Abstract: Publication date: 14–20 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10142Author(s): Stephen Woodman
       
  • Offline: The UK's child health emergency
    • Abstract: Publication date: 14–20 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10142Author(s): Richard Horton
       
  • Denicotinised cigarettes
    • Abstract: Publication date: 14–20 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10142Author(s): John Britton
       
  • How Montgomery is reconfiguring consent in the UK
    • Abstract: Publication date: 14–20 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10142Author(s): Natalie Harrison, Hilary Hewitt, Pranav Pandya, Dan Reisel
       
  • Indonesia disavows “unity in diversity”
    • Abstract: Publication date: 14–20 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10142Author(s): The Lancet
       
  • Food security in the Middle East and north Africa
    • Abstract: Publication date: 14–20 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10142Author(s): The Lancet
       
  • Is digital medicine different'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 14–20 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10142Author(s): The Lancet
       
  • NHS on screen
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7–13 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10141Author(s): Nicholas Timmins
       
  • Progress in clinical research in surgery and IDEAL
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7–13 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10141Author(s): Peter McCulloch, Joshua Feinberg, Yiannis Philippou, Angelos Kolias, Sean Kehoe, Gillian Lancaster, Jenny Donovan, Tatjana Petrinic, Riaz Agha, Christopher PennellSummaryThe quality of clinical research in surgery has long attracted criticism. High-quality randomised trials have proved difficult to undertake in surgery, and many surgical treatments have therefore been adopted without adequate supporting evidence of efficacy and safety. This evidence deficit can adversely affect research funding and reimbursement decisions, lead to slow adoption of innovations, and permit widespread adoption of procedures that offer no benefit, or cause harm. Improvement in the quality of surgical evidence would therefore be valuable. The Idea, Development, Exploration, Assessment, and Long-term Follow-up (IDEAL) Framework and Recommendations specify desirable qualities for surgical studies, and outline an integrated evaluation pathway for surgery, and similar complex interventions. We used the IDEAL Recommendations to assess methodological progress in surgical research over time, assessed the uptake and influence of IDEAL, and identified the challenges to further methodological progress. Comparing studies from the periods 2000–04 and 2010–14, we noted apparent improvement in the use of standard outcome measures, adoption of Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) standards, and assessment of the quality of surgery and of learning curves, but no progress in the use of qualitative research or reporting of modifications during procedure development. Better education about research, integration of rigorous evaluation into routine practice and training, and linkage of such work to awards systems could foster further improvements in surgical evidence. IDEAL has probably contributed only slightly to the improvements described to date, but its uptake is accelerating rapidly. The need for the integrated evaluation template IDEAL offers for surgery and other complex treatments is becoming more widely accepted.
       
  • Bochdalek hernia
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7–13 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10141Author(s): Xiaofeng Hu, Bin Liu
       
  • Department of Error
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7–13 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10141Author(s):
       
  • Dilemmas for nurses in China
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7–13 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10141Author(s): Jun-Song Yang, Ding-Jun Hao
       
  • Percutaneous coronary intervention for stable angina in ORBITA –
           Authors' reply
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7–13 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10141Author(s): Darrel P Francis, Rasha Al-Lamee
       
  • Percutaneous coronary intervention for stable angina in ORBITA
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7–13 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10141Author(s): Adrian Banning, Simon Redwood
       
  • Percutaneous coronary intervention for stable angina in ORBITA
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7–13 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10141Author(s): Cameron Dowling, Sami Firoozi, Stephen Brecker
       
  • Percutaneous coronary intervention for stable angina in ORBITA
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7–13 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10141Author(s): Grant W Reed, Samir R Kapadia
       
  • Percutaneous coronary intervention for stable angina in ORBITA
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7–13 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10141Author(s): Axel Bauer, Konstantinos D Rizas, Steffen Massberg
       
  • Percutaneous coronary intervention for stable angina in ORBITA
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7–13 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10141Author(s): Stuart J Pocock
       
  • Percutaneous coronary intervention for stable angina in ORBITA
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7–13 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10141Author(s): Mohamad Fahed Barakat, Panagiotis Simitsis
       
  • Percutaneous coronary intervention for stable angina in ORBITA
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7–13 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10141Author(s): Rahul G Muthalaly, Nitesh Nerlekar, Adam J Brown
       
  • Percutaneous coronary intervention for stable angina in ORBITA
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7–13 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10141Author(s): Philippe Degrell, Fabien Picard, Olivier Varenne
       
  • Percutaneous coronary intervention for stable angina in ORBITA
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7–13 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10141Author(s): Tao Tu, Qiming Liu, Xinqun Hu, Shenghua Zhou
       
  • Douglas Graham Altman
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7–13 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10141Author(s): Geoff Watts
       
  • The NHS at 70: the story of our lives
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7–13 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10141Author(s): Stephanie Snow
       
  • Elias Mossialos: breaking down borders between politics and health
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7–13 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10141Author(s): Rachael Davies
       
  • Idiopathic nephrotic syndrome in children
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7–13 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10141Author(s): Damien G Noone, Kazumoto Iijima, Rulan ParekhSummaryThe incidence of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (NS) is 1·15–16·9 per 100 000 children, varying by ethnicity and region. The cause remains unknown but the pathogenesis of idiopathic NS is thought to involve immune dysregulation, systemic circulating factors, or inherited structural abnormalities of the podocyte. Genetic risk is more commonly described among children with steroid-resistant disease. The mainstay of therapy is prednisone for the vast majority of patients who are steroid responsive; however, the disease can run a frequently relapsing course, necessitating the need for alternative immunosuppressive agents. Infection and venous thromboembolism are the main complications of NS with also increased risk of acute kidney injury. Prognosis in terms of long-term kidney outcome overall is excellent for steroid-responsive disease, and steroid resistance is an important determinant of future risk of chronic or end-stage kidney disease.
       
  • South Africa reveals health bills
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7–13 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10141Author(s): Andrew Green
       
  • From health service to national identity: the NHS at 70
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7–13 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10141Author(s): Talha Burki
       
  • Offline: Can the Global Fund survive'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7–13 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10141Author(s): Richard Horton
       
  • Health stories in focus: Highlights 2018 photography competition open for
           submissions
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7–13 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10141Author(s): Joanna Palmer
       
  • The Wakley Prize Essay 2018: open for submissions
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7–13 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10141Author(s): Niall Boyce, Charlotte Leigh, Joanna Palmer, Jonathan Pimm
       
  • Retraction—Engineered whole organs and complex tissues
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7–13 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10141Author(s): The Lancet Editors
       
  • Retraction—Tracheobronchial transplantation with a stem-cell-seeded
           bioartificial nanocomposite: a proof-of-concept study
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7–13 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10141Author(s): The Lancet Editors
       
  • Women and opioids: something different is happening here
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7–13 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10141Author(s): Carolyn M Mazure, David A Fiellin
       
  • Action on Salt China
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7–13 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10141Author(s): Feng J He, Puhong Zhang, Yuan Li, Graham A MacGregor
       
  • Personalised recovery after general and gynaecologic surgery
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7–13 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10141Author(s): Shuyan Wei, Lillian S Kao
       
  • Patient-centred care for multimorbidity: an end in itself'
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7–13 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10141Author(s): Christopher Dowrick
       
  • Sodium bicarbonate for severe metabolic acidaemia
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7–13 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10141Author(s): Jeffrey A Kraut, Nicolaos E Madias
       
  • The final verdict on Paolo Macchiarini: guilty of misconduct
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7–13 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10141Author(s): The Lancet
       
  • Cervical cancer prevention in Thailand—a model of success
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7–13 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10141Author(s): The Lancet
       
  • Progress towards a tobacco-free world
    • Abstract: Publication date: 7–13 July 2018Source: The Lancet, Volume 392, Issue 10141Author(s): The Lancet
       
  • Improving management of neonatal infections
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 July 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Anna C Seale, Ramesh Agarwal
       
  • A new step towards an HIV/AIDS vaccine
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 July 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): George N Pavlakis, Barbara K Felber
       
  • Viral gastroenteritis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 June 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Krisztián Bányai, Mary K Estes, Vito Martella, Umesh D ParasharSummaryEnteric viruses, particularly rotaviruses and noroviruses, are a leading cause of gastroenteritis worldwide. Rotaviruses primarily affect young children, accounting for almost 40% of hospital admissions for diarrhoea and 200 000 deaths worldwide, with the majority of deaths occurring in developing countries. Two vaccines against rotavirus were licensed in 2006 and have been implemented in 95 countries as of April, 2018. Data from eight high-income and middle-income countries showed a 49–89% decline in rotavirus-associated hospital admissions and a 17–55% decline in all-cause gastroenteritis-associated hospital admissions among children younger than 5 years, within 2 years of vaccine introduction. Noroviruses affect people of all ages, and are a leading cause of foodborne disease and outbreaks of gastroenteritis worldwide. Prevention of norovirus infection relies on frequent hand hygiene, limiting contact with people who are infected with the virus, and disinfection of contaminated environmental surfaces. Norovirus vaccine candidates are in clinical trials; whether vaccines will provide durable protection against the range of genetically and antigenically diverse norovirus strains remains unknown. Treatment of viral gastroenteritis is based primarily on replacement of fluid and electrolytes.
       
  • Ebola virus disease: 11 323 deaths later, how far have we come'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 June 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Joseph A Lewnard
       
  • Acute rheumatic fever
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 June 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Ganesan Karthikeyan, Luiza GuilhermeSummaryAcute rheumatic fever is caused by an autoimmune response to throat infection with Streptococcus pyogenes. Cardiac involvement during acute rheumatic fever can result in rheumatic heart disease, which can cause heart failure and premature mortality. Poverty and household overcrowding are associated with an increased prevalence of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease, both of which remain a public health problem in many low-income countries. Control efforts are hampered by the scarcity of accurate data on disease burden, and effective approaches to diagnosis, prevention, and treatment. The diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever is entirely clinical, without any laboratory gold standard, and no treatments have been shown to reduce progression to rheumatic heart disease. Prevention mainly relies on the prompt recognition and treatment of streptococcal pharyngitis, and avoidance of recurrent infection using long-term antibiotics. But evidence for the effectiveness of either approach is not strong. High-quality research is urgently needed to guide efforts to reduce acute rheumatic fever incidence and prevent progression to rheumatic heart disease.
       
  • Discontinuing tumour necrosis factor inhibitors in non-radiographic axial
           spondyloarthritis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 June 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Jürgen Braun
       
  • The how: a message for the UN high-level meeting on NCDs
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 June 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Kent Buse, Robert Marten, Sarah Hawkes, George Alleyne, Phillip Baker, Fran Baum, Robert Beaglehole, Chantal Blouin, Ruth Bonita, Luisa Brumana, John Butler, Simon Capewell, Sally Casswell, José Luis Castro, Mickey Chopra, Helen Clark, Katie Dain, Sandro Demaio, Andrea Feigl, Patricia Frenz
       
  • Reducing NCDs globally: the under-recognised role of environmental risk
           factors
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 June 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Rajiv Chowdhury, Rian Lawrence, Kim van Daalen, Sarah Hawkes, Joerg Feldmann, Research Councils UK–CAPABLE Programme on Environmental Hazards and Non-communicable Diseases
       
  • Preventing rural to urban spread of Ebola: lessons from Liberia
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 June 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Mosoka P Fallah, Laura A Skrip, Jonathan Enders
       
  • Police killings and their spillover effects on the mental health of black
           Americans: a population-based, quasi-experimental study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 June 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Jacob Bor, Atheendar S Venkataramani, David R Williams, Alexander C TsaiSummaryBackgroundPolice kill more than 300 black Americans—at least a quarter of them unarmed—each year in the USA. These events might have spillover effects on the mental health of people not directly affected.MethodsIn this population-based, quasi-experimental study, we combined novel data on police killings with individual-level data from the nationally representative 2013–15 US Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) to estimate the causal impact of police killings of unarmed black Americans on self-reported mental health of other black American adults in the US general population. The primary exposure was the number of police killings of unarmed black Americans occurring in the 3 months prior to the BRFSS interview within the same state. The primary outcome was the number of days in the previous month in which the respondent's mental health was reported as “not good”. We estimated difference-in-differences regression models—adjusting for state-month, month-year, and interview-day fixed effects, as well as age, sex, and educational attainment. We additionally assessed the timing of effects, the specificity of the effects to black Americans, and the robustness of our findings.Findings38 993 (weighted sample share 49%) of 103 710 black American respondents were exposed to one or more police killings of unarmed black Americans in their state of residence in the 3 months prior to the survey. Each additional police killing of an unarmed black American was associated with 0·14 additional poor mental health days (95% CI 0·07–0·22; p=0·00047) among black American respondents. The largest effects on mental health occurred in the 1–2 months after exposure, with no significant effects estimated for respondents interviewed before police killings (falsification test). Mental health impacts were not observed among white respondents and resulted only from police killings of unarmed black Americans (not unarmed white Americans or armed black Americans).InterpretationPolice killings of unarmed black Americans have adverse effects on mental health among black American adults in the general population. Programmes should be implemented to decrease the frequency of police killings and to mitigate adverse mental health effects within communities when such killings do occur.FundingRobert Wood Johnson Foundation and National Institutes of Health.
       
  • Police violence and the built harm of structural racism
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 June 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Rhea W Boyd
       
  • Transparency and accountability in AstraZeneca's access to health-care
           programmes
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 June 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Katarina Ageborg
       
  • Pembrolizumab versus paclitaxel in gastro-oesophageal adenocarcinoma
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 June 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Elizabeth C Smyth, Russell D Petty
       
  • Time to deliver: report of the WHO Independent High-Level Commission on
           NCDs
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 June 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Sania Nishtar, Sauli Niinistö, Maithripala Sirisena, Tabaré Vázquez, Veronika Skvortsova, Adolfo Rubinstein, Festus Gontebanye Mogae, Pirkko Mattila, Seyyed Hassan Ghazizadeh Hashemi, Sicily Kariuki, José Narro Robles, Isaac F Adewole, Adboulaye Diouf Sarr, Kim Yong Gan, Saia Ma'u Piukala, Abdul Rahman Bin Mohammed Al Owais, Eric Hargan, George Alleyne, Ala Alwan, Arnaud Bernaert
       
  • Monitoring country progress and achievements by making global predictions:
           is the tail wagging the dog'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 April 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Ties Boerma, Cesar Victora, Carla Abouzahr
       
  • On reducing the risk of vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis in the
           global transition from oral to inactivated poliovirus vaccine
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 April 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Xiangdong Peng, Xiaojiang Hu, Miguel A Salazar
       
  • Viroj Tangcharoensathien: master carpenter of Thai health care
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 February 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Geoff Watts
       
  • A new powerful drug to combat river blindness
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 January 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Michel Boussinesq
       
  • Single dose moxidectin versus ivermectin for Onchocerca volvulus infection
           in Ghana, Liberia, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo: a randomised,
           controlled, double-blind phase 3 trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 January 2018Source: The LancetAuthor(s): Nicholas O Opoku, Didier K Bakajika, Eric M Kanza, Hayford Howard, Germain L Mambandu, Amos Nyathirombo, Maurice M Nigo, Kambale Kasonia, Safari L Masembe, Mupenzi Mumbere, Kambale Kataliko, Jemmah P Larbelee, Mawolo Kpawor, Kpehe M Bolay, Fatorma Bolay, Simon K Attah, Michel Vaillant, Christine M Halleux, Annette C KueselSummaryBackgroundThe morbidity and socioeconomic effects of onchocerciasis, a parasitic disease that is primarily endemic in sub-Saharan Africa, have motivated large morbidity and transmission control programmes. Annual community-directed ivermectin treatment has substantially reduced prevalence. Elimination requires intensified efforts, including more efficacious treatments. We compared parasitological efficacy and safety of moxidectin and ivermectin.MethodsThis double-blind, parallel group, superiority trial was done in four sites in Ghana, Liberia, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. We enrolled participants (aged ≥12 years) with at least 10 Onchocerca volvulus microfilariae per mg skin who were not co-infected with Loa loa or lymphatic filariasis microfilaraemic. Participants were randomly allocated, stratified by sex and level of infection, to receive a single oral dose of 8 mg moxidectin or 150 μg/kg ivermectin as overencapsulated oral tablets. The primary efficacy outcome was skin microfilariae density 12 months post treatment. We used a mixed-effects model to test the hypothesis that the primary efficacy outcome in the moxidectin group was 50% or less than that in the ivermectin group. The primary efficacy analysis population were all participants who received the study drug and completed 12-month follow-up (modified intention to treat). This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00790998.FindingsBetween April 22, 2009, and Jan 23, 2011, we enrolled and allocated 998 participants to moxidectin and 501 participants to ivermectin. 978 received moxidectin and 494 ivermectin, of which 947 and 480 were included in primary efficacy outcome analyses. At 12 months, skin microfilarial density (microfilariae per mg of skin) was lower in the moxidectin group (adjusted geometric mean 0·6 [95% CI 0·3–1·0]) than in the ivermectin group (4·5 [3·5–5·9]; difference 3·9 [3·2–4·9], p
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
Home (Search)
Subjects A-Z
Publishers A-Z
Customise
APIs
Your IP address: 54.161.40.41
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-