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Journal of Academic Librarianship
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.224
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 1007  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0099-1333
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3162 journals]
  • Keeping Current: Reviews and Analysis of Special Reports
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s):
       
  • Does Physical Activity Enhance Learning Performance': Learning
           Effectiveness of Game-based Experiential Learning for University Library
           Instruction
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Kosuke Kaneko, Yuriko Saito, Yukari Nohara, Eriko Kudo, Masanori Yamada This paper reports research results of the proposed experiential learning using a game-based educational material. The educational material was an application running on a mobile device and was supported for learners to study university library instruction. During the experiential learning, the learners answered several quizzes provided from the educational material. The quizzes were including experiential contents such as actually to find an academic journal or to reserve a learning room. In order to evaluate learning effectiveness of the experiential learning, this research made a comparative experiment. The experimental group used the educational material and the control group used another educational material of e-learning (non-experiential) but the contents was almost same as the contents of the experiential learning. The comparative experiment took several evaluation elements such as pre-/post-test scores, delayed-test scores and learning motivation scores based on IMMS of ARCS model. The experimental results revealed that experiential learning was superior for the several elements of these metrics. This research, furthermore, analyzed learner's operation data to the educational material and learner's behavior data during the learning in the experimental group. The analyzing results showed three types of the learning behaviors and indicated that an instructor needs to adopt suitable instructional design to each type to bring superior learning effectiveness.
       
  • Looking Back, Moving Forward: An Assessment of LIS Internship Programme in
           Developing Country's Perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Muhammad Arif, José Miguel Baptista Nunes, Saima Kanwal
       
  • Bridging the Great Divide: Librarian-faculty Collaboration in Selected
           Higher Institutions in Lagos State Nigeria
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 4Author(s): Adefunke O. Alabi This paper examines librarian-faculty collaboration in selected academic libraries in Lagos State, Nigeria. Simple random sampling method was used to select five out of a total population of nine higher institutions in Lagos State. Questionnaire was used as the major instrument for data gathering among librarians in the selected institutions. The study found that librarians are willing to collaborate with faculty in the areas of providing Current Awareness Services (CAS), working with accreditation teams, and helping to develop both the media and information literacy skills of students. The study also found that librarians believe that faculty board meetings and library committee initiatives are effective platforms for promoting librarian faculty collaboration. Further, the study identified essential skills for librarian-faculty collaboration. Overall, findings show that a weak negative correlation exists between gender and area of collaboration at N = 38, r = −0.136, p 
       
  • Following the arc of learning: Using syllabi to target instruction in a
           professional graduate program
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 4Author(s): B. Grantham Aldred This study examines a corpus of syllabi to target program-specific information literacy needs. Examining a graduate program in Urban Planning, the study first identifies specific information literacy needs for the program, focusing on student data use, student tasks including locating, identifying and analyzing existing data sets. Based on these needs, the study then analyzes all courses in the curriculum, identifying places in the curriculum that strongly feature student data use and identifying patterns among those courses. What emerges is the ‘Arc of Learning’, a sloped trajectory that takes students from dependent beginners to independent pre-professionals. By following this arc, librarians can better make the case for library instruction in the curriculum. This study additionally provides a framework for such a study.
       
  • Play On' Comparing Active Learning Techniques for Information Literacy
           Instruction in the Public Speaking Course
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 4Author(s): Jennifer L. Bonnet, Liliana Herakova, Ben McAlexander
       
  • Out of Sight, But Not Out of Mind: Surveying Library Use Among Students
           Studying Abroad
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 4Author(s): Marc Vinyard Pepperdine University's six international campus libraries are not staffed by librarians. However, the library serves overseas students with small print collections, course specific LibGuides and highly trained student assistants. A goal of the LibGuides and student workers is to make students aware of library resources and services while studying abroad. Students studying overseas were surveyed to determine their use and awareness of library resources. In addition, to determine if the library could have an important role in supporting study abroad programs, students were asked if they had research assignments that required outside resources. While the results of the survey revealed that the majority of students are aware of library resources and services, the library should take additional steps to better serve overseas students.
       
  • Getting Off on the Right Foot: Psychological Contracts, Socialization
           Theory and Library Student Workers
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 4Author(s): Miriam L. Matteson, Emily Hankinson Academic libraries rely on student employees to manage a wide range of operational areas. Employing students can be beneficial to the library, to the students, and to the library patrons, but there are also challenges in recruiting, training, and supervising a student workforce. In this article, we introduce two frameworks from human resources management that describe and explain new relationships between employees and employers. Psychological contracts are tacitly held expectations by employees and employers that direct attitudes and behaviors about the work, attitudes toward the organization, and interpersonal relationships. Socialization refers to the wide range of tactics that organizations and newcomers may take to adjust to a new work situation. In the article, we first explore each of the constructs and provide a short review of empirical studies that show the relevance of each construct as it pertains to student workers in libraries. We then offer some suggestions for steps library managers can take based on these frameworks to maximize the benefits of the student employee workforce for the students and for the organization.
       
  • Use and Presentation of Personal Name Components in Chinese Authority
           Files
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 4Author(s): Yanqing Shi, Junzhi Jia This study explores means of coping with the increase in homonymous personal name files in authority control systems. To improve the accuracy with which such files are distinguished, we suggest developing systematic rules for handling additional components—elements frequently, but inconsistently, associated with personal name authority files in various authority control schemes. We describe the general usage of these components for Chinese personal names, along with the influence of these use patterns on the quality of name authority files. To illustrate our points, we offer a statistical analysis of the top 100 personal names (i.e., those with the greatest number of homonymous entries) from the name duplication list in the three most influential databases in China: HKCAN, NLC and CALIS. Statistics of name duplication, along with type and use frequency of additional components, are described and analyzed. We also analyze the discriminating power of three frequently-used types of additional information. Finally, we point out various issues which have impeded the broader and more systematic use of additional components.
       
  • Research trends and collaborations by applied science researchers in South
           African universities of technology: 2007–2017
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 4Author(s): Elisha R.T. Chiware, Deborah A. Becker This paper analyses the publication patterns of researchers in the field of applied sciences at Universities of Technology in South Africa. Aspects investigated include publications in SCOPUS-listed journals; number of citations and countries of publication. Collaborative research patterns at national and international levels were also investigated. A bibliometric analysis approach was followed using SCOPUS as the main source of data and analysing the articles published in selected applied science disciplines. Results show that researchers in the field of applied sciences in universities of technology have increased their number of publications over the past 10 years and are also working in conjunction with other researchers both nationally and internationally. The analysis is an important addition to the field in South Africa which helps in measuring how institutions are positively responding to government incentives in research. The results are also important to information professionals who are increasingly playing an important role in research impact assessments.
       
  • Editing the Eartha M.M. White Collection: An Experiment in Engaging
           Students in Archival Research and Editorial Practice
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 4Author(s): Clayton McCarl
       
  • The New National School Library Standards: Implications for Information
           Literacy Instruction in Higher Education
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 4Author(s): Caitlin Gerrity This paper explores the new American Association of School Libraries (AASL) National School Library Standards relative to the information literacy pipeline as K-12 students reach university-level learning environments. Shifts in the standards, and therefore eventual shifts in this pipeline, are examined. The new school library standards integrate standards for learners, school libraries, and school librarians. This paper will focus exclusively on the standards for learners, as this is where the primary crossover between high schools and academic libraries takes place. Potential implications and future directions for academic librarianship, especially relative to information literacy instruction, are discussed.
       
  • Effective Techniques for Marketing Electronic Resources
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 4Author(s): Zhixian Yi This study examines how Australian academic librarians perceived effective techniques used to market their electronic resources and the factors influencing their perceptions of the used particular techniques. Descriptive (frequencies, percentages, means, and standard deviations) and inferential (ordinal regressions) statistics were used to analyze the collected data from an online survey. The results reveal that demographics, human capital and library variables play an important and significant role in predicting librarians' perceptions of effective techniques used to market electronic resources. The findings are useful for information professionals to reflect on the effectiveness of the techniques used, to balance the weight of the factors' influences, and to better understand various effective techniques to enable them to market electronic resources more effectively in the future.
       
  • Keeping up the Momentum: A Longitudinal Evaluation of Professional
           Development in Digital Technologies for Academic Librarians at an
           Australian University
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 4Author(s): Frances O'Neil, Mark Pegrum
       
  • Reaching the Baseline: A Professional's Perspective on Technological
           Competencies for Library Students
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 4Author(s): Cas Laskowski
       
  • Visualizing the Silent Dialogue About Race: Diversity Outreach in an
           Academic Library
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 4Author(s): Stephanie Everett PurposeThis paper aims to describe the implementation and analyze the outcomes of The Race Card Project initiative at large public university's main library. Through this program, candid submissions from the public were used to promote multicultural learning and inclusivity, as well as to build campus relationships with curricular and co-curricular units engaged in diversity work on campus.Design/methodology/approachThe paper places the university's program within the context of academic library outreach through displays and exhibits. An overview of the development and implementation is provided along with the results of a multi-year assessment of the initiative.Originality/valueThis paper describes a unique approach to cultivating conversations with and among students, faculty, and staff, about diversity and inclusion and the library's impact on fostering increased positive campus climate.ConclusionsThe mindful leveraging of the library as safe (intellectual) space provides opportunities for student learning regarding diversity and inclusion, and a platform to build collaborative campus relationships and elevate library visibility. The Race Card Project initiative has been a positive way to engage patrons with social and cultural issues about multiculturalism and inclusivity.
       
  • Library Minisites: Organization and Effective Implementation
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 4Author(s): Dana Haugh
       
  • The Availability and Effectiveness of Research Supports for Early Career
           Academic Librarians
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 June 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Erin Ackerman, Jennifer Hunter, Zara T. Wilkinson For many academic librarians, scholarly research is required in order to attain tenure or promotion and it is widely acknowledged that many early career librarians find this process challenging. Using a survey of>200 untenured or recently tenured academic librarians, this study investigates early career academic librarians' access to and experiences with research support activities designed to develop research skills and confidence. Specific attention is paid to informal mentoring, formal mentoring programs, and writing groups. Responses indicate that early career librarians need supports that target three dimensions of the research experience: research design and methods; work practices and accountability; and emotional elements. Despite this, survey respondents had limited access to formal research supports that offer instruction and guidance in the research process, leaving them to rely heavily on informal mentoring. This study highlights the need for libraries and library organizations to invest their resources in research supports for early career academic librarians, helping them to become more effective and confident researchers.
       
  • A Comparative Study of Information Literacy Skill Performance of Students
           in Agricultural Sciences
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 3Author(s): Tomaž Bartol, Danica Dolničar, Bojana Boh Podgornik, Blaž Rodič, Tihomir Zoranović The aim was to assess the information literacy (IL) of 310 first- and second-year students enrolled in nine different study programs at the School of Agriculture (Faculty of Agriculture), Novi Sad, Serbia, using an adapted version of a validated IL test (ILT) in an e-environment. Because the school does not provide systematic IL education, another purpose was to raise awareness of the importance of such instruction. ILT results were assessed according to five ACRL (Association of College & Research Libraries) standards, as well as three cognitive levels adapted from Bloom's taxonomy. The mean ILT score was 46.35%. Students were most successful in information evaluation and information need identification, and least successful in legal/ethical issues and information use. As expected, IL skills increase from the first to second year of study. Cognitive skills also increase, except for the highest level (applying knowledge), where all student groups are weak. Different study programs attract students with disparate knowledge/skill levels gained during secondary education, where some groups of first-year students may outperform second-year students in both IL and cognitive abilities. It is thus important to offer IL education to all students in order to provide a basis for more balanced academic progress.
       
  • Leading in the New Academic Library, B. Albitz, C. Avery, D. Zabel (Eds.).
           Libraries Unlimited, Santa Barbara, CA (2017), 195p. $55.00. ISBN
           978-1-4408-5113-1
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 3Author(s): David Gibbs
       
  • Becoming a Reflective Librarian and Teacher: Strategies for Mindful
           Academic Practice, M. Reale (Ed.). ALA Editions, Chicago, IL (2017), 124p.
           $57.00. ISBN 978-0-8389-1529-5
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 3Author(s): Glenda Insua
       
  • The Politics of Academic Libraries: Fake News, Neutrality and ALA
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 3Author(s): John Buschman
       
  • Trends in academic libraries graduate student services: A case study
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 3Author(s): Sharon Ince
       
  • Diving Deep: Reflective Questions for Identifying Tacit Disciplinary
           Information Literacy Knowledge Practices, Dispositions, and Values through
           the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 3Author(s): Sara D. Miller The ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education combined with the Decoding the Disciplines model provides a structure for critical reflection to help unearth and clarify tacit, or unspoken, expert disciplinary processes and values related to information literacy. This article details a pilot project designed to explore the process of unearthing unspoken assumptions about disciplinary information literacy through reflective questions designed using the theory of Decoding the Disciplines and the structure of the Framework, and details themes which emerged from several of the author's experiences with librarians and teaching faculty working through the reflections. The themes are presented as potential further sites for inquiry and to generate ideas for identifying and addressing discipline-specific roadblocks, both practical and cultural, through the Framework.
       
  • Demonstrating Library Impact Through Acknowledgment: An Examination of
           Acknowledgments in Theses and Dissertations
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 3Author(s): David E. Hubbard, Sierra Laddusaw, Joel Kitchens, Rusty Kimball Academic libraries are increasingly seeking ways to demonstrate their impact on student learning. Acknowledgments - formal statements of indebtedness – in graduate theses and dissertations provide a rather unexplored area for demonstrating impact of the academic library on student learning. This study uses quantitative and qualitative methods to characterize acknowledgments of the Texas A&M University Libraries (TAMU Libraries) in theses and dissertations, both overall and for three disciplines specifically: civil engineering, geography, and history. This study also searched for mentions of the TAMU Libraries throughout the entire body of theses and dissertations. Overall, acknowledgments to the TAMU Libraries in theses and dissertations were less than 1%, though acknowledgments were found in all three disciplines with over a quarter of the history theses and dissertations containing an acknowledgment to libraries. There was no statistically significant difference found between the numbers of acknowledgments in theses versus dissertations. Acknowledgments to the TAMU Libraries were found in the theses and dissertations of 28 different departments. Mentions to the TAMU Libraries – not necessarily a formal acknowledgment – were found throughout the text of theses and dissertations with most concentrated in the acknowledgment, method, and bibliography sections.
       
  • Long Nav or Short Nav': Student Responses to Two Different
           Navigational Interface Designs in LibGuides Version 2
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 3Author(s): Aaron Bowen, Jake Ellis, Barbara Chaparro This study used two successive phases of usability testing to evaluate two different versions of a Communication 430 course LibGuide. The first version of this guide had a longer, more visually complex navigation menu, with more course-related research information directly accessible through this menu. The second version had a shorter, less complex menu that offered less directly accessible information. Twenty-four of the 33 students enrolled in the class (73%) tested either one version or the other for usability in completing tasks that simulate course-related research assignments, ultimately indicating they found the longer navigation menu more usable. This paper may be the first to describe the engagement of students enrolled in a course in testing a LibGuide dedicated specifically to that course. As such, it will be of interest to many academic librarians and instructional design professionals.
       
  • Collaborative Learning in an Information Literacy Course: The Impact of
           Online Versus Face-to-face Instruction on Social Metacognitive Awareness
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 3Author(s): Marcia E. Rapchak Metacognition and social metacognition play important roles in information literacy, online learning, and collaborative learning. This study examines how students rated themselves in both metacognitive and social metacognitive awareness after a collaborative project in an information literacy course offered face-to-face and online. Students in the face-to-face version of the course rated themselves as having higher social metacognitive awareness, though metacognitive awareness scores were similar. Because of this finding, this article makes recommendations for improving collaboration online for information literacy instruction.
       
  • Curating Research Data: A Handbook of Current Practice, L.R. Johnston
           (Ed.). Association of Research Libraries, Chicago, IL (2017), 338p.
           $58.50. ISBN 978-0-8389-8862-6
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 3Author(s): Bill McMillin
       
  • E-book ILL in Academic Libraries: A Three-Year Trend Report
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 3Author(s): Xiaohua Zhu In spite of the widespread trend of e-book adoption by U.S. academic libraries, interlibrary loan (ILL) of e-books is significantly lagging behind because of license agreement restrictions, unstandardized platforms, library policies, and technological barriers. More recently, the long-cherished tradition of ILL has been further challenged, because an increasing number of academic libraries are adopting user-based e-book purchasing models that have the potential to bypass ILL. This paper compares the findings of two longitudinal surveys on e-book ILL practices in U.S. academic libraries, based on random sampling. The results from inferential statistical analyses reveal that, while inter-library lending of entire e-books is seldom practiced and shows no growth, e-book chapter ILL is becoming more prevalent in U.S. academic libraries. Librarians have grown more knowledgeable about licensing and technological issues, but their perceptions of these barriers are mixed. The study also shows that larger institutions are more likely to perform e-book ILL services, and their librarians tend to be more positive about the future of e-book ILL.
       
  • Serving a Fragmented Field: Information Seeking in Higher Education
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 3Author(s): Sarah Rose Fitzgerald This study examines the information seeking habits and needs of scholars of higher education. Because higher education is a field which draws on many disciplinary traditions rather than a pure discipline in itself, the information needs of these scholars require diverse information seeking strategies. Phenomenological interviews with productive scholars of higher education were conducted and analyzed for this study. Ellis' (1989) common information seeking behaviors of social scientists are used as a framework to examine the behaviors of these applied social scientists in the modern information seeking environment.
       
  • Determining Librarian Research Preferences: A Comparison Survey of
           Web-Scale Discovery Systems and Subject Databases
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 3Author(s): Anita K. Foster The success or failure of any tool, service or system used in a library is predicated on the audience it finds. While web-scale discovery systems have developed widespread adoption in academic libraries, there is a sense from librarians that they continue to be in search of their true audience. Librarians play a key role in the utilization of web-scale discovery systems, and their experiences as an end user of these systems may influence their attitudes in many ways. The survey discussed in this article looks at the attitudes librarians have toward web-scale discovery systems when using them for their personal research, including feature preferences and inquiries into opinions regarding strengths and weaknesses of the system. The results of this survey provide some insights into why some librarians struggle with the idea using of web-scale discovery systems by themselves and by the patrons with which they work.
       
  • Situating Expertise in Practice: Domain-Based Data Management Training for
           Liaison Librarians
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 3Author(s): Jamie Wittenberg, Anna Sackmann, Rick Jaffe The research data management team at the University of California, Berkeley implemented a domain-based Librarian Training Program in order to upskill liaison librarians in research data management principles and create a community of practice among librarians providing research data support. The training program partnered with representatives from each subject division of the Library to integrate content from relevant disciplines. The training model emphasized scaffolding and concrete deliverables, teaching specific tools and concepts, and creating learning objects useful for instruction and outreach. Employing a situated, learning-based, pedagogical model, the program was more successful than previous attempts at library-wide research data management training at Berkeley. This analysis details the program management, curricular design, instruction, and outcomes that made the Library Training Program successful.
       
  • Information Literacy in the Workplace, M. Forster (Ed.). Facet Publishing,
           London (2017), 189p. $80.00. ISBN 978-1-78330-132-4
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 3Author(s): Delmus Williams
       
  • Working with Library Collections: An Introduction for Support Staff, H.R.
           Keeler (Ed.). Rowman & Littlefield, New York (2017), 196p. $35.00. ISBN
           978-1-4422-7489-1
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 3Author(s): Madeline Kelly
       
  • Keeping Current: Reviews and Analysis of Special Reports
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 3Author(s):
       
  • Affordable Course Materials: Electronic Textbooks and Open Educational
           Resources, C. Diaz (Ed.). ALA Editions, Chicago (2017), 160p. $65.00. ISBN
           978-0-8389-1580-6
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 3Author(s): Madeline Kelly
       
 
 
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