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Journal of Academic Librarianship
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.224
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 1028  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0099-1333
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3162 journals]
  • The “Collage Effect” – Against Filter Bubbles: Interdisciplinary
           Approaches to Combating the Pitfalls of Information Technology
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 October 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Péter Kiszl, János Fodor The rapid development of information technology has partially been reversed, and may become a tool for manipulation, which is incompatible with librarians' social mission. Making information available, connecting databases, and making them accessible result in people becoming more and more exposed. Customisation and effectively filtered information sources create filter bubbles. Although new systems of collaboration would be suitable for sharing reliable knowledge, they often lead to the spread of fake news. Despite worrying trends, we seek an encouraging future. Therefore, in this paper we analyse the relationship between information technology, market economy, and the librarian profession from the perspective of Hungarian LIS education, and emphasise the importance of active and creative information provision based on interdisciplinarity. Based on our experiences we believe that current and future readers can be reached through intriguing collages of credible information. The use of collages can compensate for the effects of filter bubbles, and librarians may become the masters of creating digital information collages.
       
  • Disciplinary, Institutional, and Individual Factors Affecting Researchers'
           Depositing Articles in Institutional Repository: An Empirical Analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 October 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Youngseek Kim, Jong Sir Oh This research investigates how disciplinary contexts, institutional settings, and individual motivations all affect researchers' depositing their articles into an institutional repository (IR). This study employed the Theory of Planned Behavior as its main theoretical framework and proposed six hypotheses to explain how disciplinary, institutional, and individual factors influence researchers' article depositing behaviors through an IR. This research utilized an online survey as its data collection method, and a total of 221 survey responses from researchers in U.S. academic institutions were collected. The hypothesized relationships were then tested by using multiple regression analysis. This research found that perceived community benefit, perceived institutional support, and perceived career benefit significantly increases researchers' article depositing behaviors through an IR, and the perceived career risk significantly decreases researchers' article depositing behaviors through an IR. This research suggests that community benefit, institutional support, and career issues need to be considered to increase researchers' overall article sharing behaviors through an IR.
       
  • Fostering Innovation in Academic Libraries Through Knowledge Creation
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 October 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Maria Koloniari, Eftichia Vraimaki, Kostas Fassoulis Knowledge management (KM) and innovation have been recognized as critical success factors for libraries since 1990s and 1980s, respectively; however, neither is easily achieved. In this context, the current study aims to explore – using structural equation modeling – the extent to which various organizational, technological, and personal factors influence the creation of new knowledge and innovation in academic libraries. More specifically, vision and goals, culture, and structure (formalization and centralization) are explored in terms of organizational factors; IT support is examined in the technological context; and human resources skills and perceptions toward KM are investigated in terms of personal factors. For the collection of primary data a structured questionnaire was developed and distributed electronically to Greek academic library personnel. The final sample comprised 312 professionals from 28 libraries. Results indicate that a visionary leadership facilitates the creation of new knowledge through fostering a culture of collaboration, trust, and learning, providing opportunities for taking initiatives, and creating the appropriate technological environment. All these help libraries develop innovative services, thus responding more quickly and effectively to their changing external environment. Most importantly, library leaders should focus on building a common vision that will guide necessary practices and changes for innovation to be achieved.
       
  • Visualizing Academic Librarians: An Arts-informed Inquiry
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 October 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Rickie-Lee Morey, Josephine Le Clerc, Marina Minns, Deirdrie Gregory, Susanne Glynn This research was undertaken by five librarians from Deakin University Library Australia as part of a professional development project. The objective was to collect qualitative data on the perceptions of librarians by academics and library colleagues from Deakin University. The ways in which academics perceive librarians, as well as how other library staff perceive librarians, are relatively under-explored areas. This study investigates the topic through an analysis of drawing and other visual representations, based on a study design that applied a visual, arts-based methodological approach. Participants were invited to focus groups where they were provided with a variety of craft materials, asked to create a visual representation of liaison librarians, then discuss their artifact. The data consists of twenty-eight artifacts, which were content analyzed, and semi-structured interview recordings, which were transcribed and analyzed for themes. Participants expressed liaison librarians positively, as helpers and connectors, as a gateway to knowledge, with complex and varied roles, as trusted sources, and as relationship builders. By drawing attention to these themes, the participants highlighted that liaison librarians are invaluable to Deakin University.
       
  • Boomers to Millennials: Generational Stereotypes at Work in Academic
           Librarianship
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 October 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Jessica B. Hayes, Cecelia Parks, Samantha McNeilly, Phill Johnson Over the past 30 years, as the American workforce has become more generationally diverse, library administrators and academic librarians alike have focused on navigating dynamics that arise in a multigenerational workplace. Much scholarly research has been conducted on generational differences; however, most of this research assumes that the individuals studied adhere to or believe in generational stereotypes. This exploratory study used a hybrid experience-perception survey to examine the role or influence generational stereotypes have on academic librarians and how those stereotypes influence the academic library workforce. While few specific generational stereotypes were found to be held by participants, perceptions of generational stereotypes still have a significant influence in academic librarians' interactions with their colleagues. This finding means that regardless of their validity, the impact of generational stereotypes cannot be disregarded in academic library workplaces.
       
  • Effects of Publisher Interface and Google Scholar on HTML and PDF Clicks:
           Investigating Paths That Inflate Usage
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 October 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Karen Kohn When considering canceling a journal subscription, librarians often want to predict future demand for the journal. Predictions are often based on past usage, measured by COUNTER Journal Report 1, yet many factors prevent this report from reflecting true usage. One factor is the double-counting that occurs when an article is viewed in both PDF and HTML formats. This study investigated four variables that could affect ratios of HTML article views to PDF downloads at the publisher level: the presence of a PDF link on the publisher's table of contents page, the destination of links from article titles on this same page, the destination of sidebar links on a Google Scholar results screen, and links from article titles on the same screen. Using data on thirteen scholarly publishers, the author tested for correlations between the types of links offered and the ratio of HTML views to PDF downloads on each platform. Only title links in Google Scholar were found to have a significant correlation to HTML-to-PDF ratios, suggesting that platforms for which Google Scholar links directly to full-text could have elevated usage counts. The author explains how to calculate an adjustment factor to estimate true article views on these platforms.
       
  • Keeping Current: Reviews and Analysis of Special Reports
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 September 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s):
       
  • Multifaceted Evaluation Criteria of Digital Libraries in Academic
           Settings: Similarities and Differences From Different Stakeholders
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 September 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Iris Xie, Soohyung Joo, Krystyna K. Matusiak Digital library (DL) evaluation is essential to the success and enhancement of DLs. However, there is a lack of research on the assessment of comprehensive evaluation criteria across multiple dimensions of DLs. In particular, limited research is available on criteria prioritization to determine which criteria are perceived important by different stakeholders. This study was conducted to compare similarities and differences in perceptions of the importance of different DL evaluation criteria by heterogeneous stakeholders in academic settings. Ninety subjects were recruited with 30 from each of the group representing DL scholars, DL librarians, and DL users. Subjects were instructed to fill in an in-depth survey consisting of 10 evaluation dimensions with 94 criteria. ANOVA and t-test were applied to examine the similarities and differences among the three groups. This study reveals consensus and divergence in perceptions of criteria importance among the three groups, and indicates an inherent tension among the stakeholders. Moreover, the differences identify gaps not only between user expectations and the DL practice but also between what's desirable and what's possible in the academic environment. The findings provide a comprehensive list of criteria to guide practical evaluation of DLs, and contribute to the narrowing of the identified gaps.
       
  • How Can Librarians Aid Transfer Student Integration': A Multi-Campus
           Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 September 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Mark Robison, Nancy Fawley, Ann Marshall
       
  • Six Issues Facing Libraries Today: Critical Perspectives, by John M. Budd.
           Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2017. 196 pp. $75.00. ISBN:
           9781442277373.
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 5Author(s): Alexandra Simons
       
  • Zotero: A Guide for Librarians, Researchers, and Educators, 2nd ed., by
           Jason Puckett. Chicago: Association of College and Research Libraries,
           2017. (220 pp. $54.00). ISBN 978-0-8389-8931-9.
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 5Author(s): Amy Riegelman
       
  • The Self as Subject: Autoethnographic Research Into Identity, Culture, and
           Academic Librarianship, Anne‐Marie Deitering, Robert Schroeder, Richard
           Stoddart (Eds.). Association of College and Research Libraries, Chicago
           (2017), 375 pp. $70.00, ISBN: 978-0-8389-8892-3
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 5Author(s): Sandra Hussey
       
  • Reading, Research, and Writing: Teaching Information Literacy With
           Process-based Research Assignments, by Mary Snyder Broussard. Chicago:
           Association of College and Research Libraries, 2017. 131 pp. $40.00 ISBN
           978-083898875-6
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 5Author(s): Glenda Insua
       
  • Winning Elections and Influencing Politicians for Library Funding, by
           Patrick “PC” Sweeney and John Chrastka. Chicago: American Library
           Association, 2017. 288 pp. $57.00. ISBN 9780838915561.
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 5Author(s): Alexandra Simons
       
  • A Perfect Mess: The Unlikely Ascendancy of American Higher Education, by
           David F. Labaree. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2017. 222 pp.
           $25.00. ISBN 978-0-226-25044-1.
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 5Author(s): Delmus E. Williams
       
  • Ecological Study of Graduation Rates and GPA in a Library Credit Course
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 August 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Christina Heady, Megan M. Morrison, Joshua Vossler The purpose of this ecological study was to examine the impact of a library credit course on graduation rates and GPA using pre-existing records. Over 20 years of aggregate institutional data were analyzed to evaluate the course's impact on first-time-full-time, white, and black students. Results were mixed: students who took the course were less likely to graduate than their peers who did not take the course but enjoyed slightly higher GPAs at graduation. It was discovered that students taking the course are not representative of the overall student body and struggle academically. Implications for revisions to the library credit course are discussed.
       
  • The Politics of Academic Libraries: A Measure of the Health of a
           University
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 August 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): John Buschman
       
  • Format Preferences of Performing Arts Students: A Multi-institution Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 August 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Joe C. Clark, Sheridan Stormes, Jonathan Sauceda The article describes a follow-up to Clark's 2012 examination of performing arts students' format preferences; it also explored their preferred sources for course-related information. This mixed-methods study was implemented at three institutions and included an online Qualtrics survey and focus groups. Results indicated a continued shift toward digital resources, with strong preferences for obtaining electronic journals and reference materials through the library. Print scores and books remained popular; however, students appeared more open to electronic options when compared to the 2012 results. Freely available online video and audio continued to enjoy popularity. Students want the libraries to acquire a mix of both physical and electronic resources, and they favor print books and scores.
       
  • We May Be Teaching Information Literacy, but Are the Design First Year
           Students Actually Getting It'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 August 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Debby R. Wegener The purpose of this study was to examine the outcomes of information literacy instruction for the Design first year students at the Temasek Polytechnic Library. Also of interest was whether or not the librarian was being seen as easily approachable, and if the students were deeming the lessons to be worthwhile. A participant action research approach was used, with the data being collected from multiple choice tests delivered via the institutional learning management system, group exercises, and a diagnostic assessment that was delivered before the workshops. It was found that the students did see the librarian as someone who was eminently approachable, and the majority of them found the lessons to be of value. It was concluded that the use of a diagnostic tool can be very useful in highlighting the gaps in students' knowledge, and that it would be beneficial to use it for all information literacy instruction at TP. Suggested future research could include a study of how much the students retain of IL skills into their third year of study.
       
  • Judging the Need for and Value of DDA in an Academic Research Library
           Setting
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Kevin W. Walker, Michael A. Arthur This article reports findings from a multiphase analysis of demand-driven acquisitions (DDA) within the academic research library setting. Evaluating local collections within the context of Trueswell's (1969) often-cited 80/20 Rule, phase one of this study illustrates the deficiencies of a just-in-case approach to building library collections. Following from this, phase two evaluates the viability of DDA as the just-in-time collection-building solution librarians have sought as an answer to low-use titles that plague most academic library collections. Supported by 16 months of data, this study scrutinizes the comparative value of DDA against traditionally acquired titles along two key dimensions—the subject-matter profile of purchases and their overall usage levels. Further, the concept of a utility as value paradigm, as well as a purchase-use equilibrium for library collections, provide a theoretical framework in which the relative value of DDA is assessed. From a content, or subject-matter, perspective, this study finds negligible deviation in those purchasing patterns associated with DDA when compared with traditionally-acquired materials. At the same time, DDA titles experience much higher levels of use and are, therefore, associated with markedly lower cost-per-use figures and greater overall value.
       
  • Academic Librarianship Without the Degree: Examining the Characteristics
           and Motivations of Academic Library Professionals
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Astrid Oliver, Eric Prosser Studies exploring librarians' backgrounds and career motivations frequently focus on all types of librarians or on students seeking degrees in librarianship. Investigating particular subsets of librarians is a field ripe for study. Here, we employed a survey of 193 academic library professionals, who are defined as those employed in professional positions in academic libraries but not possessing a graduate degree in librarianship. We found prior work in an academic library is a substantial motivating factor for entry into the field, as is also the case for traditional academic librarians who choose to attain a graduate degree in library science prior to obtaining a position in the library. The data also suggests that there are two main streams of entry for academic library professionals: those who are hired into functional positions that do not require a graduate degree in librarianship and those who hold paraprofessional titles that have taken on professional-level work. Finally, we found a majority of academic library professionals have no intention of, and do not see the value in, pursuing a graduate degree in librarianship.
       
  • The Actor-oriented Transfer Perspective in Information Literacy
           Instruction
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Karen Sobel
       
  • The Changing Research Data Landscape and the Experiences of Ethics Review
           Board Chairs: Implications for Library Practice and Partnerships
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Brian Jackson Academic libraries have to a large extent taken the lead in facilitating new approaches to research data management, but changes to the research data landscape have had an impact on numerous areas of academic work, including ethics review. Using interpretive phenomenological analysis of interviews with chairs of Canadian research ethics boards, this study explores how ethics review boards have experienced changes to data policy and related technologies in order to describe the ethical implications of new approaches to data management and to explore ways in which the library, ethics review boards, and other campus partners might harmonize efforts to support emerging data practices. While ethics review boards in Canada are keenly aware of open data policies, data publishing in practice is still nascent. There is uncertainty about the adoption of changing technologies for research and their impacts on privacy protection. Where responsibility lies for addressing these uncertainties is often unclear. Academic libraries and research ethics boards are well-suited to engage in mutual knowledge transfer and to integrate data management planning and ethics review processes. Institutional-level oversight that includes all campus departments impacted by changes to the research data landscape may facilitate improved communication and reduce role ambiguity.
       
  • Keeping Current: Reviews and Analysis of Special Reports
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s):
       
  • Academic Librarians, Information Overload, and the Tao of Discovery
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Steven Shapiro This article explores the meaning of web-scale discovery and argues for the need to formulate a philosophy of discovery (consistent with library values) before using and deploying a discovery tool to make it easier to achieve goals and objectives. It also focuses on how user behavior and the success of Google Scholar can help guide us in improving these tools. At the same time, the essay describes the limitations of discovery tools and their perceived role in contributing to information overload.
       
  • Digital Government Information: The Challenges of Collaborative
           Preservation
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Bethany Latham
       
  • Keeping Current: Reviews and Analysis of Special Reports
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s):
       
  • Does Physical Activity Enhance Learning Performance': Learning
           Effectiveness of Game-based Experiential Learning for University Library
           Instruction
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Kosuke Kaneko, Yuriko Saito, Yukari Nohara, Eriko Kudo, Masanori Yamada This paper reports research results of the proposed experiential learning using a game-based educational material. The educational material was an application running on a mobile device and was supported for learners to study university library instruction. During the experiential learning, the learners answered several quizzes provided from the educational material. The quizzes were including experiential contents such as actually to find an academic journal or to reserve a learning room. In order to evaluate learning effectiveness of the experiential learning, this research made a comparative experiment. The experimental group used the educational material and the control group used another educational material of e-learning (non-experiential) but the contents was almost same as the contents of the experiential learning. The comparative experiment took several evaluation elements such as pre-/post-test scores, delayed-test scores and learning motivation scores based on IMMS of ARCS model. The experimental results revealed that experiential learning was superior for the several elements of these metrics. This research, furthermore, analyzed learner's operation data to the educational material and learner's behavior data during the learning in the experimental group. The analyzing results showed three types of the learning behaviors and indicated that an instructor needs to adopt suitable instructional design to each type to bring superior learning effectiveness.
       
  • Looking Back, Moving Forward: An Assessment of LIS Internship Programme in
           Developing Country's Perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Muhammad Arif, José Miguel Baptista Nunes, Saima Kanwal
       
  • Bridging the Great Divide: Librarian-faculty Collaboration in Selected
           Higher Institutions in Lagos State Nigeria
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 4Author(s): Adefunke O. Alabi This paper examines librarian-faculty collaboration in selected academic libraries in Lagos State, Nigeria. Simple random sampling method was used to select five out of a total population of nine higher institutions in Lagos State. Questionnaire was used as the major instrument for data gathering among librarians in the selected institutions. The study found that librarians are willing to collaborate with faculty in the areas of providing Current Awareness Services (CAS), working with accreditation teams, and helping to develop both the media and information literacy skills of students. The study also found that librarians believe that faculty board meetings and library committee initiatives are effective platforms for promoting librarian faculty collaboration. Further, the study identified essential skills for librarian-faculty collaboration. Overall, findings show that a weak negative correlation exists between gender and area of collaboration at N = 38, r = −0.136, p 
       
  • Following the arc of learning: Using syllabi to target instruction in a
           professional graduate program
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 4Author(s): B. Grantham Aldred This study examines a corpus of syllabi to target program-specific information literacy needs. Examining a graduate program in Urban Planning, the study first identifies specific information literacy needs for the program, focusing on student data use, student tasks including locating, identifying and analyzing existing data sets. Based on these needs, the study then analyzes all courses in the curriculum, identifying places in the curriculum that strongly feature student data use and identifying patterns among those courses. What emerges is the ‘Arc of Learning’, a sloped trajectory that takes students from dependent beginners to independent pre-professionals. By following this arc, librarians can better make the case for library instruction in the curriculum. This study additionally provides a framework for such a study.
       
  • Play On' Comparing Active Learning Techniques for Information Literacy
           Instruction in the Public Speaking Course
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 4Author(s): Jennifer L. Bonnet, Liliana Herakova, Ben McAlexander
       
  • Out of Sight, But Not Out of Mind: Surveying Library Use Among Students
           Studying Abroad
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 4Author(s): Marc Vinyard Pepperdine University's six international campus libraries are not staffed by librarians. However, the library serves overseas students with small print collections, course specific LibGuides and highly trained student assistants. A goal of the LibGuides and student workers is to make students aware of library resources and services while studying abroad. Students studying overseas were surveyed to determine their use and awareness of library resources. In addition, to determine if the library could have an important role in supporting study abroad programs, students were asked if they had research assignments that required outside resources. While the results of the survey revealed that the majority of students are aware of library resources and services, the library should take additional steps to better serve overseas students.
       
  • Getting Off on the Right Foot: Psychological Contracts, Socialization
           Theory and Library Student Workers
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 4Author(s): Miriam L. Matteson, Emily Hankinson Academic libraries rely on student employees to manage a wide range of operational areas. Employing students can be beneficial to the library, to the students, and to the library patrons, but there are also challenges in recruiting, training, and supervising a student workforce. In this article, we introduce two frameworks from human resources management that describe and explain new relationships between employees and employers. Psychological contracts are tacitly held expectations by employees and employers that direct attitudes and behaviors about the work, attitudes toward the organization, and interpersonal relationships. Socialization refers to the wide range of tactics that organizations and newcomers may take to adjust to a new work situation. In the article, we first explore each of the constructs and provide a short review of empirical studies that show the relevance of each construct as it pertains to student workers in libraries. We then offer some suggestions for steps library managers can take based on these frameworks to maximize the benefits of the student employee workforce for the students and for the organization.
       
  • Use and Presentation of Personal Name Components in Chinese Authority
           Files
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 4Author(s): Yanqing Shi, Junzhi Jia This study explores means of coping with the increase in homonymous personal name files in authority control systems. To improve the accuracy with which such files are distinguished, we suggest developing systematic rules for handling additional components—elements frequently, but inconsistently, associated with personal name authority files in various authority control schemes. We describe the general usage of these components for Chinese personal names, along with the influence of these use patterns on the quality of name authority files. To illustrate our points, we offer a statistical analysis of the top 100 personal names (i.e., those with the greatest number of homonymous entries) from the name duplication list in the three most influential databases in China: HKCAN, NLC and CALIS. Statistics of name duplication, along with type and use frequency of additional components, are described and analyzed. We also analyze the discriminating power of three frequently-used types of additional information. Finally, we point out various issues which have impeded the broader and more systematic use of additional components.
       
  • Research trends and collaborations by applied science researchers in South
           African universities of technology: 2007–2017
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 4Author(s): Elisha R.T. Chiware, Deborah A. Becker This paper analyses the publication patterns of researchers in the field of applied sciences at Universities of Technology in South Africa. Aspects investigated include publications in SCOPUS-listed journals; number of citations and countries of publication. Collaborative research patterns at national and international levels were also investigated. A bibliometric analysis approach was followed using SCOPUS as the main source of data and analysing the articles published in selected applied science disciplines. Results show that researchers in the field of applied sciences in universities of technology have increased their number of publications over the past 10 years and are also working in conjunction with other researchers both nationally and internationally. The analysis is an important addition to the field in South Africa which helps in measuring how institutions are positively responding to government incentives in research. The results are also important to information professionals who are increasingly playing an important role in research impact assessments.
       
  • Editing the Eartha M.M. White Collection: An Experiment in Engaging
           Students in Archival Research and Editorial Practice
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 4Author(s): Clayton McCarl
       
  • The New National School Library Standards: Implications for Information
           Literacy Instruction in Higher Education
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 4Author(s): Caitlin Gerrity This paper explores the new American Association of School Libraries (AASL) National School Library Standards relative to the information literacy pipeline as K-12 students reach university-level learning environments. Shifts in the standards, and therefore eventual shifts in this pipeline, are examined. The new school library standards integrate standards for learners, school libraries, and school librarians. This paper will focus exclusively on the standards for learners, as this is where the primary crossover between high schools and academic libraries takes place. Potential implications and future directions for academic librarianship, especially relative to information literacy instruction, are discussed.
       
  • Effective Techniques for Marketing Electronic Resources
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 4Author(s): Zhixian Yi This study examines how Australian academic librarians perceived effective techniques used to market their electronic resources and the factors influencing their perceptions of the used particular techniques. Descriptive (frequencies, percentages, means, and standard deviations) and inferential (ordinal regressions) statistics were used to analyze the collected data from an online survey. The results reveal that demographics, human capital and library variables play an important and significant role in predicting librarians' perceptions of effective techniques used to market electronic resources. The findings are useful for information professionals to reflect on the effectiveness of the techniques used, to balance the weight of the factors' influences, and to better understand various effective techniques to enable them to market electronic resources more effectively in the future.
       
  • Keeping up the Momentum: A Longitudinal Evaluation of Professional
           Development in Digital Technologies for Academic Librarians at an
           Australian University
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 4Author(s): Frances O'Neil, Mark Pegrum
       
  • Reaching the Baseline: A Professional's Perspective on Technological
           Competencies for Library Students
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 4Author(s): Cas Laskowski
       
  • Visualizing the Silent Dialogue About Race: Diversity Outreach in an
           Academic Library
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 4Author(s): Stephanie Everett PurposeThis paper aims to describe the implementation and analyze the outcomes of The Race Card Project initiative at large public university's main library. Through this program, candid submissions from the public were used to promote multicultural learning and inclusivity, as well as to build campus relationships with curricular and co-curricular units engaged in diversity work on campus.Design/methodology/approachThe paper places the university's program within the context of academic library outreach through displays and exhibits. An overview of the development and implementation is provided along with the results of a multi-year assessment of the initiative.Originality/valueThis paper describes a unique approach to cultivating conversations with and among students, faculty, and staff, about diversity and inclusion and the library's impact on fostering increased positive campus climate.ConclusionsThe mindful leveraging of the library as safe (intellectual) space provides opportunities for student learning regarding diversity and inclusion, and a platform to build collaborative campus relationships and elevate library visibility. The Race Card Project initiative has been a positive way to engage patrons with social and cultural issues about multiculturalism and inclusivity.
       
  • Library Minisites: Organization and Effective Implementation
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 4Author(s): Dana Haugh
       
  • The Availability and Effectiveness of Research Supports for Early Career
           Academic Librarians
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 June 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Erin Ackerman, Jennifer Hunter, Zara T. Wilkinson For many academic librarians, scholarly research is required in order to attain tenure or promotion and it is widely acknowledged that many early career librarians find this process challenging. Using a survey of>200 untenured or recently tenured academic librarians, this study investigates early career academic librarians' access to and experiences with research support activities designed to develop research skills and confidence. Specific attention is paid to informal mentoring, formal mentoring programs, and writing groups. Responses indicate that early career librarians need supports that target three dimensions of the research experience: research design and methods; work practices and accountability; and emotional elements. Despite this, survey respondents had limited access to formal research supports that offer instruction and guidance in the research process, leaving them to rely heavily on informal mentoring. This study highlights the need for libraries and library organizations to invest their resources in research supports for early career academic librarians, helping them to become more effective and confident researchers.
       
 
 
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