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Journal Cover Journal of Academic Librarianship
  [SJR: 1.442]   [H-I: 33]   [769 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0099-1333
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2801 journals]
  • High Density Storage: From There to Here and Beyond
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 January 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Mary S. Laskowski
      This article presents results from a national survey regarding library high density storage, as well as qualitative and quantitative analysis of various aspects of a library high density storage facility at a major academic research institution. Findings are contextualized within a discussion of the past, present, and potential future of library high density storage.


      PubDate: 2016-01-29T03:53:21Z
       
  • Impact of Assignment Prompt on Information Literacy Performance in
           First-year Student Writing
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 January 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): M. Sara Lowe, Sean M. Stone, Char Booth, Natalie Tagge
      This study attempts to quantify the impact of assignment prompts and phased assignment sequencing on first-year student work; specifically, whether more fully developed and “scaffolded” assignment prompts produced better Information Literacy (IL) in student papers (n=520). The examination of assignment prompts in relation to student IL rubric scores would seem to indicate that conventional wisdom on developing assignment prompts might not have an impact on IL performance.


      PubDate: 2016-01-29T03:53:21Z
       
  • A Text Mining Analysis of Academic Libraries' Tweets
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 January 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Sultan M. Al-Daihani, Alan Abrahams
      This study applies a text mining approach to a significant dataset of tweets by academic libraries. The dataset for this research was collected from the complete Twitter timelines of ten academic libraries. The total dataset comprised 23,707 tweets with 17,848 mentions, 7625 hashtags, and 5974 retweets. Academic libraries from the dataset have typically posted fewer than 50 tweets per month, though tweet volume grew rapidly in late-2013 through 2014. The results show variance between academic libraries in distribution of tweets over time. The most frequent word was “open,” which was used in a variety of contexts by the academic libraries. It was noted that the most frequent bi-gram (two-word sequence) in the aggregated tweets was “special collections”. The most frequent tri-gram (three-word sequence) was “save the date”. The most frequent word categories in the semantic analysis for most libraries were related to “knowledge, insight, and information concerning personal and cultural relations”. The most common category of the tweets was “Resources” among all the selected academic libraries. These findings highlight the importance of using data- and text-mining approaches in understanding the aggregate social data of academic libraries to aid in decision-making and strategic planning for patron outreach and marketing of services.


      PubDate: 2016-01-23T20:02:14Z
       
  • Leveraging research synthesis for promoting and expanding library services
           and educational programs
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 January 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Misa Mi
      Research synthesis (or systematic review) uses systematic techniques to comprehensively search, select, appraise, and summarize separate empirical studies to minimize bias in the review process. The past decade saw a growing interest in research synthesis in health sciences and other disciplines. Librarians as information professionals and knowledge workers are well poised to educate faculty and students about the systematic review as one type of research methodology and diffuse it into the traditional hypothesis-driven research discourse and undertakings. This article illustrates how a medical library at a medical school developed strategies to leverage research synthesis for expanding library services and educational programs.


      PubDate: 2016-01-10T20:25:57Z
       
  • On the Front Lines: Serving Ohio's Best
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 January 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Thomas Atwood, Michael Farmer, Krista McDonald, Brianne Miller, Eileen Theodore-Shusta, Elizabeth J. Wood
      Presenters from a June, 2015 Academic Libraries of Ohio conference titled “Serving Our Veterans: A Call to Action” discuss the state of outreach and service to student veterans, students currently serving in the military, and military dependent students at their respective academic libraries.


      PubDate: 2016-01-05T20:22:11Z
       
  • Fundamentals for the Academic Liaison, Richard Moniz, Jo Henry, Joe
           Eshleman (Eds.). Neal-Schuman, Chicago (2014), ISBN: 978-1-55570-967-9
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 1
      Author(s): Maura Seale



      PubDate: 2015-12-24T16:28:16Z
       
  • Difficult Decisions: Closing and Merging Academic Libraries, Sara Holder,
           Amber Butler Lannon. Association of College & Research Libraries,
           Chicago, IL (2015), ISBN: 978-0-8389-8791-9
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 1
      Author(s): Glenda Insua



      PubDate: 2015-12-24T16:28:16Z
       
  • Classroom Assessment Techniques for Librarians, Melissa Bowles-Terry,
           Cassandra Kvenild. Association of College and Research Libraries, Chicago,
           IL (2015), ISBN: 978-0-8389-8775-9
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 1
      Author(s): Amy Riegelman



      PubDate: 2015-12-24T16:28:16Z
       
  • Unlocking the Mysteries of Cataloging: A Workbook of Examples, 2nd ed.,
           Elizabeth Haynes, Joanna F. Fountain. Libraries Unlimited, Santa Clara, CA
           (2015), ISBN: 978-1-61069-569-5
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 1
      Author(s): Richard Lee Guinn



      PubDate: 2015-12-24T16:28:16Z
       
  • Library Programs and Services: The Fundamentals, 8th ed., G. Edward Evans,
           Margaret Zarnosky Saponaro, Holland Christie, Carol Sinwell. Libraries
           Unlimited, Santa Barbara, CA (2015), ISBN: 978-1-61069-637-1
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 1
      Author(s): Alexis Linoski



      PubDate: 2015-12-24T16:28:16Z
       
  • Library Security: Better Communication, Safer Facilities, Steve Albrecht.
           American Library Association Editions, Chicago, IL (2015), ISBN:
           978-0838913307
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 1
      Author(s): Loretta Wallace



      PubDate: 2015-12-24T16:28:16Z
       
  • TOC w/barcode & ed board
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 1




      PubDate: 2015-12-24T16:28:16Z
       
  • TOC continued & ed board
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 1




      PubDate: 2015-12-24T16:28:16Z
       
  • If an Editorial Board Resigns in the Forest...
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 1
      Author(s): Elizabeth Blakesley



      PubDate: 2015-12-24T16:28:16Z
       
  • Keeping Current: Reviews and Analysis of Special Reports
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 December 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Leslie Stebbins



      PubDate: 2015-12-20T08:38:57Z
       
  • Data in context: Using case studies to generate a common understanding of
           data in academic libraries
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 December 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Juleah Swanson, Amanda K. Rinehart
      As new expectations emerge in librarianship, librarians find themselves engaging with researchers throughout the entire research process. This includes during early stages, when research outputs are in their infancy. This shift means that any librarian might be faced with a ‘data question’ and be able to assist without necessarily being a ‘data’ expert. As libraries approach professional development in this field, additional difficulties occur as data cannot be easily understood without context. Instead of attempting to comprehensively cover this broad, nuanced, and sometimes vague topic, the authors took a different approach. In order to place ‘data’ in definable contexts, the authors created local, real-world case studies to introduce this topic to the library. This article describes the professional development event, complete with case studies, their development, discussion questions, and observations. As faculty and staff answered guided questions, they self-identified the value of existing librarian capabilities such as the reference interview, information location, and referral systems. This enabled library faculty and staff from across the library to engage positively and proactively, without any extensive background in this field.


      PubDate: 2015-12-20T08:38:57Z
       
  • Analyzing the Data Management Environment in a Master's-level Institution
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 December 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Anthony Stamatoplos, Tina Neville, Deborah Henry
      The data management environments at research-intensive institutions have been studied extensively. Few studies, however, have assessed the environments at institutions that are not classified as research-intensive, where scholarship and obtaining external funding is still highly encouraged. Using results from semi-structured interviews with faculty from an array of disciplines, the authors describe the research processes and data concerns at a Master's-level institution. A comparison of the results illustrate that, at least at this institution, faculty face very similar issues as those identified at research-intensive organizations and many of the same practices and services could be implemented on a smaller scale.


      PubDate: 2015-12-12T04:52:23Z
       
  • Librarians Empathy: Visually Impaired Students' Experiences Towards
           Inclusion and Sense of Belonging in an Academic Library
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 November 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Nahid Bayat Bodaghi, Loh Sau Cheong, A.N. Zainab
      One of the key factors that fosters the creation of a sense of belonging is the sense of empathy. Indeed, it is considered to be one of the key skills for helping professionals, especially librarians. Nevertheless, previous studies were mostly library-focused. This paper approaches this issue from the visually impaired person's (VIP) perspective. The questions this paper aims to answer are: “What have VIPs experienced in a University library regarding the degree of librarians' sense of empathy” and, “How do they perceive it?” This study uses a qualitative approach. Data was collected through interviews and focus group discussions with eighteen VIPs who were registered in a university library. To determine the trustworthiness of the data, member checking, external audit, and reflexivity were used. The participants of the study perceived librarians' greeting and friendly conversation, their tone of voice, sense of understanding regarding their limitations, and their communication regarding any changes in the circumstance of the library environment as key factors that illustrate their sense of empathy towards VIPs. Furthermore, VIPs expressed being afraid to ask for help from librarians, being disappointed, confused, uncomfortable, and not being understood due to a lack of librarians' sense of empathy that influenced their professional behavior.


      PubDate: 2015-12-02T17:21:14Z
       
  • Faculty status of librarians at U.S. research universities
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 December 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): William H. Walters
      This survey of 124 library directors reveals that 52% of U.S. research universities grant nominal faculty status to librarians. The proportion granting faculty status has declined since 2008. Further survey results are provided for 12 distinct components of faculty status: nominal faculty status, tenure, professor ranks, peer review, scholarship, faculty senate, other committees, sabbaticals, flexible work, 9-month year, research funds, and equivalent salaries. Certain components of faculty status are substantially more or less common than faculty status itself, and nominal faculty status does not correspond to a clear-cut set of working conditions, rights, or responsibilities. A 5-tier hierarchy of faculty status indicators can be identified, and factor analysis can be used to create a single faculty status index that fully represents 9 of the 12 components of faculty status. The individual components that correspond most closely to the faculty status index are peer review and sabbaticals—not nominal faculty status.


      PubDate: 2015-12-02T17:21:14Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 6




      PubDate: 2015-11-27T22:25:36Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 6




      PubDate: 2015-11-27T22:25:36Z
       
  • Ranking Search Results in Library Information Systems — Considering
           Ranking Approaches Adapted From Web Search Engines
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 6
      Author(s): Christiane Behnert, Dirk Lewandowski
      For an information retrieval system to be successful, it must have the ability to rank search results. As web search engines are the most often used and — in terms of ranking functionality — the most advanced existing systems, the principles they are based on and the strategies they use can be advantageous when applied to the library context. We categorize ranking factors into six different groups: 1. text statistics, 2. popularity, 3. freshness, 4. locality and availability, 5. content properties and 6. user background. We discuss the basic concepts and assumptions these ranking factors involve and offer potential implementations in the library context. The practice recommended here is for libraries to not only apply selected ranking factors — as existing library information systems already do — but to systematically test for the ranking factors best suited to their systems. We argue for a user-centric view on ranking, because in the end, ranking should be for the benefit of the user, and user preferences may vary across different contexts.


      PubDate: 2015-11-27T22:25:36Z
       
  • Research Consultation Assessment: Perceptions of Students and Librarians
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 November 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Kathy Butler, Jason Byrd
      Both students and librarians evaluated face-to-face research consultations scheduled in an academic library. The survey asked both participants to rate usefulness of the interaction and to mark a list of the resources that were used. Results showed that librarians frequently underestimated the effectiveness of the consultation, a phenomenon known as provider pessimism, and that students were confused by the library terminology used for resources. Research consultations are potentially important “teaching moments” as long as students and librarians speak the same language and librarians verify learning outcomes using communication cues during the consultation.


      PubDate: 2015-11-24T17:58:24Z
       
  • Use and Evaluation of Information From Social Media in the Academic
           Context: Analysis of Gap Between Students and Librarians
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 November 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Kyung-Sun Kim, Sei-Ching Joanna Sin
      Recent research shows that some types of social media such as wikis and social networking sites have emerged as important sources of information. While social media are becoming increasingly popular, the quality of information available through them varies widely and is difficult to assess. This study examined the main purposes behind undergraduate students' use of different social media platforms in information-seeking and the strategies they use for evaluating information from social media in academic contexts. The results were then compared with what academic librarians deem useful. The comparison helped identify gaps between students and librarians regarding the use and evaluation of information from social media. Two web surveys were conducted: one for undergraduates (n=1355), and the other for academic librarians (n=189). The study found the two groups similar in terms of social media platforms used for information-seeking, and also the main purposes for using them. However, a significant gap was detected in the strategies that students used, and those that librarians found useful, for evaluating information from social media. Based on the findings, suggestions were made for information literacy education and future research.


      PubDate: 2015-11-19T11:15:27Z
       
  • Surveying Users' Perception of Academic Library Services Quality: A Case
           Study in Universiti Malaysia Pahang (UMP) Library
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 November 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Suziyana Mat Dahan, Mohd Yusof Taib, Nurhaizan Mohd Zainudin, Fadzida Ismail
      Global competition among academic institutions has compelled university libraries to transform their conventional services and traditional roles to a more sophisticated, all-round service provider that can deliver their best services to their users. University libraries must cater the expansion of information sources, the high demand of users and information application as well as high student enrolments and competition among service sectors. The ability of an academic library to fulfill its user expectations will yield user satisfaction for its services. Primarily, research on assessing users' perception on the level of service quality focuses on finding ways to meet or exceed users' expectations. This study nevertheless aimed to measure students' perception and their satisfaction level of services provided by the UMP library and customized a new measuring tool on service quality and perspectives of library users based on the LibQUAL Model. A customized survey instrument was developed based on the model, consisting of 30 items measuring the level of four service dimensions and user satisfaction with an additional five items examining user satisfaction on general services. The Cronbach's alpha range is from 0.813 to 0.942, which was adequately greater than the recommended value of 0.7, thus exhibiting good internal reliability of the constructs. The result of the study reported positive values for both gap analyses in all service quality dimensions. Based on 382 respondent feedbacks, results showed that the perceived service quality level exceeded users' acceptable level on minimum service and desired service. Specifically, the users are satisfied with the services provided. Results from this study serveas a guide for effective decision making by the library in its administration and resource allocation to ensure accomplishment of the library's vision and mission.


      PubDate: 2015-11-15T13:57:09Z
       
  • IDEA Model from Theory to Practice: Integrating Information Literacy in
           Academic Courses
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 November 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Kimberly Mullins
      IDEA (interview, design, embed, and assess) is a theoretical instructional design model for integrating information literacy (IL) in academic courses. The model supports the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) proposed 2015 Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education through the collaborative efforts between librarians and teaching faculty. The article describes a case study application of information literacy content integrated into three Doctor of Education blended classes taught by the same classroom instructor. The theoretical phases are explained in terms of practical steps and outcomes resulting in pedagogically sound curriculum and effective collaboration between librarian and teaching faculty.


      PubDate: 2015-11-15T13:57:09Z
       
  • “Good Fences Make Good Neighbors”: Territorial Dividers
           Increase User Satisfaction and Efficiency in Library Study Spaces
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 November 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Çağrı İmamoğlu, Meltem Ö. Gürel



      PubDate: 2015-11-15T13:57:09Z
       
  • Publishing Trends in Library and Information Sciences Across European
           Countries and Institutions
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 November 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Carlos Olmeda-Gómez, Félix de Moya-Anegón
      Ten bibliometric indicators were used to assess European publishing intensity in journals listed in Scopus under the subject category “Library and Information Science” between 2003 and 2012. The findings were analyzed for the 20 countries and 25 research institutions with the greatest output in that period. The indicators calculated included normalized impact, number and proportion of highly cited papers and the distribution of papers by the quartiles defined in the Scimago Journal Rank (SJR). SJR is a measure of the scientific influence of scholarly journals that accounts for both the number of citations received by a journal and the importance or prestige of the journals where such citations come from. With SJR, the subject field, quality and reputation of the journal have a direct effect on the value of a citation. The analysis covered 11,931 Western and 939 Eastern European papers published in 149 journals. The highest output growth rates were found for Spain, Poland, Portugal, Italy, Greece and Austria. The highest impact ratings were attained by European institutions whose members are prolific authors of papers on informetrics. On the whole, the articles were written primarily in English, Spanish, German or French, while the publications most widely cited appeared in English language journals. This study presents bibliometric data that shed light on the status of Library and Information Science research in Europe today, in the framework of the European Higher Education Area.


      PubDate: 2015-11-11T13:55:06Z
       
  • Information Behavior and Expectations of Veterinary Researchers and Their
           Requirements for Academic Library Services
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 November 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Marguerite A. Nel, Ina Fourie
      Increased pressure for quality research at South African universities, and limited research done on the information needs of veterinary science researchers and the role of veterinary libraries supporting them, motivated a case study at the Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria (South Africa). The study aimed to determine what the information needs, information seeking behavior and information use behavior of veterinary researchers are, and how these needs are being met by the library. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected from researchers as well as information specialists by means of questionnaires, focus group interviews and a citation analysis. Findings and recommendations are based on descriptive statistical analysis of the quantitative data and thematic analysis of the qualitative data. The study found that the information needs of researchers are influenced by the research environment and expectations for research output. Most needs for information and support services are met. Collection building practices, library space, and awareness of services offered by information specialists need attention. Findings reveal considerable gaps between researchers' expectations from information specialists and their own perceptions of roles to fulfil. The paper contributes to the limited literature on the information behavior of veterinary researchers and library services supporting their needs.


      PubDate: 2015-11-07T11:42:58Z
       
  • Reading the Fine Print
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 November 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Elizabeth Blakesley



      PubDate: 2015-11-07T11:42:58Z
       
  • Professional Development for Assessment: Lessons from Reflective Practice
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 October 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe



      PubDate: 2015-10-30T07:26:02Z
       
  • Developing Information Literate Librarians: A Study of LIS Academics
           Pedagogical Approaches in the Development of Information Literacy
           Competencies
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 October 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Maryam Derakhshan, Mohammad Hassanzadeh, Maryam Nazari
      This study explored the teaching experiences of LIS educators in Iran to identify the contribution of their teaching to the development of IL competencies in LIS students. Taking an exploratory approach, the study used semi-structured interviews to gather the data. Using the ACRL standards as a framework, the fieldwork questions were designed around the five areas of IL competencies, viz. determining information needs, locating information, evaluating information, using information ethically, and using information for a specific purpose. The data was collected from 15 educators in 6 LIS departments in Iranian universities. IL activities at 6 universities take the form of lectures, workshops, and basic IL skills modules. Few IL activities are subject discipline related. They were asked to reflect on the IL competencies in the context of their teaching experiences to identify the contribution of their teaching to the development of each IL competency. A thematic approach was used to analyze the data. It was found that the LIS educators employ a variety of teaching approaches to transfer IL competencies. This includes getting students to find and select a topic, helping students obtaining their needed information and developing a query on their essay work, and so on.


      PubDate: 2015-10-30T07:26:02Z
       
  • The Core and More: Improving on Baseline Technology Competencies
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 October 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Ray Laura Henry



      PubDate: 2015-10-30T07:26:02Z
       
  • Comparison of Native Chinese-speaking and Native English-speaking
           Engineering Students' Information Literacy Challenges
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 October 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Jennifer Congyan Zhao, Tara Mawhinney
      This study identifies challenges that native Chinese-speaking undergraduate engineering students face in researching and writing an academic paper in comparison with their native English-speaking peers. With growing enrolment of Chinese students in North America, the question of how best to enhance these students' learning experiences through library instruction and services is increasingly important. In this study, researchers recruited 17 participants (eight native Chinese-speaking and nine native English-speaking students) from a communication in engineering course at McGill University, and conducted a preliminary interview, an online survey, and an in-depth interview to gather data about each student's research experience. The online survey findings, which were used to inform the in-depth interview questions, were reported in a previous publication. The current article presents the qualitative findings from the in-depth interviews only. Findings show that native Chinese-speaking students have unique information-related challenges in the areas of searching, evaluating information, reading, writing, and citing. Challenges with specific elements of searching (such as locating full text) and writing (such as creating an outline) were shared among members of both groups. Recommendations for librarians, engineering instructors, and staff in other units serving international students are also provided.


      PubDate: 2015-10-30T07:26:02Z
       
  • Yes Virginia, It Will Scale: Using Data to Personalize High-volume
           Reference Interactions
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 October 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Lauren Reiter, J.P. Huffman
      This examination of an on-going embedded partnership between Penn State University Libraries business librarians and an instructor in the Smeal College of Business confronts the question of scalability for one-on-one reference consultations for high-enrollment classes. Through these in-person interactions off-site and in the library, the librarians hope to build student confidence in librarians as information resources as well as increasing business literacy through research using established, authoritative sources. This article documents the first four semesters of this evolving project to demonstrate the logistics of managing a high volume of student interactions using library data as support for decision-making and action.


      PubDate: 2015-10-21T03:18:14Z
       
  • Factors That Contribute to Research and Publication Output Among
           Librarians in Nigerian University Libraries
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 October 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Ijeoma J. Ibegbulam, Eze U. Jacintha
      Considering the relevance of research and publication in the career and professional development and growth of academic librarians especially in Nigerian Universities, this paper was used to find out the factors which contribute to high publication output among librarians in Nigerian University libraries. The main objectives of the study were to find out librarians' motivation for research and publication; find out the factors that contribute to high research productivity among librarians; find out the barriers to research and publication among librarians; and determine the strategies that will enhance research and publication among librarians. The population of the study comprised of 146 librarians of the university libraries in South-East Nigeria. Purposive sampling based on the level of publication output was used to select about 85 librarians as the sample of the study. The data were collected using a questionnaire and analyzed using frequency counts and mean scores and presented in tables. Major findings showed that the desire to earn promotion and to develop one's self among others motivated the librarians to write and publish while collaboration and attendance to conferences among other factors contributed to high publication output. Lack of a research grant and a tight work schedule hinder research and publication while partnering with research funders and issuance of grants enhanced the opportunities for research and publication.


      PubDate: 2015-10-11T18:47:33Z
       
  • Students as Co-designers of a Virtual Learning Commons: Results of a
           Collaborative Action Research Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 October 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Ieda M. Santos, Nagla Ali, Anthony Hill
      In order to meet the 21st century students' learning styles and expectations, as well as keep up with technological advancements, many academic libraries are creating virtual learning commons. This paper reports on phase 1 of a larger project that aimed at investigating the design of 21st century physical and virtual learning commons in the library at a higher education institution in the United Arab Emirates. Using a collaborative action research, project participants explored the design and implementation of a virtual learning commons to support learning activities. Two action research cycles were implemented where students acted as co-designers. Multiple methods of data collection were adopted. Based on outcomes, a blog space was created to facilitate discussions of readings. This study contributes with a practical example of how student voices and preferences can influence the design of a virtual learning commons. Phase 1 also worked as a catalyst to further the discussion of the larger virtual learning commons in academic libraries. The paper also discusses several recommendations for future improvements.


      PubDate: 2015-10-04T17:03:52Z
       
  • Supporting Scholars: An Analysis of Academic Library Websites'
           Documentation on Metrics and Impact
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 October 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Amy M. Suiter, Heather Lea Moulaison
      A number of indicators and metrics have been devised, especially in the past 10 to 15years, to assist scholars in making a case for themselves and for their work. These metrics describe the impact of traditional venues (i.e. scholarly journals) as well as the impact of the scholars based on the number of times their work has been cited in traditional and nontraditional venues. Academic librarians assist faculty in explaining their impact and productivity in their respective fields in part through information published to their websites. Terms/concepts associated with common metrics relating to scholarly impact were searched in the library websites of the 62 Association of American University (AAU) members. A total of 61 libraries had web pages or LibGuides providing information on these topics, with Journal Citation Reports and the Impact Factor being the most commonly discussed (100%; 98.4%). Slightly over 90% (90.2%) supplied information about the h-index and 80.3% addressed altmetrics. We conclude that AAU librarians are assisting with the understanding and use of both traditional and new metrics as part of their service to their community of users.


      PubDate: 2015-10-04T17:03:52Z
       
  • Imagining Library 4.0: Creating a Model for Future Libraries
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 October 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Younghee Noh
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to suggest a Library 4.0 model based on the concepts of Library 4.0 discussed in the literature as the future of library service. The concepts and model of Library 4.0 can be adapted to fit every different kind of library. Design/Methodology/Approach For this purpose, first, major reference databases (e.g. Google Scholar, EbscoHost, LISA, etc.) were examined for literature that discusses Web 4.0 and Library 4.0. Second, examples of information technology environments as well as studies and news articles related to information technology were comprehensively collected and analyzed by focusing on those which may influence libraries. Third, examples of cutting-edge information technology applied in libraries were examined and analyzed. Other examples were found of cutting-edge information technologies that have not yet been used in libraries but would be applicable to the next-generation library. Fourth, this study developed a model for next-generation library service provided by Library 4.0 and representative keywords explaining Library 4.0. Findings First, opinions of scholars tracking the rise of Web 4.0 vary widely, but Web 4.0 features commonly suggested by previous researchers are: reading, writing, and executing simultaneously, intelligence-based agents, connected web, ubiquitous web, intelligence connections, and intelligence-based web. Secondly, this study determined the features of Library 4.0 as: intelligence-based, massive data, augmented reality, context aware, cutting-edge displays, and infinite creative space. Third, in this context, the keywords that best explain Library 4.0 are: Intelligent, Makerspace, Context-Aware Technology, Open Source, Big Data, Cloud Service, Augmented Reality, State-of-the-art Display, and Librarian 4.0. Originality/Value Discussions about Web 4.0 have begun, but little has been written about Library 4.0. This study is significant for deriving keywords for Library 4.0 and presenting the development direction of Library 4.0. In the future, research on Library 4.0 can actively proceed from this starting point.


      PubDate: 2015-10-04T17:03:52Z
       
  • Faculty and Librarians' Partnership: Designing a New Framework to Develop
           Information Fluent Future Doctors
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 September 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Rachid Bendriss, Reya Saliba, Sally Birch
      Upon faculty request, information literacy instruction was fully integrated into an English for Academic Purposes course for non-native English speaking students pursuing a medical degree at a U.S. institution in the Gulf State of Qatar. Adopting the flipped classroom modality, librarians designed modules to meet the students' information literacy needs while adapting the content to the course syllabus. Content was uploaded to the learning management system, Canvas. Readings, online tutorials, quizzes and assignments were created to achieve the outcomes of each session. Completion of information literacy modules is factored in the overall grades of students in the English for Academic Purposes course. This paper will outline the design, implementation, and assessment of information literacy sessions and will highlight the importance of collaboration between faculty and librarians to set a common ground and reach expected outcomes. It will also share the students' perceptions of the effectiveness of integrating information literacy in an English for Academic Purposes course.


      PubDate: 2015-09-26T16:59:31Z
       
  • Measuring the Effect of Virtual Librarian Intervention on Student Online
           Search
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 September 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Chris Leeder, Chirag Shah
      In this paper we describe the results from a case study of the online search behavior of high school students, and the effect of virtual librarian intervention on the quality of the search results. Search log data of students' actions were analyzed, librarians recommended revised search terms, new searches were conducted with these terms, and the difference in results was analyzed. Results showed that the librarians' recommended queries were more focused and produced results of a higher reading level, which was used as a proxy for source quality. The work presented here is a preliminary investigation of how librarian search expertise can improve online search results, and raises questions about how to support online student search that are of interest to both librarians and information science researchers. Possible directions for future research are discussed.


      PubDate: 2015-09-26T16:59:31Z
       
  • The design and assessment of the Learning Commons at the University of
           Iowa
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 September 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Brittney Thomas, Sam Van Horne, Wayne Jacobson, Matthew Anson
      The academic library has become a nexus of collaboration and engagement with university resources, and, increasingly, academic librarians in higher education institutions are creating flexible environments that can accommodate a range of activities. The University of Iowa designed and built the Learning Commons on the first floor of the Main Library with a variety of group study rooms, open study areas, and computing resources. The results of the assessment suggest that approximately 75% of first-year students had used the Learning Commons. Compared with students in engineering and business, a greater percentage of students in the liberal arts reported using the Learning Commons, suggesting that the informal learning environment was more suitable to students in these disciplines. Indeed, the most commonly cited reason for non-usage of the Learning Commons was already having a preferred place to study. The more students believed they could use their laptops in the Learning Commons and the more they believed they could concentrate, the more satisfied they were overall with the Learning Commons. The authors discuss the implications of this research for other institutions who are seeking to implement similar learning environments.


      PubDate: 2015-09-26T16:59:31Z
       
  • The Joy of Combining Librarianship and Motherhood
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 September 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Alexandra Gallin-Parisi
      While there is a rich literature about how academic faculty manage to balance work and family life, there is a surprising paucity of research centered on academic librarianship and motherhood. In this phenomenological study based on interviews, the lived experiences of 21 librarians who are also mothers of young children are explored. Six themes focused on the benefits and rewards of combining librarianship and motherhood emerge.


      PubDate: 2015-09-18T15:49:20Z
       
  • Circulation Policies in Major Academic Libraries
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 September 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Duane Wilson, Cynthia Frazier, Diana Harter
      As part of an assessment of its patron circulation policies, Brigham Young University's Harold B. Lee Library Circulation Committee studied the circulation policies of ARL members and like-sized academic institution's libraries. Access Services Department Heads or their equivalent at 165 academic libraries were surveyed. This paper reports on policies relating to circulation, renewals, fines, and recalls for these libraries. The majority of circulation policies are traditional (typical circulation periods, low numbers of renewals and traditional fines), though non-traditional policies (longer circulation periods, more renewals, and elimination of fines) provide better service and satisfaction for patrons. Libraries should examine their policies to determine if non-traditional policies would work at their institution.


      PubDate: 2015-09-18T15:49:20Z
       
  • Knowledge Management as a Predictor of Organizational Effectiveness: The
           Role of Demographic and Employment Factors
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 September 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Kumaresan Chidambaranathan, Swarooprani B.S.
      This paper seeks to examine how the demographic and employment-related factors affect the knowledge management process in higher educational libraries in Qatar. The study is based on a wider research conducted to determine the relationships between organizational culture and knowledge management. The survey covered 122 employees from 16 higher educational libraries in Qatar. A descriptive and quantitative research design was employed to determine the significance of difference in knowledge management activities with respect to demographic and employment-related factors of the respondents. The results of the study revealed that knowledge management activities are not affected by the demography of the respondents. However, it is affected by employment-related factors especially in the type of institutions. The findings are significant and have implications for library directors, especially those from government institutions who need to take necessary measures in order to succeed in knowledge management efforts and achieve organizational effectiveness.


      PubDate: 2015-09-13T20:21:02Z
       
  • Copyright Instruction in LIS Programs: Report of a Survey of Standards in
           the U.S.A.
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 September 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): LeEtta Schmidt, Michael English
      This article will detail the results of a survey distributed within the United States of America to professionals working in academic, public, school/media, and special libraries that asked respondents to rate their daily copyright and intellectual property knowledge needs vs. their actual knowledge and education in this area. The results were then compared with an analysis of course content in current ALA accredited LIS programs in the U.S. gathered from online course descriptions to determine whether there is evidence pointing to a need to alter the curriculum of LIS programs to better prepare graduates for the copyright and intellectual property demands they will face on the job. The combined data will inform Library Science colleges and educators as to whether an instruction deficit exists in their current curricula and will give these colleges and educators data to support the development of new programs.


      PubDate: 2015-09-13T20:21:02Z
       
  • Standing By to Help: Transforming Online Reference with a Proactive Chat
           System
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 September 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Jan H. Kemp, Carolyn L. Ellis, Krisellen Maloney
      In July 2013, the University of Texas at San Antonio Libraries implemented a proactive, context-sensitive chat system developed for online businesses. Chat questions immediately increased from eight questions daily to eight questions hourly on average, resulting in an increase of 340% from 2013 to 2014. This paper describes the system characteristics, explaining how the chat client was configured to provide convenient, context-sensitive help that engages many more users than the previous system. An analysis showed that most questions received were reference questions requiring the expertise of a librarian. The system has lowered the bar of inquiry for reference users, transforming chat from a low-use option to a heavily used service with an important role in supporting academic research and information literacy.


      PubDate: 2015-09-13T20:21:02Z
       
  • Equipping Academic Librarians to Integrate the Framework into
           Instructional Practices: A Theoretical Application
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 September 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Amanda Nichols Hess
      Academic librarians are increasingly charged with providing instruction in conducting research and using library resources to students, faculty, and staff in higher education. In early 2015, the Association of College and Research Libraries released the Framework for Information Literacy in Higher Education and this new set of guidelines significantly impacts how academic libraries and librarians approach library instruction. However, little meaningful research has been done on how to equip this particular group of educational professionals through job-situated or job-related learning to reframe their instructional practices to fit this new mold. In seeking to best address these changing instructional needs, the author proposes that those involved in designing professional learning for academic librarians – such as conference planning committees, instructional designers, and library leaders charged with providing and supporting professional learning on information literacy instruction – design and deliver learning experiences that incorporate transformational learning theory, use principles of social learning theory, and consider learners' goal orientation and motivation. By incorporating these theories into professional learning practice, academic librarians can more effectively and meaningfully integrate the ACRL Framework into their instruction.


      PubDate: 2015-09-13T20:21:02Z
       
  • A Survey of Online Library Tutorials: Guiding Instructional Video Creation
           to Use in Flipped Classrooms
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 September 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Alexandra Obradovich, Robin Canuel, Eamon P. Duffy
      There has been a steady increase in library literature on “flipping the classroom.” This teaching strategy requires students to review course material outside the classroom beforehand, thereby allowing more time during workshops to apply newly gained knowledge and techniques. The proliferation of literature on classroom flipping provoked an interest to determine if other academic libraries were making explicit reference on their websites to the preliminary viewing of videos in a classroom context. To ascertain the extent of this practice, and inform the development of instructional videos at McGill, the authors surveyed all Canadian Association of Research Libraries (CARL) and Association of Research Libraries (ARL) websites to document the production of instructional videos, determine the various types of videos, and take note of explicit pre-viewing instructions prior to a workshop. Of the 140 libraries examined, 107 (76%) provide instructional videos on their website. However, of this group, only 2 (2%) clearly instruct users to watch instructional videos before attending a library research workshop. A literature review documents this emerging trend and contextualizes the results.


      PubDate: 2015-09-09T20:20:31Z
       
  • Evaluating the University of North Texas' Digital Collections and
           Institutional Repository: An Exploratory Assessment of Stakeholder
           Perceptions and Use
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 September 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Laura Waugh, Jesse Hamner, Janette Klein, Sian Brannon
      The University of North Texas (UNT) Libraries conducted a study on the value of the UNT Digital Library, including its UNT Scholarly Works institutional repository, to investigate the value of the UNT Libraries' digital repositories as perceived by UNT faculty, staff, and graduate students. This evaluation of the impact of the UNT Libraries'interventions begins a longitudinal view of the overall impact of these digital repositories in order to inform decisions and provide baseline measurements against which future assessment results can be compared. Findings include that an increase in awareness of the UNT Libraries' digital repositories is statistically associated with a greater likelihood of multiple types of use and contributions back to digital repositories. Also, graduate students are, as a whole, more likely to be aware of and use the UNT Libraries' digital repositories than faculty or staff.


      PubDate: 2015-09-09T20:20:31Z
       
 
 
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