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Journal Cover Journal of Academic Librarianship
  [SJR: 1.442]   [H-I: 33]   [707 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0099-1333
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2805 journals]
  • Flipped Instruction for Information Literacy: Five Instructional Cases of
           Academic Librarians
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 April 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Jeffery L. Loo, David Eifler, Elliott Smith, Liladhar Pendse, Jianye He, Michael Sholinbeck, Gisele Tanasse, Jennifer K. Nelson, Elizabeth A. Dupuis
      University of California, Berkeley librarians have incorporated the flipped instruction model into information literacy training by focusing on two primary elements: assigning pre-class assignments and increasing active learning techniques. We explore these two elements across five diverse instructional cases, which include one-shot and semester-long classes that were conducted through online or in-person delivery for both graduate and undergraduate students across a range of subject areas (sciences, social sciences, and humanities). We examine the enabling factors and the perceived outcomes of this instructional paradigm. Because students came to class with enhanced library understanding and experience from the pre-class assignment, they were better prepared to engage with the material and articulate additional learning needs. We note students' increased engagement during class and more time available for higher-order learning exercises and discussions. As a result, flipped instruction appears to enable more learning opportunities without increasing classroom time. The challenges of this model are the requisite commitment of time and effort, the need to foster class participation, and the facilitation of active communication within the class. We propose a framework of catalysts, building blocks, and instructional outcomes to help library instructors incorporate flipped instruction elements into their instructional design.


      PubDate: 2016-04-24T14:19:36Z
       
  • Practicing Critical Evaluation of Online Sources Improves Student Search
           Behavior
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 April 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Chris Leeder, Chirag Shah
      This research investigated the effect of critical source evaluation on student online search behavior and results. The study employed an experimental design in which participants in the treatment condition conducted a prompted critical evaluation of a set of provided sources, while participants in the control condition reviewed them without any prompts. Participants in both conditions then searched online for sources on an assigned research topic. Server log data and participant survey responses were analyzed using both quantitative and qualitative measures to identify the impact of the intervention, guided practice in the critical evaluation of online information, on their search behavior. Results showed that the treatment condition participants who conducted the prompted critical evaluation of sources performed better on most measures of search behavior, and appeared to be better prepared to search effectively and complete their group assignment. Implications for instructors and librarians teaching information literacy skills are discussed.


      PubDate: 2016-04-24T14:19:36Z
       
  • Championing Institutional Goals: Academic Libraries Supporting Graduate
           Women in STEM
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 April 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Laura Palumbo
      Academic libraries are well-positioned within their scientific research communities to assist with the retention of women in STEM fields. Librarians have an opportunity to find new ways to match collections and services to student needs and institutional goals by providing resources and programming in support of women in STEM. This paper will focus on the ways in which academic librarians can help support female graduate students in STEM, beginning with a review of the literature to determine the causes for the under-representation of women graduate students in some STEM fields. Next, it will review interventions conducted by institutions to address the uneven distribution, including a scan for resources or services provided by the library. Finally, it will use the findings presented in the literature to propose services and resources that libraries and librarians can provide to help address the issues that contribute to the low number of women in STEM fields.


      PubDate: 2016-04-15T02:00:12Z
       
  • Reviews and Analysis of Special Reports
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 April 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship




      PubDate: 2016-04-15T02:00:12Z
       
  • Cognitive Bias and the Discovery Layer
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 April 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Elizabeth Blakesley



      PubDate: 2016-04-09T09:26:08Z
       
  • Student Use of Keywords and Limiters in Web-scale Discovery Searching
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 April 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Megan Dempsey, Alyssa M. Valenti
      Using transaction log analysis of student search histories in EBSCO Discovery Service, which we branded RVOneSearch, we seek to answer: 1. Do students use the limiters provided in RVOneSearch? 2. How effectively do students use keywords in RVOneSearch after receiving instruction on keywording? In Spring 2012, RVOneSearch became an integral part of our 80-minute librarian-led sessions that are required of all English Composition I courses. We began focusing our instruction on selecting appropriate keywords when we noticed that regardless of interface, students struggled most with identifying the right search terms. With RVOneSearch we stopped teaching multiple interfaces and instead began teaching one reference database for background and context, and RVOneSearch for scholarly sources. We spend less time on the nuances of interfaces and more time on evaluating results. We also teach students to use the facets and limiters available in RVOneSearch. In this study we wanted to determine if students used the available facets and limiters and whether they chose appropriate keywords after instruction on how to do so. Our results inform how and what we teach students and are applicable to others teaching with web-scale discovery.


      PubDate: 2016-04-05T03:56:50Z
       
  • Finding Sound and Score: A Music Library Skills Module for Undergraduate
           Students
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 March 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Amanda Myers, Yusuke Ishimura
      Music students need library search skills to find music resources of scores and sound recordings for study, repertoire selection and performance practice. This article describes the design and evaluation of a Blackboard eLearning module, Music Library Instruction Module based on a music information literacy standard 2, accessing needed information effectively and efficiently. The module supported students' development of skills in catalog searching to find music resources. The learning achievements of 25 participants were evaluated using a pre-test–post-test method. Post-test results had an increase between scores of 15% and statistical significance (t=4.75; p<0.001) to support the hypothesis that students demonstrate higher performance in search skills after interaction with the module. The Music Library Instruction Module was successful as an eLearning treatment in instructing library search skills to find music resources however additional instruction is needed when searching by major composer and subject headings. This study has practical implications in the design and assessment of music information literacy programs in the eLearning environment.


      PubDate: 2016-03-16T11:52:29Z
       
  • An Old Horse Revived?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 March 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Lisa M. Rose-Wiles, John P. Irwin
      With limited library budgets and declining circulation of print books, it is important to demonstrate library value to multiple stakeholders and to make informed collection development choices. The aim of this one-year study was to gain a complete picture of print book circulation by identifying titles that were used in the library (“in-house”) but not checked out. We found that almost 30% of circulation transactions were books that were used in-house. Medical and nursing books showed the highest rate of in-house use in both the reference and main (circulating) collection. A close examination of these subject areas indicated that 46% of potentially circulating medical books used in-house were checked out, and 19% of science books used in house were checked out. This suggests that libraries should not assume that titles used in-house are subsequently checked out, or that check out statistics represent the totality of book use. We recommend including in-house use statistics to obtain an accurate picture of total circulation and library value, and to inform collection development.


      PubDate: 2016-03-16T11:52:29Z
       
  • Reviews and Analysis of Special Reports
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 2
      Author(s): Leslie Stebbins



      PubDate: 2016-03-06T22:33:57Z
       
  • University Students Awareness, Usage and Attitude Towards E-books:
           Experience from China
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 February 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Sufang Wang, Xue Bai
      The purpose of this study was to investigate students' awareness, usage and attitude towards e-books at the Zhejiang University in China. The research design was quantitative using a convenience sampling method and chi-square analyses were employed. Library staff responsible for digital resources collection had been interviewed. Results indicated that there was a significant difference of students' awareness and usage of general e-books and academic e-books. There was a higher awareness but lower adoption of general e-books. The awareness and level of usage of library provided e-books were both very low. A search engine was generally used to access e-books. Senior undergraduates and postgraduate students mainly accessed e-books from the library website and library catalog. Students, particularly undergraduate students, used e-books mainly for the purpose of leisure. In contrast, postgraduate students tended to use e-books more for academic purposes. The use of mobile devices and computers was preferred when reading e-books; but for academic e-books students preferred print part of them for reading. University students showed strong preference for printing books. Academic libraries should put more efforts on promotion, stimulating demands, and cooperation with teachers to improve e-books usage.


      PubDate: 2016-03-06T22:33:57Z
       
  • Libraries, Human Rights, and Social Justice: Enabling Access and Promoting
           Inclusion, Paul T. Jaeger, Natalie Greene Taylor, Ursula Gorham. Rowman
           &amp; Littlefield, Lanham, MD (2015), ISBN: 978-1-4422-5051-2
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 2
      Author(s): Alicia Kubas



      PubDate: 2016-03-06T22:33:57Z
       
  • Makerspaces in Libraries, Theresa Willingham, Jeroen De Boer. Rowman
           &amp; Littlefield, Lanham, MD (2015), ISBN: 978-1-4422-5300-1
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 2
      Author(s): Lee Andrew Hilyer



      PubDate: 2016-03-06T22:33:57Z
       
  • The Complete Guide to Acquisitions Management, 2nd ed., Frances C.
           Wilkinson, Linda K. Lewis, Rebecca L. Lubas. Libraries Unlimited, Santa
           Barbara, CA (2015), ISBN: 978-1-61069-713-2
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 2
      Author(s): Alexis Linoski



      PubDate: 2016-03-06T22:33:57Z
       
  • Creative Library and Marketing Publicity: Best Practices, Robert J.
           Lackie, M. Sandra Wood (Eds.). Rowman &amp; Littlefield, Lanham, MD
           (2015), ISBN: 978-1-4422-5421-3
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 2
      Author(s): Steve McKinzie



      PubDate: 2016-03-06T22:33:57Z
       
  • Creating Leaders: An Examination of Academic and Research Library
           Leadership Institutes, Irene M.H. Herold (Ed.). Association of College and
           Research Libraries, Chicago (2015), ISBN: 978-0838987636
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 2
      Author(s): Margot Note



      PubDate: 2016-03-06T22:33:57Z
       
  • Editorial Board Continued
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2016-03-06T22:33:57Z
       
  • Mobile Social Marketing in Libraries, Samantha C. Helmick. Rowman
           &amp; Littlefield, Lanham, MD (2015), ISBN: 978-14422-4381-1
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 2
      Author(s): Amy Wainwright



      PubDate: 2016-03-06T22:33:57Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2016-03-06T22:33:57Z
       
  • A Collaborative Approach to Integrating Information and Academic Literacy
           into the Curricula of Research Methods Courses
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 March 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Claudia Adams, Stephen Buetow, Richard Edlin, Neda Zdravkovic, Josta Heyligers
      The University of Auckland, like many tertiary educational institutions, expects undergraduates and postgraduates to leave the institution equipped not only with specialist knowledge, but with a set of intellectual skills, capacities and personal attributes. Included in this suite of transferable skills is academic and information literacy (AIL). This case study reports on the collaborative process, content development and outcomes of integrating AIL into the curricula of two Population Health research methods courses, one at postgraduate level and another at undergraduate level. The study shows how experiences gained from designing an online assessment for the postgraduate course, provided evidence to develop scaffolded activities and online summative and formative assessment design for the undergraduate course. The analysis of the quality of completed student coursework showed that interventions assisted students to think more critically and develop understanding of the key elements of the research process and methodology.


      PubDate: 2016-03-06T22:33:57Z
       
  • Creating a Culture of Documentation
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 February 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Ray Laura Henry



      PubDate: 2016-02-24T09:26:56Z
       
  • Using Time-Driven Activity-Based Costing to Identify Best Practices in
           Academic Libraries
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 February 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Lorena Siguenza-Guzman, Andres Auquilla, Alexandra Van den Abbeele, Dirk Cattrysse
      In the current competitive and dynamic environment, libraries must remain agile and flexible, as well as open to new ideas and ways of working. Based on a comparative case study of two academic libraries in Belgium, this research study investigates the opportunities of using Time-Driven Activity-Based Costing (TDABC) to benchmark library processes. To this end, two major research questions are addressed: 1) Can TDABC be used to enhance process benchmarking in libraries? 2) Do results at activity level provide additional insights compared to macro results in a process benchmarking? We first start by describing the TDABC implementation. Then, we discuss and compare the workflow of 10 library processes covering the four principal library functions: acquisition, cataloging, circulation and document delivery. Next, based on the benchmarking exercise, we report and discuss potential processes and performance improvements that can be realized from using library time and costs information, in particular concerning the two libraries analyzed. We conclude this article by discussing the advantages of using TDABC as a tool to enhance process benchmarking in libraries.


      PubDate: 2016-02-17T12:44:08Z
       
  • Why Users Come to the Library: A Case Study of Library and Non-Library
           Units
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 February 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Vera Lux, Robert J. Snyder, Colleen Boff
      This case study explores use patterns of an academic library following the addition of several non-library units. Of specific interest were the initial destinations of patrons, the number of destinations visited, and the primary purpose for coming to the library. We observed all destinations of patrons as they entered the building and administered an exit survey to gain additional insight into patrons' use of the library, including all first floor destinations visited and their primary purpose for visiting the library. We used selected statistics to further explore library use. Findings indicate that non-library units are a popular destination for library patrons but do not eclipse the overall use of library units; that the majority of patrons only visit one destination per trip to the library; and that the primary purposes for which patrons come to the library are studying and the use of library materials.


      PubDate: 2016-02-09T03:24:45Z
       
  • Understanding the “Complexity of Experience”: Modeling Faculty
           Research Practices
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 January 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Nancy Falciani-White
      Despite the amount of research that faculty do and the influence they have over their students' use of the library, faculty research is not well understood by the academic libraries trying to support it. Rather “research” is often considered synonymous with information seeking and other information behaviors. This grounded theory study interviewed nine internationally recognized scholars about their research practices, and proposes a model of research that is complex and intimately connected to the other areas of academic practice (teaching and service). This model includes information seeking as one aspect, but also considers social, environmental, organizational, and dissemination components, and how those components interact. Having a better understanding of research equips academic libraries to better support faculty, and through the faculty, their students.


      PubDate: 2016-02-09T03:24:45Z
       
  • Reflecting the Science of Instruction? Screencasting in Australian and
           New Zealand Academic Libraries: A Content Analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 February 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Jason Murphy, Chern Li Liew
      Research problem Instructional screencasts are increasingly part of the online tutorial mix offered by academic libraries. However, what makes for effective screencast design? This research provides a snapshot of screencast design in Australian and New Zealand academic libraries and appraises it through the lens of multimedia learning theory. Methodology Evidence-based design principles that promote effective learning for multimedia were identified from the research literature. A cognitive psychological approach was taken, drawing principally from Mayer's cognitive theory of multimedia learning. The principles outlined in Mayer's theory were translated into guidelines applicable to screencast tutorial production. These guidelines formed the basis for an assessment rubric which was applied to screencasts produced by New Zealand and Australian Universities. Content analysis was then applied to determine to what extent screencast tutorials in the sample reflected the principles outlined in Mayer's theory. Results On average, screencasts from the institutions surveyed integrated 7.6 of 9 effective multimedia principles. The low variance across the sample suggests this high standard was approximated or exceeded by most tutorials. Australian and New Zealand libraries were of a comparable standard overall with similar areas of strength and weakness. Implications Mayer's principles provide a useful foundation for designing effective multimedia instruction. The translation of these principles into screencast design guidelines will hopefully serve as useful considerations. Commonly neglected principles (coherence, signalling and segmenting) present areas for design improvement but also opportunities for further research in an academic library context.


      PubDate: 2016-02-09T03:24:45Z
       
  • High Density Storage: From There to Here and Beyond
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 January 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Mary S. Laskowski
      This article presents results from a national survey regarding library high density storage, as well as qualitative and quantitative analysis of various aspects of a library high density storage facility at a major academic research institution. Findings are contextualized within a discussion of the past, present, and potential future of library high density storage.


      PubDate: 2016-01-29T03:53:21Z
       
  • Impact of Assignment Prompt on Information Literacy Performance in
           First-year Student Writing
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 January 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): M. Sara Lowe, Sean M. Stone, Char Booth, Natalie Tagge
      This study attempts to quantify the impact of assignment prompts and phased assignment sequencing on first-year student work; specifically, whether more fully developed and “scaffolded” assignment prompts produced better Information Literacy (IL) in student papers (n=520). The examination of assignment prompts in relation to student IL rubric scores would seem to indicate that conventional wisdom on developing assignment prompts might not have an impact on IL performance.


      PubDate: 2016-01-29T03:53:21Z
       
  • A Text Mining Analysis of Academic Libraries' Tweets
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 January 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Sultan M. Al-Daihani, Alan Abrahams
      This study applies a text mining approach to a significant dataset of tweets by academic libraries. The dataset for this research was collected from the complete Twitter timelines of ten academic libraries. The total dataset comprised 23,707 tweets with 17,848 mentions, 7625 hashtags, and 5974 retweets. Academic libraries from the dataset have typically posted fewer than 50 tweets per month, though tweet volume grew rapidly in late-2013 through 2014. The results show variance between academic libraries in distribution of tweets over time. The most frequent word was “open,” which was used in a variety of contexts by the academic libraries. It was noted that the most frequent bi-gram (two-word sequence) in the aggregated tweets was “special collections”. The most frequent tri-gram (three-word sequence) was “save the date”. The most frequent word categories in the semantic analysis for most libraries were related to “knowledge, insight, and information concerning personal and cultural relations”. The most common category of the tweets was “Resources” among all the selected academic libraries. These findings highlight the importance of using data- and text-mining approaches in understanding the aggregate social data of academic libraries to aid in decision-making and strategic planning for patron outreach and marketing of services.


      PubDate: 2016-01-23T20:02:14Z
       
  • Leveraging research synthesis for promoting and expanding library services
           and educational programs
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 January 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Misa Mi
      Research synthesis (or systematic review) uses systematic techniques to comprehensively search, select, appraise, and summarize separate empirical studies to minimize bias in the review process. The past decade saw a growing interest in research synthesis in health sciences and other disciplines. Librarians as information professionals and knowledge workers are well poised to educate faculty and students about the systematic review as one type of research methodology and diffuse it into the traditional hypothesis-driven research discourse and undertakings. This article illustrates how a medical library at a medical school developed strategies to leverage research synthesis for expanding library services and educational programs.


      PubDate: 2016-01-10T20:25:57Z
       
  • On the Front Lines: Serving Ohio's Best
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 January 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Thomas Atwood, Michael Farmer, Krista McDonald, Brianne Miller, Eileen Theodore-Shusta, Elizabeth J. Wood
      Presenters from a June, 2015 Academic Libraries of Ohio conference titled “Serving Our Veterans: A Call to Action” discuss the state of outreach and service to student veterans, students currently serving in the military, and military dependent students at their respective academic libraries.


      PubDate: 2016-01-05T20:22:11Z
       
  • Classroom Assessment Techniques for Librarians, Melissa Bowles-Terry,
           Cassandra Kvenild. Association of College and Research Libraries, Chicago,
           IL (2015), ISBN: 978-0-8389-8775-9
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 1
      Author(s): Amy Riegelman



      PubDate: 2015-12-24T16:28:16Z
       
  • Unlocking the Mysteries of Cataloging: A Workbook of Examples, 2nd ed.,
           Elizabeth Haynes, Joanna F. Fountain. Libraries Unlimited, Santa Clara, CA
           (2015), ISBN: 978-1-61069-569-5
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 1
      Author(s): Richard Lee Guinn



      PubDate: 2015-12-24T16:28:16Z
       
  • Library Security: Better Communication, Safer Facilities, Steve Albrecht.
           American Library Association Editions, Chicago, IL (2015), ISBN:
           978-0838913307
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 1
      Author(s): Loretta Wallace



      PubDate: 2015-12-24T16:28:16Z
       
  • TOC w/barcode &amp; ed board
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 1




      PubDate: 2015-12-24T16:28:16Z
       
  • TOC continued &amp; ed board
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 1




      PubDate: 2015-12-24T16:28:16Z
       
  • If an Editorial Board Resigns in the Forest...
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 1
      Author(s): Elizabeth Blakesley



      PubDate: 2015-12-24T16:28:16Z
       
  • Data in context: Using case studies to generate a common understanding of
           data in academic libraries
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 December 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Juleah Swanson, Amanda K. Rinehart
      As new expectations emerge in librarianship, librarians find themselves engaging with researchers throughout the entire research process. This includes during early stages, when research outputs are in their infancy. This shift means that any librarian might be faced with a ‘data question’ and be able to assist without necessarily being a ‘data’ expert. As libraries approach professional development in this field, additional difficulties occur as data cannot be easily understood without context. Instead of attempting to comprehensively cover this broad, nuanced, and sometimes vague topic, the authors took a different approach. In order to place ‘data’ in definable contexts, the authors created local, real-world case studies to introduce this topic to the library. This article describes the professional development event, complete with case studies, their development, discussion questions, and observations. As faculty and staff answered guided questions, they self-identified the value of existing librarian capabilities such as the reference interview, information location, and referral systems. This enabled library faculty and staff from across the library to engage positively and proactively, without any extensive background in this field.


      PubDate: 2015-12-20T08:38:57Z
       
  • Analyzing the Data Management Environment in a Master's-level Institution
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 December 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Anthony Stamatoplos, Tina Neville, Deborah Henry
      The data management environments at research-intensive institutions have been studied extensively. Few studies, however, have assessed the environments at institutions that are not classified as research-intensive, where scholarship and obtaining external funding is still highly encouraged. Using results from semi-structured interviews with faculty from an array of disciplines, the authors describe the research processes and data concerns at a Master's-level institution. A comparison of the results illustrate that, at least at this institution, faculty face very similar issues as those identified at research-intensive organizations and many of the same practices and services could be implemented on a smaller scale.


      PubDate: 2015-12-12T04:52:23Z
       
  • Librarians Empathy: Visually Impaired Students' Experiences Towards
           Inclusion and Sense of Belonging in an Academic Library
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 November 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Nahid Bayat Bodaghi, Loh Sau Cheong, A.N. Zainab
      One of the key factors that fosters the creation of a sense of belonging is the sense of empathy. Indeed, it is considered to be one of the key skills for helping professionals, especially librarians. Nevertheless, previous studies were mostly library-focused. This paper approaches this issue from the visually impaired person's (VIP) perspective. The questions this paper aims to answer are: “What have VIPs experienced in a University library regarding the degree of librarians' sense of empathy” and, “How do they perceive it?” This study uses a qualitative approach. Data was collected through interviews and focus group discussions with eighteen VIPs who were registered in a university library. To determine the trustworthiness of the data, member checking, external audit, and reflexivity were used. The participants of the study perceived librarians' greeting and friendly conversation, their tone of voice, sense of understanding regarding their limitations, and their communication regarding any changes in the circumstance of the library environment as key factors that illustrate their sense of empathy towards VIPs. Furthermore, VIPs expressed being afraid to ask for help from librarians, being disappointed, confused, uncomfortable, and not being understood due to a lack of librarians' sense of empathy that influenced their professional behavior.


      PubDate: 2015-12-02T17:21:14Z
       
  • Faculty status of librarians at U.S. research universities
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 December 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): William H. Walters
      This survey of 124 library directors reveals that 52% of U.S. research universities grant nominal faculty status to librarians. The proportion granting faculty status has declined since 2008. Further survey results are provided for 12 distinct components of faculty status: nominal faculty status, tenure, professor ranks, peer review, scholarship, faculty senate, other committees, sabbaticals, flexible work, 9-month year, research funds, and equivalent salaries. Certain components of faculty status are substantially more or less common than faculty status itself, and nominal faculty status does not correspond to a clear-cut set of working conditions, rights, or responsibilities. A 5-tier hierarchy of faculty status indicators can be identified, and factor analysis can be used to create a single faculty status index that fully represents 9 of the 12 components of faculty status. The individual components that correspond most closely to the faculty status index are peer review and sabbaticals—not nominal faculty status.


      PubDate: 2015-12-02T17:21:14Z
       
  • Research Consultation Assessment: Perceptions of Students and Librarians
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 November 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Kathy Butler, Jason Byrd
      Both students and librarians evaluated face-to-face research consultations scheduled in an academic library. The survey asked both participants to rate usefulness of the interaction and to mark a list of the resources that were used. Results showed that librarians frequently underestimated the effectiveness of the consultation, a phenomenon known as provider pessimism, and that students were confused by the library terminology used for resources. Research consultations are potentially important “teaching moments” as long as students and librarians speak the same language and librarians verify learning outcomes using communication cues during the consultation.


      PubDate: 2015-11-24T17:58:24Z
       
  • Use and Evaluation of Information From Social Media in the Academic
           Context: Analysis of Gap Between Students and Librarians
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 November 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Kyung-Sun Kim, Sei-Ching Joanna Sin
      Recent research shows that some types of social media such as wikis and social networking sites have emerged as important sources of information. While social media are becoming increasingly popular, the quality of information available through them varies widely and is difficult to assess. This study examined the main purposes behind undergraduate students' use of different social media platforms in information-seeking and the strategies they use for evaluating information from social media in academic contexts. The results were then compared with what academic librarians deem useful. The comparison helped identify gaps between students and librarians regarding the use and evaluation of information from social media. Two web surveys were conducted: one for undergraduates (n=1355), and the other for academic librarians (n=189). The study found the two groups similar in terms of social media platforms used for information-seeking, and also the main purposes for using them. However, a significant gap was detected in the strategies that students used, and those that librarians found useful, for evaluating information from social media. Based on the findings, suggestions were made for information literacy education and future research.


      PubDate: 2015-11-19T11:15:27Z
       
  • Surveying Users' Perception of Academic Library Services Quality: A Case
           Study in Universiti Malaysia Pahang (UMP) Library
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 November 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Suziyana Mat Dahan, Mohd Yusof Taib, Nurhaizan Mohd Zainudin, Fadzida Ismail
      Global competition among academic institutions has compelled university libraries to transform their conventional services and traditional roles to a more sophisticated, all-round service provider that can deliver their best services to their users. University libraries must cater the expansion of information sources, the high demand of users and information application as well as high student enrolments and competition among service sectors. The ability of an academic library to fulfill its user expectations will yield user satisfaction for its services. Primarily, research on assessing users' perception on the level of service quality focuses on finding ways to meet or exceed users' expectations. This study nevertheless aimed to measure students' perception and their satisfaction level of services provided by the UMP library and customized a new measuring tool on service quality and perspectives of library users based on the LibQUAL Model. A customized survey instrument was developed based on the model, consisting of 30 items measuring the level of four service dimensions and user satisfaction with an additional five items examining user satisfaction on general services. The Cronbach's alpha range is from 0.813 to 0.942, which was adequately greater than the recommended value of 0.7, thus exhibiting good internal reliability of the constructs. The result of the study reported positive values for both gap analyses in all service quality dimensions. Based on 382 respondent feedbacks, results showed that the perceived service quality level exceeded users' acceptable level on minimum service and desired service. Specifically, the users are satisfied with the services provided. Results from this study serveas a guide for effective decision making by the library in its administration and resource allocation to ensure accomplishment of the library's vision and mission.


      PubDate: 2015-11-15T13:57:09Z
       
  • IDEA Model from Theory to Practice: Integrating Information Literacy in
           Academic Courses
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 November 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Kimberly Mullins
      IDEA (interview, design, embed, and assess) is a theoretical instructional design model for integrating information literacy (IL) in academic courses. The model supports the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) proposed 2015 Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education through the collaborative efforts between librarians and teaching faculty. The article describes a case study application of information literacy content integrated into three Doctor of Education blended classes taught by the same classroom instructor. The theoretical phases are explained in terms of practical steps and outcomes resulting in pedagogically sound curriculum and effective collaboration between librarian and teaching faculty.


      PubDate: 2015-11-15T13:57:09Z
       
  • “Good Fences Make Good Neighbors”: Territorial Dividers
           Increase User Satisfaction and Efficiency in Library Study Spaces
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 November 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Çağrı İmamoğlu, Meltem Ö. Gürel



      PubDate: 2015-11-15T13:57:09Z
       
  • Publishing Trends in Library and Information Sciences Across European
           Countries and Institutions
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 November 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Carlos Olmeda-Gómez, Félix de Moya-Anegón
      Ten bibliometric indicators were used to assess European publishing intensity in journals listed in Scopus under the subject category “Library and Information Science” between 2003 and 2012. The findings were analyzed for the 20 countries and 25 research institutions with the greatest output in that period. The indicators calculated included normalized impact, number and proportion of highly cited papers and the distribution of papers by the quartiles defined in the Scimago Journal Rank (SJR). SJR is a measure of the scientific influence of scholarly journals that accounts for both the number of citations received by a journal and the importance or prestige of the journals where such citations come from. With SJR, the subject field, quality and reputation of the journal have a direct effect on the value of a citation. The analysis covered 11,931 Western and 939 Eastern European papers published in 149 journals. The highest output growth rates were found for Spain, Poland, Portugal, Italy, Greece and Austria. The highest impact ratings were attained by European institutions whose members are prolific authors of papers on informetrics. On the whole, the articles were written primarily in English, Spanish, German or French, while the publications most widely cited appeared in English language journals. This study presents bibliometric data that shed light on the status of Library and Information Science research in Europe today, in the framework of the European Higher Education Area.


      PubDate: 2015-11-11T13:55:06Z
       
  • Information Behavior and Expectations of Veterinary Researchers and Their
           Requirements for Academic Library Services
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 November 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Marguerite A. Nel, Ina Fourie
      Increased pressure for quality research at South African universities, and limited research done on the information needs of veterinary science researchers and the role of veterinary libraries supporting them, motivated a case study at the Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria (South Africa). The study aimed to determine what the information needs, information seeking behavior and information use behavior of veterinary researchers are, and how these needs are being met by the library. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected from researchers as well as information specialists by means of questionnaires, focus group interviews and a citation analysis. Findings and recommendations are based on descriptive statistical analysis of the quantitative data and thematic analysis of the qualitative data. The study found that the information needs of researchers are influenced by the research environment and expectations for research output. Most needs for information and support services are met. Collection building practices, library space, and awareness of services offered by information specialists need attention. Findings reveal considerable gaps between researchers' expectations from information specialists and their own perceptions of roles to fulfil. The paper contributes to the limited literature on the information behavior of veterinary researchers and library services supporting their needs.


      PubDate: 2015-11-07T11:42:58Z
       
  • Yes Virginia, It Will Scale: Using Data to Personalize High-volume
           Reference Interactions
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 October 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Lauren Reiter, J.P. Huffman
      This examination of an on-going embedded partnership between Penn State University Libraries business librarians and an instructor in the Smeal College of Business confronts the question of scalability for one-on-one reference consultations for high-enrollment classes. Through these in-person interactions off-site and in the library, the librarians hope to build student confidence in librarians as information resources as well as increasing business literacy through research using established, authoritative sources. This article documents the first four semesters of this evolving project to demonstrate the logistics of managing a high volume of student interactions using library data as support for decision-making and action.


      PubDate: 2015-10-21T03:18:14Z
       
  • Factors That Contribute to Research and Publication Output Among
           Librarians in Nigerian University Libraries
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 October 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Ijeoma J. Ibegbulam, Eze U. Jacintha
      Considering the relevance of research and publication in the career and professional development and growth of academic librarians especially in Nigerian Universities, this paper was used to find out the factors which contribute to high publication output among librarians in Nigerian University libraries. The main objectives of the study were to find out librarians' motivation for research and publication; find out the factors that contribute to high research productivity among librarians; find out the barriers to research and publication among librarians; and determine the strategies that will enhance research and publication among librarians. The population of the study comprised of 146 librarians of the university libraries in South-East Nigeria. Purposive sampling based on the level of publication output was used to select about 85 librarians as the sample of the study. The data were collected using a questionnaire and analyzed using frequency counts and mean scores and presented in tables. Major findings showed that the desire to earn promotion and to develop one's self among others motivated the librarians to write and publish while collaboration and attendance to conferences among other factors contributed to high publication output. Lack of a research grant and a tight work schedule hinder research and publication while partnering with research funders and issuance of grants enhanced the opportunities for research and publication.


      PubDate: 2015-10-11T18:47:33Z
       
  • Students as Co-designers of a Virtual Learning Commons: Results of a
           Collaborative Action Research Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 October 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Ieda M. Santos, Nagla Ali, Anthony Hill
      In order to meet the 21st century students' learning styles and expectations, as well as keep up with technological advancements, many academic libraries are creating virtual learning commons. This paper reports on phase 1 of a larger project that aimed at investigating the design of 21st century physical and virtual learning commons in the library at a higher education institution in the United Arab Emirates. Using a collaborative action research, project participants explored the design and implementation of a virtual learning commons to support learning activities. Two action research cycles were implemented where students acted as co-designers. Multiple methods of data collection were adopted. Based on outcomes, a blog space was created to facilitate discussions of readings. This study contributes with a practical example of how student voices and preferences can influence the design of a virtual learning commons. Phase 1 also worked as a catalyst to further the discussion of the larger virtual learning commons in academic libraries. The paper also discusses several recommendations for future improvements.


      PubDate: 2015-10-04T17:03:52Z
       
  • Measuring the Effect of Virtual Librarian Intervention on Student Online
           Search
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 September 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Chris Leeder, Chirag Shah
      In this paper we describe the results from a case study of the online search behavior of high school students, and the effect of virtual librarian intervention on the quality of the search results. Search log data of students' actions were analyzed, librarians recommended revised search terms, new searches were conducted with these terms, and the difference in results was analyzed. Results showed that the librarians' recommended queries were more focused and produced results of a higher reading level, which was used as a proxy for source quality. The work presented here is a preliminary investigation of how librarian search expertise can improve online search results, and raises questions about how to support online student search that are of interest to both librarians and information science researchers. Possible directions for future research are discussed.


      PubDate: 2015-09-26T16:59:31Z
       
 
 
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