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Journal Cover Journal of Academic Librarianship
   Journal TOC RSS feeds Export to Zotero [699 followers]  Follow    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
     ISSN (Print) 0099-1333
     Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2566 journals]   [SJR: 1.577]   [H-I: 31]
  • A Roadmap for Assessing Student Learning Using the New Framework for
           Information Literacy for Higher Education
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 September 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Megan Oakleaf



      PubDate: 2014-09-13T16:05:41Z
       
  • “Going to College in your Pajamas”?!?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 August 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Wendi Arant Kaspar , Wyoma vanDuinkerken



      PubDate: 2014-09-02T15:56:31Z
       
  • A Correlational Study of Foreign Language Anxiety and Library Anxiety
           Among Non-native Speakers of English: A Case Study in a Malaysian Public
           University
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 September 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Janaki Sinnasamy , Noor Harun Abdul Karim
      This study examines the correlation of the dimensions of foreign language anxiety and library anxiety among undergraduates at a public university in Malaysia. The Malay translated versions of the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (FLCAS) and the Library Anxiety Scale (LAS) were completed by 147 students pursuing a Foundation in Science course. Analysis revealed a significant correlation in all the dimensions of library anxiety with three of the dimensions of foreign language anxiety, namely speaking anxiety, self-evaluation anxiety, and learner anxiety. The findings in this study will enable librarians to be aware of the anxieties faced by students which can help in the planning and delivery of services and instruction.


      PubDate: 2014-09-02T15:56:31Z
       
  • Reviews and Analysis of Special Reports
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 August 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship




      PubDate: 2014-08-16T15:37:28Z
       
  • ChristaBurnsMichael P.SauersGoogle Search Secrets2014ALA
           Neal-SchumanChicago, IL978-1555709235211 p. $45.60
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 40, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): Irene Ke



      PubDate: 2014-08-02T15:24:08Z
       
  • TOC continued & ed board cont.
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 40, Issues 3–4




      PubDate: 2014-08-02T15:24:08Z
       
  • Book Piracy in Nigeria: Issues and Strategies
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 40, Issues 3–4
      Author(s): Christopher Nkiko
      Book piracy is an illegal and illegitimate reproduction of other people's intellectual property for economic reasons without prior consent or authorization. This paper examines the intricate dimension of book piracy in the Nigerian Publishing Industry. It notes the dangers the trend portends to qualitative education and scholarship in general. The paper identifies the different forms of book piracy as: local reproduction of fast moving titles using newsprint or poor textured paper, abuse of publication rights, hi-tech reproduction overseas, circumventing the e-book version, illegal reprography, unauthorized excessive production by printers, and translation without permission. Some of the causes of book piracy are poverty, book scarcity, ignorance of the copyright laws by the public and the uncooperative attitude of some countries in endorsing international treaties on intellectual property rights. The paper recommends the following as panacea to stemming the tide of the menace: cost reduction strategies, national book policy and commissioning of local authorship, awareness and enforcement of copyright laws, revitalization of libraries, sanctions on countries showing complacency towards piracy, special algorithms to detect illegal downloads, security printing devices and moral suasion.


      PubDate: 2014-08-02T15:24:08Z
       
  • A Literature Review of How Videogames Are Assessed in Library and
           Information Science and Beyond
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 July 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Ron T. Brown
      In this paper the author explores how videogames and gaming are assessed in Library and Information Science (LIS) and in other fields. The author concludes with a discussion of some potential future directions for assessment practices of videogames and gaming in LIS.


      PubDate: 2014-07-29T15:20:02Z
       
  • Measuring Individual and Organizational Knowledge Activities in Academic
           Libraries with Multilevel Analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 July 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Yuan-Ho Huang
      Knowledge management is vital in many work environments; however, it is difficult to measure the outcome of knowledge management and to distinguish the typology of knowledge activities. This study proposes a knowledge activity scale for assessing individual tacit knowledge and organizational knowledge. This study not only explores knowledge activities of knowledge workers from both individual and organizational dimensions but also investigates the empirical data from academic librarians with exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses of both individual and organizational levels. More than 550 sample data were collected and analyzed in several stages. To conduct a multilevel analysis, the final sample consisted of 286 persons from 40 universities and colleges, and the organizational sizes ranged from 3 to 22 persons. The results show 6 constructs for individual dimensions (knowledge acquisition, knowledge absorption, knowledge sharing, knowledge obstacles, knowledge transfers, and knowledge diffusion) and 3 constructs for organizational dimensions (knowledge growth, knowledge integration, and knowledge breadth). The scale from both individual and organizational dimensions shows robust psychometric properties with acceptable levels of reliability and validity. The proposed scale can reveal the value of librarians' intangible work and also indicate the level of creative organizational climate within academic libraries.


      PubDate: 2014-07-29T15:20:02Z
       
  • Toward a Kairos of Library Instruction
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 June 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Emily Drabinski
      Information literacy instruction in libraries is organized by the ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards. Currently under revision, these Standards define a set of external, abstract learning objectives that have been productive of a teaching role for librarians. Simultaneously, the Standards have generated a substantial critical literature that contests the objectives as a “Procrustean bed” that distracts from the particular teaching and learning contexts. This paper offers an alternative organizing heuristic for instruction in libraries. Kairos is an ancient Greek theory of time married to measure. Used by both Plato and the Sophists to understand the emergence of truth from context, kairos has been deployed by composition studies to gain a critical perspective on teaching student writing. Used to understand the context that generated both the first set of Standards and their revision, kairos can usefully direct the energy of teaching librarians toward their particular students and classrooms.


      PubDate: 2014-07-29T15:20:02Z
       
  • How Much of Library and Information Science Literature Qualifies as
           Research'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 June 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Mirna E. Turcios , Naresh Kumar Agarwal , Linda Watkins
      There is an extensive amount of Library and Information Science (LIS) writing produced each year. While there is general awareness regarding the variety of journal literature, there is no certainty on the percentage of the collection that we can call research. This project is an important first step in answering the question. A content analysis of the LIS academic/scholarly journals at the Simmons College Library was conducted. The research level collection of LIS literature makes the library an ideal candidate for this study. The latest issue of each journal subscribed to for fiscal year 2012–2013 containing academic/scholarly content was analyzed. Each article was analyzed to determine: 1) if it was research or non-research, 2) the method used to collect data for the study in the article, and 3) the subject terms or keywords associated with the article. 105 journal titles were identified out of 177 periodicals. In the 1880 articles analyzed from these, 16% qualified as research. Surveys were found to be the most popular research method used. This study will benefit students, faculty, and staff with research requirements as well as librarians who guide patrons through a search for research literature.


      PubDate: 2014-07-29T15:20:02Z
       
  • What is a Library': International College Students' Perceptions of
           Libraries
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 July 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Ilka Datig
      This study presents findings from an online survey and series of one-on-one interviews with students at New York University Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) regarding their perceptions of libraries. With an international student population, NYUAD represents a unique opportunity to gain insight into a wide variety of student opinions and experiences of libraries. The goal of the study was to develop a student-based perspective of libraries, which can be used to improve library services and outreach. The student responses ranged from intense engagement with libraries to little or no experience. In general, students had a limited view of the role of librarians in the library. Interestingly, many students have a lofty view of libraries and see them as repositories of knowledge for humanity.


      PubDate: 2014-07-29T15:20:02Z
       
  • Academic Librarians' Varying Experiences of Archives: A Phenomenographic
           Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 July 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Diana K. Wakimoto , Christine S. Bruce
      This article reports on a study investigating academic librarians' varying experiences of archives in order to promote understanding and communication among librarians and archivists. A qualitative, phenomenographic approach was adopted for the study. Three different ways of experiencing archives were identified from analysis of interviews. Archives may be experienced by academic librarians as 1) a place which protects collections; 2) resources to be used in accomplishing tasks such as teaching, research, or outreach; or 3) manifestations of politics. The third way of experiencing archives is the most complex, incorporating both the other experiences. The results of this study may help librarians, especially academic librarians, and archivists communicate more clearly on joint projects involving archival collections thereby enabling more collaboration.


      PubDate: 2014-07-29T15:20:02Z
       
  • Adoption of Digital Preservation Methods for Theses in Nigerian Academic
           Libraries: Applications and Implications
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 July 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Goodluck Ifijeh
      Graduating students of higher institutions in Nigeria usually write and submit theses, as a requirement for the award of diplomas, undergraduate and postgraduate degrees. This paper examines the importance of students' theses to research, industrial and economic development of the nation and therefore advocates the need to preserve them. It discusses the intricate dimensions of the preservation of theses in academic libraries and notes the urgent need to address the worsening deteriorating state of students' theses in academic libraries in Nigeria. The paper also discusses the current traditional preservation methods practiced among academic libraries and observed that these methods are not adequate. It recommends that academic libraries in Nigeria should digitize theses and adopt the cloud computing preservation model through the operations of institutional repositories. The paper further identified digital divide and poor technological infrastructure, inadequate funding, data security breaches and issues revolving around copyright as challenges of digitization and cloud computing, and made recommendations.


      PubDate: 2014-07-29T15:20:02Z
       
  • Student Deep Participation in Library Work: A Chinese Academic Library's
           Experience
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 July 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Lifeng Han , Yuan Wang , Lili Luo
      Student deep participation in library work allows students to actively participate in library operation and become deeply involved in library service and program development. There are usually two levels of deep participation: level I refers to the employment of student assistants in different areas of library routine work, ranging from shelving to IT support; and level II refers to the engagement of students as library partners or collaborators, working with librarians to complete independent project. Sharing Tsinghua University Library's experiences, we provide a holistic view of how the two levels of student deep participation are implemented at an academic library, with a focus on level II. We seek to generate a thorough understanding of the practices and benefits of student deep participation, and encourage academic libraries to create more opportunities to deeply involve students in library work, and to ultimately demonstrate the value and relevance of the library to the campus community.


      PubDate: 2014-07-29T15:20:02Z
       
  • Champions of Digital Literacy: Fostering a World of Informed Digital
           Producers
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 July 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Kathleen Scheaffer , Geoffrey Little



      PubDate: 2014-07-29T15:20:02Z
       
  • Research Information Literacy: Addressing Original Researchers' Needs
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 July 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Nina Exner
      Information literacy for faculty, doctoral students and other research-based graduate students, post-docs, and other original researchers is complex. There are fundamental differences between the processes of inquiry used by original researchers as compared to students or even faculty who are synthesizing information to find answers. Original research is different from information synthesis for discovery. Therefore, the information literacy processes to train and support those researchers are different. Analysis of the inquiry-oriented parts of the current and emerging information literacy Standards and Framework shows significant differences in the approach needed for teaching research information literacy. Promising instructional outcomes for information literacy training based around original research include gap analysis, theoretical and methodological discovery, and practical skills like funding search and analysis.


      PubDate: 2014-07-29T15:20:02Z
       
  • Use and Perceptions of E-books by Academic Staff in Further Education
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 July 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Elaine Mulholland , Jessica Bates
      This article reports on a study of the awareness, perceptions and use of e-books by academic staff in Further Education (FE) colleges throughout Northern Ireland (NI). It is the first comprehensive study of e-book use by FE faculty in NI and fills a significant gap in the research literature on e-books in education, which has tended to focus on Higher Education and the university setting. Data was collected through an online survey which was distributed to FE faculty across NI. The findings show that although FE academic staff are receptive to e-books and welcome them as a resource, poor reading experience and lack of awareness of relevant titles have had an impact. In particular, the research found that 40% of academic staff, in post less than five years, had not used e-books. Greater availability of titles, promotion, and better integration within teaching and learning emerge as key requisites for effective service delivery and enhancement of e-books within FE, as does the need for better targeted instruction and training aimed at academic staff. Understanding patrons' views, awareness, needs, habits and expectations in relation to e-books is crucial to help direct collection content while budgets remain tight and physical space limited.


      PubDate: 2014-07-29T15:20:02Z
       
  • Data Sharing and Discovery: What Librarians Need to Know
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 July 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Don MacMillan
      Drawing from the literatures of science, scholarly communication, and librarianship, this review paper describes what librarians need to know about how scientists manage and share their data. It is intended to help librarians become more engaged and integral partners in research and education. Scientific data repositories, journal data deposition policies, and the development of persistent linking between scholarly publications and data sets, have made data more accessible. However, deposition and sharing practices still vary among researchers, journal publishers, data repositories, information providers, and universities. Understanding the dynamic relationships between these stakeholders is critical to providing relevant support to researchers and students in the sciences. Librarians need to develop skills that bridge traditional liaison work with the increasingly data-driven demands of scientific research, so that we can support researchers with their data management needs and help users discover data across myriad collections and resources.


      PubDate: 2014-07-29T15:20:02Z
       
  • Reviews and Analysis of Special Reports
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 June 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship




      PubDate: 2014-06-27T14:55:10Z
       
  • Information Needs: Developing Personas of Humanities Scholars
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 June 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Mohammad Khaled Al-Shboul , A.Abrizah
      A persona represents a group of target users that share common behavioural characteristics. The personas method, an approach to systems design, has been receiving significant attention from practitioners. However, only anecdotal evidence currently exists for the effectiveness of personas and there have been criticisms about its validity as a scientific approach to research. This paper attempts to demonstrate how incorporating personas may lead to better understand the information needs of humanities scholars. Humanities scholars in an advanced ICT environment in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan are sampled as a case. Previous studies show that the humanities scholars have a significant negative relation with ICT use; they are using it less than scientists and social scientists, and they demonstrate a significantly higher use of library facilities than other academics. There is also a lack of up-to-date international research on the humanities scholars' information needs that takes into account recent rapid increases in the availability of ICT infrastructure, especially the Internet. As such, the objective of this study is to understand the information needs of humanities scholars and the effect of the electronic environment on their information seeking behaviour using personas. This study is conducted within a conceptual framework based on an integration of existing models of information-seeking behaviour, along with additional new elements representing the information context environment, such as languages, decision to seek and format of information resources. The four personas that were uncovered in this study may be able to effectively communicate the actual information needs of the humanities scholars through the personal narrative, name, and face, which continuously will remind the academic library of what their users really want and need from their services. This study also lays the foundation for future research by identifying variables of interest, and building construct validity through the themes of information needs that emerged.


      PubDate: 2014-06-27T14:55:10Z
       
  • Ten Years Later: A Joint Library Evolves
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 June 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Ann Agee
      In 2003, a unique joint library was created. A partnership between the San Jose Public Library system and San Jose State University, the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Library serves a city population of more than a million and a campus population of over 30,000 students. With different patrons and different missions, bringing the two library cultures and functions together presented many challenges, but the library today is a vital, innovative space for learning. In the ten years since its opening, however, the cost savings envisioned when the library was created have not been realized. Also, the partnership originally presented in the library's organizational structure has undergone alterations. This restructuring was driven by changes in funding, staffing, and patron needs. Despite this organizational evolution, the King Library still provides a richer resource to its communities than either partner could have provided alone and can serve as a model to other communities considering the creation of a joint library.


      PubDate: 2014-06-27T14:55:10Z
       
  • Copyright and You: Copyright Instruction for College Students in the
           Digital Age
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 June 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Julia E. Rodriguez , Katie Greer , Barbara Shipman
      Educators are concerned about the ease with which new digital technologies permit intellectual property to be discovered, re-purposed and shared. What do our students know about copyright compliance and academic integrity and how are these critical information competencies being addressed' Librarians have the authority for copyright-related instruction on campus and can provide both the point-of-need instruction and expertise to ensure that all students are informed about these issues. This article discusses the importance of developing copyright education for students as part of an overall information literacy curriculum by describing the development of a relevant, active learning online course targeting students' competencies as both users of and creators of creative content.


      PubDate: 2014-06-27T14:55:10Z
       
  • Making Strides by Leading from the Middle
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 June 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Kelly Visnak



      PubDate: 2014-06-27T14:55:10Z
       
  • Are Librarians Equipped to Teach International Students' A Survey of
           Current Practices and Recommendations for Training
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 June 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Yusuke Ishimura , Joan C. Bartlett
      Past studies of international students and academic libraries have often focused on students' own characteristics and experiences. Using an online survey, this study instead investigated librarians' teaching skills for serving this population. The analysis reveals that participants perceived an importance in developing skills specifically for international students. They tried to accommodate students' unique needs and optimize teaching approaches using their own experience working with the students. Although they reported having obtained knowledge of students' backgrounds as well as communication and teaching techniques, they showed strong interest in having further training opportunities to improve their teaching. The survey results thus give insight into recommendations for the provision of training to improve teaching in the context of serving international students.


      PubDate: 2014-06-18T14:42:43Z
       
  • LIS Graduate Students as Library Users: A Survey Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 June 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Daniel G. Tracy , Susan E. Searing
      Library and information science (LIS) students at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, were surveyed to ascertain their patterns of library use and their perceptions of the value of various library services. The data reveals similarities and differences to previously studied general graduate student populations, at both Illinois and other universities. The analysis highlights differences between distance and on-campus students, an important division in LIS professional education. Beyond the utility of the findings for understanding the information needs and behaviors of the target population, the study sheds light on pre-professional LIS students' use of libraries and their attitudes toward services they are being trained to provide.


      PubDate: 2014-06-18T14:42:43Z
       
  • Evaluating Scholarly Book Publishers—A Case Study in the Field of
           Journalism
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 June 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Tina M. Neville , Deborah B. Henry
      By adapting multiple metrics used for journal article evaluation and replicating recent publisher metrics, the authors tested methods for evaluating scholarly book publishers. Using monographs published in journalism between 2007 and 2011 as a test case, results indicate that these methods may be useful to other scholarly disciplines.


      PubDate: 2014-06-18T14:42:43Z
       
  • The NSF/NIH Effect: Surveying the Effect of Data Management Requirements
           on Faculty, Sponsored Programs, and Institutional Repositories
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 May 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Anne R. Diekema , Andrew Wesolek , Cheryl D. Walters
      The scholarly communication landscape is rapidly changing and nowhere is this more evident than in the field of data management. Mandates by major funding agencies, further expanded by executive order and pending legislation in 2013, require many research grant applicants to provide data management plans for preserving and making their research data openly available. However, do faculty researchers have the requisite skill sets and are their institutions providing the necessary infrastructure to comply with these mandates' To answer these questions, three groups were surveyed in 2012: research and teaching faculty, sponsored programs office staff, and institutional repository librarians. Survey results indicate that while faculty desire to share their data, they often lack the skills to do this effectively. Similarly, while repository managers and sponsored programs offices often provide the necessary infrastructure and knowledge, these resources are not being promoted effectively to faculty. The study offers important insights about services academic libraries can provide to support faculty in their data management efforts: providing tools for sharing research data; assisting with describing, finding, or accessing research data; providing information on copyright and ownership issues associated with data sets; and assisting with writing data management plans.


      PubDate: 2014-06-18T14:42:43Z
       
  • Distance Students' Attitude Toward Library Help Seeking
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 May 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Yingqi Tang , Hung Wei Tseng
      Distance students' attitude toward seeking library help was examined in a medium sized university. A web-based survey was conducted for indentifying library help seeking attitudes among distance students. A 30-mile radius of the campus was used to arbitrarily distinguish between near campus and far campus groups. The study concluded that distance students who visit library and seek help more frequently are more likely have higher self-efficacy on learning. Among all types of library help sources, Libguides were the most used. Near campus students preferred face-to-face consultation more than virtual service, and they also tend to seek help from peers. However, far campus students were more likely seek help with a distance librarian. Email continued to be the most common way of distributing and receiving library information. Social network tools for information seeking were not appreciated as had been anticipated. Implications of the findings for providing effective reference service are discussed. There is not one reference service model that fits all. A library should determine the best reference service that meets the changes of their communities and library's function over time.


      PubDate: 2014-06-18T14:42:43Z
       
  • The Politics of Work and Productivity Standards
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 May 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): John Buschman



      PubDate: 2014-06-18T14:42:43Z
       
  • Teaching International Students How to Avoid Plagiarism: Librarians and
           Faculty in Collaboration
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 May 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Jenny Gunnarsson , Wlodek J. Kulesza , Anette Pettersson
      This paper presents how a plagiarism component has been integrated in a Research Methodology course for Engineering Master students at Blekinge Institute of Technology, Sweden. The plagiarism issue was approached from an educational perspective, rather than a punitive. The course director and librarians developed this part of the course in close collaboration. One part of the course is dedicated to how to cite, paraphrase and reference, while another part stresses the legal and ethical aspects of research. Currently, the majority of the students are international, which means there are intercultural and language aspects to consider. In order to evaluate our approach to teaching about plagiarism, we conducted a survey. The results of the survey indicate a need for education on how to cite and reference properly in order to avoid plagiarism, a result which is also supported by students' assignment results. Some suggestions are given for future development of the course.


      PubDate: 2014-06-18T14:42:43Z
       
  • Good IDEA: Instructional Design Model for Integrating Information Literacy
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 May 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Kimberly Mullins
      The demand for instructional design librarianship is increasing. The trend is due to higher education's focus on integrating information literacy content in academic disciplines. The generic ADDIE (analysis, design, development, implementation, and evaluation) design model is traditionally used to develop information literacy instruction and content. The IDEA (interview, design, embed, assess) Model is a library-specific systematic approach to integrating information literacy instruction and resources within academic courses. The process is based upon instructional design best practices and cognitive and behavioral learning theories. Close collaboration between library and academic faculty is evident throughout. Flowcharts, forms, and rubrics guide librarians not formally trained in instructional design through the process.


      PubDate: 2014-06-18T14:42:43Z
       
  • Library Value in the Classroom: Assessing Student Learning Outcomes from
           Instruction and Collections
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 May 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Denise Pan , Ignacio J. Ferrer-Vinent , Margret Bruehl
      What is the value of library services and resources in the college classroom' How do library instruction and collections contribute to academic teaching and learning outcomes' A chemistry instructor, instruction librarian, and technical services librarian collaborated to answer these questions by combining chemistry education and information literacy pedagogy to assess student learning. The authors developed curriculum units that teach information literacy skills and scientific literature research in a General Chemistry Laboratory course for Honors students. Their study extends beyond examining library instruction and collections assessment in isolation. Rather, their research protocol intends to contribute to student learning outcomes assessment research. The authors propose that an embedded, mixed-methodology, and longitudinal approach can be used to collect data and assess outcomes in terms that describe and measure the value of library services and resources.


      PubDate: 2014-06-18T14:42:43Z
       
  • The Library Assessment Conference — Past, Present, and Near Future!
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 June 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Steve Hiller , Martha Kyrillidou , Megan Oakleaf



      PubDate: 2014-06-18T14:42:43Z
       
  • The Effects of Reference, Instruction, Database Searches, and Ongoing
           Expenditures on Full-text Article Requests: An Exploratory Analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 May 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Jody Condit Fagan
      ACRL Library Trends and Statistics survey data from two years were analyzed to explore relationships among variables thought to predict full-text article requests. Five different regression models predicted full-text article requests from variables including reference transactions, library instruction, Web site visits, database searches, and ongoing expenditures. Full-time student enrollment and Carnegie classification were included as covariates in all five models. All regressions supported using enrollment as a covariate; four of the regressions supported using Carnegie classification as an additional covariate. Results suggested that reference transactions, library instruction, and ongoing expenditures increase the number of database searches and full-text requests beyond these covariates. Ongoing expenditures made the largest contribution in all models, but did not always contribute the most unique variance. Furthermore, a mediation analysis showed a significant indirect effect of library instruction on full-text requests through database searches. This study suggests most ACRL data may need log transformation before using regression analyses, and offers one approach to interpreting results. Future research could investigate the meaning of ongoing expenditures after controlling for institutional size and Carnegie classification. Additional variables such as interlibrary loan usage or whether the library has a discovery tool might be interesting to include in similar models.


      PubDate: 2014-06-18T14:42:43Z
       
  • Student Engagement in One-Shot Library Instruction
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 May 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Kevin W. Walker , Michael Pearce
      As technology has increased students' access to both high and low quality information, the need for effective information literacy instruction has become more apparent. However, many librarians still struggle to solidify their place, and their value, in the instructional landscape of their parent institution. This struggle persists while library instruction for students remains limited to one 50–75min session (one-shot instruction). Indeed, the notion that information literacy can be taught in one session is preposterous for most librarians. Nevertheless, as this constraint persists, librarians must work to improve the results students achieve within the one-shot model. This research explores ways in which one-shot library instruction might be bolstered through the promotion of higher levels of student engagement. This research utilizes a pre and post-test analytical model to compare an experimental, learner-centered approach to library instruction, supplemented with clickers, to a more traditional pedagogical approach. Statistical analyses show that while both the experimental and control groups witnessed significant improvement from pre to post-test, there was no statistically significant difference between these two approaches. These findings elicit further, perhaps more troubling, questions regarding the level of engagement possible in one-shot library instruction.


      PubDate: 2014-06-18T14:42:43Z
       
  • The Transition Experience of Academic Library Directors
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 May 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Curtis Brundy
      Academic library administration is challenging work, and this is especially the case during a leader's transition into a new director role. This phenomenological study examines the transition experience of three academic library directors who have been in their positions for approximately one year. This study investigates strategies for success, lessons learned, and pitfalls during the transition period. The findings explore actions and strategies that were taken by the participants to help ensure success during their own transitions, information that may prove useful to new and aspiring academic library directors.


      PubDate: 2014-06-18T14:42:43Z
       
  • A Library and the Disciplines: A Collaborative Project Assessing the
           Impact of eBooks and Mobile Devices on Student Learning
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 May 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Barbara C. Glackin , Roy W. Rodenhiser , Brooke Herzog
      With the proliferation of technology usage, it is essential to understand the effect of implementation of technology in the academic setting. Specifically, this article examines the impact of eBooks and mobile devices on student learning. A pilot study was conducted with three areas of interest. The first question of interest found that owning or having access to two or more mobile devices significantly increased respondents' frequency of accessing eBooks. The second question examined the pros and cons of using mobile devices. Accessibility and cost savings were found as pros; while functionality and pedagogy were reported as drawbacks to mobile device usage. Furthermore, usability responses varied. The third question examined the effect of mobile device use on student learning. Findings show that eBooks and mobile device use in the classroom have a significant impact on the student's educational experience.


      PubDate: 2014-06-18T14:42:43Z
       
  • Use of UGC-Infonet E-resources by Social Science Academics in Indian
           Universities: An Evaluation Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 June 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Suresh K. Chauhan , Preeti Mahajan
      UGC is providing access to scholarly electronic resources (e-resources) to Indian universities through the UGC-Infonet Digital Library Consortium. Access to subscribed e-resources is being provided free of cost to member universities. The whole program is funded by the UGC and executed by the INFLIBNET Centre. Now, the UGC-Infonet Digital Library Consortium is in its 11th year and it has been expected that privileged academicians are utilizing available e-resources extensively and optimally. In this paper an effort is being made to assess, how social science faculty working in Indian universities have been using e-resources, what are the problems they are facing in accessing them, and what are the efforts made by INFLIBNET to spread awareness about such an ambitious initiative of UGC among social science faculty members. This paper also highlights some important issues with respect to use, acceptance and planning of this consortium.


      PubDate: 2014-06-18T14:42:43Z
       
  • Snakes or Ladders' Evaluating a LibGuides Pilot at UCD Library
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 June 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Michelle Dalton , Rosalind Pan
      Online subject guides are commonly used by libraries to provide information support to students. LibGuides (a cloud-based commercial product launched in 2007) represents one of the latest incarnations of the traditional subject guide or portal, and are widely used across American academic libraries. In Ireland however, library subject guides of entirely local design and hosted on a local web server still dominate. This paper outlines the project management process involved in implementing a LibGuides pilot at University College Dublin Library, including the planning, design and implementation of a new range of subject-related guides. The pilot nature of the project necessitated a strong focus on evaluation, particularly in assessing the effectiveness and suitability of LibGuides as a platform for delivering information literacy support, both from an administrative and end-user perspective. A two-stranded approach was used in this review process, incorporating quantitative web statistics and analytics alongside qualitative feedback from students, academic staff and Library staff. Feedback that was gathered suggested that the LibGuides subject guides were generally viewed very positively by both staff and students. Notwithstanding this, awareness (as indicated through usage statistics) remained moderate during the pilot, pointing to the importance of the visibility, positioning and promotion of guides.


      PubDate: 2014-06-18T14:42:43Z
       
  • A Quantitative Survey on the Influence of Students' Epistemic Beliefs on
           Their General Information Seeking Behavior
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 April 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Heidar Mokhtari
      This exploratory survey aimed to investigate the possible influence of students' epistemic beliefs (EBs) on their general information seeking behavior (GISB). The study sample consisted of 290 undergraduate students majoring in different disciplines in some centers and units of Payame Noor University (distance education) in northern Iran in the academic year of 2012–2013. They completed a 28-itemed Epistemic Beliefs Inventory and a researcher-made 25-itemed General Information Seeking Behavior Questionnaire. By using SPSS 19 software, collected data was analyzed. The findings showed that students' EBs positively affected their GISB. Students with sophisticated EBs had elaborate GISB in comparison with those having naïve EBs. It can be concluded that the consideration of epistemic beliefs is relevant for research on information seeking behavior. This necessitates us to revise our approaches to reference services, information consulting and information literacy. This study and further related studies can lead to better performance in information environments from the user's side and guide academic librarians to integrate epistemic beliefs in library instruction.


      PubDate: 2014-04-29T06:44:08Z
       
  • NASIG's Core Competencies for Electronic Resources Librarians Revisited:
           An Analysis of Job Advertisement Trends, 2000–2012
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 April 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Eric Hartnett
      During its relatively short existence, the electronic resources librarian has often shared responsibilities with other areas of librarianship. To highlight the uniqueness and provide a level of understanding about the position, the North American Serials Interest Group developed NASIG's Core Competencies for Electronic Resources Librarians based on a study which analyzed the occurrence of descriptors – responsibilities and qualifications – from job ads posted between 2005 and 2009. The aim of this article is to build on NASIG's Core Competencies by expanding the time period considered. Data from the additional years brings to light both rising and declining trends reflecting changes in electronic resources librarian responsibilities and requirements. The author contends that the findings reported in this article may be useful for refining NASIG's Core Competencies as the profession evolves.


      PubDate: 2014-04-29T06:44:08Z
       
  • Education and Life-long Learning of an Academic Librarian
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 April 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Wyoma vanDuinkerken , Wendi Arant-Kaspar



      PubDate: 2014-04-29T06:44:08Z
       
  • Four Pedagogical Approaches in Helping Students Learn Information Literacy
           Skills
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 April 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Ma Lei Hsieh , Patricia H. Dawson , Melissa A. Hofmann , Megan L. Titus , Michael T. Carlin
      In spring 2012, Rider University librarians heightened their collaboration with classroom faculty to teach students in core writing classes information literacy (IL) skills during IL instruction (ILI) sessions. This quasi-experimental study assessed four pedagogical approaches for single or multi-session ILI. The conventional approach, which involves lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on time, was used in both the control and the experimental groups. The three experimental groups involved: (a) assigning students to preview the class Research Guide and take a graded quiz (Preview group), (b) engaging interactively with students during the ILI session (Active Learning group), and (c) providing multiple instruction and follow-up sessions (Multi-session group). A different pretest and posttest based on the first two ACRL Information Competency Standards for Higher Education (2000) were developed for assessment. The results showed that student knowledge of concepts included in the training improved significantly in both the control and the experimental groups, but no differences were found among the teaching methods employed. The qualitative analysis revealed that the professor in the Preview group who integrated IL cohesively in her assignments experienced more satisfactory learning outcomes. The overall low scores suggest that more powerful instruction strategies besides diversified pedagogies are needed to significantly enhance long-term retention.


      PubDate: 2014-04-29T06:44:08Z
       
  • Australian Academic Librarians' Perceptions of Effective Web 2.0 Tools
           Used to Market Services and Resources
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 April 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Zhixian Yi
      This study examines how Australian academic librarians perceive effective Web 2.0 tools used to market library services and resources and the factors influencing perceptions of the Web 2.0 tools used. An online survey was sent to 400 academic librarians in 37 Australian universities. The response rate was 57.5%. The qualitative data were analysed using content analysis. The collected quantitative and qualitative data were analysed using descriptive (frequencies, percentages, means, standard deviations) and inferential statistics (ordinal regressions). The key findings show that demographics, human capital and library variables play an important and significant role in predicting librarians' perceptions of effective Web 2.0 tools used to market services and resources. This paper provides a better understanding of academic librarians' attitudes, views as well as effective Web 2.0 tools used to market their services and resources. Librarians can use the results to reflect on the effectiveness of the Web 2.0 tools used, to balance the weight of the factors' influences and to better understand various effective Web 2.0 tools to enable them to market academic library services and resources more effectively in the future.


      PubDate: 2014-04-29T06:44:08Z
       
  • Putting a Sacred Cow Out to Pasture: Assessing the Removal of Fines and
           Reduction of Barriers at a Small Academic Library
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 April 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Kathleen Reed , Jean Blackburn , Daniel Sifton
      At the beginning of the 2012/13 academic year, Vancouver Island University library removed most fines and made other loans changes to improve access to physical collections. One year later, the changes were assessed using circulation data and staff interviews. The removal of fines had no significant effect on borrower return rates and circulation numbers, but did win significant goodwill among users. Library staff believe the changes to be positive.


      PubDate: 2014-04-29T06:44:08Z
       
  • Occupational Sub-Cultures, Jurisdictional Struggle and Third Spa
           Theorising Professional Service Responses to Research Data Management
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 April 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): E. Verbaan , A.M. Cox
      Effective Research Data Management (RDM) is becoming an increasing concern in UK universities as a result of mandates from research funders. The study explored the usefulness of theories of occupational sub-culture, jurisdictional struggle and Third Space to understand how librarians, IT staff and research administrators view developing services to support RDM. Data were collected through 20 semi-structured interviews with staff in the Library, IT services and Research Office of a research intensive university in Northern England. The notion of occupational sub-culture directs attention to the different ways professional services view RDM. Broadly speaking, IT Services focussed on short term data storage; Research Office on compliance and research quality; librarians on preservation and advocacy. In terms of Abbott's theories, the Library was the only department claiming a new jurisdiction in RDM. This could be seen as an extension of its existing jurisdiction in Open Access and Information Literacy. The other departments claimed to be short of resources to take on such a complex project. Some interviewees feared RDM might be risky and demand lots of resources. Third Space theory is a powerful way to think about roles that might emerge in a new intra-professional space as RDM services become a reality.


      PubDate: 2014-04-29T06:44:08Z
       
  • Repurposing Space in a Science and Engineering Library: Considerations for
           a Successful Outcome
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 April 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): John H. Sandy , Mangala Krishnamurthy , Vincent F. Scalfani
      In response to the growth of digital collections, services, and changes in legacy operations, Rodgers Library for Science and Engineering at The University of Alabama prepared a plan to re-emphasize the “library as place.” Changing expectations and needs of users was another catalyst for change. A major project followed to repurpose substantial space formerly used to house collections and deliver services linked to physical collections. As part of the change, the library streamlined legacy operations and added new services such as specialized academic software and new technology. The library was developed as a place where students can collaborate, share, and perform a wide variety of research and instructional activities using special technologies and modern facilities. Importantly, the library was designed as a flexible environment with emphasis on mobile furnishings and technologies. To create ambience and build an inviting atmosphere, library space was embellished with attractive art and high-demand accessories such as casual seating and café services. This paper reports on repurposing an area of about 13,000ft2 in the Rodgers Library for Science and Engineering. The project was completed in about one year. Preliminary assessment data revealed that in the year following space repurposing, library use increased dramatically with patron visits up about 43% over the prior year.


      PubDate: 2014-04-29T06:44:08Z
       
  • Copyright Awareness, Partnerships, and Training Issues in Academic
           Libraries
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 April 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Deborah H. Charbonneau , Michael Priehs
      This article reports on the results of a national survey of academic librarians and library staff (N=226) in the United States about their awareness of various copyright policies, partnerships with campus groups to address copyright issues, and training needs. A majority of the survey respondents reported that they have answered copyright-related questions in the workplace, yet only 49% (n=98) of the respondents perceived they were prepared to provide copyright information to library users. Awareness of various copyright policies among librarians and staff members varied, including a reported minimal awareness of the T.E.A.C.H. Act. In addition, survey respondents expressed the desire for more copyright-related training. In light of these findings, the present study extends the existing literature and offers recommendations to help better prepare a “copyright confident” or “copyright responsive” academic library workforce.


      PubDate: 2014-04-29T06:44:08Z
       
  • Re-framing Librarians' Identities and Assumptions around IT
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 April 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Pamela Carson , Geoffrey Little
      As important aspects of librarianship converge with information technology (IT), the role of librarians is worth considering. Librarians may not be fully engaging with the possibilities of IT because they are only using, rather than creating, information technology. Examining the implications of gender underrepresentation and gendered identities in both fields is a starting point for investigating librarians' relationship with IT. In particular, stereotypes for the female gender and the librarian profession may be an impediment in librarians' involvement in IT. Librarians may self-stereotype themselves out of engaging with IT by identifying strongly with female and librarian stereotypes, which can be considered to be incompatible with IT stereotypes. However, upon closer examination, stereotypes can be shown to be false and those who previously self-stereotyped can adopt more balanced identities, aiding performance. Finding positive role models who do not fit stereotypes may be helpful. Expecting a comprehensive IT education in library school is misguided, but problem-based learning – commonly seen in IT – is one method librarians could adopt. Libraries should prioritize and make allowances for IT skill development and librarians can take advantage of the increasing opportunities for learning about IT.


      PubDate: 2014-04-29T06:44:08Z
       
 
 
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