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Journal Cover Journal of Academic Librarianship
   [764 followers]  Follow    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
     ISSN (Print) 0099-1333
     Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2575 journals]   [SJR: 1.577]   [H-I: 31]
  • Library Instruction and Themed Composition Courses: An Investigation of
           Factors that Impact Student Learning
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 December 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Erin E. Rinto , Elisa I. Cogbill-Seiders
      Many academic libraries partner with English composition in order to teach first year students skills related to academic research and writing. Due to the partnership between information literacy and first-year writing programs, it is important to evaluate how these programs can best support one another. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of two factors on student information literacy skill development: library instruction and section theme—defined here as class sections of the English 102 (ENG 102) program developed around a central topic selected by the instructor. A random sample of annotated bibliographies from 95 sections of ENG 102 were scored with two information literacy rubrics in order to find out if scores differed between sections based on the variables of library instruction and theme. The results of this study indicate that sections of the ENG 102 program that attended an information literacy instruction session scored significantly higher on the annotated bibliography assignment than sections that did not attend. We also found that themed sections of ENG 102 scored marginally higher on the annotated bibliography than non-themed sections of ENG 102. Implications for further research are discussed, including the potential impact of theme-based writing on information literacy learning.


      PubDate: 2014-12-16T21:26:12Z
       
  • Digital Preservation Challenges with an ETD Collection — A Case
           Study at Texas Tech University
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 December 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Joy M. Perrin , Heidi M. Winkler , Le Yang
      The dangers that digital files face can seem merely the stuff of theory and risk assessment matrices until an institution experiences its first data loss; especially when those digital files represent the graduate research output of a university, the potential impact of that loss increases exponentially. The authors present a case study of the challenges one academic library has encountered in the stewardship of its electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs) over the course of a decade. This article examines the problems that can arise years after the transition from a physical to electronic collection and presents documentation solutions that can make ETD preservation and curation more effective.


      PubDate: 2014-12-16T21:26:12Z
       
  • Student Confidence/Overconfidence in the Research Process
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 December 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Valeria E. Molteni , Emily K. Chan
      Librarians with instructional responsibilities will base information literacy session content upon course syllabi and teaching faculty's assessments of student readiness. Often students' self-perceived competencies do not factor into the lesson planning process. The aim of this project is to collect the levels of self-confidence for a group of students who are primarily entering health care professions. This study observes students' levels of self-confidence in performing research-related activities and their corresponding ability to correctly answer content questions for those tasks. Students' self-confidence ratings are not reliable indicators for information literacy competence. The confidence levels for information literacy tasks of students entering health care professions may have clinical implications for future practice.


      PubDate: 2014-12-16T21:26:12Z
       
  • Promoting Academic Library Research Through the
           “Faculty-Member-In-Residence” Program
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 December 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Brian Detlor , Vivian Lewis
      As a means of fostering academic library research, this paper provides an overview of an inaugural “Faculty-Member-In-Residence” program implemented at McMaster University Library, where a non-librarian faculty member from McMaster spent his sabbatical year conducting library research and helping librarians think about research. In addition to providing background on the context of academic library research and the research productivity of academic librarians, the paper describes the objectives, outcomes, and benefits of the program, as well as personal reflections and recommendations on how to move the program forward. Academic libraries are encouraged to launch similar “Faculty-Member-In-Residence” programs at their own institutions.


      PubDate: 2014-12-16T21:26:12Z
       
  • Preserving Patron Privacy in the 21st Century Academic Library
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 December 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Amanda Nichols Hess , Rachelle LaPorte-Fiori , Keith Engwall
      How do libraries reconcile increasing access to information and encouraging the use of 21st century technology systems and tools while also preserving patrons' privacy? This question is challenging for all libraries to address, but academic libraries must grapple with it while also considering other complex issues: not only do these libraries need to comply with the ALA's Library Bill of Rights and supporting documents, but they must also adhere to federal-, state-, and institution-level policies regarding student privacy and information security. This article presents how one university's libraries worked to both develop a public statement on patron privacy and identify behind-the-scenes issues with the collection, storage, and disposal of library patrons' private information. The strategies used herein may be helpful to other academic libraries as they consider patron privacy in the 21st century.


      PubDate: 2014-12-12T16:27:46Z
       
  • BeckyAlbitzChristineAveryDianeZabelRethinking Collection Development and
           Management2014Libraries UnlimitedSanta Barbara, CA978-1-61069-305-9394 p.
           $60
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 40, Issue 6
      Author(s): Brian Sherman



      PubDate: 2014-12-03T16:16:59Z
       
  • Colin B.BurkeInformation and Intrigue: From Index Cards to Dewey Decimals
           to Alger Hiss2014MITCambridge, MA9780262027021344 p. $45
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 40, Issue 6
      Author(s): Bill McMillin



      PubDate: 2014-12-03T16:16:59Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 40, Issue 6




      PubDate: 2014-12-03T16:16:59Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 40, Issue 6




      PubDate: 2014-12-03T16:16:59Z
       
  • Buffering the Negative Effects of Surface Acting: The Moderating Role of
           Supervisor Support in Librarianship
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 November 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Yu-Ping Peng
      The career of a librarian involves lots of emotional labor. Emotional labor strategies influence individual and organizational outcomes in different ways. Previous studies have highlighted several detrimental organizational outcomes of surface acting such as reduced job satisfaction and job performance. To minimize the detrimental effects of surface acting, it has been suggested that there may be some moderators of negative relationships between surface acting and some outcomes. The study uses structural equation modeling to examine how supervisor support moderates the impact of surface acting on facets of job satisfaction and job performance of university librarians. Results indicate that supervisor support was a significant moderator of the relationships between surface acting and the outcomes of extrinsic satisfaction, task performance, and contextual performance. Contrary to one preliminary hypothesis, supervisor support did not moderate the relationship between surface acting and intrinsic satisfaction. The findings can be useful for providing a comprehensive understanding of the relationships between surface acting, supervisor support, facets of job satisfaction, and facets of job performance in the university library context. The study concludes by offering some managerial advice for librarians.


      PubDate: 2014-12-03T16:16:59Z
       
  • The Shift of Information Literacy Towards Research 2.0
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 December 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Tibor Koltay , Sonja Špiranec , László Z. Karvalics
      In this paper, based on desk research, we will present the most important features of Research 2.0 in its relationship with information literacy (IL). The appearance of the Research 2.0 paradigm was brought about by numerous technological innovations resulting from Web 2.0. This may lead to transformations that could change the principles of research activities. When explaining the nature of Research 2.0 we highlight factors that hinder its wider uptake. We will also try to show that IL is changing in some of its aspects as a result of developments in the Research 2.0 domain, regardless of the fact that it is not widely adopted. The consequences resulting from the analyzed transformations in IL are of utmost importance for academic libraries, the content of their instructional activities and future information literacy conceptualizations.


      PubDate: 2014-12-03T16:16:59Z
       
  • Reviews and Analysis of Special Reports
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 40, Issue 6




      PubDate: 2014-12-03T16:16:59Z
       
  • Reviewer Acknowledgement
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 40, Issue 6




      PubDate: 2014-12-03T16:16:59Z
       
  • GillianOliverFiorellaFoscariniRecords Management and Information Culture:
           Tackling the People Problem2014Facet PublishingLondon978-1-85604-947-4178
           p. $95
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 40, Issue 6
      Author(s): Lee Andrew Hilyer



      PubDate: 2014-12-03T16:16:59Z
       
  • DavidStuartWeb Metrics for Library and Information Professionals2014Facet
           PublishingLondon978-1-85604-874-3vii, 199 p. $85.00
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 40, Issue 6
      Author(s): Diana Symons



      PubDate: 2014-12-03T16:16:59Z
       
  • PeggyJohnsonFundamentals of Collection Development and Management3rd
           ed.2014ALA EditionsChicago978-0-8389-1191-4554 p. $77
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 40, Issue 6
      Author(s): Alexis Linoski



      PubDate: 2014-12-03T16:16:59Z
       
  • KarenCalhounExploring Digital Libraries: Foundations, Practice,
           Prospects2014Neal-SchumanChicago978-1-55570-985-3xxix, 329 p. $59
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 40, Issue 6
      Author(s): Delmus E. Williams



      PubDate: 2014-12-03T16:16:59Z
       
  • Relationship of Library Assessment to Student Retention
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 November 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Elizabeth M. Mezick
      Using institution specific data related to library assessment collected as part of an Association of Research Libraries (ARL) Systems and Procedures Exchange Center (SPEC) survey, as well as fall-to-fall retention rates obtained from the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) of the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), this study employs statistical measures of association to analyze the relationship of various assessment practices and policies, including evaluation of student learning outcomes and accessibility of assessment data and analysis, to student persistence.


      PubDate: 2014-11-25T16:11:38Z
       
  • Advancing Digital Repository Services for Faculty Primary Research Assets:
           An Exploratory Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 October 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Stephen Kutay
      The Oviatt Library at California State University Northridge (CSUN) hosts two digital repositories represented by Digital Collections for archival and historical materials, and ScholarWorks institutional repository (IR) for scholarly output. This paper reports on an exploratory study for advancing digital repository services regarding faculty primary research assets created in the course of research and/or collected by scholar custodians of archival materials at CSUN. A survey was distributed to understand: 1) which faculty and departments collect or create primary source assets as part of their research, 2) what types of assets are collected or created, 3) the activities performed to preserve these assets, 4) the level of interest in making primary research documents available online, 5) faculty knowledge of library methods, and 6) attitudes regarding collaboration with the library. This survey functions as part of a needs assessment toward the development of new and enhanced digital repository services to advance research, preservation, data curation, instruction, and exhibition. This knowledge will also help to systematize library and faculty collaboration through the development of policies and workflows that reduce ad hoc re-evaluations and protracted negotiations over the ability of the library to support digital research and instruction projects.


      PubDate: 2014-11-21T16:06:47Z
       
  • Awareness and Attitudes about Open Access Publishing: A Glance at
           Generational Differences
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 October 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Julia E. Rodriguez
      This study explores PhD faculty members' current awareness of open access (OA) and perceptions of OA publishing, focusing on demographic characteristics to understand whether these variables correspond to specific perceptions and behaviors. The majority of respondents taught in Art, Humanities and Social Sciences disciplines. Results point to a growing trend in self reported knowledge of OA across all age groups but OA publishing activity is relatively limited. The younger age brackets reported higher percentages of publishing history than older age brackets, but these younger groups tended to also be tenured. Credibility of OA journals was the top concern of respondents. Results suggest that faculty authors cannot be prejudged by their age, seniority or rank as to their perception of, or experience with OA, because these indicators no longer appear to be strong predictors.


      PubDate: 2014-11-21T16:06:47Z
       
  • Case Study: Managing Change, and More Change, in Tech Services
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 October 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Maurine McCourry



      PubDate: 2014-11-21T16:06:47Z
       
  • Web-based Citation Management Tools: Comparing the Accuracy of Their
           Electronic Journal Citations
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 October 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Lindley Homol
      Many students struggle when citing sources in their research papers and have turned to web-based citation tools in increasing numbers. In order to test the accuracy of the citations generated by these products, a sample of student-selected electronic journal articles was collected and MLA and APA citations for these articles were created using EBSCO Discovery Service's Cite tool, EndNote Basic, RefWorks, and Zotero. Although EndNote Basic, RefWorks and Zotero's APA citation error rates were significantly lower than that of EBSCO Discovery Service, none of the programs was capable of generating an error-free MLA electronic journal citation.


      PubDate: 2014-11-21T16:06:47Z
       
  • Applying the Tiers of Assessment: A Holistic and Systematic Approach to
           Assessing Library Collections
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 October 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Madeline Kelly
      Collection assessment is a key component of collection development, budget allocation, and justification of library collections. Unfortunately, comprehensive collection assessment is daunting, subject to the weaknesses of individual tools and the overwhelming number of subject areas to assess. Few studies have attempted systematic assessment projects using multiple tools or methods, nor have many attempted to assess an entire collection subject-by-subject. This study implements an alternative to the single-tool model, combining multi-tool analysis with a systematic, subject-by-subject approach to the collection. The goal was to determine whether such a model of collection assessment was feasible in an academic library setting, providing usable data without overinvestment of manpower and resources. To this end, the method was tested in a pilot program at George Mason University (Mason), assessing three subjects at varying levels of depth. While there was concern that the methodology would prove too ambitious for full-scale implementation, the pilot yielded valuable, tangible results in a timely manner and provides a solid model for future assessment efforts at Mason and elsewhere.


      PubDate: 2014-11-21T16:06:47Z
       
  • Moving Beyond Seating-centered Learning Environments: Opportunities and
           Challenges Identified in a POE of a Campus Library
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 October 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Caitlin P. DeClercq , Galen Cranz
      Colleges increasingly are recognized as student workplaces, inspiring campus leaders to create healthier campus environments. Yet challenging this vision is burgeoning research regarding the health risks of sedentary behavior, an under-studied college health concern that implies deleterious health outcomes and, by extension, academic impediments as well. Can movement be incorporated into academic activities such as studying or reading? This question—particularly relevant to libraries due to their increasing use as study spaces—requires the expansion of standard methods of evaluating student health needs and behaviors. We propose Post-Occupancy Evaluation (POE) methods as a novel way to investigate sedentary behaviors in a campus library and identify designs and practices to help promote movement. In 2012 and 2013, as part of an undergraduate architecture class, we conducted two POEs of Berkeley's newest library to learn how the space is used and, inspired by new research about the perils of sedentary behavior, we also considered how the library could be used. Through our findings we confirmed the changing role of campus libraries as study spaces, observed social and built environment contexts of sedentary behaviors in library settings, and identified possible interventions to introduce postural variation and physical activity into observed patterns of library use.


      PubDate: 2014-11-21T16:06:47Z
       
  • Usage of E-resources: Virtual Value of Demographics
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 October 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Sue Samson
      The focus of this study was to identify: 1) usage of library e-resources by faculty and staff affiliation and status to identify research and teaching needs; 2) usage of library e-resources by student major, status, gender, registered disability and registered veteran to establish best outreach practices and areas that need service improvement and collection development in support of student learning; and 3) the correlation between use of library e-resources and student attainment as defined by grade point average (GPA). Demographic data was collected for these users based on their university NetID logins. The findings in this study conclusively document that students and faculty use library e-resources to a statistically significant extent and that a statistical relationship exists between student GPA and their use of e-resources. This information confirms the value of library resources to institutional teaching and research needs and can be used to document library value to the institutional mission.


      PubDate: 2014-11-21T16:06:47Z
       
  • The NIH Public Access Policy and Federally Funded Research: An Analysis of
           Problem Recognition and Agenda Setting
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 October 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Glenn S. McGuigan
      This interpretive and descriptive study examines the development of the U.S. National Institute of Health's (NIH) public access policy which requires NIH funded research to be made publicly available through an open access depository, the PubMed Central database. Using elements of Kingdon's (2003) multiple streams framework, Stone's (2012) challenges to the theory of free market efficiency, and her rhetorical characterization of “good weak interests” vs. “bad strong interests,” this work explores the rationale behind the development of the NIH open access policy . Based upon this rationale and the current structure of the scholarly publishing system, future implications for other federally or publicly funded research are proposed.


      PubDate: 2014-11-21T16:06:47Z
       
  • Finding the Right Notes: An Observational Study of Score and Recording
           Seeking Behaviors of Music Students
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 November 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Kirstin Dougan
      There are several complexities inherent in searching for music materials and many possible starting points both within the library and outside of it. This study uses task observation as well as interviews to determine how undergraduate and graduate music students undertake finding music scores and recordings in an academic setting. It explores what tools and search strategies music students employ, and whether they are more disposed to use YouTube or Google rather than trying to make sense of the wide array of choices and interfaces libraries offer. Results of this study show that context of the search and the end use of the materials are important factors in how and where students search.


      PubDate: 2014-11-21T16:06:47Z
       
  • Communicating Library Value — The Missing Piece of the Assessment
           Puzzle
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 November 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Amanda B. Albert



      PubDate: 2014-11-21T16:06:47Z
       
  • Stealing the Limelight? Examining the Relationship Between New
           Librarians and Their Supervisors
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 November 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Melissa N. Mallon
      This study was conducted in order to determine how supervisor support relates to a new librarian's job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Factors examined include whether librarians in positions of power are reluctant to foster growth in beginning librarians and, if so, whether this reluctance is due to feelings of insecurity or fear of being outshone. This paper also examines the effect a supervisor's reluctance to offer advice and mentoring on the psychological state of new librarians. Suggestions for future research are discussed.


      PubDate: 2014-11-21T16:06:47Z
       
  • Functionality Analysis of an Open Source Repository System: Current
           Practices and Implications
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 November 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Hsin-liang Chen , Yin Zhang
      The aim of this research study is to examine the functionality development of the open source repository system: DSpace. The data on DSpace repositories' implementation practices were collected from the DSpace User Registry during September 2013–March 2014. A total of 545 repositories in the registry indicated specific system function customizations, representing 533 unique institutions from 95 countries worldwide. The findings indicate that U.S.A. and India are the top two countries to have adopted DSpace. The majority of the DSpace digital repositories are created by academic institutions, which indicates a strong representation of academic institutions in the use of DSpace. The major adopted system functions are statistics, Dublin Core Meta Toolkit, Manakin Themes, and language packages. Most DSpace members use the repository system as their institutional and learning resource repositories. The top content types are conference papers, research documents, and learning/teaching materials. The implications of the findings are also discussed.


      PubDate: 2014-11-21T16:06:47Z
       
  • Academic Library Mission Statements, Web Sites, and Communicating Purpose
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 November 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Preston Salisbury , Matthew R. Griffis
      Continual changes in information technologies over the past three decades have wrought substantial changes in library services and in information-seeking behavior among the general public. Thus the necessity for libraries to utilize the internet to communicate with stakeholders is even more important for academic libraries, as the rate of internet usage among those with college degrees continues to outpace that of the general population. The online availability of a well-crafted mission statement is therefore crucial. This analysis of the web sites of 113 ARL academic libraries—an update of Kuchi's (2006) study—considers the inclusion (availability) and placement (accessibility) of mission statements on library web sites and provides insights into the academic library's use of such statements for communicating mission and purpose to different stakeholders.


      PubDate: 2014-11-21T16:06:47Z
       
  • A Utilization Model of Users' Metadata in Libraries
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 November 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Constantia Kakali
      The purpose of this paper is to define a utilization model of meaningful users' tags in subject indexing work in libraries. The research work was originally performed with a quantitative method; a large number of relations (tag–bibliographic record) were examined and analyzed, resulting in a definition of the classes of the model. This model was attempted to be verified by a survey addressed to cataloguers in Greek libraries. This paper is based on the principle that the users' collaboration and their vocabulary provide useful feedback for the enhancement of the subject description of the documents.


      PubDate: 2014-11-21T16:06:47Z
       
  • Racial Microaggressions in Academic Libraries: Results of a Survey of
           Minority and Non-minority Librarians
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 November 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Jaena Alabi
      There is relatively little literature on racism within the profession of academic librarianship. To investigate academic librarians' experiences of racism, this research project uses the framework of racial microaggressions, which are subtle, denigrating messages directed toward people of color. According to the results of an online survey, some librarians of color have had racial microaggressions directed at them by their colleagues. Non-minority librarians, however, are unlikely to recognize these disparaging exchanges.


      PubDate: 2014-11-21T16:06:47Z
       
  • Delivering Virtual Reference Services on the Web: An Investigation into
           the Current Practice by Academic Libraries
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 November 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Sharon Q. Yang , Heather A. Dalal
      This article describes a study on web-based reference services in academic libraries. A random sample of 362 institutions was taken from Peterson's Four-Year Colleges 2013. The authors scanned each library's website for reference-related activities, specifically if the library 1) provides or advertises reference on the main page and terminology used to advertise the reference service; 2) provides chat and related information such as chat box location, provider (in-house vs. consortia), and the vendor or program used and 3) provides other forms of virtual reference through email, phone, text messaging, instant messenger, video chat, interactive knowledge base, and other technologies. The findings indicate that approximately 68% of the libraries in the sample stated reference services on the main webpage. About 74% of the libraries used at least one of the following technologies for virtual reference: email, phone, chat, IM, text, and video chat. Exactly 47.5% of the libraries provide chat. The institutions that offer more advanced degrees and have more students are more likely to offer chat than those who offer low-level degrees and fewer students. This is the only study on a large scale with details about virtual reference in academic libraries.


      PubDate: 2014-11-21T16:06:47Z
       
  • Interactive Training Materials Developed by Spanish University Libraries
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 November 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Marta Somoza-Fernández
      The main features of interactive training materials produced by Spanish university libraries are described. A total of 365 materials that are both technologically and educationally interactive were selected. The results show positive indicators such as a considerable increase in production and the diversification of technological media. While libraries are actively involved in the creation and development of training materials, the general conclusion is that most are still at an early stage in the context of the information and knowledge society, which fosters learning of information skills, virtual training and adaptation to different learning styles.


      PubDate: 2014-11-21T16:06:47Z
       
  • Space: The Final Frontier
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 November 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Geoffrey Little



      PubDate: 2014-11-21T16:06:47Z
       
  • Applications of Mobile Social Media: WeChat Among Academic Libraries in
           China
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 November 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Jianhua Xu , Qi Kang , Zhiqiang Song , Christopher Peter Clarke
      This paper describes the application of the social media platform WeChat. It explores the use of this emerging mobile app using the official WeChat accounts of the top 39 academic libraries in China. The findings indicate that approximately one third of the libraries use WeChat as a marketing tool to promote collections and services for users. Most of the 39 libraries, however, are still using the most basic functions. Advanced functions urgently need to be adopted. The main uses of WeChat are general social networking services (SNSs) and automatic answering and interaction features, which include seeking and sharing information, user self-service, and keyword-identified reference auto-responders. The study uses six aspects of quality to evaluate the interaction and content delivered by WeChat. These include the volume of information, information content quality, concordance rate, frequency, self-service, and basic features. The experience of Chinese university libraries is used to provide recommendations for other libraries.


      PubDate: 2014-11-21T16:06:47Z
       
  • The Politics of Neoliberalism in Academic Libraries: The Fiscal Front
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 October 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): John Buschman



      PubDate: 2014-11-21T16:06:47Z
       
  • Characterizing University Library Use of Social Media: A Case Study of
           Twitter and Facebook from Australia
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 October 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Stuart Palmer
      The work presented here characterise the engagement of one university library with two social media platforms popular with academic libraries. The collected data are analysed to identify the forms of Twitter and Facebook activity that engage library stakeholders in social media conversations. Associations were observed between: i) directed tweets from the library and mentions of the library by others on Twitter; and ii) comments from the library and comments from others on Facebook. Three broad classes of Twitter user interacting with the library were revealed: i) accounts strongly linked to the library with multiple to/from tweets; ii) those weakly linked to the library with, typically, a single tweet; and iii) those indirectly linked to the library through tweets mentioning the library and sent by other users. Two divergent forms of Facebook interaction with the library were highlighted: i) a library post generating a large sequence of comments, typically in response to a competition/challenge; and ii) a library post with no comments, typically a photo post or a post inviting readers to click a link to find out more about an event/service. The work presented here is an initial investigation that provides useful insights, and offers a methodology for future research.


      PubDate: 2014-11-21T16:06:47Z
       
  • International Open Access Week at Small to Medium U.S. Academic Libraries:
           The First Five Years
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 October 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Paula C. Johnson
      This research seeks to expand the body of knowledge surrounding International Open Access Week (OA Week) practices among small to medium-sized U.S. institutions, examining the rationales guiding these, and creating a baseline activity inventory which may be elaborated upon as open access continues to evolve and as OA Week matures beyond its fifth (2013) anniversary. An electronic survey with closed- and open-ended questions was used to collect data, which were analyzed for recurring themes. Of respondents whose campuses did observe OA Week, the most reported reason for doing so was related to supporting the library's educational outreach program; fewer respondents cited the library's philosophical commitment to open access. Lack of time was the most frequently given reason for OA Week non-participation, however around one quarter of non-participating respondents reported that they were unaware of OA Week, and another quarter reported that it did not figure in their strategic plan. The conditions that were found to best support celebrating OA Week included a grasp of the principles guiding OA on the part of at least one librarian, reinforced by: the educational mission of the library; adequate personnel; and sufficient time for planning. This exploratory study yields points for library- and self-assessment.


      PubDate: 2014-10-09T16:39:49Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 40, Issue 5




      PubDate: 2014-10-03T16:33:32Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 40, Issue 5




      PubDate: 2014-10-03T16:33:32Z
       
  • We Did it Our Way….
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 October 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Wyoma vanDuinkerken , Wendi Arant Kaspar



      PubDate: 2014-10-03T16:33:32Z
       
  • “Going to College in your Pajamas”?!?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 August 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Wendi Arant Kaspar , Wyoma vanDuinkerken



      PubDate: 2014-09-02T15:56:31Z
       
  • A Correlational Study of Foreign Language Anxiety and Library Anxiety
           Among Non-native Speakers of English: A Case Study in a Malaysian Public
           University
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 September 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Janaki Sinnasamy , Noor Harun Abdul Karim
      This study examines the correlation of the dimensions of foreign language anxiety and library anxiety among undergraduates at a public university in Malaysia. The Malay translated versions of the Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (FLCAS) and the Library Anxiety Scale (LAS) were completed by 147 students pursuing a Foundation in Science course. Analysis revealed a significant correlation in all the dimensions of library anxiety with three of the dimensions of foreign language anxiety, namely speaking anxiety, self-evaluation anxiety, and learner anxiety. The findings in this study will enable librarians to be aware of the anxieties faced by students which can help in the planning and delivery of services and instruction.


      PubDate: 2014-09-02T15:56:31Z
       
  • A Literature Review of How Videogames Are Assessed in Library and
           Information Science and Beyond
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 July 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Ron T. Brown
      In this paper the author explores how videogames and gaming are assessed in Library and Information Science (LIS) and in other fields. The author concludes with a discussion of some potential future directions for assessment practices of videogames and gaming in LIS.


      PubDate: 2014-07-29T15:20:02Z
       
  • Measuring Individual and Organizational Knowledge Activities in Academic
           Libraries with Multilevel Analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 July 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Yuan-Ho Huang
      Knowledge management is vital in many work environments; however, it is difficult to measure the outcome of knowledge management and to distinguish the typology of knowledge activities. This study proposes a knowledge activity scale for assessing individual tacit knowledge and organizational knowledge. This study not only explores knowledge activities of knowledge workers from both individual and organizational dimensions but also investigates the empirical data from academic librarians with exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses of both individual and organizational levels. More than 550 sample data were collected and analyzed in several stages. To conduct a multilevel analysis, the final sample consisted of 286 persons from 40 universities and colleges, and the organizational sizes ranged from 3 to 22 persons. The results show 6 constructs for individual dimensions (knowledge acquisition, knowledge absorption, knowledge sharing, knowledge obstacles, knowledge transfers, and knowledge diffusion) and 3 constructs for organizational dimensions (knowledge growth, knowledge integration, and knowledge breadth). The scale from both individual and organizational dimensions shows robust psychometric properties with acceptable levels of reliability and validity. The proposed scale can reveal the value of librarians' intangible work and also indicate the level of creative organizational climate within academic libraries.


      PubDate: 2014-07-29T15:20:02Z
       
  • Academic Librarians' Varying Experiences of Archives: A Phenomenographic
           Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 July 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Diana K. Wakimoto , Christine S. Bruce
      This article reports on a study investigating academic librarians' varying experiences of archives in order to promote understanding and communication among librarians and archivists. A qualitative, phenomenographic approach was adopted for the study. Three different ways of experiencing archives were identified from analysis of interviews. Archives may be experienced by academic librarians as 1) a place which protects collections; 2) resources to be used in accomplishing tasks such as teaching, research, or outreach; or 3) manifestations of politics. The third way of experiencing archives is the most complex, incorporating both the other experiences. The results of this study may help librarians, especially academic librarians, and archivists communicate more clearly on joint projects involving archival collections thereby enabling more collaboration.


      PubDate: 2014-07-29T15:20:02Z
       
  • Student Deep Participation in Library Work: A Chinese Academic Library's
           Experience
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 July 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Lifeng Han , Yuan Wang , Lili Luo
      Student deep participation in library work allows students to actively participate in library operation and become deeply involved in library service and program development. There are usually two levels of deep participation: level I refers to the employment of student assistants in different areas of library routine work, ranging from shelving to IT support; and level II refers to the engagement of students as library partners or collaborators, working with librarians to complete independent project. Sharing Tsinghua University Library's experiences, we provide a holistic view of how the two levels of student deep participation are implemented at an academic library, with a focus on level II. We seek to generate a thorough understanding of the practices and benefits of student deep participation, and encourage academic libraries to create more opportunities to deeply involve students in library work, and to ultimately demonstrate the value and relevance of the library to the campus community.


      PubDate: 2014-07-29T15:20:02Z
       
  • Research Information Literacy: Addressing Original Researchers' Needs
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 July 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Nina Exner
      Information literacy for faculty, doctoral students and other research-based graduate students, post-docs, and other original researchers is complex. There are fundamental differences between the processes of inquiry used by original researchers as compared to students or even faculty who are synthesizing information to find answers. Original research is different from information synthesis for discovery. Therefore, the information literacy processes to train and support those researchers are different. Analysis of the inquiry-oriented parts of the current and emerging information literacy Standards and Framework shows significant differences in the approach needed for teaching research information literacy. Promising instructional outcomes for information literacy training based around original research include gap analysis, theoretical and methodological discovery, and practical skills like funding search and analysis.


      PubDate: 2014-07-29T15:20:02Z
       
 
 
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