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Journal of Academic Librarianship
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.224
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 1056  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0099-1333
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3161 journals]
  • Critical pedagogies to combat the deficit model in community college
           libraries: A perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 February 2019Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Vikki C. Terrile
       
  • Talent, Schmalent: An Instructional Design/Action Research Framework for
           the Professionalization of Teaching in Academic Libraries
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 45, Issue 2Author(s): Alexander J. Carroll, Kevin Michael Klipfel When myths become canonical beliefs within a professional culture, they can have a profound impact on professional practice. In this paper we identify as a pernicious educational myth the belief that the ability to teach well is a naturally occurring innate talent or skill. The first two sections of the paper aim to demonstrate (i) that the concept of the naturally gifted teacher is a myth based on factually incorrect assumptions about expertise development and (ii) that this myth has several major negative implications for professional practices around teaching in academic libraries. We then we draw on the education literature to offer an alternative model for the cultivation of teaching excellence, an instructional design/action research framework that prioritizes ‘deliberative’ practice over innate talent. We close with suggestions for how academic librarians and library administrators can implement this framework within their institutions.
       
  • State of University Library: Challenges and Solutions for Yemen
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 45, Issue 2Author(s): Abdulghani Muthanna, Guoyuan Sang This study focuses on presenting the state of university libraries in Yemen, drawing upon observational research and in-depth interviews with 4 key university leaders, 12 teaching education program (TEP) chairpersons, 9 college deans, 6 vice-deans, 20 teaching professors, and 34 teacher training students within one higher education institution. The observational research has also covered five libraries of three private universities and two state ones. The findings outline the challenges faced by library users: the presence of traditional libraries, traditional resources and services, and the implementation of new policy. The study highlights the urgent need to redesign libraries, to increase libraries' budgets, and to establish digital resources and services, as well as a national library association.
       
  • How Cyclical Assessment Can Guide Information Literacy Instruction to Best
           Serve First-year Students
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 February 2019Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Susan Woitte, Kathleen McCay There are opportunities and challenges when working with multiple stakeholders, as well as challenges and barriers to first-year student information literacy learning. This article discusses the ways in which one regional university employed cyclical assessment to focus information literacy learning objectives, improve instruction methods, and advance methods of assessment across a four-year time span.
       
  • The Pedagogical Promise of Primary Sources: Research Trends, Persistent
           Gaps, and New Directions
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 45, Issue 2Author(s): Patricia Garcia, Joseph Lueck, Elizabeth Yakel
       
  • Practices, Policies, and Problems in the Management of Learning Data: A
           Survey of Libraries' Use of Digital Learning Objects and the Data They
           Create
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 45, Issue 2Author(s): Graham Sherriff, Daisy Benson, Gary S. Atwood This study analyzed libraries' management of the data generated by library digital learning objects (DLOs) such as forms, surveys, quizzes, and tutorials. A substantial proportion of respondents reported having a policy relevant to learning data, typically a campus-level policy, but most did not. Other problems included a lack of access to library learning data, concerns about student privacy, inadequate granularity or standardization, and a lack of knowledge about colleagues' practices. We propose more dialogue on learning data within libraries, between libraries and administrators, and across the library profession.
       
  • Research sprints: A new model of support
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 January 2019Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Benjamin Wiggins, Shanda L. Hunt, Jenny McBurney, Karna Younger, Michael Peper, Sherri Brown, Tami Albin, Rebecca Orozco
       
  • A Perspective on Wikipedia: Your Students Are Here, Why Aren't You'
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 45, Issue 2Author(s): Meghan L. Dowell, Laurie M. Bridges
       
  • Accepted and Emerging Roles of Academic Libraries in Supporting Research
           2.0
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 45, Issue 2Author(s): Tibor Koltay This paper identifies some of the tasks and roles that academic libraries have to fulfil in order to react to the appearance of Research 2.0 that materialises in data intensive research and requires supporting activities. Reacting to the appearance of Research 2.0 by becoming service providers for scholars working on data-intensive tasks will become an imperative for libraries worldwide, even though due to the differences between countries and institutions, the tasks described in this paper may not seem urgent today. On the other hand, the issues, we identified are already part of everyday best practices in several institutions. Some of them are fairly recent or have taken new characteristics. A few roles identified in this paper are on their way to become standard occupation, while there are still ones that require innovative approaches. Our argument is based on a non-exhaustive review of the recent literature, reporting both on theoretical and practical issues and presenting the results of empirical research in the field.
       
  • Chinese College Students' Health Information Seeking Behavior:
           Implications for Academic Libraries
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 45, Issue 2Author(s): Yanxia Shi, Lili Luo
       
  • “The Carrels are Essential”: An Investigation of Faculty Study Spaces
           at a Mid-Size State College
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 45, Issue 2Author(s): Michelle Hendley
       
  • A Perspective on Emotional Labor in Academic Libraries
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 45, Issue 1Author(s): Jennifer Joe
       
  • Latino students and the academic library: A primer for action
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 45, Issue 1Author(s): Marta Bladek As the growth in Latino college enrollment is expected to continue for years to come, academic libraries at Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs) and beyond will be serving increasing numbers of Hispanic students. Since Latino educational attainment remains lower than of other groups and academic libraries' impact on retention, GPA and related educational outcomes has been well documented, it is crucial that academic libraries actively foster Latino students' success. A review of the literature on Hispanic students and library use, the article also includes recommendations for practice and offers a local example to illustrate strategies libraries may implement to better meet the educational needs of Hispanic students.
       
  • Mentoring Mid-Career: Reflections on Fostering a Culture of Mentorship for
           Experienced Librarians
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 December 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Ginger H. Williams
       
  • Comparing the Information Needs and Experiences of Undergraduate Students
           and Practicing Engineers
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 45, Issue 1Author(s): Margaret Phillips, Michael Fosmire, Laura Turner, Kristin Petersheim, Jing Lu Practicing engineers and undergraduate engineering and technology students seek and use information differently within the research and design process. This paper presents the results of a survey conducted by librarians at Purdue University and information specialists at Caterpillar Inc. to analyze self-reported information habits and challenges of both user populations. The authors created surveys containing similar questions for each user group, using a framework that asked participants to think about their information needs and use during a recent engineering project. The survey questions discerned users' confidence in their information abilities, and their preferences and barriers for finding and using information.The results of this study reveal differences between students and engineers and are informative for both academic and corporate librarians. Key findings affirm previous research that novices are more confident in their abilities than experts. Additionally, the findings suggest undergraduates prefer quick, easy to digest content like online videos and news, while engineers are more likely to learn by consulting a colleague or other subject expert, and through reading journals and trade literature. While students rated themselves as more confident information users, engineers reported working in a more complex information landscape, which includes internal document management systems and numerous places to look for technical information. Findings within this paper can inform the development of information literacy curricula that better parallels the corporate environment, and can give corporate librarians insight into how recent graduates may expect to interact with information in a new work environment.
       
  • A Citation Study on the Use of English Materials in East Asian Studies
           Dissertations
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 45, Issue 1Author(s): Xiang Li
       
  • Problems and Changes in Digital Libraries in the Age of Big Data From the
           Perspective of User Services
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 45, Issue 1Author(s): Shuqing Li, Fusen Jiao, Yong Zhang, Xia Xu Based on the investigation of the position of user service for constructing digital libraries in the big data era, this paper points out that not only data resources of modern digital library have the characteristics of big data, but also the existing library services need to use big data methods to achieve reform and innovation, including resource transferring, resource utilization, social identity, thinking innovation. We focus on the importance of user services and types of big data resources that digital libraries can utilize, which include big data within libraries such as user behavior data and digital literature resource, and other big data outside libraries such as scholarly big data. We also examine the problems and potential of digital libraries in the age of big data relative to data, technology, services, and users. Using existing big data resources and considering the characteristics of current users' needs from the perspective of users, more effective ideas and methods to improve existing services in digital library can be put forward. At the same time, it is the personalized need of users in the age of big data that constitute the driving factor for the development of digital library from resource-sharing service to user-oriented service.
       
  • The Leadership/Followership Process: A Different Understanding of Library
           Leadership
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 45, Issue 1Author(s): Jason Martin
       
  • Challenge of Ukrainian academic librarians in an evolving scholarly
           publishing landscape
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 45, Issue 1Author(s): Serhii Nazarovets, Jaime A. Teixeira da Silva, Maryna Nazarovets Faced with a prolonged economic crisis, Ukrainian research institutes are under pressure as a direct result of limited funding. This has also had a direct negative impact on the functionality of librarians who have seen increasing limitations to acquisitions. Despite economic difficulties, Ukrainian academic librarians are trying to offer their end-users specialized services that involve active librarian mediation in the preparation and dissemination of the results of these users' scientific work. One notable function is to offer aid to users on how to detect pseudo-scientific journals. In this paper, based on a survey of librarians from leading Ukrainian universities, we studied for the first time, the main information resources and tools used by Ukrainian experts to test the validity of scientific journals so that they may be recommended to library users as reliable channels for disseminating research results. These are tools and resources include Scopus, Web of Science, Beall's blacklists, the DOAJ, Think. Check. Submit., and the Norwegian Register. We describe the benefits and limitations that Ukrainian academic librarians may encounter when each of these resources is used. Modern reformation to Ukrainian science has opened up new opportunities for Ukrainian academic librarians. As a result, if they are able to successfully implement such services, they can regain a prominent place in the scientific life of institutions and on the global academic platform.
       
  • Architects, Renovators, Builders, and Fragmenters: A Model for First Year
           Students' Self-perceptions and Perceptions of Information Literacy
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 45, Issue 1Author(s): Maoria J. Kirker, Ilana Stonebraker The transition from high school to college is fraught with academic, social, and emotional changes for first-year students. This year long qualitative study uses cognitive dissonance theory to examine first-year students' changing perceptions of their information literacy competencies throughout their freshman year. Through the examination of students' self-reflections and semi-structured interviews, the study produced cognitive dissonance in students, revealed four information literacy journeys, demonstrated the shifting of students' definitions of research, and shed light on the emotional labor involved in college-level research. Implications for information literacy instruction and future research are discussed.
       
 
 
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