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Journal of Academic Librarianship    [565 followers]  Follow    
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
     ISSN (Print) 0099-1333
     Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2556 journals]   [SJR: 1.577]   [H-I: 31]
  • Necessity as the Mother of Invention: Library Technology in the New
           Economy
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 January 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Geoffrey Little



      PubDate: 2014-01-19T20:15:14Z
       
  • Engagement of Academic Libraries and Information Science Schools in
           Creating Curriculum for Sustainability: An Exploratory Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 January 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Maria A. Jankowska , Bonnie J. Smith , Marianne A. Buehler
      In 2010, the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education released, “Sustainability curriculum in higher education: A call to action,” encouraging infusion of sustainability topics into universities' teaching and research. Since then, academic programs and research related to social, economic, and environmental sustainability have enriched university curricula. An exploratory study was conducted to determine the position and engagements of academic libraries and information science schools in their contributions to scholarly sustainability activities and curricular initiatives. This article presents the results of the study which reveals a number of engagements by library professionals in the areas of sustainability, such as increasing open access to research, building sustainability-related collections and research guides, and incorporating sustainability content into information literacy. While academic libraries and information science schools are engaged in a broad spectrum of initiatives that support their institutions' sustainability research and curricular functions, this study indicates that such activities require a more targeted approach.


      PubDate: 2014-01-15T19:45:58Z
       
  • Empirical Research on a Model to Measure End-user Satisfaction with the
           Quality of Database Search Results
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 January 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Feicheng Ma , Zuying Mo , Yi Luo
      We constructed an end-user model to measure end-user satisfaction with the quality of database search results, using the customer satisfaction theory as a metric. We investigated end-user satisfaction and analyzed key factors which affected user satisfaction. The results show that the end-users' perception of value is the key factor among all of the different factors that impact satisfaction with regard to quality and end-users are willing to make efforts to obtain a higher quality of data. Users tend to evaluate their satisfaction from the perspective of their demands, and database developers should be user oriented in order to improve the level of satisfaction with the data in the database.


      PubDate: 2014-01-15T19:45:58Z
       
  • Stacks, Serials, Search Engines, and Students' Success: First-Year
           Undergraduate Students' Library Use, Academic Achievement, and Retention
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 January 2014
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Krista M. Soria , Jan Fransen , Shane Nackerud
      Like other units within colleges and universities, academic libraries are subject to increasing internal and external pressures to demonstrate their contributions to institutional goals related to students' success. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between first-year undergraduate students' use of the academic library, academic achievement, and retention. Results of ordinary least squares regressions predicting first-year students' cumulative grade point averages (GPA) and logistic regressions predicting students' first-year to second-year retention suggest that students who used academic library services and resources at least once during the academic year had higher GPA and retention on average than their peers who did not use library services. The results of two separate regressions predicting students' GPA by 10 different types of library use suggest that four library use areas were consistently and positively associated with students' GPA: database logins, book loans, electronic journal logins, and library workstation logins. The results of two separate logistic regression analyses suggest that logging into databases and using library workstations were actions consistently and positively associated with students' retention. Additional results predicted by students' use of services at least one time and by one-unit increases in the frequency of library area uses are discussed.


      PubDate: 2014-01-11T19:40:55Z
       
  • Librarians as Authors in Higher Education and Teaching and Learning
           Journals in the Twenty-First Century: An Exploratory Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 December 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Amanda L. Folk
      The future of academic libraries largely depends on our ability to be innovative, anticipate our users' needs, adapt to a changing landscape, and prove our value through evidence. However, if our higher education colleagues do not perceive the profession as being relevant, our ability to innovate, anticipate, and adapt will be moot. This study investigates the visibility of librarians as authors in scholarly higher education (HE) and teaching and learning (TL) journals between 2000 and 2012. Findings include that 1.38% of articles published in these journals were written by a librarian author or authors, most of who are employed at research institutions. Information literacy was the most common topic, and theoretical articles were the most popular article type.


      PubDate: 2013-12-22T12:41:49Z
       
  • Library Space Assessment: User Learning Behaviors in the Library
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 December 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Susan E. Montgomery
      As an essential department at a higher education institution and an informal learning space, little is known about how academic libraries contribute to student learning on campus. The Olin Library sought to learn the role of library space in our users' learning. We surveyed users about their learning behaviors in a specific space prior to a scheduled renovation and then in the same space after. We wanted to determine how the renovation changed users' perceptions of their learning behaviors in that space.


      PubDate: 2013-12-22T12:41:49Z
       
  • License Analysis of e-Journal Perpetual Access
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 December 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Mei Zhang , Kristin R. Eschenfelder
      In this paper we investigate the definitions of perpetual access and examine current studies on the attitudes and concerns towards perpetual access from both libraries and publishers separately. We then conduct a content analysis of 72 e-journal licenses to explore whether perpetual access clauses vary among commercial publishers and non-commercial publishers, whether clauses change over time, and whether differences exist between consortium and site licenses. Results suggest that different perpetual access clauses may be at different stages of institutionalization. Perpetual access clauses that are more institutionalized include: addressing perpetual access in license, providing perpetual access upon expiry of subscription, and specifying a location for perpetual access.


      PubDate: 2013-12-03T12:04:55Z
       
  • American Reference Books Annual, 2012 ed., Volume 43 by Shannon Graff
           Hysell. Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited, 2012. 658 p. $149. ISBN
           978-1610691512.
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 39, Issue 6
      Author(s): Deborah Katz



      PubDate: 2013-11-29T12:03:59Z
       
  • ALA [Glossary] of Library & Information Science, 4th ed., edited
           by Michael Levine-Clark and Toni M. Carter. Chicago: ALA, 2013. 280 p.
           $55.00. ISBN 978-0-8389-1111-2.
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 39, Issue 6
      Author(s): Alexis Linoski



      PubDate: 2013-11-29T12:03:59Z
       
  • Records & Information Management, by Patricia C. Franks. Chicago:
           Neal-Schuman, 2013. 410 p. $80.00. ISBN 978-1-55570-910-5.
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 39, Issue 6
      Author(s): Lee Andrew Hilyer



      PubDate: 2013-11-29T12:03:59Z
       
  • Build a Great Team: One Year to Success, by Catherine Hakala-Ausperk.
           Chicago, IL: ALA Editions, 2013. 286 p. $52.00. ISBN 9780838911709.
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 39, Issue 6
      Author(s): Maura Seale



      PubDate: 2013-11-29T12:03:59Z
       
  • Research Methods in Information, 2nd ed., by Alison Jane Pickard. Chicago:
           Neal-Schuman, 2013. xxii, 361 p. $85.00. ISBN 978-1-55570-936-5.
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 39, Issue 6
      Author(s): Diana Symons



      PubDate: 2013-11-29T12:03:59Z
       
  • The Future of Scholarly Communication, edited by Deborah Shorley and
           Michael Jubb. London: Facet Publishing, 2013. 188 p. $71.04. ISBN
           9781856048170.
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 39, Issue 6
      Author(s): Rebecca L. Mugridge



      PubDate: 2013-11-29T12:03:59Z
       
  • The Whole Library Handbook 5: Current Data, Professional Advice and
           Curiosa, edited by George M. Eberhart. Chicago, IL: ALA Editions, 2013.
           536 p. $50.00. ISBN: 978-0838910900.
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 39, Issue 6
      Author(s): Alexandra Simons



      PubDate: 2013-11-29T12:03:59Z
       
  • New Electronic Resources Management System for the ANKOS Consortium
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 39, Issue 6
      Author(s): Sami Cukadar , Ayhan Tuglu , Gultekin Gurdal
      The Anatolian University Libraries Consortium (ANKOS), which was originally established to coordinate university libraries' electronic serials purchases, today plays an active role in selecting, providing access to, managing and evaluating electronic information resources in Turkey. A substantial volume of subscriptions and purchases of e-journal, e-book and e-reference resources is conducted through ANKOS. In order to measure the usage rate of these resources, to conduct cost analyses and to use the findings in strategic planning cycles of both the institutions and the consortium, a New Electronic Resources Management System (ERM) has been developed by ANKOS. In this study, the authors explain how the new system was developed, its technical features, data entry and collection, the system's contribution to the collection of institution and usage statistics, and its impact on strategic planning. Available statistical facts are also provided to illustrate the development and the impact of the new ERM system.


      PubDate: 2013-11-29T12:03:59Z
       
  • Librarians and Mandatory Academic Advising at a Mid-sized Public
           University: A Case Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 39, Issue 6
      Author(s): Robert Flatley , Michael A. Weber , Susan Czerny , Sylvia Pham
      This article provides a case study of librarians being assigned the responsibility of providing academic advising to undeclared students at a mid-sized public university. The experience of academic advising as librarians is explored as well as challenges, benefits, best practices and next steps. The implications and impact of advising on library work is discussed. For the most part, the librarians found that academic advising dovetailed well with the culture of librarianship.


      PubDate: 2013-11-29T12:03:59Z
       
  • Instruction Coordinators and Higher Education Accreditation: A Study of
           Awareness and Assessment Documentation Use
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 39, Issue 6
      Author(s): Melissa Becher
      This study gauges instruction and information literacy coordinators' awareness of higher education accreditation processes at their institutions and provides a picture of how coordinators use assessment documentation produced by units external to the library. The study took the form of a survey sent to a random sample of instruction coordinators and information literacy librarians stratified by regional accrediting body. Results showed that instruction coordinators generally are aware of accreditation processes but that only about half use documentation relating to student learning assessment, which may include written student learning outcomes at the institution, program, or course level, plans for assessing learning outcomes, and reports on assessment activities and results, to further their information literacy goals. Accreditation awareness is influenced by time in position, time in the profession, and, to some extent, regional accreditor. Use of and considered importance of assessment documentation is influenced by size of institution, regional accreditor, and, to some extent, time in position. Suggestions for increasing awareness and use of documentation include introducing the accreditation process to new librarians in library school, encouraging contribution of experiences with assessment documentation to the literature and regional conferences, and advocating for instruction coordinators to serve on campus assessment committees.


      PubDate: 2013-11-29T12:03:59Z
       
  • More Than a Number: Unexpected Benefits of Return on Investment Analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 39, Issue 6
      Author(s): Denise Pan , Gabrielle Wiersma , Leslie Williams , Yem S. Fong
      In 2010–2011, University of Colorado (CU) librarians implemented a multi-campus pilot study to measure the institutional value of library resources used by faculty in their research. The study incorporated quantitative methods including return on investment (ROI), cost benefit analysis (CBA), and citation analysis of journal articles published by faculty; and qualitative methodologies such as in-person interviews with faculty. The study resulted in a CU ROI model that can be used to measure faculty perceptions of value and the economic benefits of electronic journal collections for faculty research in terms of ROI. The CU ROI methodology provides outcomes beyond a single ROI number and led to unexpected benefits for informing collection development decisions and strategies.


      PubDate: 2013-11-29T12:03:59Z
       
  • Do Job Advertisements Reflect ACRL's Standards for Proficiencies for
           Instruction Librarians and Coordinators? A Content Analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 39, Issue 6
      Author(s): Melissa L. Gold , Margaret G. Grotti
      This study investigates the extent to which the skills and proficiencies mentioned in ACRL's Standards for Proficiencies for Instruction Librarians and Coordinators are represented in a current sample of instruction librarian job advertisements. Advertisements from U.S. academic institutions posted on the American Library Association's JobLIST site were collected over a period of six months. Results from a content analysis of these advertisements as compared to the Standards reveal trends in those skills which are in-demand. These results add support for the importance of collaboration, instructional design, leadership, and subject expertise as they relate to instruction and demonstrate that not all skills identified as crucial for instruction librarians within the Standards are typically indicated within the content of a job advertisement. This research will be of interest to library science students, job seekers, LIS faculty, and employers hoping to attract qualified candidates to fill library instruction-related positions.


      PubDate: 2013-11-29T12:03:59Z
       
  • Continuing the Discussion on OA and the Role of Libraries as Publishers
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 39, Issue 6
      Author(s): Wyoma vanDuinkerken , Wendi Arant Kaspar



      PubDate: 2013-11-29T12:03:59Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 39, Issue 6




      PubDate: 2013-11-29T12:03:59Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 39, Issue 6




      PubDate: 2013-11-29T12:03:59Z
       
  • Scholarly Information as a Political Economy
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 November 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): John M. Budd
      The scholarly information system is not a conventional market. It does follow a particular economic structure, but that structure does not follow orthodox macroeconomics. The multiple players who make up the system do compete and, at times, do cooperate, but not on the grounds of the economic theory of textbooks. An analysis that takes the differences into account is the only way to create an understanding of the system.


      PubDate: 2013-11-29T12:03:59Z
       
  • Other Duties as Assigned: Internal Consultants in Academic Libraries
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 November 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Wend Arant Kaspar , Wyoma vanDuinkerken



      PubDate: 2013-11-20T20:10:08Z
       
  • Information needs of students in Israel — A case study of a
           multicultural society
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 November 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): R. Greenberg , J. Bar-Ilan
      Students turn to a variety of sources when searching for information for their academic assignments. This study uses findings from a survey given to 151 Israeli students attending a university in Israel. A questionnaire comprising 12 questions was administered regarding their information needs, information behavior, and difficulties in searching and writing an academic assignment. A special emphasis of the study was on the multicultural environment of the Israeli students and its effect on their information behavior. Results show that there is a significant difference between native language groups with regard to the use of search engines, the use of library services, and in the patterns of conducting their academic assignment. The findings imply that when the language of instruction and assignment delivery is the students' second language, they have special needs and should receive particular attention from the library and information services.


      PubDate: 2013-11-17T03:47:35Z
       
  • Library Anxiety Among Chinese Students: Modification and Application of
           LAS in the Context of Chinese Academic Libraries
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 November 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Zhiqiang Song , Shiying Zhang , Christopher Peter Clarke
      In this paper, the status of library anxiety among university students in China is studied. With interviews, questionnaires and statistical methods, a modified Chinese Library Anxiety Scale (C-LAS) is developed, considerably different from that previously proposed by Bostick [Bostick, S. L. (1992). The development and validation of the Library Anxiety Scale. PhD dissertation, Wayne State University] and suitable for the Chinese cultural sphere, consisting of seven factors including resources, retrieval, regulations, staff, knowledge, comfort and affection, delineated further into 36 statements in total. Two aspects of users including demographic factors and participation in library training courses are also studied. This study proposes a quantitative measure for the levels of library anxiety in China. The findings also suggest that resources, retrieval, and regulations are the main factors impacting library anxiety and that users' library anxiety levels are related to demographic factors and participation in library training courses.


      PubDate: 2013-11-17T03:47:35Z
       
  • Millennials among the Professional Workforce in Academic Libraries: Their
           Perspective on Leadership
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 November 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Jolie O. Graybill
      This study explores possible leadership perceptions of Millennials working in academic libraries, specifically their definition, the attributes they associate with leadership, whether they want to assume formal leadership roles, whether they perceive themselves as leaders, and whether they perceive leadership opportunities within their organizations and LIS professional associations. An online survey was utilized to gather the responses and the study participants comprised of Millennials (born 1982 or after) currently working full-time in libraries that were a member of the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC), a consortium of the Big Ten universities and the University of Chicago in 2011–12.


      PubDate: 2013-11-08T23:40:09Z
       
  • Building a Program that Cultivates Library Leaders from Within the
           Organization
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 November 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Damon Camille , R. Niccole Westbrook
      These days few libraries can afford to hire new leaders to head teams, manage people and projects effectively, and contribute to the vision and direction of the organization. As organizational charts flatten increased levels of responsibility are expected of employees. These changes require libraries to increase the leadership skills of the talented librarians and staff members already working at their libraries. This paper describes a collaborative project between the University of Houston Libraries Training Committee and the University of Houston Human Resources Department (HR) in which emerging leaders within the library attended a semester-long intensive program designed to nurture Excellence in Library Leadership (ELLP). Successful applicants to the University of Houston Libraries ELLP participated in personality and emotional intelligence assessments; attended six interactive day-long sessions with content specifically tailored to leadership skills in the library setting; and formed a cohort that has been active in planning and advocating for continued leadership and emotional intelligence training within the organization. This paper discusses the content of the program, the lessons learned from two cohorts, information about how other libraries might pilot a similar program, and a description of how the ELLP is impacting UH Libraries' culture.


      PubDate: 2013-11-08T23:40:09Z
       
  • More Storms on the Horizon for Seabreeze Library
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 November 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Jo Cates



      PubDate: 2013-11-08T23:40:09Z
       
  • Reviews and Analysis of Special Reports
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 November 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Leslie Stebbins



      PubDate: 2013-11-08T23:40:09Z
       
  • Citation Behavior of Aerospace Engineering Faculty
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 October 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Jane Stephens , David E. Hubbard , Carmelita Pickett , Rusty Kimball
      Citation analyses provide valuable insights into the usage of library collections and assist in collection management decision-making; however, there are few engineering citation analyses of faculty publications. This study addresses that gap through an analysis of 3488 citations from aerospace engineering faculty publications by source, format, age, and subject. Local holdings were assessed based on the 80/20 rule and journal titles ranked. In addition to supporting citation patterns identified in previous citation analyses, this study revealed some novel relationships involving formats and subjects. The results of this study have implications for collection management.


      PubDate: 2013-10-27T18:36:00Z
       
  • Book Piracy in Nigeria: Issues and Strategies
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 October 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Christopher Nkiko
      Book piracy is an illegal and illegitimate reproduction of other people's intellectual property for economic reasons without prior consent or authorization. This paper examines the intricate dimension of book piracy in the Nigerian Publishing Industry. It notes the dangers the trend portends to qualitative education and scholarship in general. The paper identifies the different forms of book piracy as: local reproduction of fast moving titles using newsprint or poor textured paper, abuse of publication rights, hi-tech reproduction overseas, circumventing the e-book version, illegal reprography, unauthorized excessive production by printers, and translation without permission. Some of the causes of book piracy are poverty, book scarcity, ignorance of the copyright laws by the public and the uncooperative attitude of some countries in endorsing international treaties on intellectual property rights. The paper recommends the following as panacea to stemming the tide of the mena cost reduction strategies, national book policy and commissioning of local authorship, awareness and enforcement of copyright laws, revitalization of libraries, sanctions on countries showing complacency towards piracy, special algorithms to detect illegal downloads, security printing devices and moral suasion.


      PubDate: 2013-10-15T17:02:43Z
       
  • Squaring the Circle: Library Technology and Assessment
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 October 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Geoffrey Little



      PubDate: 2013-10-11T17:01:06Z
       
  • The Official (and Unofficial) Rules for Norming Rubrics Successfully
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 October 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Claire Holmes , Megan Oakleaf



      PubDate: 2013-10-03T16:29:26Z
       
  • Faculty–Librarian Micro-Level Collaboration in an Online Graduate
           History Course
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 September 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Erin Dorris Cassidy , Kenneth E. Hendrickson
      This paper describes a micro-level faculty–librarian collaboration implemented at the authors' state university to address students' information literacy deficiencies in a graduate-level history research methods course. The setting, implementation, and evolution of the partnership are described in detail to suggest a model for other instructors. Additionally, consideration is given to issues of working in an online course environment and the benefits of micro- versus macro-level librarian support. Consideration is given to future steps for strengthening the partnership and measuring its impact on student outcomes.


      PubDate: 2013-09-26T14:54:49Z
       
  • Factors Predicting the Importance of Libraries and Research Activities for
           Undergraduates
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 September 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Krista M. Soria
      While prior research has established linkages between undergraduate students' library use, research participation, and success, researchers know little about the importance undergraduates place upon libraries and research activities. Utilizing data from the Student Experience in the Research University (SERU) survey, the purpose of this paper was to examine factors associated with the importance of libraries and research among undergraduates at nine large, public research universities. The results of this study suggest a variety of factors are positively associated with the importance of libraries and research for students, including participation in research activities, interest in medical or research careers, academic engagement, faculty interactions, library satisfaction, and development of library skills, among others.


      PubDate: 2013-09-26T14:54:49Z
       
  • What do Our Faculty Use? An Interdisciplinary Citation Analysis Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 September 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Lea Currie , Amalia Monroe-Gulick
      During the fall of 2012 and spring of 2013, two librarians from the University of Kansas Libraries conducted a citation analysis of faculty publications in three broad disciplinary areas: humanities, social sciences, and science. The main purpose of research was to find out if the library provides adequate support to faculty researchers. The authors confirmed that KU Libraries provide access to the majority of items used by campus researchers. In addition, the findings will be used in collection management decisions, such as demand driven acquisition. Finally, the authors analyzed additional citation analysis studies in order to establish external benchmarks for their results.


      PubDate: 2013-09-26T14:54:49Z
       
  • Conducting a Search for an Academic Library Leader: Politics and Pitfalls
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 September 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): John Buschman



      PubDate: 2013-09-19T13:44:06Z
       
  • LibQUAL Revisited: Further Analysis of Qualitative and Quantitative Survey
           Results at the University of Mississippi
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 September 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Melissa Dennis , Judy Greenwood , Alex Watson
      This paper updates an earlier 2010 longitudinal study of LibQUAL qualitative and quantitative data from the University of Mississippi libraries with an additional year of LibQUAL data, collated with other library-collected data such as gate-count numbers. In doing so, it identifies several results that are not satisfactorily analyzed by LibQUAL, and it concludes that a more specialized local survey may be helpful to supplement or supplant LibQUAL.


      PubDate: 2013-09-19T13:44:06Z
       
  • Just Enough of a Good Thing: Indications of Long-Term Efficacy in One-Shot
           Library Instruction
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 September 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Elizabeth R. Spievak , Pamela Hayes-Bohanan
      Website attributions were measured as one way of evaluating the efficacy of the “one-shot” library session. Survey results indicated support for single session information literacy instruction in that participants exposed to a librarian classroom visit reported that they would be significantly more likely to have used library databases, checked out a book, asked a librarian for help, and to predict that they would ask a librarian for help at a later time. Results also indicated that students who reported a classroom librarian visit may have engaged in more systematic or complex processing to evaluate websites in that they considered more attributes and took less time to make better judgments about the quality of sources.


      PubDate: 2013-09-11T19:41:56Z
       
  • Game as Book: Selecting Video Games for Academic Libraries based on
           Discipline Specific Knowledge
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 September 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Christopher M. Thomas , Jerremie Clyde
      In response to the increased use and study of video games in academic work, academic libraries have started building or have expanded their video game collections. Collection development practices, however, have focused on collecting video games based on their format and not on their subject and disciplinary content. The authors of this article suggest that video games, while “read” differently than monographs, can communicate knowledge in unambiguous and discipline specific ways. Using the discipline of history as an example, the authors examined four World War II commercial video games to see how well these games communicated discipline-specific knowledge. Although none of the four video games evaluated would be identified as scholarly, two of the video games could be considered as sources of historical knowledge. As scholars begin to explore the creation and use of video games as secondary or tertiary sources in addition to primary sources or objects of study, academic libraries should include video games in their collections based on the video games' disciplinary content and the scholarly arguments that they present. The authors recommend a process for evaluating video games that could be used for most academic disciplines.


      PubDate: 2013-09-11T19:41:56Z
       
  • Observations and Perceptions of Academic Administrator Influence on Open
           Access Initiatives
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 September 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Thomas L. Reinsfelder , John A. Anderson
      Existing literature frequently covers the topic of open access from the perspectives of authors, librarians, or publishers. Investigations into the role of academic administrators, however, remain limited. Because librarians are uniquely positioned in the center of the scholarly communication ecosystem a survey of library directors was conducted to investigate the nature of any relationship between the actions of academic administrators and an institution's commitment to open access, as observed by librarians. Results indicate that, according to the perspective of librarians, as academic administrator attention to open access increases, open access activities of faculty and librarians also increase. Open access advocates should reflect upon the role of academic administrators and consider increasing efforts to gain the support of these individuals.


      PubDate: 2013-09-07T19:22:14Z
       
  • Do Library Fines Work?: Analysis of the Effectiveness of Fines on
           Patron's Return Behavior at Two Mid-sized Academic Libraries
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 September 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Jan S. Sung , Bradley P. Tolppanen
      Data on library fines imposed at Eastern Illinois University and the University of Hawaii at Manoa was extracted and compared to determine whether fines had an impact on the patron's return behavior. The results indicated that fines as well as patron group status (undergraduate, graduate, faculty) have an impact on the patron's return behavior.


      PubDate: 2013-09-03T18:52:46Z
       
  • Distance Education Librarians in the United States: A Study of Job
           Announcements
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 September 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Yingqi Tang
      This study analyzes the position announcements published in American Libraries between 1970 and 2010 for the purpose of documenting trends and changes in distance education librarianship in the United States. Findings include the first announced library distance education related job, total number of positions, titles, academic ranking, salary, educational background, roles/duties, and minimum qualifications. The study concluded technology skills, information science skills, and communication skills are fundamental occupational skills for distance education librarians. Only time will tell if job titles with words like “distance education” or “off-campus” will disappear the same way “extended services” or “external services” have in the field of distance education librarianship. The salient point is that, no matter how they are described or titled in job postings, librarians with the particular skill set of distance education librarians – diverse, with a focus on technology – will likely find a place in libraries of the future.


      PubDate: 2013-09-03T18:52:46Z
       
  • Distance Learners' Self-efficacy and Information Literacy Skills
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 August 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Yingqi Tang , Hung Wei Tseng
      This study investigates distance learners' information literacy skills in using digital library resources and the factors (online learning and information manipulation) that correlate with learners' information seeking self-efficacy. In addition, distance learners' preferences with regard to digital resources selection and interests of developing information seeking skills were examined. 3517 students enrolled in one or more distance education courses were invited to participate in the online survey; 219 students completed the survey, for a response rate of 6.2%. The results revealed that distance learners who have higher self-efficacy for information seeking and proficiency in information manipulation exhibited higher self-efficacy for online learning. Moreover, students with high self-efficacy demonstrated superior knowledge of digital resources selection. Students who have low self-efficacy with regard to information seeking were more likely to express interest in learning how to use the library resources, although learning techniques for database searching was the exception.


      PubDate: 2013-08-30T18:24:00Z
       
  • Administration of Education Enterprise and Gaps in the Provision of Needed
           Information: The Case of Pakistan
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 August 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Farzana Shafique , Khalid Mahmood
      This study is qualitative in nature and aims at assessing the information needs and seeking behavior of educational administrators and finding related problems. Interviews of a purposive sample and review of related literature are among the major research methods. The study is based on interviews of 13 educational administrators and 32 information professionals from Punjab province and Islamabad Capital Territory (ICT) of Pakistan. The results correspond with the previous studies conducted in other countries. The educational administrators' information needs and seeking behavior reflect a kinship with their work settings and information environment that highlights a need to understand problem situations as an ancestor to understanding how they seek and use information. The study has identified a gap in the provision of needed information which hinders the realistic planning and decision making process. It has also highlighted the need of a National Information System for educational administrators in Pakistan. As this is the first study on this topic in Pakistan, the results can be useful to design information services and facilities for educational administrators in Pakistan and other developing regions of the globe with similar conditions.


      PubDate: 2013-08-06T23:05:24Z
       
  • Embedding Guides Where Students Learn: Do Design Choices and Librarian
           Behavior Make a Difference?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 July 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Sarah Anne Murphy , Elizabeth L. Black
      This study investigated whether library guides embedded in a university's learning management system fulfill their mission to promote library resources and maintain a librarian presence in the online course environment. Specifically, the study examined whether design elements, promotional practices, or other behaviors influenced guide use. It questioned whether students located the library guides and, if so, did students find the guides helpful. Results confirmed that students who used library guides found the guides helpful. Select faculty and librarian behaviors may also influence student use of library guides. Promotion and marketing practices, however, are not the only factors encouraging students to use library guides.


      PubDate: 2013-07-25T21:28:51Z
       
  • Intentional Informationists: Re-envisioning Information Literacy and
           Re-designing Instructional Programs Around Faculty Librarians' Strengths
           as Campus Connectors, Information Professionals, and Course Designers
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 July 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Debra Hoffmann , Amy Wallace
      This article adds to the recent literature that questions, and hopes to redefine, the information literacy notions and practices in academic libraries and their institutions. The authors draw on research in the area of social justice to express the need for academic libraries to explore new avenues to insure their institution's graduates are not merely competent consumers of information. The authors put forward the notion of the intentional informationist, who they define as having the contextual, reflective and informational skills to identify information opportunities, tackle complex information problems and pitfalls, and provide solutions or considerations that do not just meet her individual needs. In addition, they pose questions and detail opportunities, partnerships, and examples of curricular and co-curricular integration to engage students beyond the library, instruction sessions, a single course, or graduation requirement.


      PubDate: 2013-07-21T21:20:04Z
       
  • Developing Data Management Services at the Johns Hopkins University
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 July 2013
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Yi Shen , Virgil E. Varvel Jr.
      Big data challenges have stimulated national and international initiatives in building inter-connected data repositories and integrated data resources as well as long-term data management and data stewardship to support cross-disciplinary scientific data discovery and reuse. To champion such efforts, Johns Hopkins University (JHU) created and developed a new model of data management services (DMS) encompassing a continuum of Storage→Archiving→Preservation→Curation layers to provide data managing and sharing through the JHU Data Archive (DA). To examine this model of data management services, we contextualized the JHU DMS in a case study drawing upon document analysis and interviews with key stakeholders. Our investigation revealed distinct dimensions of the JHU DMS/DA into environmental responsiveness (see Environmental Responsiveness section for explanation), socio-technical readiness, and marketing and collaboration strategies. We further articulated opportunities, challenges and success determinants of the DMS within its institutional context. We intend for the case study to stimulate further discussion and research on alternative options and extensions of the DMS model in other institutions or contexts.


      PubDate: 2013-07-13T20:16:03Z
       
 
 
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