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Journal Cover Journal of Academic Librarianship
  [SJR: 1.442]   [H-I: 33]   [738 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0099-1333
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2970 journals]
  • Factors that Influence Undergraduate Information-seeking Behavior and
           Opportunities for Student Success
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 May 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Sloan Komissarov, James Murray
      Informed from a survey we administered to undergraduate students on their information seeking behavior, we identify variables that influence how students conduct their search for sources, what types of sources they select, and what attributes of their sources they value. These variables relate to student academic characteristics, demographics, and actions that have been taken by instructors and library staff. With a thorough understanding of students' information seeking process and its influences, we find opportunities for instructors and librarians to have a positive influence.


      PubDate: 2016-05-17T03:05:16Z
       
  • How Do Students Get Help with Research Assignments? Using Drawings to
           Understand Students' Help Seeking Behavior
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 May 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Molly Beisler, Ann Medaille
      This study explores undergraduate students' help seeking behavior in relation to writing papers that require research. Two hundred and twenty-two undergraduate students were asked to draw the steps that they went through when completing a recent assignment. Many students answered additional written questions about the challenges they faced in completing these assignments. Nine students were also interviewed about their processes. Thirty-six percent of students depicted getting help in their drawings, while 100% of students interviewed described getting help. Analysis revealed four primary areas of interest: (1) whom students go to for help, (2) the timing of help seeking, (3) students' needs in relation to getting help, and (4) the research and study habits of students who get help. Students most commonly received help from peers and family members, and they usually received help after they had already drafted their papers. Students rarely got help from librarians, although approximately one third described how tasks related to research were the most challenging part of completing their assignments. A number of strategies are presented for encouraging students to seek library help for research assignments.


      PubDate: 2016-05-11T09:44:17Z
       
  • Knowledge Management for Libraries, Valerie Forrestal (Ed.). Rowman
           & Littlefield, Lanham, MD (2015)
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 3
      Author(s): David Gibbs



      PubDate: 2016-05-11T09:44:17Z
       
  • Reviewing the Academic Library: A Guide to Self-study and the External
           Review, Eleanor Mitchell, Peggy Seiden (Eds.). Association of College and
           Research Libraries, Chicago (2015)
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 3
      Author(s): Andrea Malone



      PubDate: 2016-05-11T09:44:17Z
       
  • Wearable Technology, Smart Watches to Google Glass for Librarians, Tom
           Bruno (Ed.). Rowman & Littlefield, Lanham, MD (2015)
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 3
      Author(s): Alexis Linoski



      PubDate: 2016-05-11T09:44:17Z
       
  • Ethics and Values in Librarianship: A History, Wallace Koehler (Ed.).
           Rowman & Littlefield, Lanham, MD (2015)
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 3
      Author(s): Alicia Kubas



      PubDate: 2016-05-11T09:44:17Z
       
  • MOOCs and Libraries, Kyle Courtney (Ed.). Rowman & Littlefield,
           Lanham, MD (2015)
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 3
      Author(s): Amy Riegelman



      PubDate: 2016-05-11T09:44:17Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 3




      PubDate: 2016-05-11T09:44:17Z
       
  • Editorial Board Continued
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 3




      PubDate: 2016-05-11T09:44:17Z
       
  • Library Technologies and the Ethics of Care
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 3
      Author(s): Ray Laura Henry



      PubDate: 2016-05-11T09:44:17Z
       
  • Data Visualizations and Infographics, Sarah K.C. Mauldin (Ed.). Rowman
           & Littlefield, Lanham, MD (2015)
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 3
      Author(s): Madeline Kelly



      PubDate: 2016-05-11T09:44:17Z
       
  • Social Capital as Operative in Liaison Librarianship: Librarian
           Participants' Experiences of Faculty Engagement as Academic Library
           Liaisons
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 May 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Tim Schlak
      This study examines the foundational concepts of social capital as operative in liaison librarianship. Participants were interviewed and asked a series of open-ended questions aimed at soliciting responses about the foundational aspects in question, including motivations to engage, trust, trustworthiness, shared values, relationship dynamics, influence, and network growth. The focus of the analysis is the interviewee's responses and statements about their own personal interaction with faculty as well as their reflections on their relationships. Responses were categorized and coded as shared commitment, interrelational dynamics, and network positionality. The findings raise intriguing dynamics for liaison librarianship in the 21st century as academic libraries are challenged to broaden their reach and services and demonstrate increasing return on investment.


      PubDate: 2016-05-11T09:44:17Z
       
  • Different, but More Similar Now: Faculty Status
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 May 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): John Buschman



      PubDate: 2016-05-05T22:17:30Z
       
  • Use It or Lose It? A Longitudinal Performance Assessment of
           Undergraduate Business Students' Information Literacy
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 May 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Ilana R. Stonebraker, Rachel Fundator
      At a large, public, Midwestern, American university, business librarians teach a required, one-credit information literacy course geared towards lower-division students in the school of management. In order to determine the lasting effects of the course, a longitudinal study of individual students' performance on three pre/post-test surveys was conducted across a set of management courses. The first course, a required information literacy class, was generally taken in the lower-division. The second course, a career strategies course, is generally taken after the first information literacy class. Students who took both required courses displayed greater information literacy knowledge and skills than students who took only the second course. Students retained the information uniformly over time, as time between the two courses did not yield a significant difference in scores. These findings show that information literacy courses have a lasting impact on lower-division students as they progress through a college program.


      PubDate: 2016-05-05T22:17:30Z
       
  • Come Fly with Me: Screencasts with Zooming Fly-in-style Highlights
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 May 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): John T. Oliver
      Although digital learning objects such as screencasts and video tutorials are increasingly used to teach information literacy and library-related content, the design of those learning objects has been little studied and has been rarely tied to findings from the learning sciences literature. Low-effort, high-impact evidence-based enhancements are especially important with screencasts that teach library interfaces, since they are often updated and redesigned. This study analyzes the performance of library-related tasks by 39 students exposed to digital learning objects, and it tests whether learning is facilitated by highlighting elements known as “callouts.” This study tests a) whether these callouts improve learning and, b) whether gradually revealed, “fly-in” style callouts—in contrast with tutorials with abruptly revealed callouts and with tutorials without callouts—have a more pronounced effect on learning. Study results supported the hypothesis that these highlighting callouts improved learning, although gradually revealed callouts and abruptly revealed callouts were similarly effective. Participants who viewed tutorials with callouts performed twice as well on some library-related tasks. Although the relatively small size of the study sample limits the statistical power, these results suggest that callouts are effective in helping learners select and pay attention to the most relevant aspects of a presentation.


      PubDate: 2016-05-05T22:17:30Z
       
  • Cost of Print and Digital Books: A Comparative Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 April 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): K. Nageswara Rao, Manorama Tripathi, Sunil Kumar
      The present paper dwells upon the difference between the prices of print versions of academic titles and their digital counterparts across different subjects. It underlines that the print versions of academic titles are cheaper than their digital counterparts. It also spotlights that the commercial publishers are more capable of catering to the information needs of the students and researchers than the University presses by publishing more number of books. Just 57.5% of the required academic titles are available in digital format; hence, libraries cannot switch over to e-only collection development as all of what is needed is not available in digital format.


      PubDate: 2016-05-05T22:17:30Z
       
  • Information Fluency: Not Information Literacy 2.0
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 April 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Emmett Lombard
      This paper distinguishes information fluency from information literacy as concepts in and approaches to higher education. A review of information fluency literature reveals emphases on defining it, and the importance of collaboration. In addition to distinguishing it from information literacy, this paper identifies two necessary components to information fluency: collaboration and commitment. A table and checklist for assessing these components, along with an exceptionally effective institutional example of information fluency is provided.


      PubDate: 2016-04-29T14:14:13Z
       
  • The Search for Landmark Works in English Literary Studies: A Citation
           Analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 April 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): David S. Nolen, Hillary A.H. Richardson
      The authors of the current study set out to test for the presence of landmark works in a certain area of English literary scholarship with collection development in mind. By conducting a citation study on a specific niche within English literary studies, the authors hoped to identify core groups of scholarly works that could be used as a tool for collection development and provide a picture of literary scholarship on a more granular level. The data, though representative of a smaller sample size, indicated diversity in the use of sources with no clear core distinguishable, mirroring macroscopic trends in English literary scholarship.


      PubDate: 2016-04-29T14:14:13Z
       
  • Contributing to the Library Student Employee Experience: Perceptions of a
           Student Development Program
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 April 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Amanda Melilli, Rosan Mitola, Amy Hunsaker
      Academic libraries are in a unique position to evolve student employment into being more than merely a part-time job and to contribute to students' academic and personal success. Library student employees at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas were surveyed to determine if their participation in a co-curricular workshop series added value to their academic, professional and personal lives. The study shows statistically significant relationships between class standing and level of agreement that workshops provided students with information and/or skills that will help them in a job after college and in their day to day life outside of work and school. The results of this study indicate that students find value in having opportunities to develop academic, professional, and life skills while being employed part-time. Potential future research studies are discussed, including the impact of such a program on student retention, progression, and completion.


      PubDate: 2016-04-29T14:14:13Z
       
  • Flipped Instruction for Information Literacy: Five Instructional Cases of
           Academic Librarians
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 April 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Jeffery L. Loo, David Eifler, Elliott Smith, Liladhar Pendse, Jianye He, Michael Sholinbeck, Gisele Tanasse, Jennifer K. Nelson, Elizabeth A. Dupuis
      University of California, Berkeley librarians have incorporated the flipped instruction model into information literacy training by focusing on two primary elements: assigning pre-class assignments and increasing active learning techniques. We explore these two elements across five diverse instructional cases, which include one-shot and semester-long classes that were conducted through online or in-person delivery for both graduate and undergraduate students across a range of subject areas (sciences, social sciences, and humanities). We examine the enabling factors and the perceived outcomes of this instructional paradigm. Because students came to class with enhanced library understanding and experience from the pre-class assignment, they were better prepared to engage with the material and articulate additional learning needs. We note students' increased engagement during class and more time available for higher-order learning exercises and discussions. As a result, flipped instruction appears to enable more learning opportunities without increasing classroom time. The challenges of this model are the requisite commitment of time and effort, the need to foster class participation, and the facilitation of active communication within the class. We propose a framework of catalysts, building blocks, and instructional outcomes to help library instructors incorporate flipped instruction elements into their instructional design.


      PubDate: 2016-04-24T14:19:36Z
       
  • Practicing Critical Evaluation of Online Sources Improves Student Search
           Behavior
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 April 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Chris Leeder, Chirag Shah
      This research investigated the effect of critical source evaluation on student online search behavior and results. The study employed an experimental design in which participants in the treatment condition conducted a prompted critical evaluation of a set of provided sources, while participants in the control condition reviewed them without any prompts. Participants in both conditions then searched online for sources on an assigned research topic. Server log data and participant survey responses were analyzed using both quantitative and qualitative measures to identify the impact of the intervention, guided practice in the critical evaluation of online information, on their search behavior. Results showed that the treatment condition participants who conducted the prompted critical evaluation of sources performed better on most measures of search behavior, and appeared to be better prepared to search effectively and complete their group assignment. Implications for instructors and librarians teaching information literacy skills are discussed.


      PubDate: 2016-04-24T14:19:36Z
       
  • Championing Institutional Goals: Academic Libraries Supporting Graduate
           Women in STEM
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 April 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Laura Palumbo
      Academic libraries are well-positioned within their scientific research communities to assist with the retention of women in STEM fields. Librarians have an opportunity to find new ways to match collections and services to student needs and institutional goals by providing resources and programming in support of women in STEM. This paper will focus on the ways in which academic librarians can help support female graduate students in STEM, beginning with a review of the literature to determine the causes for the under-representation of women graduate students in some STEM fields. Next, it will review interventions conducted by institutions to address the uneven distribution, including a scan for resources or services provided by the library. Finally, it will use the findings presented in the literature to propose services and resources that libraries and librarians can provide to help address the issues that contribute to the low number of women in STEM fields.


      PubDate: 2016-04-15T02:00:12Z
       
  • Reviews and Analysis of Special Reports
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 April 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship




      PubDate: 2016-04-15T02:00:12Z
       
  • Cognitive Bias and the Discovery Layer
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 April 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Elizabeth Blakesley



      PubDate: 2016-04-09T09:26:08Z
       
  • Student Use of Keywords and Limiters in Web-scale Discovery Searching
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 April 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Megan Dempsey, Alyssa M. Valenti
      Using transaction log analysis of student search histories in EBSCO Discovery Service, which we branded RVOneSearch, we seek to answer: 1. Do students use the limiters provided in RVOneSearch? 2. How effectively do students use keywords in RVOneSearch after receiving instruction on keywording? In Spring 2012, RVOneSearch became an integral part of our 80-minute librarian-led sessions that are required of all English Composition I courses. We began focusing our instruction on selecting appropriate keywords when we noticed that regardless of interface, students struggled most with identifying the right search terms. With RVOneSearch we stopped teaching multiple interfaces and instead began teaching one reference database for background and context, and RVOneSearch for scholarly sources. We spend less time on the nuances of interfaces and more time on evaluating results. We also teach students to use the facets and limiters available in RVOneSearch. In this study we wanted to determine if students used the available facets and limiters and whether they chose appropriate keywords after instruction on how to do so. Our results inform how and what we teach students and are applicable to others teaching with web-scale discovery.


      PubDate: 2016-04-05T03:56:50Z
       
  • Finding Sound and Score: A Music Library Skills Module for Undergraduate
           Students
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 March 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Amanda Myers, Yusuke Ishimura
      Music students need library search skills to find music resources of scores and sound recordings for study, repertoire selection and performance practice. This article describes the design and evaluation of a Blackboard eLearning module, Music Library Instruction Module based on a music information literacy standard 2, accessing needed information effectively and efficiently. The module supported students' development of skills in catalog searching to find music resources. The learning achievements of 25 participants were evaluated using a pre-test–post-test method. Post-test results had an increase between scores of 15% and statistical significance (t=4.75; p<0.001) to support the hypothesis that students demonstrate higher performance in search skills after interaction with the module. The Music Library Instruction Module was successful as an eLearning treatment in instructing library search skills to find music resources however additional instruction is needed when searching by major composer and subject headings. This study has practical implications in the design and assessment of music information literacy programs in the eLearning environment.


      PubDate: 2016-03-16T11:52:29Z
       
  • An Old Horse Revived?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 March 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Lisa M. Rose-Wiles, John P. Irwin
      With limited library budgets and declining circulation of print books, it is important to demonstrate library value to multiple stakeholders and to make informed collection development choices. The aim of this one-year study was to gain a complete picture of print book circulation by identifying titles that were used in the library (“in-house”) but not checked out. We found that almost 30% of circulation transactions were books that were used in-house. Medical and nursing books showed the highest rate of in-house use in both the reference and main (circulating) collection. A close examination of these subject areas indicated that 46% of potentially circulating medical books used in-house were checked out, and 19% of science books used in house were checked out. This suggests that libraries should not assume that titles used in-house are subsequently checked out, or that check out statistics represent the totality of book use. We recommend including in-house use statistics to obtain an accurate picture of total circulation and library value, and to inform collection development.


      PubDate: 2016-03-16T11:52:29Z
       
  • Reviews and Analysis of Special Reports
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 2
      Author(s): Leslie Stebbins



      PubDate: 2016-03-06T22:33:57Z
       
  • University Students Awareness, Usage and Attitude Towards E-books:
           Experience from China
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 February 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Sufang Wang, Xue Bai
      The purpose of this study was to investigate students' awareness, usage and attitude towards e-books at the Zhejiang University in China. The research design was quantitative using a convenience sampling method and chi-square analyses were employed. Library staff responsible for digital resources collection had been interviewed. Results indicated that there was a significant difference of students' awareness and usage of general e-books and academic e-books. There was a higher awareness but lower adoption of general e-books. The awareness and level of usage of library provided e-books were both very low. A search engine was generally used to access e-books. Senior undergraduates and postgraduate students mainly accessed e-books from the library website and library catalog. Students, particularly undergraduate students, used e-books mainly for the purpose of leisure. In contrast, postgraduate students tended to use e-books more for academic purposes. The use of mobile devices and computers was preferred when reading e-books; but for academic e-books students preferred print part of them for reading. University students showed strong preference for printing books. Academic libraries should put more efforts on promotion, stimulating demands, and cooperation with teachers to improve e-books usage.


      PubDate: 2016-03-06T22:33:57Z
       
  • Libraries, Human Rights, and Social Justice: Enabling Access and Promoting
           Inclusion, Paul T. Jaeger, Natalie Greene Taylor, Ursula Gorham. Rowman
           &amp; Littlefield, Lanham, MD (2015), ISBN: 978-1-4422-5051-2
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 2
      Author(s): Alicia Kubas



      PubDate: 2016-03-06T22:33:57Z
       
  • Makerspaces in Libraries, Theresa Willingham, Jeroen De Boer. Rowman
           &amp; Littlefield, Lanham, MD (2015), ISBN: 978-1-4422-5300-1
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 2
      Author(s): Lee Andrew Hilyer



      PubDate: 2016-03-06T22:33:57Z
       
  • The Complete Guide to Acquisitions Management, 2nd ed., Frances C.
           Wilkinson, Linda K. Lewis, Rebecca L. Lubas. Libraries Unlimited, Santa
           Barbara, CA (2015), ISBN: 978-1-61069-713-2
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 2
      Author(s): Alexis Linoski



      PubDate: 2016-03-06T22:33:57Z
       
  • Creative Library and Marketing Publicity: Best Practices, Robert J.
           Lackie, M. Sandra Wood (Eds.). Rowman &amp; Littlefield, Lanham, MD
           (2015), ISBN: 978-1-4422-5421-3
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 2
      Author(s): Steve McKinzie



      PubDate: 2016-03-06T22:33:57Z
       
  • Creating Leaders: An Examination of Academic and Research Library
           Leadership Institutes, Irene M.H. Herold (Ed.). Association of College and
           Research Libraries, Chicago (2015), ISBN: 978-0838987636
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 2
      Author(s): Margot Note



      PubDate: 2016-03-06T22:33:57Z
       
  • Editorial Board Continued
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2016-03-06T22:33:57Z
       
  • Mobile Social Marketing in Libraries, Samantha C. Helmick. Rowman
           &amp; Littlefield, Lanham, MD (2015), ISBN: 978-14422-4381-1
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 2
      Author(s): Amy Wainwright



      PubDate: 2016-03-06T22:33:57Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 42, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2016-03-06T22:33:57Z
       
  • A Collaborative Approach to Integrating Information and Academic Literacy
           into the Curricula of Research Methods Courses
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 March 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Claudia Adams, Stephen Buetow, Richard Edlin, Neda Zdravkovic, Josta Heyligers
      The University of Auckland, like many tertiary educational institutions, expects undergraduates and postgraduates to leave the institution equipped not only with specialist knowledge, but with a set of intellectual skills, capacities and personal attributes. Included in this suite of transferable skills is academic and information literacy (AIL). This case study reports on the collaborative process, content development and outcomes of integrating AIL into the curricula of two Population Health research methods courses, one at postgraduate level and another at undergraduate level. The study shows how experiences gained from designing an online assessment for the postgraduate course, provided evidence to develop scaffolded activities and online summative and formative assessment design for the undergraduate course. The analysis of the quality of completed student coursework showed that interventions assisted students to think more critically and develop understanding of the key elements of the research process and methodology.


      PubDate: 2016-03-06T22:33:57Z
       
  • Creating a Culture of Documentation
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 February 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Ray Laura Henry



      PubDate: 2016-02-24T09:26:56Z
       
  • Using Time-Driven Activity-Based Costing to Identify Best Practices in
           Academic Libraries
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 February 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Lorena Siguenza-Guzman, Andres Auquilla, Alexandra Van den Abbeele, Dirk Cattrysse
      In the current competitive and dynamic environment, libraries must remain agile and flexible, as well as open to new ideas and ways of working. Based on a comparative case study of two academic libraries in Belgium, this research study investigates the opportunities of using Time-Driven Activity-Based Costing (TDABC) to benchmark library processes. To this end, two major research questions are addressed: 1) Can TDABC be used to enhance process benchmarking in libraries? 2) Do results at activity level provide additional insights compared to macro results in a process benchmarking? We first start by describing the TDABC implementation. Then, we discuss and compare the workflow of 10 library processes covering the four principal library functions: acquisition, cataloging, circulation and document delivery. Next, based on the benchmarking exercise, we report and discuss potential processes and performance improvements that can be realized from using library time and costs information, in particular concerning the two libraries analyzed. We conclude this article by discussing the advantages of using TDABC as a tool to enhance process benchmarking in libraries.


      PubDate: 2016-02-17T12:44:08Z
       
  • Why Users Come to the Library: A Case Study of Library and Non-Library
           Units
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 February 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Vera Lux, Robert J. Snyder, Colleen Boff
      This case study explores use patterns of an academic library following the addition of several non-library units. Of specific interest were the initial destinations of patrons, the number of destinations visited, and the primary purpose for coming to the library. We observed all destinations of patrons as they entered the building and administered an exit survey to gain additional insight into patrons' use of the library, including all first floor destinations visited and their primary purpose for visiting the library. We used selected statistics to further explore library use. Findings indicate that non-library units are a popular destination for library patrons but do not eclipse the overall use of library units; that the majority of patrons only visit one destination per trip to the library; and that the primary purposes for which patrons come to the library are studying and the use of library materials.


      PubDate: 2016-02-09T03:24:45Z
       
  • Understanding the “Complexity of Experience”: Modeling Faculty
           Research Practices
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 January 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Nancy Falciani-White
      Despite the amount of research that faculty do and the influence they have over their students' use of the library, faculty research is not well understood by the academic libraries trying to support it. Rather “research” is often considered synonymous with information seeking and other information behaviors. This grounded theory study interviewed nine internationally recognized scholars about their research practices, and proposes a model of research that is complex and intimately connected to the other areas of academic practice (teaching and service). This model includes information seeking as one aspect, but also considers social, environmental, organizational, and dissemination components, and how those components interact. Having a better understanding of research equips academic libraries to better support faculty, and through the faculty, their students.


      PubDate: 2016-02-09T03:24:45Z
       
  • Reflecting the Science of Instruction? Screencasting in Australian and
           New Zealand Academic Libraries: A Content Analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 February 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Jason Murphy, Chern Li Liew
      Research problem Instructional screencasts are increasingly part of the online tutorial mix offered by academic libraries. However, what makes for effective screencast design? This research provides a snapshot of screencast design in Australian and New Zealand academic libraries and appraises it through the lens of multimedia learning theory. Methodology Evidence-based design principles that promote effective learning for multimedia were identified from the research literature. A cognitive psychological approach was taken, drawing principally from Mayer's cognitive theory of multimedia learning. The principles outlined in Mayer's theory were translated into guidelines applicable to screencast tutorial production. These guidelines formed the basis for an assessment rubric which was applied to screencasts produced by New Zealand and Australian Universities. Content analysis was then applied to determine to what extent screencast tutorials in the sample reflected the principles outlined in Mayer's theory. Results On average, screencasts from the institutions surveyed integrated 7.6 of 9 effective multimedia principles. The low variance across the sample suggests this high standard was approximated or exceeded by most tutorials. Australian and New Zealand libraries were of a comparable standard overall with similar areas of strength and weakness. Implications Mayer's principles provide a useful foundation for designing effective multimedia instruction. The translation of these principles into screencast design guidelines will hopefully serve as useful considerations. Commonly neglected principles (coherence, signalling and segmenting) present areas for design improvement but also opportunities for further research in an academic library context.


      PubDate: 2016-02-09T03:24:45Z
       
  • High Density Storage: From There to Here and Beyond
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 January 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Mary S. Laskowski
      This article presents results from a national survey regarding library high density storage, as well as qualitative and quantitative analysis of various aspects of a library high density storage facility at a major academic research institution. Findings are contextualized within a discussion of the past, present, and potential future of library high density storage.


      PubDate: 2016-01-29T03:53:21Z
       
  • Impact of Assignment Prompt on Information Literacy Performance in
           First-year Student Writing
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 January 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): M. Sara Lowe, Sean M. Stone, Char Booth, Natalie Tagge
      This study attempts to quantify the impact of assignment prompts and phased assignment sequencing on first-year student work; specifically, whether more fully developed and “scaffolded” assignment prompts produced better Information Literacy (IL) in student papers (n=520). The examination of assignment prompts in relation to student IL rubric scores would seem to indicate that conventional wisdom on developing assignment prompts might not have an impact on IL performance.


      PubDate: 2016-01-29T03:53:21Z
       
  • A Text Mining Analysis of Academic Libraries' Tweets
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 January 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Sultan M. Al-Daihani, Alan Abrahams
      This study applies a text mining approach to a significant dataset of tweets by academic libraries. The dataset for this research was collected from the complete Twitter timelines of ten academic libraries. The total dataset comprised 23,707 tweets with 17,848 mentions, 7625 hashtags, and 5974 retweets. Academic libraries from the dataset have typically posted fewer than 50 tweets per month, though tweet volume grew rapidly in late-2013 through 2014. The results show variance between academic libraries in distribution of tweets over time. The most frequent word was “open,” which was used in a variety of contexts by the academic libraries. It was noted that the most frequent bi-gram (two-word sequence) in the aggregated tweets was “special collections”. The most frequent tri-gram (three-word sequence) was “save the date”. The most frequent word categories in the semantic analysis for most libraries were related to “knowledge, insight, and information concerning personal and cultural relations”. The most common category of the tweets was “Resources” among all the selected academic libraries. These findings highlight the importance of using data- and text-mining approaches in understanding the aggregate social data of academic libraries to aid in decision-making and strategic planning for patron outreach and marketing of services.


      PubDate: 2016-01-23T20:02:14Z
       
  • Leveraging research synthesis for promoting and expanding library services
           and educational programs
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 January 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Misa Mi
      Research synthesis (or systematic review) uses systematic techniques to comprehensively search, select, appraise, and summarize separate empirical studies to minimize bias in the review process. The past decade saw a growing interest in research synthesis in health sciences and other disciplines. Librarians as information professionals and knowledge workers are well poised to educate faculty and students about the systematic review as one type of research methodology and diffuse it into the traditional hypothesis-driven research discourse and undertakings. This article illustrates how a medical library at a medical school developed strategies to leverage research synthesis for expanding library services and educational programs.


      PubDate: 2016-01-10T20:25:57Z
       
  • On the Front Lines: Serving Ohio's Best
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 January 2016
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Thomas Atwood, Michael Farmer, Krista McDonald, Brianne Miller, Eileen Theodore-Shusta, Elizabeth J. Wood
      Presenters from a June, 2015 Academic Libraries of Ohio conference titled “Serving Our Veterans: A Call to Action” discuss the state of outreach and service to student veterans, students currently serving in the military, and military dependent students at their respective academic libraries.


      PubDate: 2016-01-05T20:22:11Z
       
 
 
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