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Journal Cover   Journal of Academic Librarianship
  [SJR: 1.442]   [H-I: 33]   [747 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0099-1333
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2812 journals]
  • Why Students Share Misinformation on Social Media: Motivation, Gender, and
           Study-level Differences
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 July 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Xinran Chen, Sei-Ching Joanna Sin, Yin-Leng Theng, Chei Sian Lee
      The increasing use of social media for information sharing has elevated the need for information literacy (IL) education to prepare students to be effective information creators and communicators. One concern is that students sometimes indiscriminately forward misinformation. Understanding the reasons behind misinformation sharing would help the development of IL intervention strategies. Guided by the Uses and Gratifications approach and rumor research, undergraduate and graduate students in Singapore were surveyed on why they share misinformation on social media. Gender and study-level differences were investigated. Over 60% of respondents had shared misinformation. The top reasons were related to the information's perceived characteristics, as well as self-expression and socializing. Accuracy and authoritativeness did not rank highly. Women had a higher prevalence of sharing and intention to share misinformation. Undergraduate and graduate students differed in their reasons for sharing misinformation. The former share (and intend to share) more misinformation than the latter, but the difference was not statistically significant. Because many of the reasons cited were social in nature, IL training should address the social motivations propelling such behavior. Social media systems may also develop features that encourage users to flag debunked postings and allow a correction to be displayed alongside the misinformation.


      PubDate: 2015-07-28T20:48:42Z
       
  • No title
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 4
      Author(s): Lee Andrew Hilyer



      PubDate: 2015-07-28T20:48:42Z
       
  • No title
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 4
      Author(s): Daria Carson-Dussán



      PubDate: 2015-07-28T20:48:42Z
       
  • No title
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 4
      Author(s): Alexandra Simons



      PubDate: 2015-07-28T20:48:42Z
       
  • No title
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 4
      Author(s): Asheleigh A. Perry



      PubDate: 2015-07-28T20:48:42Z
       
  • No title
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 4
      Author(s): Kerry M. Creelman



      PubDate: 2015-07-28T20:48:42Z
       
  • No title
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 4
      Author(s): Delmus E. Williams



      PubDate: 2015-07-28T20:48:42Z
       
  • Establishing a Participatory Library Model: A Grounded Theory Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 4
      Author(s): Linh Cuong Nguyen
      Purpose The purpose of this research is to explore the idea of the participatory library in higher education settings. This research aims to address the question, what is a participatory university library' Design/methodology/approach Grounded theory approach was adopted. In-depth individual interviews were conducted with two diverse groups of participants including ten library staff members and six library users. Data collection and analysis were carried out simultaneously and complied with Straussian grounded theory principles and techniques. Findings Three core categories representing the participatory library were found including “community”, “empowerment”, and “experience”. Each category was thoroughly delineated via sub-categories, properties, and dimensions that all together create a foundation for the participatory library. A participatory library model was also developed together with an explanation of model building blocks that provide a deeper understanding of the participatory library phenomenon. Research limitations The research focuses on a specific library system, i.e., academic libraries. Therefore, the research results may not be very applicable to public, special, and school library contexts. Originality/Value This is the first empirical study developing a participatory library model. It provides librarians, library managers, researchers, library students, and the library community with a holistic picture of the contemporary library.


      PubDate: 2015-07-28T20:48:42Z
       
  • Humanities Librarians and Virtual Verse: Changing Collections and User
           Services for Online Literature
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 4
      Author(s): Harriett E. Green, Rachel A. Fleming-May
      Electronic literature and digital literary publishing have grown rapidly in scope and volume in the past decade, and humanities librarians face the formidable challenge of capturing the full output of works of literature for current and future users, and determining how best to provide access to those works. This paper details the findings of the Virtual Verse in the Library project, which sought to investigate the impact of digital publishing on the access, reception, discovery, and preservation of poetry. The paper focuses on the results of the study's survey and interviews with academic librarians, and explores how library services, collections, and outreach can address the needs of students and faculty involved with digital literary publishing.


      PubDate: 2015-07-28T20:48:42Z
       
  • Demographic Differences in International Students' Information Source Uses
           and Everyday Information Seeking Challenges
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 4
      Author(s): Sei-Ching Joanna Sin
      International students are a sizeable user group of academic libraries. However, their everyday life information seeking (ELIS) behavior is seldom studied. This hinders the planning of information services and information literacy training. In light of this gap, this study surveyed 112 international students in a U.S. public university on: (1) how frequently respondents used 11 information sources; (2) how difficult it was to find information in various domains; and (3) how much their ELIS was affected by various information seeking problems. Differences between gender-study level categories and problem solving styles were tested using ANOVAs. The study found that Web search engines, social networking sites, new friends, printed resources, and traditional mass media were the top sources for ELIS. Six everyday information domains (e.g., legal, financial, and personal development information) ranked more difficult to find than academic information. Non-credible, irrelevant, and outdated information were found to be the top problems. There were more statistically significant problem solving style differences (especially on the Problem Solving Confidence subscale) than gender-study level differences. Notable gender-study level differences were still found. Male undergraduate students, for example, were more affected by their reluctance to ask personal questions. Lastly, the implications to information literacy education were discussed.


      PubDate: 2015-07-28T20:48:42Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 4




      PubDate: 2015-07-28T20:48:42Z
       
  • TOC continued & ed board continued
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 4




      PubDate: 2015-07-28T20:48:42Z
       
  • Student, Librarian, and Instructor Perceptions of Information Literacy
           Instruction and Skills in a First Year Experience Program: A Case Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 4
      Author(s): Sung Un Kim, David Shumaker
      As more and more academic librarians have adopted the practice of teaching information literacy in first year experience programs, there has been a growing number of studies assessing this practice. However, few studies have compared the views and assessments of students, librarians, and instructors. Through survey methods, this case study was conducted to understand student, librarian, and instructor perceptions of information literacy instruction and students' information literacy skills in two different types of courses at the Catholic University of America. The results indicate that notable differences are associated with the respondent's role as well as the course involvement of the respondent. Students who were involved in a course with consistent inclusion of a substantive information literacy-related assignment tended to rate the effectiveness, importance, and impacts of information literacy instruction, and their own information literacy skills, higher than those in a course with an inconsistent level of engagement with information literacy. Students' assignment grades were positively correlated with their self-ratings of information literacy skills in both courses. In addition, students rated their own information literacy skills higher and rated the importance and impacts of information literacy instruction lower than librarians or instructors did. Implications and recommendations are also addressed.


      PubDate: 2015-07-28T20:48:42Z
       
  • Socioeconomic Indicators Associated with First-year College Students' Use
           of Academic Libraries
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 July 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Krista M. Soria , Shane Nackerud , Kate Peterson
      The purpose of this study was to examine whether a wide variety of socioeconomic indicators were associated with first-year college students' use of academic libraries in six areas: checking out books from general circulation, reading electronic books, using online reference librarian services or speaking with a peer research consultant, logging into an electronic journal, using library workstations, or logging into a database. Data were drawn from 5133 first-year students attending a large, public research-extensive university in the upper Midwest of the United States. The results suggest that first-year students from lower socioeconomic status backgrounds are less likely to utilize libraries in nearly all areas. Some mixed findings also emerged suggesting that socioeconomic indicators such as hours spent in employment each week, living situation, and family are not uniformly predictive of students' use of academic libraries.


      PubDate: 2015-07-13T19:28:24Z
       
  • Factors Impacting Library Visibility on Academic Institution Home Pages
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 July 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Melissa Becher
      This study identifies factors affecting the placement of the library on post-secondary academic institution home pages. The study is a mixed method research project, consisting of content analysis of 357 home pages from all types of institutions and 15 interviews with web librarians and institution webmasters. Institution home pages were coded according to an author-developed library visibility scale. Quantitative analysis of the results indicated that financial status (public, private, or for-profit), highest degree offered, and institution size were potential factors influencing library link placement. Interviews confirmed that financial status and degree offered influenced library visibility in relation to the home page's function and the institution's marketing efforts. Additional local factors such as advocacy, engagement in web decision-making or technology, institutional understanding of the library's role, and accreditation were found to influence link placement.


      PubDate: 2015-07-13T19:28:24Z
       
  • Foregrounding the Research Log in Information Literacy Instruction
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 July 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Louise R. Fluk
      Updating an earlier study, this article reviews the literature of information literacy (IL) instruction since 2008 for empirical evidence of the value of research logs or research journals for effective pedagogy, assessment, and prevention of plagiarism in IL instruction at the college level. The review reveals a mismatch between the acknowledged theoretical and practical value of research log assignments and the mixed advocacy for them in the literature. The article further analyzes the literature for the drawbacks of research log assignments and points toward ways of mitigating these drawbacks.


      PubDate: 2015-07-08T09:21:37Z
       
  • Asked and Answered
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 July 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Elizabeth Blakesley



      PubDate: 2015-07-03T22:19:43Z
       
  • Middle Eastern Studies Librarians: An Ambivalent Professional Identity
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 July 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Anaïs Salamon
      This paper aims to investigate the ambivalent identity of librarians supporting Middle Eastern studies in North America (Canada and the United States), and Western Europe (France, Germany and the United Kingdom), as well as in North American and European institutions located in the Middle East (such as the Library of Congress, American Universities Libraries, or French Research Institutes) in 2014. To do so, the article focuses first on the emergence and evolution of the profession, then on the demographics, training and competencies of the professional community, and last on their perceptions of both characteristics of, and challenges faced by the profession. This research is based on the collection and analysis of primary and secondary sources. After a thorough review of the existing literature on Middle Eastern studies libraries, librarians 1 1 Although the terminology commonly accepted in the professional community is “Middle East librarians”, for the purpose of this paper I prefer “Middle Eastern studies librarians”. and librarianship, a survey was conducted among librarians working in North America, Western Europe and the Middle East between June 9 and July 6, 2014. Through an analysis of the survey answers, I sought to glean a better understanding of professionals active in this field in 2014. Middle Eastern studies librarianship, in spite of fundamental differences inherent to each area studies specialization, shares many similarities with specialized librarianship on other geographic areas. This paper could therefore be used as a model for research on librarians serving the teaching and research community on other areas, or as a base to compare Middle Eastern studies librarianship with other area studies librarianship.


      PubDate: 2015-07-03T22:19:43Z
       
  • Moving from Theory to Practice: Incorporating Feminist Approaches into
           Search and Discovery Tool Development
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 July 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Ray Laura Henry



      PubDate: 2015-07-03T22:19:43Z
       
  • The Effect of a Situated Learning Environment in a Distance Education
           Information Literacy Course
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 June 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Amy Catalano
      Teaching based on situated learning theory employs techniques that enable learners to experience a concept within the circumstance in which it would most likely be useful, and is presumed to facilitate transfer of knowledge from the instructional situation to its application to environments outside the classroom. The purpose of this experimental study is to investigate the efficacy of a situated learning environment for facilitating transfer during tasks requiring the evaluation of information in an online information literacy course. Eighty-five university students enrolled in a distance education library research course were randomly assigned to a situated learning condition or a control/traditional instruction group. Students assigned to the experimental group demonstrated transfer more often. A logistic regression analysis revealed that the grouping variable was a significant predictor of transfer. These results reveal that teaching models based on the principles of situated learning have the potential to facilitate transfer to real world contexts. The implications of this study may inform curricular decisions by providing evidence-based instructional design for instructors wishing to employ situated learning in order to teach for transfer, thus improving distance education courses in general, and library instruction in particular.


      PubDate: 2015-06-29T02:53:35Z
       
  • Citation Analysis of M.A. Theses and Ph.D. Dissertations in Sociology and
           Anthropology: An Assessment of Library Resource Usage
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 June 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Zila Rosenberg
      The use of library resources by Hebrew University of Jerusalem Sociology and Anthropology graduate students was assessed through an examination of bibliographic references cited in a sample of theses and dissertations accepted during the academic years 2010–2013. Five variables were identified and quantified: type of material (monographs, journals, or other), format (print, electronic or both), language of material (English, Hebrew, or other), year and “age” of publication, and availability of item in Hebrew University's library holdings. Results showed a larger percentage of citations to books than to journals, with predominant usage of books in print format and predominant usage of journals in print & electronic format, with English being the predominant language for all resources cited. The median age of cited material was 15years, older for books than for journals. 95% of the journals and 82% of the books were available in the University library's holdings. These findings present a substantiated appraisal of the University Library's ability to answer the needs of its graduate students in the Sociology and Anthropology Department.


      PubDate: 2015-06-29T02:53:35Z
       
  • Increasing the Impact: Building on the Library Impact Data Project
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 June 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Graham Stone , Alison Sharman , Penelope Dunn , Laura Woods



      PubDate: 2015-06-29T02:53:35Z
       
  • Literature Review of Data Mining Applications in Academic Libraries
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 June 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Lorena Siguenza-Guzman , Victor Saquicela , Elina Avila-Ordóñez , Joos Vandewalle , Dirk Cattrysse
      This article provides a comprehensive literature review and classification method for data mining techniques applied to academic libraries. To achieve this, forty-one practical contributions over the period 1998–2014 were identified and reviewed for their direct relevance. Each article was categorized according to the main data mining functions: clustering, association, classification, and regression; and their application in the four main library aspects: services, quality, collection, and usage behavior. Findings indicate that both collection and usage behavior analyses have received most of the research attention, especially related to collection development and usability of websites and online services respectively. Furthermore, classification and regression models are the two most commonly used data mining functions applied in library settings. Additionally, results indicate that the top 6 journals of articles published on the application of data mining techniques in academic libraries are: College and Research Libraries, Journal of Academic Librarianship, Information Processing and Management, Library Hi Tech, International Journal of Knowledge, Culture and Change Management, and The Electronic Library. Scopus is the multidisciplinary database that provides the best coverage of journal articles identified. To our knowledge, this study represents the first systematic, identifiable and comprehensive academic literature review of data mining techniques applied to academic libraries.


      PubDate: 2015-06-29T02:53:35Z
       
  • Reviews and Analysis of Special Reports
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 June 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship




      PubDate: 2015-06-29T02:53:35Z
       
  • How ARL Academic Libraries Present Open Web Resources — A Proposed
           Solution to Address Discoverability
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 June 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Le Yang , Cynthia L. Henry
      Open web resources on the Internet have become increasingly important in the scholarly community and are being cited ever more frequently in scholarly articles. Academic librarians continue to assess and collect open web resources that are of value to the academic community in order to support research. With the questions of how ARL academic libraries collect, present, and make searchable open web resources, this paper analyzes all ARL academic libraries' websites and finds that all of them are collecting valuable open web resources and presenting these on research/subject guides. This paper also finds that some ARL academic libraries implement search boxes for the collected list of open web resources, but only descriptions or titles of the resources housed on the libraries' website are being searched. None of the libraries makes the content or full text of open web resources discoverable on the academic library websites. Based on the findings, this paper proposes a solution to address the discoverability issue of collecting open web resources and how to make the content or full text of the open web resources searchable.


      PubDate: 2015-06-29T02:53:35Z
       
  • “It's in the Syllabus”: Identifying Information Literacy and
           Data Information Literacy Opportunities Using a Grounded Theory Approach
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 June 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Clarence Maybee , Jake Carlson , Maribeth Slebodnik , Bert Chapman
      Developing innovative library services requires a real world understanding of faculty members' desired curricular goals. This study aimed to develop a comprehensive and deeper understanding of Purdue's nutrition science and political science faculties' expectations for student learning related to information and data information literacies. Course syllabi were examined using grounded theory techniques that allowed us to identify how faculty were addressing information and data information literacies in their courses, but it also enabled us to understand the interconnectedness of these literacies to other departmental intentions for student learning, such as developing a professional identity or learning to conduct original research. The holistic understanding developed through this research provides the necessary information for designing and suggesting information literacy and data information literacy services to departmental faculty in ways supportive of curricular learning outcomes.


      PubDate: 2015-06-24T14:32:03Z
       
  • The Use of Paraprofessionals in Electronic Resources Management: Results
           of a Survey
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 June 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Rachel Erb , Brian Erb
      The authors surveyed 121 paraprofessionals employed in the management of electronic resources to gather information related to their institutions, education, and position descriptions. The authors sought not only to describe the kinds of work being performed by paraprofessionals in electronic resources, but also to explore correlations between institutional and educational variables and the kinds of duties being performed by electronic resources paraprofessionals. The authors discovered paraprofessionals performing a sizeable number of advanced duties and many holding advanced degrees but could find few predictive variables within our data correlating with the types of duties an electronic resources paraprofessional may be performing. In particular, holding an advanced degree seemed to yield little additional predictive power for ascertaining the level of an electronic resources paraprofessional's possible job duties.


      PubDate: 2015-06-24T14:32:03Z
       
  • Making an Exhibition of Ourselves? Academic Libraries and Exhibitions
           Today
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 June 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Dorothy Fouracre
      Recent years have seen a noticeable increase in the size and scope of libraries' exhibitions. To investigate this observation, interviews were conducted at five academic libraries: the Bodleian Library, British Library, Royal College of Physicians Library, Royal Society Library and Wellcome Library. Each reported growth in their involvement in exhibitions, which feature in their strategies. Exhibitions are increasingly aimed at the wider public, not necessarily with the target of increasing user numbers. Participants reported growing exhibition loan activity, yet there are no initiatives in the library sector to promote this. Investigation found that the sector has not developed practice to evaluate library exhibitions, and most participants did not have established means of doing so. Library professionals are also not formally prepared for involvement in exhibitions. Although practice from the museum sector can be used by libraries, they also face challenges specific to their exhibitions. This paper argues for both the closer integration of library and museum professionals, and further research into library-sector-specific issues. Exhibitions can be a valid and valuable undertaking for libraries, but more research is needed if they are to benefit fully from them, especially if they are using exhibitions as an example of public outreach.


      PubDate: 2015-06-24T14:32:03Z
       
  • Other People's Letters: Simulating Archival Intimacy Through Theater
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 June 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Abigail Wheetley
      This is an account of one archivist and her interest in communicating the experience of interacting with a collection of personal material. To this end she creates a reading of letters, diaries, and other primary source documents, specifically with an audience in mind. The article describes, in some detail, what steps one might go through to create this sort of outreach event, but also relates the personal feelings and introspections on the subject of archival work and what it means for society.


      PubDate: 2015-06-24T14:32:03Z
       
  • Undergraduates' Academic Reading Format Preferences and Behaviors
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 3
      Author(s): Diane Mizrachi
      This study of undergraduates' academic reading format preferences and behaviors asks the questions: What are undergraduates' format preferences when engaging with their academic readings, electronic or print? What factors impact their preferences and behaviors? How do these factors influence their actions? Almost 400 students at the University of California, Los Angeles completed the online Academic Reading Questionnaire in spring 2014 by agreeing or disagreeing with statements about their format preferences when engaging with their academic texts, and the contextual factors that impact them. Results show overwhelmingly that they prefer print over electronic formats for learning purposes, but multiple factors such as accessibility, cost, complexity and importance of the reading to the course affect their actual behaviors. The findings are then considered within the larger picture of previous studies of presentation format preferences, and research comparing reading comprehension in electronic and print formats. Zipf's Principle of Least Effort and the concept of information economics are used to suggest a theoretical basis for why factors outside of comprehension and learning efficiency impact the students' actual behaviors.


      PubDate: 2015-06-24T14:32:03Z
       
  • A New Role of Chinese Academic Librarians—The Development of
           Embedded Patent Information Services at Nanjing Technology University
           Library, China
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 3
      Author(s): Jun Feng , NaiXuan Zhao
      Patent information service is a newly emerging specialized in-depth information consultation service in Chinese academic libraries, developed with the implementation of the “National Intellectual Property (IP) Strategy” in China. This paper presents the embedded patent information service at Nanjing Technology University (NJTech) Library (Nanjing, China) and focuses on how it was designed and developed. Citation analysis and questionnaire survey were applied to study NJTech researchers' information behavior on patents so that the librarians could identify their unmet information needs. Based on the analysis of data collected from the citation analysis and questionnaire, the librarians found that they could assist researchers through collaboration and partnership in searching related patents, analyzing technology trends, identifying valuable patents, and tracking new emerging related patents. In the process of embedded service on patents, the role of the academic librarian at NJTech University has been extended to “Patent Specialist,” requiring close collaboration with researchers, embedding in their research units and groups, and helping them to make full use of patent information resources and become more effectively innovative in research.


      PubDate: 2015-06-24T14:32:03Z
       
  • Academic Libraries' Strategic Plans: Top Trends and Under-Recognized Areas
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 3
      Author(s): Laura Saunders
      Rapid developments in technology, as well as changes in areas such as scholarly communication, data management, and higher education pedagogy are affecting user expectations and forcing academic libraries to develop new resources and service areas. No library can respond to every new trend in the field, but where are academic libraries generally placing their priorities right now, and to what extent are they responding to emerging trends? Through a content analysis of academic library strategic plans, this study examines the stated directions and goals of libraries to discover the extent to which they are monitoring and addressing emerging and traditional program and service areas, providing a perspective on how academic libraries are addressing current issues, and how they plan to allocate resources in response to trends. Academic libraries are facing enormous pressures that require them to respond and adapt in order to remain relevant. Rapid developments in technology, as well as changes in areas such as scholarly communication, data management, and higher education pedagogy are affecting user expectations and forcing academic libraries to develop new resources and service areas. At the same time, these libraries must balance new initiatives with core service areas such as instruction and collection development. In addition to responding to current trends, academic libraries are also being challenged to anticipate future needs and to develop innovative initiatives to meet those needs. No library can respond to every new trend in the field, nor should they. Decisions about how to prioritize and allocate resources should be aligned with the mission and goals of the library's parent institution. Colleges and universities are facing their own pressures, driven by increasing demands from stakeholders to hold themselves accountable, especially in terms of student outcomes such as persistence, graduation, and employment, as well as student learning outcomes, or changes in knowledge and behavior as a result of educational programs. In turn, these institutions are looking to their departments to demonstrate how their programs and services support and further the mission and goals of the college. In this environment, academic libraries must monitor both the trends in the library and information science field as well as those in higher education more generally in order to determine where to focus resources and efforts. But where are academic libraries generally placing their priorities right now, and to what extent are they responding to emerging trends? Library and information science (LIS) literature is rife with articles and reports that track trends in the field, make predictions, and advise libraries on how to implement plans and programs related to those trends. Few studies, however, have examined academic libraries' planning documents to see how they are prioritizing among the competing issues and challenges facing them. This study aims to address the gap in the literature. Through a content analysis of academic library strategic plans, this study examines the stated directions and goals of the library to discover the extent to which they are monitoring and addressing emerging and traditional program and service areas. Academic librarians and library directors will be interested to see which issues and challenges are receiving the most attention, and how their peers are prioritizing those areas. The study will also offer campus administrators a perspective on how academic libraries are addressing current issues, and how they plan to allocate resources in response to trends. Library faculty might also be interested in the results, as understanding which trends are having the most impact in their field could inform curricular decisions and program emphases.


      PubDate: 2015-06-24T14:32:03Z
       
  • Finding Parents for Orphan Works: Using Genealogical Methods to Locate
           Heirs for Obtaining Copyright Permissions
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 3
      Author(s): Drew Smith
      Faculty and students frequently want to use copyrighted material in their books, articles, presentations, and instructional materials, but because such usage often falls outside Creative Commons and Fair Use guidelines, they will need to obtain permissions for the use of the material in those cases. Because current copyright law has resulted in long durations for copyright, the copyright owner may be very difficult to identify and locate, resulting in a large number of “orphan works.” When the original copyright owner is deceased, it will be necessary to locate an appropriate heir to contact in order to obtain the needed permissions. Genealogical methods can be used to identify and locate these heirs, but because these methods are usually unfamiliar to academic librarians, the librarian may feel unable to assist the faculty member or student with this type of search. This article demonstrates how these methods are easy to learn and apply, using case studies in which an academic librarian, within a brief period of time, was able to access readily available online genealogical sources and to apply basic genealogical techniques in order to identify and locate heirs to a deceased copyright owner.


      PubDate: 2015-06-24T14:32:03Z
       
  • Nature Writing: The Creation of a Bibliography of Seminal Books
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 3
      Author(s): Maria Kochis



      PubDate: 2015-06-24T14:32:03Z
       
  • What Matters for Students' Use of Physical Library Space?
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 3
      Author(s): Seung Hyun Cha , Tae Wan Kim
      Physical space in an academic library is increasingly important to fully support students' diverse needs for learning spaces. However, inefficient space design and planning give rise to crowded and underutilized spaces in a library, thereby probably lowering students' learning outcomes and wasting costly space. Understanding students' use of space can facilitate effective design and planning, which in turn will result in more efficient use of space. As students' spatial choices (i.e., the act of decision-making of an individual or group among two or more space alternatives for a certain activity) account for much of the space use in a library, this study explored the factors that influence their choice of space in an academic library using a paper-based survey (n=252) at the central academic library, Eindhoven University of Technology, the Netherlands. The five most important space attributes were “Amount of space,” “Noise level,” “Crowdedness,” “Comfort of furnishing” and “Cleanliness.” The spatial choice patterns also differed according to different user and activity profiles.


      PubDate: 2015-06-24T14:32:03Z
       
  • Role-related Stress Experienced by Academic Librarians
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 3
      Author(s): Ellen I. Shupe , Stephanie K. Wambaugh , Reed J. Bramble
      Although a substantial body of research has identified stressors and their consequences in a number of organizational populations, very little systematic research has investigated the stress experienced by librarians. The study described here addresses this oversight by examining two sources of role-related stress experienced in a diverse sample of academic librarians. Results of the study were largely consistent with predictions. The librarians experienced role ambiguity, role overload, and burnout at or above the level experienced by other occupational samples, and the role stressors significantly predicted an array of psychological, health-related, and work-related outcomes. Implications of the results for the prevention of role stress and interventional programs are discussed.


      PubDate: 2015-06-24T14:32:03Z
       
  • Back to the Beginning — The Journal is Dead, Long Live Science
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 June 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Williams E. Nwagwu , Bosire Onyancha
      This paper synthesises literature on the evolution of the academic journal, showing that the weaknesses of the journal strategy of science information dissemination are nothing new in the history of science. The paper avers that information technology has provided a solution to the age-long constraints associated with the journal. It is shown that by expanding the public's participation in science, and by enabling research results to be presented to the public in various formats, the rapid development in electronic technologies has touched the essential structure and functions of the journal. Formal and informal means of science dissemination and communication have emerged to blur the boundaries between journals, articles and ideas. Most significantly, the journal as an information product has been dismembered into different new and legitimate forms of the research effort, formerly packaged as a single product.


      PubDate: 2015-06-24T14:32:03Z
       
  • A Bibliometric Analysis of the Scholarly Publications of Librarians at the
           University of Mississippi, 2008–2013
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 3
      Author(s): Ashley S. Dees
      This article uses bibliometric tools to analyze the peer-reviewed publications of tenure and tenure track librarians at the University of Mississippi from 2008 to 2013. The purpose of this article is to gain a better understanding of the role of academic librarians including the role that tenure plays in librarian publications and the usage of the collection by librarians for research. Analysis found that 59% of librarians publishing peer-reviewed literature were tenure track and 81% of sources cited from all librarians' peer-reviewed publications were held by the University of Mississippi's J.D. Williams library.


      PubDate: 2015-06-24T14:32:03Z
       
  • The Relationship Between Academic Library Department Experience and
           Perceptions of Leadership Skill Development Relevant to Academic Library
           Directorship
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 3
      Author(s): Colleen S. Harris-Keith
      Though research into academic library director leadership has established leadership skills and qualities required for success, little research has been done to establish in which library departments library directors were most likely to acquire those skills and qualities. This study surveyed academic library directors at Carnegie-designated Master's granting institutions about their previous academic library positions, and what skills and qualities they perceived to have exercised in those positions. The two research questions addressed by this portion of the research project were: (1) is the perception of library leadership skill and quality development equal across departmental experience? and (2) what are the leadership skills and qualities most commonly perceived to be used in each department? Findings revealed that respondents perceived that there were great opportunities to exercise leadership qualities in previous positions, but few opportunities to develop more empirically measurable leadership skills. In addition, respondents perceived those skill development opportunities to be available only once working in the position of library director or in the administration department of academic libraries.


      PubDate: 2015-06-24T14:32:03Z
       
  • The Veteran Student Experience and the Academic Librarian
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 3
      Author(s): Sue F. Phelps
      With the increase of student veteran enrollment under the Post 9/11 Veterans Education Assistance Act of 2008, colleges and university campuses are beginning to accommodate the needs of this population. Student veterans present unique challenges to institutions of higher education as they are adjusting to a new culture and coping with both visible and invisible injuries. Some of these war-related injuries affect behavior in both classroom and extracurricular settings and some result in learning disabilities. Librarians who understand the experiences of student veterans can better assist these students with their academic goals.


      PubDate: 2015-06-24T14:32:03Z
       
  • Looking Back to Look Ahead
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 3
      Author(s): Elizabeth Blakesley



      PubDate: 2015-06-24T14:32:03Z
       
  • Exploring Chinese Students' Perspective on Reference Services at Chinese
           Academic Libraries: A Case Study Approach
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 3
      Author(s): Jingzhen Xie , Lili Sun
      Reference services have been developed in China for nearly a century; however literature shows that very little research has been done on users' perception of reference services in Chinese academic libraries. To fill the research gap, this study aims to examine how Chinese undergraduates perceive, understand and use the reference service. A survey was employed and conducted in a comprehensive Chinese university with about 19,000 undergraduate students. 433 valid questionnaires were received. ANOVA was adopted to examine overall reference service satisfaction variation among respondents in different programs. The study reveals that library resources and reference services have been improved in China during the past twenty years, especially with the great support of Project 211 and Project 985 by the Ministry of Education of China. However, there is still more to do to change libraries from book repositories to modern user-centered information services and to improve historically underdeveloped user services in Chinese libraries. Libraries and librarians in China need to more actively embrace the philosophy that library resources are to be used and librarians are there to serve, to thoroughly promote reference services and render them more visible, and to diligently learn, adopt and apply technology to provide quality reference services.


      PubDate: 2015-06-24T14:32:03Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 3




      PubDate: 2015-06-24T14:32:03Z
       
  • Editorial Board Continued
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 3




      PubDate: 2015-06-24T14:32:03Z
       
  • Librarians' and Information Professionals' Perspectives Towards Discovery
           Tools — An Exploratory Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 May 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Noa Aharony , Gila Prebor
      Discovery tools are becoming popular all over the world. Yet, there is little information regarding discovery tool implementation and evaluation. The objectives of this study are to explore: (a) librarians' and information professional' current use of discovery tools, (b) to what extent does the TAM explain librarians' and information professionals' intentions to use discovery tools, (c) to what extent do characteristics such as cognitive appraisals explain librarians' and information professionals' intentions to use discovery books, and (d) to what extent do personality dimensions such as openness to experience explain librarians' and information professionals' intentions to use discovery books. The research was conducted in Israel during the first semester of the 2015 academic year and encompassed 145 librarians and information professionals. Researchers used eight questionnaires and two open questions to gather the data. Findings reveal that the implementation of discovery tools in Israel is still in its infancy. Further, findings confirm that the TAM, cognitive appraisals, openness to experience, and importance of discovery tool features, affect respondents' satisfaction with discovery tools.


      PubDate: 2015-06-24T14:32:03Z
       
  • Beyond Embedded: Creating an Online-Learning Community Integrating
           Information Literacy and Composition Courses
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 May 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Mary Beth Burgoyne , Kim Chuppa-Cornell
      This article recounts our experience developing an embedded librarian model which evolved into a fully integrated learning community, pairing online composition with an online information literacy credit-bearing course. Our assessment of student success measures indicate that the positive trends we found under the embedded librarian program have continued to improve under the formal learning community model. We discuss the results of our qualitative and quantitative measures of the program's impact on student success and share our recommendations for further developments.


      PubDate: 2015-06-24T14:32:03Z
       
  • Creation and Use of Intellectual Works in the Academic Environment:
           Students' Knowledge About Copyright and Copyleft
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 May 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Enrique Muriel-Torrado , Juan-Carlos Fernández-Molina
      Copyright legislation directly affects the habitual work of university students, who are both users and creators of copyrighted works. The development of the digital setting has complicated this relationship substantially, as it multiplies the possibilities of creating, modifying and sharing works, while also multiplying the infractions of copyright. Moreover, two opposing phenomena are seen: on the one hand, a staunch reinforcement of copyright legislation, and at the same time a movement toward aperture and flexibility whose best example would be the Creative Commons licenses. In this context, it is crucial for students to have some minimal knowledge that will allow them to adequately deal with problems or questions arising as they use or create intellectual works. This study presents the results of a survey of Spanish university students, with the aim of determining their level of knowledge about copyright and copyleft, particularly applied to academic activities. The results make manifest a level of knowledge far below the one required to make proper use of the copyrighted works of other parties, or to appropriately protect and diffuse one's own intellectual creations deriving from activity as a university student.


      PubDate: 2015-06-24T14:32:03Z
       
  • Mapping the Roadmap: Using Action Research to Develop an Online
           Referencing Tool
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 May 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Carole Gibbs , Ben Kooyman , Kirstin Marks , Julie Burns
      In early 2013, the University of South Australia's Roadmap to Referencing online resource was launched. The impetus for developing this resource was to address fundamental questions facing students when they accessed sources online. Taking inspiration from the University of Portsmouth's online referencing resource, this interactive tool helps students to identify the specific type of source they are using and the required reference format for that source. Utilising an action research methodology, this paper provides an overview of the development of the Roadmap to Referencing. It discusses the pedagogical impetus behind this resource and reports on its evaluation using quantitative and qualitative data to gauge its usage and effectiveness. The findings indicate that the resource was well-received and has contributed to students' ability to better reference the various types of sources that they previously found problematic. These findings also show areas for future development and refinement of the resource.


      PubDate: 2015-06-24T14:32:03Z
       
  • Sign, Sign, Everywhere a Sign: What Does “Reference” Mean to
           Academic Library Users?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 May 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Kimberly L. O'Neill , Brooke A. Guilfoyle
      In the library profession there is abundant use of jargon and acronyms to describe library activities. The terminology used is important to both market and describe library services. Often library professionals make assumptions that their users understand what library terminology means. Reference is a term widely understood by librarians and library workers, but is that understanding conveyed to the library user especially in academic institutions? The Regis University Library Reference Services Department faculty were curious to discover whether their students and faculty knew what the word “reference” meant especially since this word was on the sign above their service desk and used in the name of their department. A survey was developed by the Reference Services Department to answer that question and others. Results from the survey were used to propose a new name for the desk, department and librarians.


      PubDate: 2015-06-24T14:32:03Z
       
  • Of Law Schools and Libraries
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 June 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): John Buschman



      PubDate: 2015-06-24T14:32:03Z
       
 
 
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