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Journal of Academic Librarianship
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.224
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 1036  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0099-1333
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3160 journals]
  • Problems and Changes in Digital Libraries in the Age of Big Data From the
           Perspective of User Services
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 45, Issue 1Author(s): Shuqing Li, Fusen Jiao, Yong Zhang, Xia Xu Based on the investigation of the position of user service for constructing digital libraries in the big data era, this paper points out that not only data resources of modern digital library have the characteristics of big data, but also the existing library services need to use big data methods to achieve reform and innovation, including resource transferring, resource utilization, social identity, thinking innovation. We focus on the importance of user services and types of big data resources that digital libraries can utilize, which include big data within libraries such as user behavior data and digital literature resource, and other big data outside libraries such as scholarly big data. We also examine the problems and potential of digital libraries in the age of big data relative to data, technology, services, and users. Using existing big data resources and considering the characteristics of current users' needs from the perspective of users, more effective ideas and methods to improve existing services in digital library can be put forward. At the same time, it is the personalized need of users in the age of big data that constitute the driving factor for the development of digital library from resource-sharing service to user-oriented service.
       
  • The Leadership/Followership Process: A Different Understanding of Library
           Leadership
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 45, Issue 1Author(s): Jason Martin
       
  • Challenge of Ukrainian academic librarians in an evolving scholarly
           publishing landscape
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 45, Issue 1Author(s): Serhii Nazarovets, Jaime A. Teixeira da Silva, Maryna Nazarovets Faced with a prolonged economic crisis, Ukrainian research institutes are under pressure as a direct result of limited funding. This has also had a direct negative impact on the functionality of librarians who have seen increasing limitations to acquisitions. Despite economic difficulties, Ukrainian academic librarians are trying to offer their end-users specialized services that involve active librarian mediation in the preparation and dissemination of the results of these users' scientific work. One notable function is to offer aid to users on how to detect pseudo-scientific journals. In this paper, based on a survey of librarians from leading Ukrainian universities, we studied for the first time, the main information resources and tools used by Ukrainian experts to test the validity of scientific journals so that they may be recommended to library users as reliable channels for disseminating research results. These are tools and resources include Scopus, Web of Science, Beall's blacklists, the DOAJ, Think. Check. Submit., and the Norwegian Register. We describe the benefits and limitations that Ukrainian academic librarians may encounter when each of these resources is used. Modern reformation to Ukrainian science has opened up new opportunities for Ukrainian academic librarians. As a result, if they are able to successfully implement such services, they can regain a prominent place in the scientific life of institutions and on the global academic platform.
       
  • Academic l/INS;ibrary m/INS;etamorphosis and r/INS;egeneration, M./INS;
           Simons. Rowman & Littlefield, Lanham, MD (2017), 146 pp. $78.00. ISBN
           978-1442273078
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 6Author(s): Alexandra Simons
       
  • The fun of motivation: Crossing the threshold concepts, M./INS; Francis.
           Association of College and Research Libraries, Chicago, IL (2017), 168 pp.
           $48.00. ISBN 978-8389-8933-3
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 6Author(s): David Dettman
       
  • Leading in the n/INS;ew a/INS;cademic l/INS;ibrary, B./INS; Albitz,
           C./INS; Avery, D./INS; Zabel (Eds.). Libraries Unlimited, Santa Barbara,
           CA (2017), 195 pp. $55.00. ISBN 978-1-4408-5113-1
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 6Author(s): David Gibbs
       
  • Academic s/INS;kills for i/INS;nterdisciplinary s/INS;tudies, J.J.W./INS;
           Buis, G./INS; Post, V.R./INS; Visser. Amsterdam University Press,
           Amsterdam (2016), 143 pp. $18.99. ISBN 978-94-6298-359-5
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 6Author(s): Margot Note
       
  • Undergraduate r/INS;esearch and the a/INS;cademic l/INS;ibrarian,
           M.K./INS; Hensley, S./INS; Davis-Kahl. Association of College and Research
           Libraries, Chicago, IL (2017), (348 pp. $65.00. ISBN 978-0-8389-8908-1)
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 6Author(s): Amy Wainwright
       
  • Teaching Google Scholar: A practical guide for librarians, P./INS;
           Alfonzo, M. Sandra Wood (Ed.), in: From practical guides for librarians.
           No. 26. Rowman & Littlefield, Lanham, MD (2016), 188 pp. $65.00. ISBN
           978-1-4422-4358-3
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2018Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 44, Issue 6Author(s): Amy Riegelman
       
  • Architects, Renovators, Builders, and Fragmenters: A Model for First Year
           Students' Self-perceptions and Perceptions of Information Literacy
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 45, Issue 1Author(s): Maoria J. Kirker, Ilana Stonebraker The transition from high school to college is fraught with academic, social, and emotional changes for first-year students. This year long qualitative study uses cognitive dissonance theory to examine first-year students' changing perceptions of their information literacy competencies throughout their freshman year. Through the examination of students' self-reflections and semi-structured interviews, the study produced cognitive dissonance in students, revealed four information literacy journeys, demonstrated the shifting of students' definitions of research, and shed light on the emotional labor involved in college-level research. Implications for information literacy instruction and future research are discussed.
       
  • Community College Libraries & Academic Support for Student Success
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 November 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Christine Wolff-Eisenberg, Braddlee
       
  • In-house Software Development: Considerations for Implementation
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 November 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Scott Jackson, Sian Brannon
       
  • How Are We the Same or Different: Information Needs and Barriers of
           Domestic and International Students
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 October 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Sei-Ching Joanna Sin, Kyung-Sun Kim The study sought to (1) investigate whether international students differ from domestic students in their information needs and barriers encountered, and (2) test the relative importance of students' domestic/international status against their gender and level of study. A survey was used to collect data from international and domestic undergraduate and graduate students in a US public university. The study collected 1259 responses. Regression analysis was used for analyzing the data. International and domestic students were found to be similar in their top-ranked needs (e.g., career information) and barriers (e.g., irrelevant and non-credible information). Compared to their gender and level of study, students' domestic/international status resulted in fewer significant differences in their needs and barriers. However, for the areas where domestic/international status was significant, its effect size was often prominent. Differences between domestic and international students are more notable in the barriers than in the information needs. Based on the findings, six propositions were developed. The implications for research and practice are discussed.
       
  • Impacts of Library Space on Learning Satisfaction – An Empirical Study
           of University Library Design in Guangzhou, China
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 October 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Ling Hin Li, Fan Wu, Boya Su The current generation of millennial university students is more accustomed to searching reference information online than visiting the physical library facility, compared to the previous generations of students. Studies have shown that the role of the physical library facilities as a mere collection point of reading and reference materials is being threatened by the availability of free and high-speed online search engines. University libraries have always been an integral part in higher education learning activities, and they are not exempted from this threat. Based on a structural equation modelling framework, we analysed empirically the importance of different library design features that help enhance students' learning satisfaction, and found that lighting environment, acoustic environment as well as location of the library building were the main determinants impacting on the use of the university library by students in a major university in China. We conclude the paper with our suggestions in modifying library design to accommodate students' learning needs, and more importantly in recon uring the spatial and functional role of university libraries in this age of digital information from a mere provider of reference materials to a physical space of learning commons on campus.
       
  • Lessons Learned From a Failed Research Project: An Informal Examination of
           LibGuide Design and Use Became a Professional Growth Opportunity
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 October 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Doris Van Kampen-Breit, Renée H. Gould
       
  • What Value Do Journal Whitelists and Blacklists Have in Academia'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 October 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Jaime A. Teixeira da Silva, Panagiotis Tsigaris This paper aims to address the issue of predatory publishing, sensu lato. To achieve this, we offer our perspectives, starting initially with some background surrounding the birth of the concept, even though the phenomenon may have already existed long before the popularization of the term “predatory publishing”. The issue of predation or “predatory” behavior in academic publishing is no longer limited to open access (OA). Many of the mainstream publishers that were exclusively subscription-based are now evolving towards a state of complete OA. Academics seeking reliable sources of journals to publish their work tend to rely on a journal's metrics such as citations and indexing, and on whether it is blacklisted or whitelisted. Jeffrey Beall raised awareness of the risks of “predatory” OA publishing, and his blacklists of “predatory” OA journals and publishers began to be used for official purposes to distinguish valid from perceived invalid publishing venues. We initially reflect on why we believe the blacklists created by Beall were flawed, primarily due to the weak set of criteria confusing non-predatory with true predatory journals leading to false positives and missing out on blacklisting true predatory journals due to false negatives. Historically, most critiques of “predatory publishing” have relied excessively on Beall's blacklists to base their assumptions and conclusions but there is a need to look beyond these. There are currently a number of blacklists and whitelists circulating in academia, but they all have imperfections, such as the resurrected Beall blacklists, Crawford's OA gray list based on Beall's lists, Cabell's new blacklist with about 11,000 journals, the DOAJ with about 11,700 OA journals, and UGC, with over 32,600 journals prior to its recent (May 2018) purge of 4305 journals. The reader is led into a discussion about blacklists' lack of reliability, using the scientific framework of conducting research to assess whether a journal could be predatory at the pre- and post-study levels. We close our discussion by offering arguments why we believe blacklists are academically invalid.
       
  • Embedded Librarianship in Research in Nigerian Universities: Practices and
           Sources of Practice Knowledge
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 October 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Samaila Inuwa, A. Abrizah Academic librarians have begun to take the reference desk services outside their library premises to raise a new level of importance within and beyond their communities. Through embedded librarianship (EL), librarians move from a supporting role into partnership with their clientele, enabling librarians to develop stronger connections and relationship with those they serve. Academic librarians in Nigerian universities are given full faculty status and they have the responsibilities for teaching, research, and academic services, enabling a more natural climate for collaboration. EL in the research context is still an emerging model, the pathways to engagement and the criteria for success in Nigerian universities have not yet fully defined. Realizing this, the objective of this paper is to explore how academic librarians in Nigeria universities practice EL in research. This is a qualitative exploratory study, purposively sampled 12 academic librarians who are (a) embedded with schools or academic departments; and (b) directly involved in collaboration with faculties or partners in relation to research. Semi-structured interview was used for the data collection. Six themes that emerged from the embedding practices are (a) doing research and publishing papers; (b) being editor of a national journal/reviewing manuscripts of publication; (c) managing the life cycle of data; (d) disseminating research output; (e) providing scholarly publication service and bibliometrics analysis; and (f) conducting research method course. These embedded roles offer librarians means to increase their value in their organizations, their communities, and society as a whole. However, with regards to the sources of knowledge needed to foster learning and information sharing in EL, the librarians play an integral role as research partners because they have traditionally excelled in literature search, and very familiar with database content and its search language and features. This paper covers only the role of embedded librarians in research in three selected Nigerian Universities. Obviously, there is demand for further research to be conducted in other context. Further study need to be carried out on the relevance of EL to the library and stakeholders.
       
  • Graduate Student Use and Non-use of Reference and PDF Management Software:
           An Exploratory Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 October 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Marie Speare Graduate students at the University of Manitoba were surveyed to find out if they used reference management software (RMS), features used, challenges and barriers to using RMS. Interest in different types of PDF management features and training options were also investigated. Both users and non-users of reference management software were invited to participate. Non-users managed their citations and references with a variety of other tools. The principal reasons for non-use were that students were not aware of options that were available, and the amount of time needed to learn the program. RMS users also mentioned the steep learning curve, problems with extracting metadata from PDFs, technical issues, and problems with inaccurate citation styles. Most of the students saved PDF documents to their computer. Students were most interested in full-text searching of PDFs, automatic renaming of PDFs, and automatically extracting citation metadata from a PDF. PDF annotation and reading tools were also of some interest. Mobile features were of the least interest. There were no statistically significant differences in the interest of PDF management features between the user and non-user groups but there were statistically significant differences in the interest of some of the training options between the groups.
       
  • How academic librarians involve and contribute in research activities of
           universities' A systematic demonstration in practice through
           comparative studies of research productivities and research impacts
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 October 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Zhiyi Shao, Yongming Li, Ke Wu, Yingjie Guo, Fan Feng, Fen Hui, Yanfen Niu, Yang Zheng Participating in research and teaching activities of universities, and then providing valuable information and policy suggestions are an important task of academic librarians. This paper demonstrates systematically in practice that how academic librarians can involve and contribute in the research activities of universities. Our demonstration is launched through comparative studies of research productivities and research impacts among universities. These universities are divided into two counterparts. One is the Chinese universities which aim to construct the world-class mathematics discipline, and the other is the university which already owns the world-class mathematics discipline. During these comparative studies, we demonstrate in practice that how to seek the research question, how to collect and process the data, how to design the research methods, how to analyze the data, and how to propose policy suggestions. Contributions of this paper are twofold. The first aspect is a systematic demonstration in practice. This demonstration shows to academic librarians that how to involve and contribute in the research activities of universities. The academic librarianship thus can be strengthened, as it provides a way for us academic librarians to promote our roles in teaching and research activities of universities. The second aspect is to gain insights in the research productivities and research impacts of Chinese universities which aim to construct the world-class mathematics discipline. During this process, we design a bibliometric indicator for evaluating the research impacts of universities based on academic papers, launch comparative studies with the university that already owns the world-class mathematics discipline, and propose policy suggestions for China to scientifically achieve its goal. This also provides references for other countries to launch similar studies.
       
  • Theories of Value and Demonstrating their Practical Implementation in
           Academic Library Services
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 October 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Thembani Malapela, Karin De Jager Academic libraries are increasingly required to provide tangible evidence of their value to the scholarly community. Library responses have developed from early process-focused investigations to develop input and output measures, or user satisfaction studies, that do not provide much evidence of value, to attempting to demonstrate value from different perspectives, depending on the philosophical point of view with which the concept is regarded, for example in economic or social terms. This article attempts to explore a number of theoretical approaches that have been used to inform assessments of value in academic libraries, as well as some practical approaches to consider when undertaking studies of the value of academic library services.1
       
  • The “Collage Effect” – Against Filter Bubbles: Interdisciplinary
           Approaches to Combating the Pitfalls of Information Technology
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 October 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Péter Kiszl, János Fodor The rapid development of information technology has partially been reversed, and may become a tool for manipulation, which is incompatible with librarians' social mission. Making information available, connecting databases, and making them accessible result in people becoming more and more exposed. Customisation and effectively filtered information sources create filter bubbles. Although new systems of collaboration would be suitable for sharing reliable knowledge, they often lead to the spread of fake news. Despite worrying trends, we seek an encouraging future. Therefore, in this paper we analyse the relationship between information technology, market economy, and the librarian profession from the perspective of Hungarian LIS education, and emphasise the importance of active and creative information provision based on interdisciplinarity. Based on our experiences we believe that current and future readers can be reached through intriguing collages of credible information. The use of collages can compensate for the effects of filter bubbles, and librarians may become the masters of creating digital information collages.
       
  • Disciplinary, Institutional, and Individual Factors Affecting Researchers'
           Depositing Articles in Institutional Repository: An Empirical Analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 October 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Youngseek Kim, Jong Sir Oh This research investigates how disciplinary contexts, institutional settings, and individual motivations all affect researchers' depositing their articles into an institutional repository (IR). This study employed the Theory of Planned Behavior as its main theoretical framework and proposed six hypotheses to explain how disciplinary, institutional, and individual factors influence researchers' article depositing behaviors through an IR. This research utilized an online survey as its data collection method, and a total of 221 survey responses from researchers in U.S. academic institutions were collected. The hypothesized relationships were then tested by using multiple regression analysis. This research found that perceived community benefit, perceived institutional support, and perceived career benefit significantly increases researchers' article depositing behaviors through an IR, and the perceived career risk significantly decreases researchers' article depositing behaviors through an IR. This research suggests that community benefit, institutional support, and career issues need to be considered to increase researchers' overall article sharing behaviors through an IR.
       
  • Fostering Innovation in Academic Libraries Through Knowledge Creation
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 October 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Maria Koloniari, Eftichia Vraimaki, Kostas Fassoulis Knowledge management (KM) and innovation have been recognized as critical success factors for libraries since 1990s and 1980s, respectively; however, neither is easily achieved. In this context, the current study aims to explore – using structural equation modeling – the extent to which various organizational, technological, and personal factors influence the creation of new knowledge and innovation in academic libraries. More specifically, vision and goals, culture, and structure (formalization and centralization) are explored in terms of organizational factors; IT support is examined in the technological context; and human resources skills and perceptions toward KM are investigated in terms of personal factors. For the collection of primary data a structured questionnaire was developed and distributed electronically to Greek academic library personnel. The final sample comprised 312 professionals from 28 libraries. Results indicate that a visionary leadership facilitates the creation of new knowledge through fostering a culture of collaboration, trust, and learning, providing opportunities for taking initiatives, and creating the appropriate technological environment. All these help libraries develop innovative services, thus responding more quickly and effectively to their changing external environment. Most importantly, library leaders should focus on building a common vision that will guide necessary practices and changes for innovation to be achieved.
       
  • Visualizing Academic Librarians: An Arts-informed Inquiry
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 October 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Rickie-Lee Morey, Josephine Le Clerc, Marina Minns, Deirdrie Gregory, Susanne Glynn This research was undertaken by five librarians from Deakin University Library Australia as part of a professional development project. The objective was to collect qualitative data on the perceptions of librarians by academics and library colleagues from Deakin University. The ways in which academics perceive librarians, as well as how other library staff perceive librarians, are relatively under-explored areas. This study investigates the topic through an analysis of drawing and other visual representations, based on a study design that applied a visual, arts-based methodological approach. Participants were invited to focus groups where they were provided with a variety of craft materials, asked to create a visual representation of liaison librarians, then discuss their artifact. The data consists of twenty-eight artifacts, which were content analyzed, and semi-structured interview recordings, which were transcribed and analyzed for themes. Participants expressed liaison librarians positively, as helpers and connectors, as a gateway to knowledge, with complex and varied roles, as trusted sources, and as relationship builders. By drawing attention to these themes, the participants highlighted that liaison librarians are invaluable to Deakin University.
       
  • Boomers to Millennials: Generational Stereotypes at Work in Academic
           Librarianship
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 October 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Jessica B. Hayes, Cecelia Parks, Samantha McNeilly, Phill Johnson Over the past 30 years, as the American workforce has become more generationally diverse, library administrators and academic librarians alike have focused on navigating dynamics that arise in a multigenerational workplace. Much scholarly research has been conducted on generational differences; however, most of this research assumes that the individuals studied adhere to or believe in generational stereotypes. This exploratory study used a hybrid experience-perception survey to examine the role or influence generational stereotypes have on academic librarians and how those stereotypes influence the academic library workforce. While few specific generational stereotypes were found to be held by participants, perceptions of generational stereotypes still have a significant influence in academic librarians' interactions with their colleagues. This finding means that regardless of their validity, the impact of generational stereotypes cannot be disregarded in academic library workplaces.
       
  • Effects of Publisher Interface and Google Scholar on HTML and PDF Clicks:
           Investigating Paths That Inflate Usage
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 October 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Karen Kohn When considering canceling a journal subscription, librarians often want to predict future demand for the journal. Predictions are often based on past usage, measured by COUNTER Journal Report 1, yet many factors prevent this report from reflecting true usage. One factor is the double-counting that occurs when an article is viewed in both PDF and HTML formats. This study investigated four variables that could affect ratios of HTML article views to PDF downloads at the publisher level: the presence of a PDF link on the publisher's table of contents page, the destination of links from article titles on this same page, the destination of sidebar links on a Google Scholar results screen, and links from article titles on the same screen. Using data on thirteen scholarly publishers, the author tested for correlations between the types of links offered and the ratio of HTML views to PDF downloads on each platform. Only title links in Google Scholar were found to have a significant correlation to HTML-to-PDF ratios, suggesting that platforms for which Google Scholar links directly to full-text could have elevated usage counts. The author explains how to calculate an adjustment factor to estimate true article views on these platforms.
       
  • Keeping Current: Reviews and Analysis of Special Reports
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 September 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s):
       
  • Multifaceted Evaluation Criteria of Digital Libraries in Academic
           Settings: Similarities and Differences From Different Stakeholders
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 September 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Iris Xie, Soohyung Joo, Krystyna K. Matusiak Digital library (DL) evaluation is essential to the success and enhancement of DLs. However, there is a lack of research on the assessment of comprehensive evaluation criteria across multiple dimensions of DLs. In particular, limited research is available on criteria prioritization to determine which criteria are perceived important by different stakeholders. This study was conducted to compare similarities and differences in perceptions of the importance of different DL evaluation criteria by heterogeneous stakeholders in academic settings. Ninety subjects were recruited with 30 from each of the group representing DL scholars, DL librarians, and DL users. Subjects were instructed to fill in an in-depth survey consisting of 10 evaluation dimensions with 94 criteria. ANOVA and t-test were applied to examine the similarities and differences among the three groups. This study reveals consensus and divergence in perceptions of criteria importance among the three groups, and indicates an inherent tension among the stakeholders. Moreover, the differences identify gaps not only between user expectations and the DL practice but also between what's desirable and what's possible in the academic environment. The findings provide a comprehensive list of criteria to guide practical evaluation of DLs, and contribute to the narrowing of the identified gaps.
       
  • How Can Librarians Aid Transfer Student Integration': A Multi-Campus
           Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 September 2018Source: The Journal of Academic LibrarianshipAuthor(s): Mark Robison, Nancy Fawley, Ann Marshall
       
 
 
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