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Journal Cover   Journal of Academic Librarianship
  [SJR: 1.442]   [H-I: 33]   [837 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0099-1333
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2588 journals]
  • The Shift of Information Literacy Towards Research 2.0
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 1
      Author(s): Tibor Koltay , Sonja Špiranec , László Z. Karvalics
      In this paper, based on desk research, we will present the most important features of Research 2.0 in its relationship with information literacy (IL). The appearance of the Research 2.0 paradigm was brought about by numerous technological innovations resulting from Web 2.0. This may lead to transformations that could change the principles of research activities. When explaining the nature of Research 2.0 we highlight factors that hinder its wider uptake. We will also try to show that IL is changing in some of its aspects as a result of developments in the Research 2.0 domain, regardless of the fact that it is not widely adopted. The consequences resulting from the analyzed transformations in IL are of utmost importance for academic libraries, the content of their instructional activities and future information literacy conceptualizations.


      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • Integrating Information Literacy, the POGIL Method, and iPads into a
           Foundational Studies Program
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 2
      Author(s): Carrie Moore , Jennifer Black , Barbara Glackin , Margie Ruppel , Elaine Watson
      This article provides an overview of the design, implementation, revision and informal assessment of an information literacy curriculum embedded in a new University Foundations (UF) program at a mid-sized public university. The library information literacy sessions incorporated team-based learning and Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning (POGIL) elements using iPads. Each session provided students an opportunity to develop and apply information literacy skills, and included critical thinking questions which led students to think about underlying concepts. A focus group with the librarians assessed the UF library curriculum, its impact on student engagement, and the training activities for librarian teaching preparation.


      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • The NIH Public Access Policy and Federally Funded Research: An Analysis of
           Problem Recognition and Agenda Setting
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 1
      Author(s): Glenn S. McGuigan
      This interpretive and descriptive study examines the development of the U.S. National Institute of Health's (NIH) public access policy which requires NIH funded research to be made publicly available through an open access depository, the PubMed Central database. Using elements of Kingdon's (2003) multiple streams framework, Stone's (2012) challenges to the theory of free market efficiency, and her rhetorical characterization of “good weak interests” vs. “bad strong interests,” this work explores the rationale behind the development of the NIH open access policy . Based upon this rationale and the current structure of the scholarly publishing system, future implications for other federally or publicly funded research are proposed.


      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • Finding the Right Notes: An Observational Study of Score and Recording
           Seeking Behaviors of Music Students
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 1
      Author(s): Kirstin Dougan
      There are several complexities inherent in searching for music materials and many possible starting points both within the library and outside of it. This study uses task observation as well as interviews to determine how undergraduate and graduate music students undertake finding music scores and recordings in an academic setting. It explores what tools and search strategies music students employ, and whether they are more disposed to use YouTube or Google rather than trying to make sense of the wide array of choices and interfaces libraries offer. Results of this study show that context of the search and the end use of the materials are important factors in how and where students search.


      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • Delivering Virtual Reference Services on the Web: An Investigation into
           the Current Practice by Academic Libraries
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 1
      Author(s): Sharon Q. Yang , Heather A. Dalal
      This article describes a study on web-based reference services in academic libraries. A random sample of 362 institutions was taken from Peterson's Four-Year Colleges 2013. The authors scanned each library's website for reference-related activities, specifically if the library 1) provides or advertises reference on the main page and terminology used to advertise the reference service; 2) provides chat and related information such as chat box location, provider (in-house vs. consortia), and the vendor or program used and 3) provides other forms of virtual reference through email, phone, text messaging, instant messenger, video chat, interactive knowledge base, and other technologies. The findings indicate that approximately 68% of the libraries in the sample stated reference services on the main webpage. About 74% of the libraries used at least one of the following technologies for virtual reference: email, phone, chat, IM, text, and video chat. Exactly 47.5% of the libraries provide chat. The institutions that offer more advanced degrees and have more students are more likely to offer chat than those who offer low-level degrees and fewer students. This is the only study on a large scale with details about virtual reference in academic libraries.


      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • The Copyright Librarian: A Study of Advertising Trends for the Period
           2006–2013
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 March 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Dick Kawooya , Amber Veverka , Tomas Lipinski
      Academic libraries are creating copyright positions to respond to the evolving and litigious copyright environment associated with digital content and services. This paper reports on a study of advertisement trends for copyright positions available in academic libraries. A content analysis of job advertisement data was carried out on data generated from JobLIST, an electronic listserv of the American Library Association (ALA) where library positions from the United States and Canada are posted. Job data were generated by searching the JobLIST database using the following search terms: copyright, intellectual property, scholarly communication, repository, electronic resources, licensing, and digital. Data were for the period August 2006 through April 2013. The search generated 2799 job advertisements (ads) of which 264 jobs mention ‘copyright’ in the title or text of the job advertisement (job ads). Of the 264, none required a Juris Doctor (JD) although 5 preferred a JD. The MLS/MLIS was always mentioned first. Of the 264 jobs, 16 were copyright officer/manager type positions. Between 2006 and 2011, there was a slight but steady growth in the positions mentioning copyright from 9% (2006) to 13% (2011). In the first quarter of 2013, copyright positions already represented 8% of the positions retrieved from JobLIST. The majority of the positions were a combination of copyright and related areas like intellectual property, scholarly communication, electronic resources, licensing and digital management. It is evident from the data that the copyright librarian or competence in copyright is a prerequisite for current and future needs of academic libraries and academic institutions in general.


      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • Buffering the Negative Effects of Surface Acting: The Moderating Role of
           Supervisor Support in Librarianship
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 1
      Author(s): Yu-Ping Peng
      The career of a librarian involves lots of emotional labor. Emotional labor strategies influence individual and organizational outcomes in different ways. Previous studies have highlighted several detrimental organizational outcomes of surface acting such as reduced job satisfaction and job performance. To minimize the detrimental effects of surface acting, it has been suggested that there may be some moderators of negative relationships between surface acting and some outcomes. The study uses structural equation modeling to examine how supervisor support moderates the impact of surface acting on facets of job satisfaction and job performance of university librarians. Results indicate that supervisor support was a significant moderator of the relationships between surface acting and the outcomes of extrinsic satisfaction, task performance, and contextual performance. Contrary to one preliminary hypothesis, supervisor support did not moderate the relationship between surface acting and intrinsic satisfaction. The findings can be useful for providing a comprehensive understanding of the relationships between surface acting, supervisor support, facets of job satisfaction, and facets of job performance in the university library context. The study concludes by offering some managerial advice for librarians.


      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • Racial Microaggressions in Academic Libraries: Results of a Survey of
           Minority and Non-minority Librarians
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 1
      Author(s): Jaena Alabi
      There is relatively little literature on racism within the profession of academic librarianship. To investigate academic librarians' experiences of racism, this research project uses the framework of racial microaggressions, which are subtle, denigrating messages directed toward people of color. According to the results of an online survey, some librarians of color have had racial microaggressions directed at them by their colleagues. Non-minority librarians, however, are unlikely to recognize these disparaging exchanges.


      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • The Utility of Google Scholar When Searching Geographical Literature:
           Comparison With Three Commercial Bibliographic Databases
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 March 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Simona Știrbu , Paul Thirion , Serge Schmitz , Gentiane Haesbroeck , Ninfa Greco
      This study aims to highlight what benefits, if any, Google Scholar (GS) has for academic literature searches in the field of geography, compared to three commercial bibliographic databases: Web of Science (WoS), FRANCIS (multidisciplinary databases) and GeoRef (specialized in geosciences). This study focuses exclusively on evaluating the results, and not the features, of GS and the databases under examination. To ensure a valid comparison, identical bibliographic searches were applied using each of the four bibliographic tools. To exclude automatic variations of the ten keywords tested, they were placed between quotation marks and searched only in the “title” field of the respective search tools' interfaces. The results were limited to bibliographic references published from 2005 to 2009. In order to assess the repeatability of the results, the exact same process was repeated monthly between November 2010 and July 2011. Initially the whole set of results was analyzed, after which the search results for two keywords (selected since they yielded a manageable number of results) were studied in more detail. The results indicate that GS search results show a large degree of overlap with those of the other databases but, moreover, yield numerous unique hits, which should be useful to researchers in both the fields of human and physical geography. GS leads the other tools widely on number of results, independently of keyword, subfield, year of publication, or time of search.


      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • Relationship of Library Assessment to Student Retention
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 1
      Author(s): Elizabeth M. Mezick
      Using institution specific data related to library assessment collected as part of an Association of Research Libraries (ARL) Systems and Procedures Exchange Center (SPEC) survey, as well as fall-to-fall retention rates obtained from the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) of the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), this study employs statistical measures of association to analyze the relationship of various assessment practices and policies, including evaluation of student learning outcomes and accessibility of assessment data and analysis, to student persistence.


      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • Language in Context: A Model of Language Oriented Library Instruction
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 2
      Author(s): Sara Luly , Holger Lenz
      The following case study examines the opportunities and challenges of Language Oriented Library Instruction (LOLI). This instructional method is based on the idea that second language instruction should be the driving force for library instruction sessions delivered to students of world languages. Based on the experience of one librarian and a German language instructor at Kansas State University, this article will outline how to successfully offer library instruction in languages other than English.


      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • The Effectiveness of Online Versus In-person Library Instruction on
           Finding Empirical Communication Research
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 2
      Author(s): Kami J. Silk , Evan K. Perrault , Sharon Ladenson , Samantha A. Nazione
      With online education becoming more popular, the following study compares the effectiveness of online versus in-person library instruction with regards to teaching communication students how to seek empirical research to use in their class projects. Measures of knowledge gain and attitudes revealed significant differences across time showing success of the instruction, but non-significant differences between the modes of instruction. However, a behavioral measure found that almost 10% more students in the online condition were able to successfully find empirical articles to use in their projects than those in the in-person instructional condition. With empirical research living less at brick-and-mortar libraries and primarily in online repositories, teaching students how to find empirical research may be most successful when it is taught via online platforms.


      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • Development of Information Commons in University Libraries of Pakistan:
           The Current Scenario
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 2
      Author(s): Arslan Sheikh
      Rapid advancement of information technology, evolving student needs and change in higher education's teaching methods have greatly affected academic libraries. These challenges have caused the academic libraries to reshape their services, resources and physical spaces by adopting a new service delivery model referred to as Information Commons. This study analyzes the current condition of Information Commons in the libraries of different universities in Pakistan. It also explores the motives of these commons, identifies the problems encountered by Pakistani library professionals in the adoption of this service model and assesses their level of awareness about the concept. 117 university central libraries were invited through e-mails to participate in an online survey. There were 97 libraries who actively participated with a ratio of 82.90%. Findings indicate that Information Commons with advanced information and communication technology equipment and other allied facilities, services, staff are few in number. It also reveals that Information Commons in Pakistan are in the process of development as, in spite of limited finances, libraries have started to add technology equipment in their resources. Moreover, many library professionals also plan to set up Information Commons in the near future.


      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • Help Wanted: Navigating the Vagaries of the Job Search
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 2
      Author(s): Elizabeth Blakesley



      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • JAL in the Past Decade: A Comprehensive Analysis of Academic Library
           Research
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 2
      Author(s): Lili Luo , Margaret McKinney
      A content analysis is conducted to examine the peer-reviewed articles published in the Journal of Academic Librarianship (JAL) from 2004 to 2013. Five key variables are studied: authorship, article type, topic, research methods/design, and research theories/models. About three-fourths of the articles were authored by at least one librarian, and over half of the articles were co-authored. More than two-thirds of the articles were primary research articles, and a total of 24 topics related to academic libraries were covered, among which information literacy was the most popular one. Survey and content analysis are the two most frequently used research methods in the articles. This study, capturing the topical and methodological substance of academic library research, will generate ideas for providing effective research training/education for academic librarians and contribute to the enhancement of research culture and research practice among them.


      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • Applications of Mobile Social Media: WeChat Among Academic Libraries in
           China
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 1
      Author(s): Jianhua Xu , Qi Kang , Zhiqiang Song , Christopher Peter Clarke
      This paper describes the application of the social media platform WeChat. It explores the use of this emerging mobile app using the official WeChat accounts of the top 39 academic libraries in China. The findings indicate that approximately one third of the libraries use WeChat as a marketing tool to promote collections and services for users. Most of the 39 libraries, however, are still using the most basic functions. Advanced functions urgently need to be adopted. The main uses of WeChat are general social networking services (SNSs) and automatic answering and interaction features, which include seeking and sharing information, user self-service, and keyword-identified reference auto-responders. The study uses six aspects of quality to evaluate the interaction and content delivered by WeChat. These include the volume of information, information content quality, concordance rate, frequency, self-service, and basic features. The experience of Chinese university libraries is used to provide recommendations for other libraries.


      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • Promoting Academic Library Research Through the
           “Faculty-Member-In-Residence” Program
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 1
      Author(s): Brian Detlor , Vivian Lewis
      As a means of fostering academic library research, this paper provides an overview of an inaugural “Faculty-Member-In-Residence” program implemented at McMaster University Library, where a non-librarian faculty member from McMaster spent his sabbatical year conducting library research and helping librarians think about research. In addition to providing background on the context of academic library research and the research productivity of academic librarians, the paper describes the objectives, outcomes, and benefits of the program, as well as personal reflections and recommendations on how to move the program forward. Academic libraries are encouraged to launch similar “Faculty-Member-In-Residence” programs at their own institutions.


      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • Library Instruction and Themed Composition Courses: An Investigation of
           Factors that Impact Student Learning
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 1
      Author(s): Erin E. Rinto , Elisa I. Cogbill-Seiders
      Many academic libraries partner with English composition in order to teach first year students skills related to academic research and writing. Due to the partnership between information literacy and first-year writing programs, it is important to evaluate how these programs can best support one another. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of two factors on student information literacy skill development: library instruction and section theme—defined here as class sections of the English 102 (ENG 102) program developed around a central topic selected by the instructor. A random sample of annotated bibliographies from 95 sections of ENG 102 were scored with two information literacy rubrics in order to find out if scores differed between sections based on the variables of library instruction and theme. The results of this study indicate that sections of the ENG 102 program that attended an information literacy instruction session scored significantly higher on the annotated bibliography assignment than sections that did not attend. We also found that themed sections of ENG 102 scored marginally higher on the annotated bibliography than non-themed sections of ENG 102. Implications for further research are discussed, including the potential impact of theme-based writing on information literacy learning.


      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • Introduction: Editorial
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 1
      Author(s): Elizabeth Blakesley



      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • Student Confidence/Overconfidence in the Research Process
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 1
      Author(s): Valeria E. Molteni , Emily K. Chan
      Librarians with instructional responsibilities will base information literacy session content upon course syllabi and teaching faculty's assessments of student readiness. Often students' self-perceived competencies do not factor into the lesson planning process. The aim of this project is to collect the levels of self-confidence for a group of students who are primarily entering health care professions. This study observes students' levels of self-confidence in performing research-related activities and their corresponding ability to correctly answer content questions for those tasks. Students' self-confidence ratings are not reliable indicators for information literacy competence. The confidence levels for information literacy tasks of students entering health care professions may have clinical implications for future practice.


      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • fmi - TOC w/barcode & ed board
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 1




      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • fmii -TOC continued & ed board cont.
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 1




      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • Reviews and Analysis of Special Reports
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • Business Domains for Boosting Customer Satisfaction in Academic Libraries
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 February 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Chaminda Jayasundara
      University library administrators in Sri Lanka, realising the necessity of complying with customer perception of high quality service, have begun to search for alternative ways to satisfy their clientele on the basis of service quality. This study therefore aims to meet this need by identifying business domains in the university library setting to assess the extent to which service quality domains may be used to predict customer satisfaction, from a service quality perspective. Domain identification of service quality was carried out with a sample of 262 subjects. Accordingly, seven domains–affect of service personnel, building environment, collection and access, furniture and facilities, technology, service delivery and web services–were statistically tested to be confirmed as potential business domains of service quality. Whilst not detracting from preceding research studies conducted in the field, this study has demonstrated significant implications for researchers and library administrators in understanding the importance of individual business domains within the specific service spectrum of university libraries, in order to provide ultimate satisfaction for customers with a quality library service.


      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • Customer-based Collection Development: An OverviewKarlBridges2014ALA
           EditionsChicago(216 pp. $60.00. ISBN 978-0-8389-1192-1. LC 2014-23029)
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 2
      Author(s): Andrea Malone



      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • The No-nonsense Guide to Training in LibrariesBarbaraAllan2013Facet
           PublishingLondon, UK(224 pp. $95.00. ISBN: 978-1-85604-828-6.)
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 2
      Author(s): Alexandra Simons



      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • Library and Information Science: A Guide to Key Literature and
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 2
      Author(s): Maura Seale



      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • Apps for Librarians: Using the Best Mobile Technology to Educate, Create,
           and EngageNicoleHennig2014Libraries UnlimitedSanta Barbara, California(197
           pp. $45.00. ISBN 978-1-61069-530-5. LC Z680.5.H46 2014)
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 2
      Author(s): Daria Carson-Dussan



      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • Preserving Complex ObjectsJanetDelveDavidAnderson2014Facet
           PublishingGreenwich, CT(432 pp. $115.00. ISBN 978-1-85604-958-0)
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 2
      Author(s): Trevor Owens



      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • Implication of 80/20 Rule in Electronic Journal Usage of UGC-Infonet
           Consortia
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 2
      Author(s): Mangkholien Singson , Paokholun Hangsing
      This study aims to understand the implication of the 80/20 rule in large academic library consortia. INFLIBNET initiative-UGC-Infonet is the largest academic consortia initiative in Indian higher education that provides services to 414 institutional members across the country. A total of eighteen publishers and aggregators (N=6854 journals) from COUNTER usage data for the year 2011 was collected from the INFLIBNET Centre. Cumulative download and cumulative percentage of the journals were calculated from the downloaded counts to generate a Pareto chart using Microsoft Excel 2007. The result of the study suggests that the 80/20 rule in large consortia is truly, if not precisely in conformity, when consolidated usage of journals across eighteen (18) publishers are put together at 85%/15%. Contrastingly, differences in the result are observed when titles are analyzed individually according to the publishers demonstrating a reverse of the 80/20 principle.


      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • The Personal Librarian: Enhancing the Student
           ExperienceRichardMonizJeanMoats2014ALA EditionsChicago, IL(143 pp. $58.00.
           ISBN 978-0-8389-1239-3)
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 2
      Author(s): Amy Wainwright



      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • The Slow Book Revolution: Creating a New Culture of Reading on College
           Campuses and BeyondMeaganLacy2014Libraries UnlimitedSanta Barbara, CA(160
           pp. $50.00. ISBN 978-1-61069-715-6)
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 2
      Author(s): Glenda Insua



      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • NICE Evidence Search: Student Peers' Views on their Involvement as
           Trainers in Peer-based Information Literacy Training
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 2
      Author(s): Laura Sbaffi , Frances Johnson , Jillian Griffiths , Jennifer Rowley , Anne Weist
      This research seeks to contribute to the understanding of peer-based models of information literacy training, through gathering insights from peer trainers (champions) in a scheme designed to promote the use of a national health and social care information portal, Evidence Search (ES), amongst university students mainly in the health professions. Specifically, this article focuses on the benefits and learning that the peer trainers derive from their involvement in the scheme. This article reports on focus groups conducted with student champions. Findings suggest that champions believe that they have learnt a lot about information searching and evaluation from their engagement as champions, and have developed their teaching, planning and organisational skills. They now reported using Evidence Search as a first port-of-call for information for an assignment, although they still used Google. Students' choice of queries for their training session was influenced by their recent experience with study units or placements. In addition, many acted as advocates, making recommendations to friends (for study) or colleagues (in practice settings). Questionnaire data showed that champions regarded Evidence Search as credible, trustworthy and reliable, and that their approach to searching for and evaluating information is comparable to that of an expert.


      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • Institutional Citizenship: Supporting Successful Technology Initiatives
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 March 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Ray Laura Henry



      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • Library and Information Science Research in China—A Survey Based
           Analysis of 10 LIS Educational Institutes
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 March 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Ximing Xiao , Fangyuan Zhang , Jinrui Li
      This paper aims to conduct a quantitative evaluation on the achievement, research productivity, and research hotspots of “Library, Information and Archives management” Science schools or departments in China. In this paper, the “LIS” in China is firstly defined. Before evaluation, data are collected from CSSCI (Chinese Social Science Citation Index)-indexed papers and SSCI (Social Science Citation Index)-indexed papers, as well as projects granted by the two authoritative national foundations in China, SSFC (National Social Science Foundation of China) and NSFC (National Natural Science Foundation of China). Then, a bibliometric-based method and a keyword-based method are employed to analyze the collected data from different perspectives, including annual distribution, author productivity, institute productivity and influence. Through the analysis, several conclusions are made: a) collaborative groups exist, though no particular collaboration preference is exhibited. b) Interdisciplinary research promotes the emergence of new disciplines. c) There are four top institutes with outstanding productivity and six hot research topics in the “LIS” study in China. Also, in a five-year period, “LIS” scholars have paid much attention on network technology and its application in this field. Research addressing the view of “information” is much more popular than the ubiquitous conception of “library”. d) There still exist some issues in China's LIS research, for example, the unbalanced development of educational institutes, the excessive preference of theoretical research over technical research, etc.


      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • Library Instruction for Romanized Hebrew
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 2
      Author(s): Sonia Smith
      University students, looking for records in Hebrew language in the library catalog, often face difficulties finding material due to the unfamiliarity with the Library of Congress rules for romanization. These difficulties may hinder their research results. This paper will present the findings of a study conducted at McGill University that investigated students' abilities to romanize Hebrew titles so they can consequently search these in the library catalog, and will show how library instruction can be a very successful tool for providing students with the knowledge they require in order to retrieve these titles. Objective — This study examined the impact on students who attended a library workshop on the Library of Congress (LC) rules of Hebrew romanization. Although this group of users had knowledge of the Hebrew language, most of the bibliographic records on McGill University's online catalog are romanized. A lack of understanding of the rules involved in romanizing makes the retrieval of records more difficult due to the inexactitudes of the spelling. Methods — The students enrolled in the course Advanced Hebrew at McGill University where selected for this study due to their knowledge of the Hebrew language. Students were asked to spell six Hebrew titles in romanized characters, a task that it is necessary to do in order to search for these titles in the catalog. This was followed by a presentation on the LC rules on romanizing the Hebrew language. Each student received a copy of the LC romanization table (see Appendix A) and with the table in hand and the explanation on how to apply it, students were asked to spell six different Hebrew titles. Results — There was an 81% improvement in the accuracy of spelling six new Hebrew titles once the students were familiar with the romanization rules. We can consider this gain a very successful outcome that would benefit these students in their academic endeavors. Limitations — One of the main limitations for this research was the small number of students (68.7% of the total enrolment for that course) that was present in the class on the day of the study. Another important limitation was the time allotted for this study. The students did not have time to practice the methodology for romanization. Right after the presentation of the LC rules, they were asked to answer the second questionnaire. Conclusions — Spelling mistakes when searching for romanized Hebrew titles in the catalog can be diminished through a targeted library instruction workshop. This research demonstrated that being familiar with the romanization rules is an effective tool for increasing students' abilities to spell correctly and thus retrieve Hebrew bibliographic records.


      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • No Budget, No Experience, No Problem: Creating a Library Orientation Game
           for Freshman Engineering Majors
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 2
      Author(s): Kelly Giles
      “Mystery at the Library” is a simple, inexpensive game developed as a library orientation activity for freshman engineering students. Players searched the library building and online to find clues and solve the mystery of a stolen book. Feedback from players and library desk staff was used to improve the game over time. A straightforward narrative with puzzles focused on learning objectives kept players engaged and avoided unnecessary confusion. A post-game survey indicated that the game was both helpful and fun for a majority of respondents.


      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • A Scoping Review of Mentoring Programs for Academic Librarians
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 2
      Author(s): Diane L. Lorenzetti , Susan E. Powelson
      Introduction The purpose of this study was to comprehensively review the best practices and current trends for mentoring programs in academic libraries. Methods The authors conducted a scoping review of the existing literature on academic library mentoring programs. The following sources were searched to identify relevant studies: ERIC, Education Research Complete (Ebsco) LISA, Library & Information Sciences Source (Ebsco), Scopus, the TRIP database, Web of Science and the grey literature. Results Among 802 unique abstracts, 42 studies reporting on 40 unique programs were selected for inclusion in this review. Of these, 28 programs were specifically designed to facilitate the development of junior or untenured librarians. Common program elements included participant input into mentor/mentee selection, written guidelines, mentor training, and senior administration support. Notably, only 18 authors (42.8%) reported on program evaluation methods and outcomes. Conclusions Despite the prevalence of the literature that exists on this topic, mentorship programs in academic libraries have been insufficiently explored. Rigorous and ongoing evaluation is required to determine the importance of mentoring programs to the career development of academic librarians, and identify design elements critical to their success.


      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • Interactive Training Materials Developed by Spanish University Libraries
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 1
      Author(s): Marta Somoza-Fernández
      The main features of interactive training materials produced by Spanish university libraries are described. A total of 365 materials that are both technologically and educationally interactive were selected. The results show positive indicators such as a considerable increase in production and the diversification of technological media. While libraries are actively involved in the creation and development of training materials, the general conclusion is that most are still at an early stage in the context of the information and knowledge society, which fosters learning of information skills, virtual training and adaptation to different learning styles.


      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • Digital Preservation Challenges with an ETD Collection — A Case
           Study at Texas Tech University
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 1
      Author(s): Joy M. Perrin , Heidi M. Winkler , Le Yang
      The dangers that digital files face can seem merely the stuff of theory and risk assessment matrices until an institution experiences its first data loss; especially when those digital files represent the graduate research output of a university, the potential impact of that loss increases exponentially. The authors present a case study of the challenges one academic library has encountered in the stewardship of its electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs) over the course of a decade. This article examines the problems that can arise years after the transition from a physical to electronic collection and presents documentation solutions that can make ETD preservation and curation more effective.


      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • Preserving Patron Privacy in the 21st Century Academic Library
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 1
      Author(s): Amanda Nichols Hess , Rachelle LaPorte-Fiori , Keith Engwall
      How do libraries reconcile increasing access to information and encouraging the use of 21st century technology systems and tools while also preserving patrons' privacy? This question is challenging for all libraries to address, but academic libraries must grapple with it while also considering other complex issues: not only do these libraries need to comply with the ALA's Library Bill of Rights and supporting documents, but they must also adhere to federal-, state-, and institution-level policies regarding student privacy and information security. This article presents how one university's libraries worked to both develop a public statement on patron privacy and identify behind-the-scenes issues with the collection, storage, and disposal of library patrons' private information. The strategies used herein may be helpful to other academic libraries as they consider patron privacy in the 21st century.


      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • FredaMatassaOrganizing Exhibitions: A Handbook for Museums, Libraries and
           Archives2013FacetLondon978-1-85604-945-0256 pp. $94.95
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 1
      Author(s): Madeline Kelly



      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • CatherineSheldrick RossThe Pleasures of Reading: A Booklover's
           Alphabet2014Libraries UnlimitedWestport, CT978-1-59158-695-1270 pp. $45.00
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 1
      Author(s): Alexandra Simons



      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • Sethvan HoolandRubenVerborghLinked Data for Libraries, Archives and
           Museums: How to Clean, Link and Publish Your Metadata2014ALA
           Neal-SchumanChicago, IL978-0-8389-1251-5254 pp. $85.00
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 1
      Author(s): Asheleigh A. Perry



      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • Shelley E.MosleyDennis C.TuckerSandraVan WinkleCrash Course in Dealing
           with Difficult Library Customers2014Libraries UnlimitedSanta Barbara,
           CA978-1-61069-283-0173 pp. $45.00
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 1
      Author(s): Lee Andrew Hilyer



      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • Mark Y.HerringAre Libraries Obsolete? An Argument for Relevance in the
           Digital Age2014McFarland & Company, Inc.Jefferson, SCpp. $50.00,
           ISBN-10: 0786473568 258 ISBN-13: 978-0786473564
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 1
      Author(s): Annie Armstrong



      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • Reviews and Analysis of Special Reports
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship, Volume 41, Issue 1
      Author(s): Leslie Stebbins



      PubDate: 2015-03-19T09:11:44Z
       
  • Leveraging the power of a Twitter network for library promotion
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 January 2015
      Source:The Journal of Academic Librarianship
      Author(s): Jason Shulman , Jewelry Yep , Daniel Tomé
      The Twitter network of two academic libraries was analyzed to determine the influential accounts that connect to them. Such information can be exploited by libraries to create tailored social media outreach and information dissemination programs. Three network metrics, measuring different definitions of importance, were calculated for each account in the network. This allowed for the quantification and ranking of the accounts by influence/importance, normally considered to be qualitative and subjective. By all measures, accounts associated with the institutions, and not faculty, staff, or students, were found to be the most influential players in the networks of both libraries, suggesting that this is a general feature of academic library Twitter networks. Furthermore, the library, as an institutional account itself, is also influential to the broader Twitter community of its home institution. This demonstrates that the library is in a key position to propagate information from sister accounts at the institution.


      PubDate: 2015-02-04T18:21:43Z
       
 
 
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