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International Information & Library Review    [363 followers]  Follow    
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
     ISSN (Print) 1057-2317 - ISSN (Online) 1095-9297
     Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2556 journals]   [SJR: 0.374]   [H-I: 12]
  • Editorial board
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2013
      Source:The International Information & Library Review, Volume 45, Issues 3–4




      PubDate: 2013-12-06T21:54:20Z
       
  • Editorial board
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2013
      Source:The International Information & Library Review, Volume 45, Issues 1–2




      PubDate: 2013-11-17T05:06:31Z
       
  • Editorial: Transition and reinvention
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2013
      Source:The International Information & Library Review, Volume 45, Issues 1–2
      Author(s): Karen I. MacDonald



      PubDate: 2013-11-17T05:06:31Z
       
  • Library consortia in India with special reference to UGC-Infonet digital
           library consortium
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 November 2013
      Source:The International Information & Library Review
      Author(s): Suresh K. Chauhan , Preeti Mahajan
      Including scholarly contents has given right to the publishers of peer-reviewed journals to keep higher subscription rates. It always affects library budget to a great extent. Since long libraries have been experimenting different ways of library cooperation so that maximum benefit, especially economic benefit, could be extracted from their joint cooperation ventures. The term ‘consortia’ has been considered an advanced stage of library cooperation. Advent of electronic journals has given rise to homogonous libraries and national governments to cope with scarcity of funds and unavailability of internationally produced scholarly literature by means of establishing library consortia. Various library consortia have been mushroomed all across the world and India has also not been spared from it. University Grants Commission (UGC) observed the dire state of Indian university libraries and found that only few were subscribing to some International peer-reviewed journals and many were not even subscribing to any international journal. The UGC opted electronic journals as medium and initiated a national consortium for strengthening library collection by providing thousands of international peer-reviewed journals over Internet free of cost. The consortium is known as UGC-Infonet Digital Library consortium. In this paper an effort is being made to discuss the various concepts of library consortia in India briefly and UGC-Infonet Digital Library consortium in detail.


      PubDate: 2013-11-17T05:06:31Z
       
  • Visualizing of the structure of subject trends in Persian articles
           published during 2008–2012 in information organization domain
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 November 2013
      Source:The International Information & Library Review
      Author(s): Maryam Mousavizadeh , Masume Bagheri , Mansure Bagheri , Masume Karbala aghaie Kamran
      This research investigates structure of the subject trends in the Persian articles published during the period of 2008–2012 about “information organization” in Iranian journals and creates a semantic map for this domain. This structure has been considered in two sections: First, the weight of each subject term used in articles was indicated, and then the relationships amounts of terms were measured. Content analysis and weighting were used in the first section. The Vector Space Model formula was used in order to weight terms. In the second section, Co-term analysis was used, that is, the number of co-occurrence of any two terms in the same article. Then the term/document occurrence matrix of these terms was created and at last the relations significant between terms were measured by Pearson Correlation Coefficient. To illustrate the structure of information organization domain, Ucinet software was used. Findings show that high-weight categories in Persian articles are: “cataloging”, “information retrieval”, “information systems” and “authority files”. Furthermore through weighting, determined that in trends rate aspect, the terms “ontologies”, “cataloging”, “evaluation”, “Dewey Decimal Classification”, “fields”, “libraries and information centers” and “descriptors”, “Functional Requirements for Bibliographic Records”, “metadata elements” and “National library and archives of I.R. of Iran” are 10 highest-weight terms. Research findings about the relationships of terms show attention to “cataloging” by “IFLA” and “National library and archives of Iran” and critical approach to this subject. Some other findings about this show: “indexing” are considered by cataloging and thesauri, “metadata” are considered in web-based and information retrieval points of view, “ontologies” term is considered in approach of basic concepts, tools and relevance, and attention to some organizations such as “IFLA” and “National library and archives organization of Iran” besides “users” and their information needs. In terms of weighting and relationships between the subject terms in Persian articles, “cataloging” is in the center of information organization domain. The semantic map of information organization in Persian articles illustrates three region of subject area including: 1. Cataloging, 2. Ontologies, thesauri and information retrieval, and 3. Metadata and information retrieval.


      PubDate: 2013-11-13T04:06:34Z
       
  • Publisher's note
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 November 2013
      Source:The International Information & Library Review




      PubDate: 2013-11-09T06:21:55Z
       
  • Library and information literacy instruction in Israeli colleges and
           universities: A preliminary survey
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 November 2013
      Source:The International Information & Library Review
      Author(s): Carol R. Simon
      Library instruction is universal in post-secondary educational institutions in Israel. Information literacy instruction is in its infancy. Israeli students experience significant difficulties in using English language resources.


      PubDate: 2013-11-09T06:21:55Z
       
  • A university library management model for students' learning support
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 October 2013
      Source:The International Information & Library Review
      Author(s): Kulthida Tuamsuk , Kanyarat Kwiecien , Jutharat Sarawanawong
      This research was aimed at developing a university library management model that would support students' learning. The research was conducted in three phases: 1) an investigation into the requirements of a university library service of instructors; 2) an investigation into the attitudes of librarians, libraries' administrators, and university's administrators toward the roles of library and policy concepts relating to university library management that promote students' learning; and 3) the development of a university library management model for students' learning support. A mixed research method was applied comprising qualitative and quantitative approaches. Data was collected using in-depth interviews and questionnaires. The findings have led to a proposal of a university library management model that supports student learning, which is comprised of five components: 1) management policy and system; 2) learning resources; 3) learning support services; 4) learning environments; and 5) the competency and roles of information professionals. It can be stated that studies into Thai university library implementation, strategic plans, and self-assessment reports under the quality assurance system showed that even though libraries have updated resources and services following changing situations in policies, technologies, and users' needs, there is no clear indicator that Thai university libraries have any strategy for acquiring roles to support students' learning with practical outcomes. Through reliable research work, this study into a model for university library management would result in a means of developing university libraries that truly supports university student learning based on information from instructors, library administrators, and librarians.


      PubDate: 2013-11-01T02:41:57Z
       
  • Strengthening professional expertise: Mentoring in knowledge transfer, the
           cataloguers' perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 October 2013
      Source:The International Information & Library Review
      Author(s): M.A. Bello , Y. Mansor
      University libraries provide support for institutions to achieve their objectives. To realise these objectives, universities allocate considerable funds for the library's development and provision of needed resources that support teaching/research activities. This is for the simple reason that a university's excellence is synonymous with the effectiveness of its library services. Hence, there is a need for continuous training and retraining for retention of librarians who manage the libraries to achieve the university's objectives. Of the few on-the-job training models, mentoring as a Continuing Professional Development programme for librarians in a university library has often been overlooked. This study surveys the uses of mentoring in knowledge transfer for cataloguing, managerial, and research skills development for cataloguers in Nigerian academic libraries. The findings show that mentoring as a tool for knowledge transfer influences cataloguers and their skills development. The result indicates that mentoring in knowledge transfer has a moderate to strong correlation with skills development, and it improves catalouers' proficiency and overall development.


      PubDate: 2013-11-01T02:41:57Z
       
  • The prediction of Internet utilization behavior of undergraduate
           agricultural students: An application of the theory of planned behavior
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 October 2013
      Source:The International Information & Library Review
      Author(s): Naser Zamani-Miandashti , Payam Memarbashi , Parvin Khalighzadeh
      The theory of planned behavior has received significant attention more recently. This study used a survey to apply the theory of planned behavior to predict the Internet utilization behavior among 214 undergraduate agricultural students in Iran. Coefficient correlations and linear regressions were employed to analyze relationships among constructs. Results revealed that subjective norm and intention were the strongest predictors of the Internet utilization behavior, which explained 57% of the variance. Perceived behavioral control was the most significant predictor of the Internet use intentions. Subjective norms, to a lesser degree also had important influences on intention. Attitude did not surface as an effective direct predictor of the Internet utilization behavior. Finally, the theory of planned behavior was supported as an effective model explaining the Internet utilization behavior. The most prevalent reason to stop using the Internet was that they were experiencing problems getting access to the Internet.


      PubDate: 2013-10-27T20:17:20Z
       
  • A study of digital curator competences: A survey of experts
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 October 2013
      Source:The International Information & Library Review
      Author(s): Melody M. Madrid
      The aim of this research was to define competences for digital curators, and to validate a Delphi process in the context of Library, Archives, Museum curriculum development. The objective for the study was to obtain consensus regarding competence statements for Library, Archives and Museum digital curators. The Delphi method, a research technique, typically used to develop a consensus of opinion for topic areas in which there is little previously documented knowledge, was used in specifying the digital curator competences in LAM context. Three rounds of questionnaires with controlled feedback with space for comments and/or suggestions were sent to panel members. Five point Likert scale was employed in the questionnaire. Consensus was determined when a competence statement received a mode higher than 3, an average mean more than 3.5, and a standard deviation smaller than 1.0. Response rates for rounds I, II and III were: 70% (n = 16), 87.5% (n = 14), and 94% (n = 15) respectively. Of the 18 digital curator competences listed in the first round questionnaire, 13 (70%) achieved consensus as being necessary digital curator competences required of advanced level digital curator. Other inputs of respondents like comments and suggestions were also analyzed. An additional 23 digital curator competence statements were also suggested by the panel in round I and further developed in subsequent rounds. In round II, 12 (30%) competence statements achieved consensus. The final round and editing of competence statements led to 20 statements that describe what a well-prepared digital curator trained to participate in digital curation work should be able to do.


      PubDate: 2013-10-20T06:34:28Z
       
  • Chinese students in American academic libraries: A survey of Chinese user
           satisfaction with U.S. library experience
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 October 2013
      Source:The International Information & Library Review
      Author(s): Xiaorong Shao , Allan Scherlen , Megan Johnson , Xuan Xu , Yuan Hu
      While scholarship has addressed issues around serving international students in U.S. libraries, until recently, relatively little attention has been directly focused upon the library needs of specific ethnic groups. This study surveys 83 Chinese students and scholars after they returned from studying at universities in the United States to measure and document their satisfaction with the academic library services and resources they used during their study abroad. Results of the survey are analyzed with the goal of benchmarking and improving services for this growing academic library user population in the United States.


      PubDate: 2013-10-04T10:19:34Z
       
  • Library development in Armenia: Problems and progress since the
           dissolution of the USSR
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 September 2013
      Source:The International Information & Library Review
      Author(s): Ian M. Johnson
      The paper provides a situation report on the state of libraries and information services, publishing and bookselling in Armenia. It briefly describes their development, outlines the international development assistance that they have received during the last twenty years, describes their current situation, and indicates some of their future needs.


      PubDate: 2013-09-16T10:56:53Z
       
  • Librarians' perceptions of knowledge management in developing countries: A
           case with Indian academic libraries
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 September 2013
      Source:The International Information & Library Review
      Author(s): Mohammad Nazim , Bhaskar Mukherjee
      The purpose of this paper is to examine librarians' perceptions of knowledge management, including its concept, potential applications, benefits and major challenges of its applications in Indian academic libraries. A structured questionnaire, containing both open and close-ended questions, was sent by postal mail to 30 librarians of academic libraries in India of which 15 questionnaires were returned. Respondents were asked to define knowledge management and answer questions on its potential applications, benefits and major challenges of implementation in academic libraries. Respondents were also allowed to specify their own views on the subject. The findings of the study show that the levels of understanding of KM concepts among librarians are varied and most of them view KM as the management of information resources, services and systems using technology or specific processes for the capture and use of explicit knowledge, rather sharing and using tacit knowledge. They have positive attitudes towards the applications of knowledge management into academic library practice, and not only because this can bring academic libraries closer to their parent organization, but also because it may help them to survive in an increasingly challenging environment. Although, librarians in the present study acknowledged that they are involved in the practices of knowledge management but these were perceived as basic information management activities. Lack of understanding of knowledge management concepts and its benefits, knowledge sharing culture, top management commitment, incentives and rewards, financial resources and information technology infrastructure are perceived as the major barriers for incorporating knowledge management into academic library practice.


      PubDate: 2013-09-12T12:35:04Z
       
  • International students and Chinese academic library: A user survey at
           Beijing Normal University Library
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 September 2013
      Source:The International Information & Library Review
      Author(s): Jia Liu
      With great increase of international students coming to study in China, more and more challenges occur for Chinese academic libraries to meet their needs. In case of Beijing Normal University Library (BNUL), we conducted a user survey and a five-point Likert Scale questionnaire focusing on the areas of library services, resources and environment was used to explore international students' library usage preference and their perceptions on importance and performance of these three areas. The analysis started with descriptive analysis followed by gap analysis between importance to the users and library's performance, and key findings from suggestions of international students were listed. The main objective of this paper is to know international students' information needs, analyze their assessment to the library, determine where and how gaps exist and find out aspects that BNUL need to improve. The paper finally drew some conclusions on how to improve BNUL service quality to international students.


      PubDate: 2013-09-12T12:35:04Z
       
  • Multilingual Digital Libraries: A review of issues in system-centered and
           user-centered studies, information retrieval and user behavior
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 September 2013
      Source:The International Information & Library Review
      Author(s): Evgenia Vassilakaki , Emmanouel Garoufallou
      Purpose This study aims to identify, collect and critical review the research literature on Multilingual Digital Libraries in English language from 1997 to 2012. Design/methodology/approach The present literature review has followed the rules of systematic review. In particular, the identified relevant papers were categorized based on their expressed aim on two core themes, that of system-centered and user-centered studies. The assigned papers were further analyzed and six sub-themes emerged for the system-centered studies and four for the user-centered studies. Additional categorization was also provided according to type of publication. Findings The literature concerning Multilingual Digital Libraries is vast and mainly focuses on two aspects the “System” and the “Users”. The majority of papers tried to meet the challenges raised for enabling multilingual information retrieval in Digital Libraries. Unfortunately, these efforts undertaken by a small number of researchers or research groups apparently working in isolation and therefore resulting in the development of numerous different tools and techniques. Relatively few studies have focused on the user and aimed to explore users' behavior and expectations when interacting with Multilingual Digital Libraries. As a result, further research is needed to reach to some tangible and usable findings. Originality/value This literature review captures the diversity of the research conducted regarding multilingual information access and retrieval in Digital Libraries. It organizes the vast literature in comprehensive themes and sub-themes enabling easy access to specific information. Limitations This study reviews only papers in English due to language restrictions from 1997 to 2012.


      PubDate: 2013-09-04T10:29:16Z
       
  • Use of digital resources by the scientists of Central Drug Research
           Institute (CDRI), India: A survey
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 August 2013
      Source:The International Information & Library Review
      Author(s): Abdul Mannan Khan , Atika Khursheed
      The purpose of this study is to find out the level of use of digital resources by the scientists of CDRI, Lucknow (India). As a matter of fact, CDRI is among the thirty eight laboratories that are functioning under the aegis of the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) of India headed by the Prime Minister of the nation as its president. CDRI is a pioneer research organization in the field of biomedical research in India. A well structured questionnaire was administered to the scientists of CDRI, Lucknow (India) to collect data regarding the use of digital resources. The survey reveals that most of the scientists are aware of the availability of digital resources and frequently use them for their research work and paper writing. They fully agree that with the usefulness of digital resources the quality of research work improves with enrichment of appurtenant contents and materials leading to high quality manuscript. It is also observed that majority of scientists of the CDRI keep themselves abreast of developments in digital resources and their proper utilization for their research projects. It is, however, found that slow downloading is the obstacle in proper and full utilization of digital resources.


      PubDate: 2013-08-03T14:02:32Z
       
  • A qualitative study of the academic, social, and cultural factors that
           influence students' library use in a rural Ugandan village
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 July 2013
      Source:The International Information & Library Review
      Author(s): Valeda F. Dent
      The Kitengesa Community Library in rural Uganda is unique in that provides tailored collections and services for the community. This library, which was built in 2002, serves a small but diverse population including a large number of secondary school students who live in the area. Previous research on the impact of this library on the surrounding community revealed that the library influences reading habits, reading culture development, and the availability of locally relevant information. This is especially true for young adults, who represent Uganda's fastest growing population. Only 18 percent of girls and 20 percent of boys are enrolled in secondary school, rendering this group of students (ages 13–17) particularly vulnerable to a wide range of social and economic challenges. School libraries in Uganda are rare, and in this case, the Kitengesa Community Library serves as a de facto school library. Previous research by Dent and Yannotta (2005) revealed that secondary school students are among the heaviest users of the Kitengesa Community Library, and this qualitative study represents an attempt to characterize students' library use experiences across academic, social, and cultural domains. Findings suggest that the student experience consists of five factors – personal improvement, reading culture development, academic support, learning independence, and reducing isolation. There is a growing network of rural village libraries in Africa and the findings from this study will be used to inform development of additional library services and resources to better support student learning and interpersonal growth.


      PubDate: 2013-07-06T11:46:07Z
       
  • Challenges of getting faculty status: Perception of university librarians
           in Pakistan
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 July 2013
      Source:The International Information & Library Review
      Author(s): Kanwal Ameen , Midrar Ullah
      Objective To find out the university head librarians' perceptions about the issues in getting faculty status. Methodology A qualitative research design was used to explore the issue through personal and telephonic interviews with 15 chief librarians of 18 university libraries located in Islamabad and Rawalpindi. The textual data was content-analyzed and coded. The emerged themes and subthemes have been presented with the frequency of their occurrences. The findings have been supported by the selected quotations of the interviewees. Findings A majority of the librarians had vague understanding of the notion of faculty status. Almost all of them desired for granting faculty status to the university librarians. However, their opinion was divided on the prerequisites for faculty status. Most of them supported the same criteria for employment and promotion of faculty librarians, as is used in case of their teaching faculty counterparts. The study has identified that the main barriers in getting faculty status are the librarians themselves, lacking preparedness in terms of qualifications and research output. Implications The study brings into light both the possibilities of granting faculty status to the university librarians and barriers in this regard. Besides, the findings though extracted from a small number of respondents, may be of interest to other countries in the region. Originality/value This exploratory investigation identifies barriers in getting faculty status and is the first ever study on the subject in the local literature. Conclusion Faculty status will help in improving visibility, image and respect of librarians. Therefore, there is a need to prepare university librarians for faculty status, and to struggle for getting it.


      PubDate: 2013-07-06T11:46:07Z
       
  • Exploring copyright knowledge in relation to experience and education
           level among academic librarians in Kenya
    • Abstract: March 2012
      Publication year: 2012
      Source:The International Information & Library Review, Volume 44, Issue 1

      Since the year 2001, Kenya’s copyright regime has extensively been shaped by Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) agreement; World Intellectual Property Organization Copyright Treaty; Africa Growth Opportunity Act (AGOA); and The Cotonou Agreement, which have advocated for effective copyright administration and management structures in addition to stiffer penalties for those who violate copyright laws. Despite better administrative structures being put in place, copyright infringement in Kenya has persisted. Being able to balance the needs of rights owners and information consumers becomes a critical role librarians have to play. Knowledge about copyright, thus, becomes critical. Despite the fact that librarians in Kenya are not a homogenous group, how knowledgeable the different librarian cadres are concerning copyright issues is least understood. The raison d’être for this study is to find out whether different cadres of librarians based on academic qualifications differ in the level of knowledge on copyright issues. A questionnaire was used to collect data. Results indicate no statistically significant difference in self-reported knowledge of copyright among the five librarian cadres based on their education level and neither is there a statistically significant difference based on librarians’ years of service. Statistically significant differences among the five librarian cadres exist when we compare “tested knowledge” of copyright issues. Evidence of insufficient mastery of provisions in the Kenyan copyright law does exist.
      Highlights ► Evidence of limited mastery of copyright issues among Kenyan academic librarians does exist. ► Significant differences exist in level of tested knowledge based on librarians’ education level. ► More years of service do not necessarily translate to higher levels of copyright knowledge.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:03:28Z
       
  • Editorial board & publication information
    • Abstract: December 2011
      Publication year: 2011
      Source:The International Information & Library Review, Volume 43, Issue 4




      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:03:28Z
       
  • Foreword
    • Abstract: December 2011
      Publication year: 2011
      Source:The International Information & Library Review, Volume 43, Issue 4




      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:03:28Z
       
  • Postage stamps and digital philately: Worldwide and Indian scenario
    • Abstract: March 2012
      Publication year: 2012
      Source:The International Information & Library Review, Volume 44, Issue 1

      ‘Postage stamps’, basically as a token for payment of postal taxes, are now being recognized as an information source and historical document in recording national achievements that visually convey four core elements: denomination, country name, graphical design, and the textual element. They are a valuable means of communication easily available anywhere to anybody. Realizing them as source of extra revenue, commemorative stamps are made available over time. The information technology (IT) wave changed the hobby of stamp collection to Digital Philately, while information and communication technology (ICT) developments accelerated the hobby further to Virtual Philately. This paper focuses on the aspects of digital and virtual philately. This study aims to evaluate The World Association for the Development of Philately (WADP) Numbering System (WNS) database, which provides free access to authentic postage stamps issued by Universal Postal Union (UPU) member countries and territories. A total of 48,159 stamps with 48 themes were found registered by 184 countries at the time of study. Indian stamps totaled 554 entries with the highest number of entries, 1258, from France, and followed by 1006 from Japan. A ranking was done using themes whereas “Fauna” was observed to be the most popular theme at 14.1% or 6800 stamps under study. For Indian stamps, politics and government, architecture and literature, press and comics are the most prevalent themes with 14.3, 9.8 and 9.8% respectively of the national contribution. The paper also presents a detailed analysis of the 15 Indian stamps commemorating the 14 Indian traditional universities issued over the 50 years of India’s independence.
      Highlights ► Postage stamps visually represent a nation’s history, accomplishments, and cultural heritage. ► Advancements in information technology have created both digital and virtual philately practices. ► Traces worldwide and Indian trends in digital philately through an analysis of a leading international philately database. ► Universities are under represented in stamp issues in India.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:03:28Z
       
  • Traditional knowledge management and preservation: Intersections with
           Library and Information Science
    • Abstract: March 2012
      Publication year: 2012
      Source:The International Information & Library Review, Volume 44, Issue 1

      The African proverb “When an elder dies, a library burns down” clearly sums up the importance of traditional knowledge preservation and cultural continuity, which the study found to be a key need and concern amongst First Nations communities in Ontario, Canada. To follow-up on elders’ suggestions that libraries are potential custodians of traditional knowledge, this paper explores how traditional knowledge preservation intersects with Library and Information Science (LIS) practices of knowledge classification, organization, and dissemination and establishes the various challenges that this intersection poses to these LIS practices. The paper concludes that libraries and other information institutions need to re-examine and reconstruct themselves in ways that take into account non-western epistemologies and worldviews and develop much needed cultural competency in order to undertake traditional knowledge custodianship.
      Highlights ► Explores how traditional knowledge preservation intersects with LIS practices. ► Questions whether the traditional knowledge protection debate considers non-western views. ► IFLA challenges libraries to take a leading role in traditional knowledge. ► Addresses whether LIS is prepared for leading role. ► Argues that current tools present many challenges.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:03:28Z
       
  • Sustainable consortium building among university libraries in Nigeria:
           Adoption of new strategies
    • Abstract: March 2012
      Publication year: 2012
      Source:The International Information & Library Review, Volume 44, Issue 1

      This paper makes a case for sustainable consortium building among University libraries in Nigeria. It examines critical issues involved in consortium building, identifies inherent problems and charts the way forward in dealing with identified problems. It further posits that if carefully planned and executed, consortium building could help Nigerian University libraries improve and sustain services to users.
      Highlights ► University libraries in Nigeria need sustainable consortia. ► Some challenges are: irregular dues payments, bureaucratic bottlenecks, and lack of power supply. ► Governance, management, and licencing also present challenges. ► Success depends on: adequate funding, ICT, power supply, HR, and a central coordinating body.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:03:28Z
       
  • The Irish ‘Working Group on Information Literacy’ –
           Edging towards a national policy
    • Abstract: March 2012
      Publication year: 2012
      Source:The International Information & Library Review, Volume 44, Issue 1

      The authors of this paper provide an overview of the activities of the Irish Working Group on Information Literacy (WGIL) and its role in advancing a national policy for information literacy in the Republic of Ireland. The study focuses on the work of the group during its lifetime including the various activities, marketing and advocacy initiatives and some of the challenges and issues the group faced, in particular, the diversity of the Irish library and information sector and the lack of an integrated approach for information literacy development. The study presents the findings of the report produced by WGIL entitled Library Association of Ireland: Working Group on Information Literacy: Review of Cross-Sector Activity 2006–2008 and Initial Recommendations for Further Action which reviewed best practices and information literacy activities in the various LIS sectors in the Republic of Ireland during a two-year period. The key recommendation of this report is for the leadership of the Library Association of Ireland to develop a national information literacy strategy that advocates for the importance of information literacy as a lifelong and transferable skill.
      Highlights ► Lack of national cohesive strategy for information literacy (IL) challenge in Ireland. ► Many challenges for IL require coordinating disparate group activities. ► IL frameworks in Scotland and Wales may be models. ► Formal research and major IL conference needed to address challenges. ► Continued advocacy and continuing professional development (CPD) for IL.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:03:28Z
       
  • Editorial board & publication information
    • Abstract: March 2012
      Publication year: 2012
      Source:The International Information & Library Review, Volume 44, Issue 1




      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:03:28Z
       
  • Use of social networking sites by research scholars of the University of
           Delhi: A study
    • Abstract: June 2012
      Publication year: 2012
      Source:The International Information & Library Review, Volume 44, Issue 2

      The main purpose of the paper is to explore how research scholars of University of Delhi integrated Social Networking Sites (SNSs) into their daily communication for research work. A structured questionnaire was designed and personally distributed 160 respondents. Most used SNSs for “lurking” while few used such sites for promoting one’s research. Additionally, most respondents preferred the SNS Facebook and ResearchGate for academic purposes. Collaborative and peer-to-peer learning were common benefits from SNSs while some expressed concern regarding cyber-bullying and privacy. Finally, a majority of respondents said using SNSs may be a waste of time.
      Highlights ► Survey of University of Delhi research scholars explored use of social networks. ► Most respondents use social networking sites daily and prefer Facebook. ► Most respondents use social networking to “lurk” more than any other activity.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:03:28Z
       
  • Growth and nature of international LIS research: An analysis of two
           journals
    • Abstract: June 2012
      Publication year: 2012
      Source:The International Information & Library Review, Volume 44, Issue 2

      The study explores the publication trends of scholarly journal articles in two core Library and Information Science (LIS) journals indexed under ScienceDirect Database during the period for the period 2000–2010, and for the “Top 25 Hottest Papers” for 2006–2010. It examines and presents an analysis of 1000 research papers in the area of LIS published in two journals: The International Information & Library Review (IILR) and Library & Information Science Research (LISR). The study examines the content of the journals, including growth of the literature, authorship patterns, geographical distributions of authors, distribution of papers by journal, citation pattern, ranking pattern, length of articles, and most cited authors. Collaboration was calculated using Subramanyam's formula, and Lotka's law was used to identify authors' productivity. The results indicated that authors' distributions did not follow Lotka's law. The study identified the eight most productive authors with a high of 19 publications in this field. The findings indicate that these publications experienced rapid and exponential growth in literature production. The contributions by scientists from India are examined.
      Highlights ► The present study is a model of Global LIS research trend consolidating papers of two core journals. ► The results of the study indicate that, there is an upward trend in LIS research productivity has been visualized. ► Most of the papers from both journals in the sample relate to ICT age. ►
      Authors ' contributions in this study are far from Lotka's Inverse Square Law of Scientific Productivity. ► A. Mathur of India and D. E. Agosto from USA appeared prolific in journal ‘IILR’ and ‘LISR’.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:03:28Z
       
  • Users' perceptions of library effectiveness: A comparative users'
           evaluation of central libraries of AMU, BHU, ALU and BBRAU
    • Abstract: June 2012
      Publication year: 2012
      Source:The International Information & Library Review, Volume 44, Issue 2

      This study examines user perceptions regarding level of satisfaction with library collections, organization, facilities as well as traditional and IT enabled services. A questionnaire was administered to the faculty members, research scholars and students of the Aligarh Muslim University (AMU), Banaras Hindu University (BHU), Allahabad University (ALU) and Baba Bhim Rao Ambedkar (BBRAU). Overall, respondents indicated that library collections are adequate. In the case of newly centralized university libraries, users were dissatisfied with library collections, particularly at BBRAU, though they were satisfied with the existing infrastructure. Overall, satisfaction levels of users at old centralized universities are good.
      Highlights ► Examines user perception of faculty, researchers, and students of the AMU, BHU, ALU and BBRAU. ► Faculty users participate in collection development more than students and researchers. ► Only one of 4 universities surveyed had implemented an Online Public Access Catalogue. ► Overall, results indicate that library collections in all the 4 universities are adequate for their users.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:03:28Z
       
  • Information ethics in Pakistani librarianship: The role of online mailing
           groups
    • Abstract: June 2012
      Publication year: 2012
      Source:The International Information & Library Review, Volume 44, Issue 2

      This study examines the practice of information ethics of the members of the mailing group of the Pakistan Library Automation Group, called PAKLAGPK who participate frequently in the discussions on a variety of LIS ethical issues. The research uses both qualitative and quantitative methods, including a survey questionnaire to measure subscribers' prior knowledge about certain issues in Information Ethics (IE). The research also uses the content analysis method to investigate the information communication behavior of the subscribers over this mailing group.
      Highlights ► Examines information ethics behavior of Pakistani LIS professionals. ► Investigates prior knowledge of LIS professionals about information ethics. ► Conducts content analysis of online discussion group of Pakistan Library Automation Group (PLAGPK). ► Suggests steps to raise awareness among the LIS professionals about information ethics.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:03:28Z
       
  • Editorial board & publication information
    • Abstract: June 2012
      Publication year: 2012
      Source:The International Information & Library Review, Volume 44, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:03:28Z
       
  • Managerial skills needed for academic library managers: The case of Iran
    • Abstract: June 2012
      Publication year: 2012
      Source:The International Information & Library Review, Volume 44, Issue 2

      This survey investigates the extent to which Iranian academic library managers need managerial skills and the influence of their level of seniority on this need. The results revealed that, in general, managers' need for managerial skills is high especially “people related skills” over “analytical and self-related skills” and “task related skills”. Analysis of the mean scores of skills across three levels of managers shows that the middle level managers' need for managerial skills is higher than top managers and supervisors. Overall, most respondents ranked “creating organizational climate” as the skill most needed while few said they needed development for “counseling subordinates.”
      Highlights ► Iranian academic library managers’ need for all managerial skills is high. ► The relative rank of each skill varies slightly based on level of seniority of managers. ► “People related skills” is the most needed category of skills across all levels.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:03:28Z
       
  • Addressing institutional potential loss of records and knowledge in
           Africa: The case of the ECA institutional repository – A knowledge
           base on African socio-economic development
    • Abstract: September 2012
      Publication year: 2012
      Source:The International Information & Library Review, Volume 44, Issue 3

      In its 50 years of existence, the United Nations Economic Commission of Africa (UNECA) has created and holds a vast quantity of information and knowledge in a variety of formats, including printed and electronic. These represent the corporate memory, providing historical evidence of its actions and decisions. The information resources include published materials such as flagship publications, journal articles, conference proceedings, technical reports, mission reports, annual reports, working papers, policy briefs, speeches and other grey literature, all which outline important research or decisions that have been made on the economic and social development in Africa. In 2009 the Library was awarded seed funding to implement the ECA Institutional Repository (IR). This paper discusses the various activities that have been undertaken to realize the project including; highly customized Dspace installation to support the MARC21 metadata, digitization, migration of metadata from the Library Integrated Management System (HORIZON) and, customization of the Dspace workflow to enable review of imported records. The paper also highlights lessons learnt, challenges and some of the best practices developed throughout the implementation and roll out of the ECA IR project. The Institutional Repository at http://repository.uneca.org/ is the first of its kind within the United Nations Secretariat and offers unique knowledge and information not available elsewhere pertaining to regional programmes, decisions and resolutions promoting social and economic development of Africa.
      Highlights ► Development of UNECA institutional repository. ► Richer metadata schemas and controlled vocabularies for value-added services. ► Overcoming quality management and metadata cross-interoperability issues. ► Internal institutional collaboration to address institutional memory loss. ► Connectivity challenges for populating and accessing repositories in Africa being addressed.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:03:28Z
       
  • Mobile phone text messaging use among university librarians of Lahore city
    • Abstract: September 2012
      Publication year: 2012
      Source:The International Information & Library Review, Volume 44, Issue 3

      Short Message Service (SMS) has become a cheap and popular source of communication in today's society. The present study examines the mobile phone text messaging patterns of 96 university librarians from 29 public and private universities in Lahore, Pakistan. Data were collected through a survey questionnaire. Results indicate that university librarians use SMS tools, but do not prefer this technology as a means of communication through phone or e-mail. A majority of librarians use SMS to connect with friends/relatives or for entertainment purposes. They rarely use SMS to communicate with library users, professional colleagues, or administration.
      Highlights ► A very low trend of SMS usage was indicated among librarians related to their job, users and professional activities. ► Librarians' used SMS mostly for their interaction with relatives/ friends and for entertainment purposes. ► Librarians' can build their image and visibility among users by adopting low cost SMS services for communication and can save their time and energy.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:03:28Z
       
  • Assessment of theft and mutilation of information resources in selected
           academic libraries in Niger State
    • Abstract: September 2012
      Publication year: 2012
      Source:The International Information & Library Review, Volume 44, Issue 3

      This research was conducted to assess theft and mutilation of information resources in academic libraries in the Niger State of Nigeria, the reason why users resort to theft and mutilation, measures used to steal and mutilate information resources, possible measures to stem and curb these acts in the future. The survey research method was employed using the simple random sampling technique where three academic libraries were selected from all academic libraries in Niger State. Two types of validated questionnaires were designed and administered to both staff and student users. One hundred copies of the questionnaire were administered to library staff, out of which 72 copies were returned and found usable with valid responses. One hundred and eighty copies of the questionnaires out of 250 administered to student users were returned with valid data. The findings revealed that most of the offenders are students who use various methods to perfect these acts. It was also discovered that such stolen materials were concealed in clothes, files or bags. Mutilations of materials occurred in the form of tearing pages of text materials and writing on pages of books. It equally revealed that theft and mutilation were encouraged by the lack of adequate copies of titles to meet the needs of users among others. To address these problems, certain security systems, provisions of photocopiers and the extension of library hours are recommended.
      Highlights ► Respondents agree that theft and mutilation of library materials are a major threat to collections. ► Respondents believed that students from poor economic backgrounds committed these acts more than any other group. ► Recommended more library security, staff training and user education to thwart theft and mutilation of collections.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:03:28Z
       
  • Journal publishing challenges: A case of STM scientific journals in
           Croatia
    • Abstract: September 2012
      Publication year: 2012
      Source:The International Information & Library Review, Volume 44, Issue 3

      This paper presents findings from the research of 87 scientific journals in the fields of science, technology and medicine (STM) in Croatia. Findings indicate a set of problems editors and editorial teams in the fields of STM encounter during their work such, as insufficient financial support to the journal, low quality of article manuscripts, badly formatted article manuscripts, lack of help to the editor, etc. Findings also indicate use of information and communication technology (ICT) for communication with authors, but ICT is still not used sufficiently to make the shift from print to electronic publishing possible. Most journals in research face financial problems, and they are understaffed, while editors are overburdened with other duties. The recommendation is to professionalize the management of the journals to allow editors and their associates to dedicate their time solely to this job in order to facilitate the transformation of scientific journals from paper to electronic versions and to participate actively in the scientific communication paradigm shift.
      Highlights ► Croatian STM journals burdened with organizational problems. ► Describes use of ICT for the improvement of journal management. ► Despite organizational problems, STM journals able to maintain quality. ► Professionalization of STM journals necessary to maintain the speed of publication.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:03:28Z
       
  • Building digital libraries in Bangladesh: A developing country perspective
    • Abstract: September 2012
      Publication year: 2012
      Source:The International Information & Library Review, Volume 44, Issue 3

      This paper describes the ways used to build digital libraries in Bangladesh as well as the problems that might be encountered during digital library system development. It shows the existing status of digital library development, particularly the status of digitization in Bangladesh as well as government initiatives to build digital library system. Finally, several steps are proposed by the author for one possible approach to build an effective digital library system.
      Highlights ► Status of digitization and digital library initiatives in Bangladesh are explored. ► Large numbers of universities have no access to subscription-based e-resources. ► National Task Force on DL System Development is proposed to build DL nationwide. ► Barriers to digital library development/digitization projects have been explored. ► Digital libraries inevitable for building ‘Digital Bangladesh’ by 2021.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:03:28Z
       
  • Electronic resources and services in Pakistani university libraries: A
           survey of users' satisfaction
    • Abstract: September 2012
      Publication year: 2012
      Source:The International Information & Library Review, Volume 44, Issue 3

      This study is an attempt to evaluate the effectiveness of electronic resources and services in Pakistani university libraries on the basis of users' satisfaction. A survey method was employed to conduct the research. Using convenience sampling, eight university libraries; four each from Islamabad and Lahore including two from the public sector and two from the private sector having IT applications, were included in the users survey. The total population (i.e., 40,236) of library users was very large; therefore, a reasonable, manageable and convenient sample of 800 library users, including 100 users each from the eight libraries was selected. A semi structured questionnaire was designed to collect data, while a five-point Likert Scale from 1 (Dissatisfied) to 5 (Extremely satisfied) was used to measure the satisfaction level of the respondent. The study concluded that Pakistani university libraries are offering effective electronic resources and services to their users.


      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:03:28Z
       
  • Use of digital media and demand for digitized contents in higher education
           sector of Pakistan
    • Abstract: September 2012
      Publication year: 2012
      Source:The International Information & Library Review, Volume 44, Issue 3

      The use of digital media is on rise around the world and same phenomenon is emerging in Pakistan. The study was intended to explore the use of digital media and demand for digitized contents in higher education sector of Pakistan. The research questions were answered by a comprehensive literature review along with semi-structured in-depth interviews of 25 library experts. The findings conferred that the use of digital media in higher education is on rise and demand for digitized contents is growing increasingly. The findings of the study made a good case for the libraries to focus more on acquisition of information resources in digital formats as well as initiate digitization initiatives.
      Highlights ► We examine the use of digital media and demand for d-contents in higher education. ► Higher education sector witnessed a significant expansion in recent years. ► Use of digital media is on rise among the users of higher education in Pakistan. ► Demand for digitized contents is growing increasingly. ► Libraries need to acquire more information resources in digital formats.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:03:28Z
       
  • Editorial board & publication information
    • Abstract: September 2012
      Publication year: 2012
      Source:The International Information & Library Review, Volume 44, Issue 3




      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:03:28Z
       
  • Foreword
    • Abstract: September 2012
      Publication year: 2012
      Source:The International Information & Library Review, Volume 44, Issue 3




      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:03:28Z
       
  • Outcomes of the Bologna Process in LIS higher education: Comparing two
           programs in Europe
    • Abstract: December 2012
      Publication year: 2012
      Source:The International Information & Library Review, Volume 44, Issue 4

      Purpose The Bologna Process (BP) approach is distinguished by its emphasis on outcomes, moving the criteria for quality from input (what faculty teaches) to learning outcomes (what students will be able to do). Methodology The authors want to look at the issues and opportunities involved in applying the learning outcomes approach in two southern European countries with similar traditions and no previous experience of this approach. Data were collected from a documentary review based on official documents and open statistics and a survey of selected stakeholders connected to the LIS schools of Parma and Barcelona. Findings Within the BP framework, the LIS schools of Parma and Barcelona have distinctive missions and goals but differ in their approach to defining the attributes they expect of their graduates. Although LIS as an academic and educational undertaking has common historical roots in Spain and Italy, research and education since BP has developed in different directions. Limitations Findings are based on the context of higher education in Italy and Spain, although the focus is on the two LIS schools of Parma and Barcelona. Originality/value of the paper There are definite barriers to using learning outcomes as a measure of quality enhancement for LIS educational programs. Not least is the challenge of developing a list of learning outcomes that stakeholders at both national and international level can agree on. Nevertheless, this study concludes that LIS learning outcomes in Europe should be investigated as a means of benchmarking and determining the feasibility of guidelines regarding the equivalency and reciprocity of professional LIS qualifications.
      Highlights ► We examine LIS higher education in Italy and Spain. ► LIS has similar tradition and common historical roots in Spain and Italy. ► In Spain and Italy, Bologna model has been developed in different directions.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:03:28Z
       
  • The flow of, and access to, information in Bangladesh: A village level
           case study
    • Abstract: December 2012
      Publication year: 2012
      Source:The International Information & Library Review, Volume 44, Issue 4

      This paper identifies the sources and channels of information in the rural areas of Bangladesh and highlights the information flow and access patterns at the village level of Comilla and Chittagong districts in Bangladesh. It proposes some suggestions for effective information services in rural area, as well as a specific model for a Bangladesh Integrated Rural Information System (BD-IRIS) to improve the information system of villagers. This study uses structured interviews through a pilot survey of 20% of the households from each village and information gathered by personal observations and other secondary sources, as well as appropriate statistical methods. A total of 155 responses is included in the study. Existing conditions of information flow and access in this case study indicate that there are problems in access in spite of interpersonal sources and channels of information. Of course, it is important to remember that the low literacy rate in the villages studied and in many similar communities presents many serious barriers. The author recommends establishing a Village Information Center (VIC) to provide integrated and concerted information services, along with an integrated rural information system for the purpose in the villages studies, and more widely, to meet the requirements of all people in villages in Bangladesh. The case study is one of very few studies focusing on the flow and access of information for rural areas of Bangladesh, particularly as regards information sources and channels, system and services. The approach can be replicated in other communities, and the proposed model for future direction to improve information system of village level people of Bangladesh could be modified for use in other countries.
      Highlights ► Case study of 4 villages in Bangladesh finds most information found in interpersonal sources. ► Information flow and access from more formal sources is very limited. ► Low literacy rates present major barriers to use of non-interpersonal sources and channels. ► A Village Information Center in every village in rural Bangladesh is proposed. ► Bangladesh Integrated Rural Information System proposed to meet needs of rural communities.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:03:28Z
       
  • Organizational storytelling as a method of tacit-knowledge transfer: Case
           study from a Sri Lankan university
    • Abstract: December 2012
      Publication year: 2012
      Source:The International Information & Library Review, Volume 44, Issue 4

      Sri Lanka has a long history and culture of storytelling but the use of stories for transferring tacit knowledge is absent. This paper is the first to examine the application of orgnisational stories as a method of tacit-knowledge transfer management tool in the library domain. The study had two objectives; 1) To explore the potential of storytelling to transfer tacit knowledge from the Librarian to the junior executives. 2) To examine whether captured stories serve the pursuit of knowledge by the junior executives. Two research questions were formulated to achieve these objectives. The first research question (RQ1) How can the tacit knowledge of a retiring senior executive be captured through stories' was framed and addressed to achieve objective one and the second research question (RQ2) Can the captured “stories of work” benefit knowledge workers in their pursuit of tacit knowledge' was framed and addressed to achieve objective two. The study was based on primary data collected from the Librarian and executive staff of the Library by means of two Interview Schedules and the entire study was underpinned by an extensive review of research literature related to organizational storytelling. Qualitative as well as quantitative methods were used to analysis and interpretation data. The findings of the study proved in response to RQ1 that organizational stories can be captured using a six-step process and a story capturing model which could be used by the other researcher emerged from the research. Nevertheless, findings also established that the comprehensiveness of the tacit knowledge that could be captured through stories would depend on the degree of confidentiality of the contents of the stories. Therefore all stories could not be recorded as they are told. Responding to RQ2 the findings proved that, captured “stories of work” can be used for the benefit of knowledge workers in their pursuit of tacit knowledge. Based on these findings it was recommended that, the library should take initiatives to exploit the already prevailing habit of organizational storytelling in the library as a method of transferring tacit knowledge in a deliberated manner and for this several activities were recommended. The findings were based only on a single case, in a single organization carried out during a six-month period, within the boundaries of a specific organizational and social culture. Therefore additional case studies would be necessary to test the validity and reliability of the story capturing model. This research is the first of its kind carried out in the library domain of Sri Lanka. Therefore it provides significant insights on which future researchers can build their studies.
      Highlights ► Informal storytelling can be exploited as a mode of tacit-knowledge transfer. ► Organizational stories can transfer tacit knowledge from managers to subordinates. ► Significance of tacit knowledge embodied in the stories depends on their contents. ► Organizational stories can be captured using a six-step process. ► Captured “stories of work” can be used as a source of knowledge.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:03:28Z
       
  • Decay and half-life period of online citations cited in open access
           journals
    • Abstract: December 2012
      Publication year: 2012
      Source:The International Information & Library Review, Volume 44, Issue 4

      This study investigates the decay and half-life of online citations cited in four open access journals published between 2000 and 2009. A total of 1158 online citations cited in 1086 research articles published in two science and social science journals spanning a period of 10 years (2000–2009) were extracted. Study found that 24.58% (267 out of 1086) of articles had online citations and these articles contained a substantially very less number of online citations (2.98%) compared to previous study results. 30.56% (26% in Science and 52.73% in Social Science) of online citations were not accessible and remaining 69.44% of online citations were still accessible. The ‘HTTP 404 error message-page not found’ was the overwhelming message encountered and represented 67.79% of all HTTP message. Domains associated with .ac and .net had higher successful access rates while .org and .com/.co had lowest successful access rates. The half-life of online citations was computed to be approximately 11.5 years and 9.07 years in Science and Social science journal articles respectively.
      Highlights ► The study investigates the availability, decay and half-life of online citations in four open access journals. ► 24.58% (267 out of 1086) of articles had online citations and contained substantially fewer online citations (2.98%). ► There is a negative correlation between the percentage of active online citations and the publishing age. ► Major problems are loss of access over time and insufficient preservation. ► Archival preservation of digital content must be a higher priority.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:03:28Z
       
  • Institutional Repositories: Benefits and incentives
    • Abstract: December 2012
      Publication year: 2012
      Source:The International Information & Library Review, Volume 44, Issue 4

      The Information Age is characterized by new ways of information generation, managing, and dissemination because of the use of information and communication technology (ICT) (Moahi, 2003; Paul, 2007). Institutional Repositories (IRs) play a fundamental role in centralizing, preserving, and making accessible institution's intellectual capital and, at the same time, they form part of a global system of distributed and interoperable repositories that provide the foundation for a new disaggregated model of scholarly publishing (Johnson, 2002; Nagahban, 2010). A study of nine libraries in the National Capital Region of India was conducted to: identify benefits of IRs, learn the satisfaction level of users with respect to IR facilities, identify the incentives for publication in IRs, and identify the appropriate policies to be adopted by institutions for implementing IRs. The results of the responses from the 496 respondents indicate that: 1) Most Faculty members and Research scholars in this study indicated that they do not publish their research in IRs. 2) Opinions about benefits of IRs are user-specific. For instance, a substantially large percentage of those Faculty members and Research scholars in the study who do use IRs are Most satisfied with potential benefits of IR while a relatively higher percentage of Students fall in the Satisfied category. 3) The benefits of IRs ranked most highly, although this varied by the different user groups was wider readership. Students ranked this and "quality aspect" – the opportunity to improve the quality of one's work through the provision of feedback from other researchers. 4) A serious concern about publishing in IRs is the potential for plagiarism and overall lower control over one's work. A second concern is the potential loss of content in IRs, which are often not archived as well as scholarly journals are. The findings suggest that institutions need to give due attention to policies related to two aspects of publication, especially those related to quality and copyright issues and to the academic value of research output. Other policy-related topics include citation in other publication with due acknowledgement, inclusion in indexing systems for retrieval, interoperability with other IRs, and Permanent storage.
      Highlights ► Institutional Repositories (IRs) play a complementary role in disseminating scholarly work. ► Study of 9 libraries in India indicates use of IRs increases readership for students' work. ► Most faculty and researchers in study do not use IRs, but most students do. ► Those who use IRs rank improved quality through use of feedback and wider readership first.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:03:28Z
       
  • Academics' attitudes towards use of electronic journals: A case study of
           Punjab and Chandigarh
    • Abstract: December 2012
      Publication year: 2012
      Source:The International Information & Library Review, Volume 44, Issue 4

      The article examines academics attitude towards e-journal use. A well structured questionnaire was designed to elicit the opinions of the users. Responses were gathered from 542 faculty members of five universities. The results of the study showed that the characteristics that affect the choice of e-format over print in order of preference are ‘faster access’, ‘available from desktop’, ‘convenience’, ‘remote access’, ‘timeliness’, ‘available at all times’, ‘hyperlinks’, ‘multi-user access’, ‘currency of information’, ‘inclusion of audio–video material’, ‘interactivity’ and ‘animation of graphics’. The characteristics that affect the choice of print format over electronic in order of priority are ‘physical comfort’, ‘portability’, ‘ability to underline’, ‘familiarity with format’ and ‘ability to browse’. A majority of the teachers use e-journals for ‘research’, ‘teaching’, ‘writing reports’, ‘current awareness’, ‘background research’ and ‘internal/external presentations’. The problems faced in accessing e-journals are ‘access difficulties’, ‘discomfort of reading from computer screen’, ‘lack of IT knowledge/skill’, ‘information overload’ etc. A majority of the teachers want future e-journals to have features such as ‘full text index of every article’, ‘searching capability across a wide range of journal articles’, ‘searching capability within an article, display relationship between a wide range of works’ and ‘links to multimedia files’, etc. On the basis of the findings, some suggestions are made for maximizing the use of e-journals.
      Highlights ► Users in case study in India prefer e-journals. ► Users prefer e-journals because of their benefits. ► Users want searching related and value-added features in future e-journals. ► Optimum use of e-journals depends on availability of proper infrastructure.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:03:28Z
       
  • Editorial board & publication information
    • Abstract: December 2012
      Publication year: 2012
      Source:The International Information & Library Review, Volume 44, Issue 4




      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:03:28Z
       
  • Foreword
    • Abstract: December 2012
      Publication year: 2012
      Source:The International Information & Library Review, Volume 44, Issue 4




      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:03:28Z
       
 
 
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