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Journal Cover The Electronic Library
  [SJR: 0.543]   [H-I: 26]   [823 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0264-0473
   Published by Emerald Homepage  [312 journals]
  • Book reviews
    • Abstract: The Electronic Library, Volume 34, Issue 5, Page 000-000, October 2016.

      Citation: The Electronic Library
      PubDate: 2016-09-22T11:06:59Z
      DOI: 10.1108/EL-11-2015-0217
       
  • Understanding Gamification
    • Abstract: The Electronic Library, Volume 34, Issue 5, Page 000-000, October 2016.

      Citation: The Electronic Library
      PubDate: 2016-09-22T11:06:05Z
      DOI: 10.1108/EL-02-2016-0049
       
  • The Weeding Handbook: A Shelf-By-Shelf Guide
    • Abstract: The Electronic Library, Volume 34, Issue 5, Page 000-000, October 2016.

      Citation: The Electronic Library
      PubDate: 2016-09-22T11:05:36Z
      DOI: 10.1108/EL-01-2016-0002
       
  • The status of open access library and information science journals in SSCI
    • First page: 722
      Abstract: The Electronic Library, Volume 34, Issue 5, October 2016.
      Purpose The main purpose of this paper is to measure the status and quality of Library and Information Science (LIS) Open Access (OA) Journals in Social Science Citation Index (SSCI) Design/methodology/approach The study selected 86 source journals of LIS in SSCI as a sample and measured their status of open access. Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) was used to analyze 36 OA Journals of 86 source journals, especially their production capability, academic influence and network communication ability. Findings The results indicate that OA journals have become an increasingly important part of LIS journals. Production capability, academic influence and network communication ability are important factors affecting the quality of OA Journals. These three evaluation indicators of LIS OA Journals are high, but many still have room for improvement. Research limitations/implications As the paper is limited by collecting data, the indicators of OA journals’ quality are not all-around. So they can’t reflect the quality of LIS OA journals. In the selection of the evaluation method, the evaluation results are limited because only one AHP method is used. Practical implications The research on evaluation of OA journals can help library and scientific research personnel use OA journals effectively. Identifying key factors on evaluation can help researchers to construct OA journals better. Originality/value This paper measures the quality of LIS OA Journals by analyzing production capability, academic influence and network communication ability. Rather than the traditional research methods, the focus of this study is on the value of the web as a source of impact indices. It contributes to the scholarly impact measurements of OA Journals.
      Citation: The Electronic Library
      PubDate: 2016-08-17T11:54:07Z
      DOI: 10.1108/EL-05-2015-0070
       
  • Current status of open access journals published in D8 countries and
           registered in the Directory of Open Access Journals (pre-2000 to 2014)
    • First page: 740
      Abstract: The Electronic Library, Volume 34, Issue 5, October 2016.
      Purpose The study aims to monitor the status of open access journals published in Developing 8 (D8) countries, i.e. Bangladesh, Egypt, Indonesia, Iran, Malaysia, Nigeria, Pakistan, and Turkey. Design/methodology/approach Our web-based data sources for journal-based metrics were the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ), Thomson Reuters (Journal Citation Reports [JCR], which provided journal impact factors [JIF]) and Scopus (SJR and SNIP). We obtained information about journals published before 2000 to 2014. From the JCR we used JIF, Rank in Category, Total Journals in Category, Journal Rank in Category, and Quartile in Category. Findings We identified 1407 open access journals published in D8 countries. Egypt published the most journals (490) and Bangladesh the fewest (29). Egypt, Iran, and Turkey accounted for approximately 73.5% of all journals. At the time of study, 10,162 journals were registered in DOAJ, and 13.8% of them were published in D8 countries. The mean JIF for all journals from individual countries was highest for Pakistan (0.84), followed by Iran (0.74) and Turkey (0.57). The mean SNIP for all journals from each country was highest for Nigeria (0.57), followed by Egypt (0.57) and Pakistan (0.51). Practical implications The widespread use of open access publishing models in D8 countries will boost accessibility of their journals’ contents and ultimately impact research in D8 states. Originality/value Journals published in Egypt, Iran, and Turkey for account for approximately three-fourths of all open access journals published in D8 countries. More than one third (38%) of the journals we studied used a Creative Commons BY license, a hallmark of open access research findings. Most of the journals with a JIF were in the JCR Medical Sciences category (60%). As the number of journals in D8 countries increases, publishers should attempt to make their journals eligible for indexing in citation databases. We recommend efforts to improve the quality of journals in other subject categories so that as many as possible become eligible for indexing in JCR.
      Citation: The Electronic Library
      PubDate: 2016-08-17T11:54:10Z
      DOI: 10.1108/EL-06-2015-0107
       
  • Internet services in academic libraries: impact on the use of printed
           resources and implications for libraries in Nigeria
    • First page: 757
      Abstract: The Electronic Library, Volume 34, Issue 5, October 2016.
      Purpose The use of the internet and www to source information is now an emerging practice in developing countries and seems to be obscuring the use of printed resources in libraries. This paper investigates the impacts of internet services on the use of prints in academic libraries in and Nigeria. Design/methodology/approach The design of the study was ex-pos- facto. The population of the study was the 131, 670 students that registered in the library from 2005 to 2014 academic sessions. The instruments for data collection were documentary records, oral interviews, and observation. Statistics of past physical transactions at the Nnamdi Azikiwe Libraries University of Nigeria, Nsukka was consulted and adapted for the study. Tables, graphs, and a benchmark for assessment guided the analysis and discussion of the data. Findings Readers’ registrations, average daily readership, consultation of theses/dissertations, were among the physical services that are multiplying and exerting pressures on existing facilities in the library. Books and periodicals consulted were constantly declining since the advent of internet services. Academic libraries in Nigeria should be adequately funded to sustain ICT backbone for Internet usage and better marketing and stabilization of library services to retain users in academic libraries. Practical implications Increased availability of full-text online could force academic libraries in developing countries to cancel much of their online subscriptions. Serious efforts must be embarked by academic libraries in order to bring back the users to the library. Originality/value This article is the first to investigate the impacts of internet usage on printed resources in academic libraries in Nigerian. The originality lies in its contribution to internet use on information resources in academic libraries in developing regions.
      Citation: The Electronic Library
      PubDate: 2016-08-17T11:54:13Z
      DOI: 10.1108/EL-04-2015-0066
       
  • Knowledge discovery of digital library subscription by RFC itemsets
    • First page: 772
      Abstract: The Electronic Library, Volume 34, Issue 5, October 2016.
      Purpose The paper aims to understand the book subscription characteristics of the students at each college and help the library administrators to conduct efficient library management plans for books in the library. Unlike the traditional association rule mining techniques which mine patterns from a single dataset, this paper proposes a model, Recency-Frequency-College (RFC) model, to analyze book subscription characteristics of library users and then discovers interesting association rules from equivalence-class RFC segments. Design/methodology/approach A framework which integrates Recency-Frequency-College (RFC) model and association rule mining technique is proposed to analyze book subscription characteristics of library users. First, we apply RFC model to determine library users’ RFC values. After that, we cluster library users’ transactions into several RFC segments by their RFC values. Finally, we discover RFC association rules and analyze book subscription characteristics of RFC segments (library users). Findings The paper provides experimental results from the survey data. It shows that the precision of the frequent itemsets discovered by the proposed RFC model outperforms the traditional approach in predicting library user subscription itemsets in the following time periods. Besides, the proposed approach can discover interesting and valuable patterns from library book circulation transactions. Research limitations/implications Because RFC thresholds were assigned based on expert opinion in this paper, it is an acquisition bottleneck. Therefore, researchers are encouraged to automatically infer the RFC thresholds from the library book circulation transactions. Practical implications The paper includes implications for the library administrators in conducting library book management plans for different library users. Originality/value This paper proposes a model, Recency-Frequency-College (RFC) model, to analyze book subscription characteristics of library users.
      Citation: The Electronic Library
      PubDate: 2016-08-17T11:54:06Z
      DOI: 10.1108/EL-06-2015-0086
       
  • Lotka's Law and productivity patterns of authors in biomedical science in
           Nigeria on HIV/AIDS: a bibliometric approach
    • First page: 789
      Abstract: The Electronic Library, Volume 34, Issue 5, October 2016.
      Purpose This study attempts to analyze the productivity patterns of authors in Nigeria using publications indexed in Medline from 2008 to 2012 based on Lotka's law. Lotka’s law of scientific productivity provides the platform of studying inequality in the productivity patterns of authors in a given field and over a specified period. Design/methodology/approach This study covers a period of 5 years (2008-2012) of journal articles of HIV/AIDS pandemic in Nigeria in Medline which 512 articles of HIV/AIDS pandemic in Nigeria were reported to have been published during that period. In this paper analysis was made for only the articles that HIV/AIDS appeared in the title and have HIV/AIDS as author keywords, in which 306 articles with HIV/AIDS appeared in the title was published in 20 journals. Medline was used because there is no local database available that index biomedical literature from Nigeria. Medline which is not only robust and flexible database that includes articles from Nigeria but it is the largest medical database that index over six and a half million articles from 3 400 biomedical journals. Findings While, HIV/AIDS can be considered a global pandemic, Nigeria has the second highest number of new infections reported each year, and an estimated 3.7 percent of the population is living with the dreaded HIV. This study presents a general picture of the distribution of papers as single-author papers, multiple-author papers, and the measures of co-authorship. Findings of the study revealed that the productivity distribution for authors in the subject HIV/AIDS only co-authors and non-collaborative authors’ categories fit into Lotka law, while all authors and first authors categories differ from the distribution of Lotka’s inverse square law. Research limitations/implications The empirical evidence used in this article was based only on articles of HIV/AIDS pandemic in Nigeria on the subject HIV/AIDS appeared in the title. Articles that did fall into this category were excluded from the study. Therefore, the findings of this study might not be the generalized to other bio-medical research. Originality/value The originality of this paper lies in the fact that the productivity pattern of each of the different author categories on the subject of HIV/AIDS is first of its kind in the Nigeria context.
      Citation: The Electronic Library
      PubDate: 2016-08-17T11:54:00Z
      DOI: 10.1108/EL-02-2014-0024
       
  • Research data management in universities of central China: practices at
           Wuhan University Library
    • First page: 808
      Abstract: The Electronic Library, Volume 34, Issue 5, October 2016.
      Purpose Revealing research data’s production and use, the status of research data management (RDM) and researchers’ service requirements in universities of Central China; investigating the feasibility of university libraries in providing RDM services without any supporting policies from governments or funding agencies. Design/methodology/approach Using a stratified sampling method, faculties and graduate students from 11 universities were investigated. Four pilot subjects at Wuhan University were chosen for whom a pilot RDM platform was to be constructed. Findings Research data at Chinese universities are small, sporadic and discontinuous. Such data are intensively or dispersedly under researcher’s management, with some unresolved problems regarding data security, data sharing and utilisation efficiency. Researchers’ needs for data services are strong. University libraries in China can develop RDM systems and provide related services. To realise this, more work should be done on service mechanism, service promotion, software development and staff training. Research limitations/implications The user survey covered 11 universities in central China, which may not reveal the real RDM status of researcher in different areas of China. Practical implications The practice at Wuhan University could provide reference to other university libraries in China or other developing countries. Originality/value The user survey is designed to be as comprehensive as possible and cover 902 researchers from 11 different types of Chinese universities. The practice at Wuhan University is one of the first RDM initiatives led by university library in China.
      Citation: The Electronic Library
      PubDate: 2016-08-17T11:54:09Z
      DOI: 10.1108/EL-04-2015-0063
       
  • Willingness of patrons to use library public computing facilities:
           insights from Malaysia
    • First page: 823
      Abstract: The Electronic Library, Volume 34, Issue 5, October 2016.
      Purpose This study aims to examine relationships between attitude, self-efficacy, and subjective norm with library patrons’ behavioral intention to use public computing facilities at a library. Design/methodology/approach Data was collected from 200 undergraduate students enrolled at a higher learning institution in the Federal Territory of Labuan, Malaysia via a structured questionnaire comprising closed-ended questions. A structural equation modelling technique employing Analysis of Moment Structures (AMOS) computer software version 21 was used to examine the stability of the model with the data and to estimate impacts among factors instantaneously. Findings The results show that library patrons’ behavioral intention to use public computing facilities at the library is widely affected by subjective norm factor i.e. influence of the support of family members, friends and neighbours. Using public computers in a library helps them to be more independent in completing their assignments and conducting research collaboration, checking email messages, social networking, and performing other online tasks. Practical implications The findings of this study provide a better understanding of factors likely to influence library patrons’ behavioral intention to use public computing facilities at a library. It also offers valuable insights into factors which university librarians need to focus on to improve library patrons’ behavioral intention to actively use public computing facilities at a library for quality information retrieval. Originality/value This study replaces perceived behavioral control with self-efficacy in the framework as it overlaps with the concept of self-efficacy in order to provide more variance in behavioral intention to use public computing facilities at a library, which has been marginally researched in the Malaysian context.
      Citation: The Electronic Library
      PubDate: 2016-08-17T11:54:12Z
      DOI: 10.1108/EL-01-2015-0008
       
  • Differences of Pareto Principle performance in e-resource download
           distribution: an empirical study
    • First page: 846
      Abstract: The Electronic Library, Volume 34, Issue 5, October 2016.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore whether the databases from a certain library are Pareto-compliant or not? If so, to what extent is the Pareto principle performance evident among these databases? The other purpose is to determine the differences in Pareto principle performance according to time change and database type. Design/methodology/approach Data on full-text downloads from six e-resources—Elsevier SD, Wiley Blackwell, Springer Journal, EBSCO BSP, ACS and AIP—for the period 2007–2013 were analysed. Forty-two samples were collected from these databases. The proportion of frequently downloads of journals from databases was selected as an indicator to determine differences in Pareto principle performance according to time change. The difference between the proportion of frequently downloaded journals and the classic proportion of 20% was used as indicator to determine difference in Pareto principle performance related to database type. Findings There are 33 samples (78.57%) exhibited the Pareto principle. Four databases—Elsevier SD, Wiley Blackwell, EBSCO BSP and AIP—constantly exhibited the Pareto principle. The differences were not significant according to time change. The two multi-discipline databases, Elsevier SD and Wiley Blackwell, fluctuated more moderately than the two single-discipline databases, EBSCO BSP and AIP. Multi-discipline and single-discipline databases showed some differences in Pareto principle performance; however, these differences were not remarkable. Originality/value The Pareto principle confirmed that there were frequent and infrequent downloads of e-journals from e-journal databases. It was of great importance to analyse these to improve digital resources acquisition and user service.
      Citation: The Electronic Library
      PubDate: 2016-08-17T11:54:01Z
      DOI: 10.1108/EL-05-2015-0068
       
  • Inventory of a library collection using Android application
    • First page: 856
      Abstract: The Electronic Library, Volume 34, Issue 5, October 2016.
      Purpose This paper discusses possibilities of using a mobile application in the process of an inventory of library collection. A mobile application dealing with inventory is presented in this paper. The application supports scanning barcode labels on the books and retrieving data about those books. For every book, the application enables changing data about status and call number of the book. Design/methodology/approach This paper is based on the case study of developing application for the Android platform and this application is part of the BISIS library management system. Findings By analysing procedure of an inventory in the library of the Faculty of Science, University of Novi Sad, it is concluded that this procedure is tedious and can be simplified. In order to make this procedure more efficient, a mobile application enabling search and update of bibliographic records has been developed. That application communicates with the BISIS library management system using a specially designed service. Practical implications By introducing this application at the libraries, the process of inventory of a library collection can be simplified and time needed for inventory will be shorter and the inventory will require less physical effort. Originality/value The application is designed to help librarians during the process of inventory of library collections. During this process, librarians have to check status of every item on the shelves and to update catalogue with new information. This application enables mobility of librarians and updating information about items during checking the shelves.
      Citation: The Electronic Library
      PubDate: 2016-08-17T11:53:59Z
      DOI: 10.1108/EL-08-2015-0150
       
  • Managing digital records in a global environment – a review of the
           landscape of international standards and best practice guidelines
    • First page: 869
      Abstract: The Electronic Library, Volume 34, Issue 5, October 2016.
      Purpose The article aims to widen as well as deepen the discussion on standards and best practice guidelines beyond just local or regional efforts and include international developments Design/methodology/approach An extensive review of literature was used to develop an outline of existing standards and best practice guidelines that are used by records management professionals to manage digital records. Findings The analysis reveals that there has been a long tradition in standards and best practice guidelines development dating back to the 1980s. The study also reveals that there are two broad categories of standards and best practice guidelines, those with assessment mechanisms and those without such mechanisms. The choice of whether or not to have an assessment mechanism depends on the purpose for which a standard or best practice guideline is developed. Originality/value The article explores an extensive array of standards and best practice guidelines, their utility and their geographical coverage. It demonstrates how different terms such as ERMS, EDMS, EDRMS and ECM have been used without much clarity on how these terms relate to each other and proposes a clarification framework.
      Citation: The Electronic Library
      PubDate: 2016-08-17T11:54:08Z
      DOI: 10.1108/EL-04-2015-0064
       
 
 
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