for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help
Followed Journals
Journal you Follow: 0
 
Sign Up to follow journals, search in your chosen journals and, optionally, receive Email Alerts when new issues of your Followed Journals are published.
Already have an account? Sign In to see the journals you follow.
Journal Cover
Science
Journal Prestige (SJR): 14.142
Citation Impact (citeScore): 16
Number of Followers: 4337  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0036-8075 - ISSN (Online) 1095-9203
Published by AAAS Homepage  [7 journals]
  • Two distinct interstitial macrophage populations coexist across tissues in
           specific subtissular niches
    • Authors: Chakarov, S; Lim, H. Y, Tan, L, Lim, S. Y, See, P, Lum, J, Zhang, X.-M, Foo, S, Nakamizo, S, Duan, K, Kong, W. T, Gentek, R, Balachander, A, Carbajo, D, Bleriot, C, Malleret, B, Tam, J. K. C, Baig, S, Shabeer, M, Toh, S.-A. E. S, Schlitzer, A, Larbi, A, Marichal, T, Malissen, B, Chen, J, Poidinger, M, Kabashima, K, Bajenoff, M, Ng, L. G, Angeli, V, Ginhoux, F.
      Abstract: Macrophages are a heterogeneous cell population involved in tissue homeostasis, inflammation, and various pathologies. Although the major tissue-resident macrophage populations have been extensively studied, interstitial macrophages (IMs) residing within the tissue parenchyma remain poorly defined. Here we studied IMs from murine lung, fat, heart, and dermis. We identified two independent IM subpopulations that are conserved across tissues: Lyve1loMHCIIhiCX3CR1hi (Lyve1loMHCIIhi) and Lyve1hiMHCIIloCX3CR1lo (Lyve1hiMHCIIlo) monocyte-derived IMs, with distinct gene expression profiles, phenotypes, functions, and localizations. Using a new mouse model of inducible macrophage depletion (Slco2b1flox/DTR), we found that the absence of Lyve1hiMHCIIlo IMs exacerbated experimental lung fibrosis. Thus, we demonstrate that two independent populations of IMs coexist across tissues and exhibit conserved niche-dependent functional programming.
      Keywords: Immunology, Online Only
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.aau0964
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Mysterious males
    • Authors: Vignieri S.
      Pages: 1188
      Keywords: Evolution, Genetics
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6432.1187-i
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Human sound systems are shaped by post-Neolithic changes in bite
           configuration
    • Authors: Blasi, D. E; Moran, S, Moisik, S. R, Widmer, P, Dediu, D, Bickel, B.
      Abstract: Linguistic diversity, now and in the past, is widely regarded to be independent of biological changes that took place after the emergence of Homo sapiens. We show converging evidence from paleoanthropology, speech biomechanics, ethnography, and historical linguistics that labiodental sounds (such as "f" and "v") were innovated after the Neolithic. Changes in diet attributable to food-processing technologies modified the human bite from an edge-to-edge configuration to one that preserves adolescent overbite and overjet into adulthood. This change favored the emergence and maintenance of labiodentals. Our findings suggest that language is shaped not only by the contingencies of its history, but also by culturally induced changes in human biology.
      Keywords: Anthropology, Online Only
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.aav3218
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Acoel genome reveals the regulatory landscape of whole-body regeneration
    • Authors: Gehrke, A. R; Neverett, E, Luo, Y.-J, Brandt, A, Ricci, L, Hulett, R. E, Gompers, A, Ruby, J. G, Rokhsar, D. S, Reddien, P. W, Srivastava, M.
      Abstract: Whole-body regeneration is accompanied by complex transcriptomic changes, yet the chromatin regulatory landscapes that mediate this dynamic response remain unexplored. To decipher the regulatory logic that orchestrates regeneration, we sequenced the genome of the acoel worm Hofstenia miamia, a highly regenerative member of the sister lineage of other bilaterians. Epigenomic profiling revealed thousands of regeneration-responsive chromatin regions and identified dynamically bound transcription factor motifs, with the early growth response (EGR) binding site as the most variably accessible during Hofstenia regeneration. Combining egr inhibition with chromatin profiling suggests that Egr functions as a pioneer factor to directly regulate early wound-induced genes. The genetic connections inferred by this approach allowed the construction of a gene regulatory network for whole-body regeneration, enabling genomics-based comparisons of regeneration across species.
      Keywords: Evolution, Genetics, Online Only
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.aau6173
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Data sharing for pediatric cancers
    • Authors: Vaske, O. M; Haussler, D.
      Pages: 1125 - 1125
      Keywords: Editorials
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.aax2739
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • News at a glance
    • Pages: 1126 - 1128
      Keywords: Scientific Community
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6432.1126
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Scheme to mine the abyss gets sea trial
    • Authors: Voosen P.
      Pages: 1129 - 1130
      Keywords: Engineering, Oceanography
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6432.1129
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Moratorium for germline editing splits biologists
    • Authors: Cohen J.
      Pages: 1130 - 1131
      Keywords: Cell Biology, Scientific Community
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6432.1130
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • How farming reshaped our smiles and our speech
    • Authors: Gibbons A.
      Pages: 1131 - 1131
      Keywords: Anthropology, Evolution
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6432.1131
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Giant prevention study has sobering message
    • Authors: Cohen J.
      Pages: 1132 - 1132
      Keywords: Epidemiology, Virology
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6432.1132
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • WHO is 'changing its DNA in bid to meet new goals
    • Authors: Kupferschmidt K.
      Pages: 1134 - 1134
      Keywords: Scientific Community
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6432.1134
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Private sector nears rank of top Ph.D. employer
    • Authors: Langin K.
      Pages: 1135 - 1135
      Keywords: Education, Scientific Community
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6432.1135
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Rare diseases prompted care in ancient times
    • Authors: Curry A.
      Pages: 1136 - 1136
      Keywords: Anthropology, Epidemiology
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6432.1136
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Flashes in the scan
    • Authors: Clery D.
      Pages: 1138 - 1141
      Keywords: Astronomy, Engineering
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6432.1138
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Nowhere to hide
    • Authors: Yee A.
      Pages: 1142 - 1143
      Keywords: Ecology
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6432.1142
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • The crisis of democracy and the science of deliberation
    • Authors: Dryzek, J. S; Bächtiger, A, Chambers, S, Cohen, J, Druckman, J. N, Felicetti, A, Fishkin, J. S, Farrell, D. M, Fung, A, Gutmann, A, Landemore, H, Mansbridge, J, Marien, S, Neblo, M. A, Niemeyer, S, Setälä, M, Slothuus, R, Suiter, J, Thompson, D, Warren, M. E.
      Pages: 1144 - 1146
      Keywords: Sociology
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.aaw2694
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Improving surface-wetting characterization
    • Authors: Liu, K; Vuckovac, M, Latikka, M, Huhtamäki, T, Ras, R. H. A.
      Pages: 1147 - 1148
      Keywords: Chemistry, Materials Science
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.aav5388
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Histone modifiers are oxygen sensors
    • Authors: Gallipoli, P; Huntly, B. J. P.
      Pages: 1148 - 1149
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.aaw8373
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Tissue-specificity in cancer: The rule, not the exception
    • Authors: Haigis, K. M; Cichowski, K, Elledge, S. J.
      Pages: 1150 - 1151
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.aaw3472
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • A master regulator of regeneration
    • Authors: Alonge, M; Schatz, M. C.
      Pages: 1152 - 1153
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.aaw6258
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Toward a clearer view into human prehistory
    • Authors: Vander Linden M.
      Pages: 1153 - 1154
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.aaw8020
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Mapping the lung
    • Authors: Mildner, A; Yona, S.
      Pages: 1154 - 1155
      Keywords: Immunology
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.aaw6775
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • What lies beneath
    • Authors: Tattersall I.
      Pages: 1156 - 1156
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.aaw4154
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Marketing "healthy" babies
    • Authors: Annas G. J.
      Pages: 1158 - 1158
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.aaw5998
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Illegal killing of birds in Europe continues
    • Authors: Margalida, A; Mateo, R.
      Pages: 1161 - 1161
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.aaw7516
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Time for Korean wildlife conservation
    • Authors: Borzee, A; Struecker, M.-Y, Yi, Y, Kim, D, Kim, H.
      Pages: 1161 - 1162
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.aaw9023
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Invertebrate scavengers matter
    • Authors: Olea, P. P; Mateo-Tomas, P, Barton, P. S.
      Pages: 1162 - 1162
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.aaw7029
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • It takes a village
    • Authors: Kiberstis P. A.
      Pages: 1164 - 1165
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.aax1736
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Beyond survival
    • Authors: Couzin-Frankel J.
      Pages: 1166 - 1169
      Keywords: Medicine, Diseases
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6432.1166
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • The genomic landscape of pediatric cancers: Implications for diagnosis and
           treatment
    • Authors: Sweet-Cordero, E. A; Biegel, J. A.
      Pages: 1170 - 1175
      Abstract: The past decade has witnessed a major increase in our understanding of the genetic underpinnings of childhood cancer. Genomic sequencing studies have highlighted key differences between pediatric and adult cancers. Whereas many adult cancers are characterized by a high number of somatic mutations, pediatric cancers typically have few somatic mutations but a higher prevalence of germline alterations in cancer predisposition genes. Also noteworthy is the remarkable heterogeneity in the types of genetic alterations that likely drive the growth of pediatric cancers, including copy number alterations, gene fusions, enhancer hijacking events, and chromoplexy. Because most studies have genetically profiled pediatric cancers only at diagnosis, the mechanisms underlying tumor progression, therapy resistance, and metastasis remain poorly understood. We discuss evidence that points to a need for more integrative approaches aimed at identifying driver events in pediatric cancers at both diagnosis and relapse. We also provide an overview of key aspects of germline predisposition for cancer in this age group.
      Keywords: Genetics, Medicine, Diseases
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.aaw3535
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Ushering in the next generation of precision trials for pediatric cancer
    • Authors: DuBois, S. G; Corson, L. B, Stegmaier, K, Janeway, K. A.
      Pages: 1175 - 1181
      Abstract: Cancer treatment decisions are increasingly based on the genomic profile of the patient’s tumor, a strategy called "precision oncology." Over the past few years, a growing number of clinical trials and case reports have provided evidence that precision oncology is an effective approach for at least some children with cancer. Here, we review key factors influencing pediatric drug development in the era of precision oncology. We describe an emerging regulatory framework that is accelerating the pace of clinical trials in children as well as design challenges that are specific to trials that involve young cancer patients. Last, we discuss new drug development approaches for pediatric cancers whose growth relies on proteins that are difficult to target therapeutically, such as transcription factors.
      Keywords: Medicine, Diseases
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.aaw4153
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Science and health for all children with cancer
    • Authors: Lam, C. G; Howard, S. C, Bouffet, E, Pritchard-Jones, K.
      Pages: 1182 - 1186
      Abstract: Each year ~429,000 children and adolescents aged 0 to 19 years are expected to develop cancer. Five-year survival rates exceed 80% for the 45,000 children with cancer in high-income countries (HICs) but are less than 30% for the 384,000 children in lower-middle-income countries (LMICs). Improved survival rates in HICs have been achieved through multidisciplinary care and research, with treatment regimens using mostly generic medicines and optimized risk stratification. Children’s outcomes in LMICs can be improved through global collaborative partnerships that help local leaders adapt effective treatments to local resources and clinical needs, as well as address common problems such as delayed diagnosis and treatment abandonment. Together, these approaches may bring within reach the global survival target recently set by the World Health Organization: 60% survival for all children with cancer by 2030.
      Keywords: Medicine, Diseases
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.aaw4892
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Herbivores shape tropical forests
    • Authors: Sugden A. M.
      Pages: 1187 - 1187
      Keywords: Ecology
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6432.1187-a
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • The state of ocean CO2 uptake
    • Authors: Smith H. J.
      Pages: 1187 - 1187
      Keywords: Geochemistry, Geophysics
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6432.1187-b
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • A flexible strategy for piezoelectrics
    • Authors: Grocholski B.
      Pages: 1187 - 1187
      Keywords: Chemistry, Materials Science
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6432.1187-c
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Defective degradation as disease mechanism
    • Authors: Ray L. B.
      Pages: 1187 - 1187
      Keywords: Cell Biology, Genetics
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6432.1187-d
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Genomics of the Iberian Peninsula
    • Authors: Zahn L. M.
      Pages: 1187 - 1188
      Keywords: Anthropology, Genetics
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6432.1187-e
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Transplanted memories
    • Authors: Balasubramani A.
      Pages: 1187 - 1188
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6432.1187-f
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Manganese spreads neurodegeneration
    • Authors: Ferrarelli L. K.
      Pages: 1187 - 1188
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6432.1187-g
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Superefficient light emission
    • Authors: Lavine M. S.
      Pages: 1187 - 1188
      Keywords: Chemistry, Materials Science
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6432.1187-h
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Tissue macrophages have a split personality
    • Authors: Scanlon S. T.
      Pages: 1187 - 1189
      Keywords: Immunology
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6432.1187-j
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • The first fricatives
    • Authors: Sugden A. M.
      Pages: 1187 - 1189
      Keywords: Anthropology
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6432.1187-k
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Acoel-regeneration regulatory landscapes
    • Authors: Zahn L. M.
      Pages: 1187 - 1189
      Keywords: Evolution, Genetics
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6432.1187-l
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Iron's new Best Friend
    • Authors: Yeston J.
      Pages: 1187 - 1189
      Keywords: Chemistry
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6432.1187-m
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Tissue specificity in cancer drivers
    • Authors: Alderton G.
      Pages: 1187 - 1189
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6432.1187-n
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Oxygen sensing revisited
    • Authors: Kiberstis P. A.
      Pages: 1187 - 1189
      Keywords: Molecular Biology
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6432.1187-o
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • The neuroscience of trust
    • Authors: Post K.
      Pages: 1187 - 1189
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6432.1187-p
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Worms go A-WOL
    • Authors: Smith O. M.
      Pages: 1187 - 1189
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6432.1187-q
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Equal opportunity nitrogen sourcing
    • Authors: Funk M. A.
      Pages: 1188 - 1188
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6432.1188-a
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Disturbance and diversity through deep time
    • Authors: Sugden A. M.
      Pages: 1188 - 1189
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6432.1188-b
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Circadian muscle mastery
    • Authors: Purnell B. A.
      Pages: 1188 - 1189
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6432.1188-c
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Hunting and population decline
    • Authors: Vignieri S.
      Pages: 1188 - 1189
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6432.1188-d
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Modeling a pediatric brain tumor
    • Authors: Kiberstis P. A.
      Pages: 1188 - 1189
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6432.1188-e
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Right in the middle
    • Authors: Yeston J.
      Pages: 1188 - 1189
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6432.1188-f
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Earth's extensive hydrogen corona
    • Authors: Smith K. T.
      Pages: 1188 - 1189
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6432.1188-g
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • The oceanic sink for anthropogenic CO2 from 1994 to 2007
    • Authors: Gruber, N; Clement, D, Carter, B. R, Feely, R. A, van Heuven, S, Hoppema, M, Ishii, M, Key, R. M, Kozyr, A, Lauvset, S. K, Lo Monaco, C, Mathis, J. T, Murata, A, Olsen, A, Perez, F. F, Sabine, C. L, Tanhua, T, Wanninkhof, R.
      Pages: 1193 - 1199
      Abstract: We quantify the oceanic sink for anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) over the period 1994 to 2007 by using observations from the global repeat hydrography program and contrasting them to observations from the 1990s. Using a linear regression–based method, we find a global increase in the anthropogenic CO2 inventory of 34 ± 4 petagrams of carbon (Pg C) between 1994 and 2007. This is equivalent to an average uptake rate of 2.6 ± 0.3 Pg C year–1 and represents 31 ± 4% of the global anthropogenic CO2 emissions over this period. Although this global ocean sink estimate is consistent with the expectation of the ocean uptake having increased in proportion to the rise in atmospheric CO2, substantial regional differences in storage rate are found, likely owing to climate variability–driven changes in ocean circulation.
      Keywords: Geochemistry, Geophysics
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.aau5153
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Redefining near-unity luminescence in quantum dots with photothermal
           threshold quantum yield
    • Authors: Hanifi, D. A; Bronstein, N. D, Koscher, B. A, Nett, Z, Swabeck, J. K, Takano, K, Schwartzberg, A. M, Maserati, L, Vandewal, K, van de Burgt, Y, Salleo, A, Alivisatos, A. P.
      Pages: 1199 - 1202
      Abstract: A variety of optical applications rely on the absorption and reemission of light. The quantum yield of this process often plays an essential role. When the quantum yield deviates from unity by significantly less than 1%, applications such as luminescent concentrators and optical refrigerators become possible. To evaluate such high performance, we develop a measurement technique for luminescence efficiency with sufficient accuracy below one part per thousand. Photothermal threshold quantum yield is based on the quantization of light to minimize overall measurement uncertainty. This technique is used to guide a procedure capable of making ensembles of near-unity emitting cadmium selenide/cadmium sulfide (CdSe/CdS) core-shell quantum dots. We obtain a photothermal threshold quantum yield luminescence efficiency of 99.6 ± 0.2%, indicating nearly complete suppression of nonradiative decay channels.
      Keywords: Chemistry, Materials Science
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.aat3803
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Terminal coordination of diatomic boron monofluoride to iron
    • Authors: Drance, M. J; Sears, J. D, Mrse, A. M, Moore, C. E, Rheingold, A. L, Neidig, M. L, Figueroa, J. S.
      Pages: 1203 - 1205
      Abstract: Boron monofluoride (BF) is a diatomic molecule with 10 valence electrons, isoelectronic to carbon monoxide (CO). Unlike CO, which is a stable molecule at room temperature and readily serves as both a bridging and terminal ligand to transition metals, BF is unstable below 1800°C in the gas phase, and its coordination chemistry is substantially limited. Here, we report the isolation of the iron complex Fe(BF)(CO)2(CNArTripp2)2 [ArTripp2, 2,6-(2,4,6-(i-Pr)3C6H2]2C6H3; i-Pr, iso-propyl], featuring a terminal BF ligand. Single-crystal x-ray diffraction as well as nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, and Mössbauer spectroscopic studies on Fe(BF)(CO)2(CNArTripp2)2 and the isoelectronic dinitrogen (N2) and CO complexes Fe(N2)(CO)2(CNArTripp2)2 and Fe(CO)3(CNArTripp2)2 demonstrate that the terminal BF ligand possesses particularly strong -donor and -acceptor properties. Density functional theory and electron-density topology calculations support this conclusion.
      Keywords: Chemistry
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.aaw6102
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • A molecular perovskite solid solution with piezoelectricity stronger than
           lead zirconate titanate
    • Authors: Liao, W.-Q; Zhao, D, Tang, Y.-Y, Zhang, Y, Li, P.-F, Shi, P.-P, Chen, X.-G, You, Y.-M, Xiong, R.-G.
      Pages: 1206 - 1210
      Abstract: Piezoelectric materials produce electricity when strained, making them ideal for different types of sensing applications. The most effective piezoelectric materials are ceramic solid solutions in which the piezoelectric effect is optimized at what are termed morphotropic phase boundaries (MPBs). Ceramics are not ideal for a variety of applications owing to some of their mechanical properties. We synthesized piezoelectric materials from a molecular perovskite (TMFM)x(TMCM)1–xCdCl3 solid solution (TMFM, trimethylfluoromethyl ammonium; TMCM, trimethylchloromethyl ammonium, 0 ≤ x ≤ 1), in which the MPB exists between monoclinic and hexagonal phases. We found a composition for which the piezoelectric coefficient d33 is ~1540 picocoulombs per newton, comparable to high-performance piezoelectric ceramics. The material has potential applications for wearable piezoelectric devices.
      Keywords: Chemistry, Materials Science
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.aav3057
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Males as somatic investment in a parthenogenetic nematode
    • Authors: Grosmaire, M; Launay, C, Siegwald, M, Brugiere, T, Estrada-Virrueta, L, Berger, D, Burny, C, Modolo, L, Blaxter, M, Meister, P, Felix, M.-A, Gouyon, P.-H, Delattre, M.
      Pages: 1210 - 1213
      Abstract: We report the reproductive strategy of the nematode Mesorhabditis belari. This species produces only 9% males, whose sperm is necessary to fertilize and activate the eggs. However, most of the fertilized eggs develop without using the sperm DNA and produce female individuals. Only in 9% of eggs is the male DNA utilized, producing sons. We found that mixing of parental genomes only gives rise to males because the Y-bearing sperm of males are much more competent than the X-bearing sperm for penetrating the eggs. In this previously unrecognized strategy, asexual females produce few sexual males whose genes never reenter the female pool. Here, production of males is of interest only if sons are more likely to mate with their sisters. Using game theory, we show that in this context, the production of 9% males by M. belari females is an evolutionary stable strategy.
      Keywords: Evolution, Genetics
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.aau0099
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Herbivores as drivers of negative density dependence in tropical forest
           saplings
    • Authors: Forrister, D. L; Endara, M.-J, Younkin, G. C, Coley, P. D, Kursar, T. A.
      Pages: 1213 - 1216
      Abstract: Ecological theory predicts that the high local diversity observed in tropical forests is maintained by negative density–dependent interactions within and between closely related plant species. By using long-term data on tree growth and survival for coexisting Inga (Fabaceae, Mimosoideae) congeners, we tested two mechanisms thought to underlie negative density dependence (NDD): competition for resources and attack by herbivores. We quantified the similarity of neighbors in terms of key ecological traits that mediate these interactions, as well as the similarity of herbivore communities. We show that phytochemical similarity and shared herbivore communities are associated with decreased growth and survival at the sapling stage, a key bottleneck in the life cycle of tropical trees. None of the traits associated with resource acquisition affect plant performance, indicating that competition between neighbors may not shape local tree diversity. These results suggest that herbivore pressure is the primary mechanism driving NDD at the sapling stage.
      Keywords: Ecology
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.aau9460
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Histone demethylase KDM6A directly senses oxygen to control chromatin and
           cell fate
    • Authors: Chakraborty, A. A; Laukka, T, Myllykoski, M, Ringel, A. E, Booker, M. A, Tolstorukov, M. Y, Meng, Y. J, Meier, S. R, Jennings, R. B, Creech, A. L, Herbert, Z. T, McBrayer, S. K, Olenchock, B. A, Jaffe, J. D, Haigis, M. C, Beroukhim, R, Signoretti, S, Koivunen, P, Kaelin, W. G.
      Pages: 1217 - 1222
      Abstract: Oxygen sensing is central to metazoan biology and has implications for human disease. Mammalian cells express multiple oxygen-dependent enzymes called 2-oxoglutarate (OG)-dependent dioxygenases (2-OGDDs), but they vary in their oxygen affinities and hence their ability to sense oxygen. The 2-OGDD histone demethylases control histone methylation. Hypoxia increases histone methylation, but whether this reflects direct effects on histone demethylases or indirect effects caused by the hypoxic induction of the HIF (hypoxia-inducible factor) transcription factor or the 2-OG antagonist 2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG) is unclear. Here, we report that hypoxia promotes histone methylation in a HIF- and 2-HG–independent manner. We found that the H3K27 histone demethylase KDM6A/UTX, but not its paralog KDM6B, is oxygen sensitive. KDM6A loss, like hypoxia, prevented H3K27 demethylation and blocked cellular differentiation. Restoring H3K27 methylation homeostasis in hypoxic cells reversed these effects. Thus, oxygen directly affects chromatin regulators to control cell fate.
      Keywords: Molecular Biology
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.aaw1026
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Hypoxia induces rapid changes to histone methylation and reprograms
           chromatin
    • Authors: Batie, M; Frost, J, Frost, M, Wilson, J. W, Schofield, P, Rocha, S.
      Pages: 1222 - 1226
      Abstract: Oxygen is essential for the life of most multicellular organisms. Cells possess enzymes called molecular dioxygenases that depend on oxygen for activity. A subclass of molecular dioxygenases is the histone demethylase enzymes, which are characterized by the presence of a Jumanji-C (JmjC) domain. Hypoxia can alter chromatin, but whether this is a direct effect on JmjC-histone demethylases or due to other mechanisms is unknown. Here, we report that hypoxia induces a rapid and hypoxia-inducible factor–independent induction of histone methylation in a range of human cultured cells. Genomic locations of histone-3 lysine-4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) and H3K36me3 after a brief exposure of cultured cells to hypoxia predict the cell’s transcriptional response several hours later. We show that inactivation of one of the JmjC-containing enzymes, lysine demethylase 5A (KDM5A), mimics hypoxia-induced cellular responses. These results demonstrate that oxygen sensing by chromatin occurs via JmjC-histone demethylase inhibition.
      Keywords: Molecular Biology
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.aau5870
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • RIT1 oncoproteins escape LZTR1-mediated proteolysis
    • Authors: Castel, P; Cheng, A, Cuevas-Navarro, A, Everman, D. B, Papageorge, A. G, Simanshu, D. K, Tankka, A, Galeas, J, Urisman, A, McCormick, F.
      Pages: 1226 - 1230
      Abstract: RIT1 oncoproteins have emerged as an etiologic factor in Noonan syndrome and cancer. Despite the resemblance of RIT1 to other members of the Ras small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases), mutations affecting RIT1 are not found in the classic hotspots but rather in a region near the switch II domain of the protein. We used an isogenic germline knock-in mouse model to study the effects of RIT1 mutation at the organismal level, which resulted in a phenotype resembling Noonan syndrome. By mass spectrometry, we detected a RIT1 interactor, leucine zipper–like transcription regulator 1 (LZTR1), that acts as an adaptor for protein degradation. Pathogenic mutations affecting either RIT1 or LZTR1 resulted in incomplete degradation of RIT1. This led to RIT1 accumulation and dysregulated growth factor signaling responses. Our results highlight a mechanism of pathogenesis that relies on impaired protein degradation of the Ras GTPase RIT1.
      Keywords: Cell Biology, Genetics
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.aav1444
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • The genomic history of the Iberian Peninsula over the past 8000 years
    • Authors: Olalde, I; Mallick, S, Patterson, N, Rohland, N, Villalba-Mouco, V, Silva, M, Dulias, K, Edwards, C. J, Gandini, F, Pala, M, Soares, P, Ferrando-Bernal, M, Adamski, N, Broomandkhoshbacht, N, Cheronet, O, Culleton, B. J, Fernandes, D, Lawson, A. M, Mah, M, Oppenheimer, J, Stewardson, K, Zhang, Z, Jimenez Arenas, J. M, Toro Moyano, I. J, Salazar-Garcia, D. C, Castanyer, P, Santos, M, Tremoleda, J, Lozano, M, Garcia Borja, P, Fernandez-Eraso, J, Mujika-Alustiza, J. A, Barroso, C, Bermudez, F. J, Viguera Minguez, E, Burch, J, Coromina, N, Vivo, D, Cebria, A, Fullola, J. M, Garcia-Puchol, O, Morales, J. I, Oms, F. X, Majo, T, Verges, J. M, Diaz-Carvajal, A, Ollich-Castanyer, I, Lopez-Cachero, F. J, Silva, A. M, Alonso-Fernandez, C, Delibes de Castro, G, Jimenez Echevarria, J, Moreno-Marquez, A, Pascual Berlanga, G, Ramos-Garcia, P, Ramos-Munoz, J, Vijande Vila, E, Aguilella Arzo, G, Esparza Arroyo, A, Lillios, K. T, Mack, J, Velasco-Vazquez, J, Waterman, A, Benitez de Lugo Enrich, L, Benito Sanchez, M, Agusti, B, Codina, F, de Prado, G, Estalrrich, A, Fernandez Flores, A, Finlayson, C, Finlayson, G, Finlayson, S, Giles-Guzman, F, Rosas, A, Barciela Gonzalez, V, Garcia Atienzar, G, Hernandez Perez, M. S, Llanos, A, Carrion Marco, Y, Collado Beneyto, I, Lopez-Serrano, D, Sanz Tormo, M, Valera, A. C, Blasco, C, Liesau, C, Rios, P, Daura, J, de Pedro Micho, M. J, Diez-Castillo, A. A, Flores Fernandez, R, Frances Farre, J, Garrido-Pena, R, Goncalves, V. S, Guerra-Doce, E, Herrero-Corral, A. M, Juan-Cabanilles, J, Lopez-Reyes, D, McClure, S. B, Merino Perez, M, Oliver Foix, A, Sanz Borras, M, Sousa, A. C, Vidal Encinas, J. M, Kennett, D. J, Richards, M. B, Werner Alt, K, Haak, W, Pinhasi, R, Lalueza-Fox, C, Reich, D.
      Pages: 1230 - 1234
      Abstract: We assembled genome-wide data from 271 ancient Iberians, of whom 176 are from the largely unsampled period after 2000 BCE, thereby providing a high-resolution time transect of the Iberian Peninsula. We document high genetic substructure between northwestern and southeastern hunter-gatherers before the spread of farming. We reveal sporadic contacts between Iberia and North Africa by ~2500 BCE and, by ~2000 BCE, the replacement of 40% of Iberia’s ancestry and nearly 100% of its Y-chromosomes by people with Steppe ancestry. We show that, in the Iron Age, Steppe ancestry had spread not only into Indo-European–speaking regions but also into non-Indo-European–speaking ones, and we reveal that present-day Basques are best described as a typical Iron Age population without the admixture events that later affected the rest of Iberia. Additionally, we document how, beginning at least in the Roman period, the ancestry of the peninsula was transformed by gene flow from North Africa and the eastern Mediterranean.
      Keywords: Anthropology, Genetics
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.aav4040
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • New Products
    • Pages: 1236 - 1236
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6432.1236
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
  • Preparing for Brexit
    • Authors: Suggitt A.
      Pages: 1246 - 1246
      PubDate: 2019-03-14T10:40:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1126/science.363.6432.1246
      Issue No: Vol. 363, No. 6432 (2019)
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
Home (Search)
Subjects A-Z
Publishers A-Z
Customise
APIs
Your IP address: 52.91.221.160
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-