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JAMA Internal Medicine
Journal Prestige (SJR): 8.032
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 281  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 2168-6106 - ISSN (Online) 2168-6114
Published by American Medical Association Homepage  [14 journals]
  • September 2018 Issue Highlights
    • Pages: 1149 - 1151
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.5229
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • JAMA Internal Medicine
    • Pages: 1152 - 1152
      Abstract: Mission Statement: To promote the art and science of medicine and the betterment of human health by publishing manuscripts of interest and relevance to internists practicing as generalists or as medical subspecialists.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2017.5230
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Implementing Opioid Agonist Treatment in Correctional Facilities
    • Authors: Fiscella K; Wakeman SE, Beletsky L.
      Pages: 1153 - 1154
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses implementation challenges and potential outcomes of providing opioid agonist treatment to incarcerated persons with opioid use disorder.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.3504
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Devolution and Devaluation of Fecal Leukocyte Testing
    • Authors: Gupta A; Johnson DH, Agrawal D.
      Pages: 1155 - 1156
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses the history of fecal leukocyte testing over the past 100 years and recommends against its continued use.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.3150
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Is the Over-the-Counter Availability of Human Insulin in the United States
           Good or Bad'
    • Authors: Goldstein JN; McCrary M, Lipska KJ.
      Pages: 1157 - 1158
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses 2 case report vignettes—and the laws that they inspired—to argue the pros and cons of over-the-counter insulin sales.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.3332
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Osteoporosis Screening—2 Steps May Be Too Much for Women Younger
           Than 65 Years
    • Authors: Gourlay ML.
      Pages: 1159 - 1160
      Abstract: The 2018 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) osteoporosis screening statement includes separate B recommendations (moderate certainty of moderate net benefit) for bone density screening in women 65 years or older and in postmenopausal women younger than 65 years who are at increased risk of osteoporosis, as determined by a formal clinical risk assessment tool. The B recommendation for routine osteoporosis screening in all women 65 years or older has been an enduring and evidence-based feature of the USPSTF recommendations since 2002. Unfortunately, the B recommendation for a 2-step strategy of risk-factor assessment before bone-density testing in postmenopausal women younger than 65 years does not match existing evidence. Instead, the evidence for 2-step osteoporosis screening in women younger than 65 years would be better characterized by an I statement; ie, the evidence is insufficient to determine the balance between benefits and harms.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.2776
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Introducing JAMA Internal Medicine Patient Pages
    • Authors: Incze MA; Grady D, Redberg RF.
      Pages: 1161 - 1162
      Abstract: In this issue of JAMA Internal Medicine, we are proud to launch our Patient Page section. This feature, written for the public and made available online free of charge, is designed to distill high-quality evidence and make it more accessible for patient education and help guide patient decisions. While patient-directed educational materials have long been available—JAMA Network Journals have produced hundreds of them over the past 20 years—we seek to add to existing resources by incorporating updated evidence to help guide patients, in alliance with their health care providers, to make more informed everyday and common decisions about their health. We hope that many of the known benefits of using decision aids to foster conversations and shared decision making will ensue from these pages, including increased patient satisfaction and a more judicious use of care.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.3738
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Weeping Higan Cherry Tree, Central Park, New York City
    • Pages: 1162 - 1162
      Abstract: Courtesy of: Manfred Hauben, MD, MPH, Pfizer, Worldwide Safety Strategy, 235 E 42nd St, New York, NY 10017
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.3810
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Screening for Cardiovascular Disease Risk With Electrocardiography
    • Authors: Bhatia R; Dorian P.
      Pages: 1163 - 1164
      Abstract: In 1968, Wilson and Jungner outlined the 10 key principles for an ideal screening program. To paraphrase this classic article, a screening program should (1) focus on a common, treatable medical condition; (2) use a suitable, cost-effective test that can accurately detect the condition; and (3) lead to an intervention that can reduce complications of the condition without causing adverse effects by applying the intervention to individuals who will not benefit. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a common global problem with effective interventions to mitigate life-threatening complications, particularly in symptomatic patients. However, in asymptomatic patients, interventions, such as revascularization, do not prevent complications. Therefore, our traditional screening tools, namely resting and exercise electrocardiography (ECG), fail to meet the key principles Wilson and Jungner described years ago and should force clinicians to ask hard questions about whether asymptomatic patients should ever be screened for CVD.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.2773
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Costs and Mortality for Transitional Care Management Services After
           Discharge of Medicare Beneficiaries
    • Authors: Bindman AB; Cox DF.
      Pages: 1165 - 1171
      Abstract: This cohort study investigates whether receipt of transitional care management services is associated with adjusted total Medicare costs and mortality among Medicare beneficiaries.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.2572
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Transitional Care Management Services for Medicare Beneficiaries
    • Authors: Huckfeldt P; Neprash H, Nuckols T.
      Pages: 1171 - 1173
      Abstract: “Come back and see us soon” is not what hospital staff say to patients these days. With policy makers and insurance payers taking aim at the high readmission rates of recently discharged patients, hospitals and clinicians have increasing financial incentives to manage the transition of care for patients from inpatient medical facilities back to the community. Successful patient interventions typically include multiple components, such as readmission risk assessments, discharge planning, medication reconciliation, follow-up appointment scheduling, patient education, coaching by dedicated clinicians, home health visits, and prompt follow-up visits with outpatient physicians. A recent meta-analysis of 50 multicomponent, quality improvement interventions found that readmissions fell by a mean of 12.1% among patients with heart failure and 6.3% among older adults.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.2545
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Effectiveness of a Mailed Colorectal Cancer Screening Outreach Program in
           Community Health Clinics
    • Authors: Coronado GD; Petrik AF, Vollmer WM, et al.
      Pages: 1174 - 1181
      Abstract: This cluster randomized clinical trial examines the effectiveness of implementing an electronic health record-embedded mailed fecal immunochemical test outreach program vs usual care for colorectal cancer screening among patients at community health centers.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.3629
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Promoting FIT Colorectal Cancer Screening
    • Authors: Redberg RF.
      Pages: 1181 - 1181
      Abstract: Rates of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening are low, particularly among the underserved. Of the several available and equally effective CRC screening options, fecal-based testing, such as fecal immunochemical testing (FIT) is the most convenient because it does not require a clinical visit, taking time off from work, or being escorted back and forth from the procedure owing to the widespread use of anesthesia for colonoscopy. In this STOP CRC project the investigators randomized federally qualified health clinics to practice improvement efforts or usual care. For the practice improvement clinics, tools were built into the electronic medical record to identify eligible patients and mail them materials including the actual FIT tests. In the lagged data (which allowed enough time for the clinics to implement the new processes), the rates of FIT screening were 15.9% for usual care compared with 21.6% in the intervention clinics. The number needed to mail to achieve a completed FIT was 4.8 overall, and 4.0 in clinics that mailed a FIT reminder. Most (59%) of those with positive FIT completed a colonoscopy. The success of this intervention should encourage health centers to engage clinicians and patients to increase CRC screening efforts.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.3654
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Approach to Enhance Medication Taking for Patients With Hyperlipidemia,
           Hypertension, and Diabetes
    • Authors: Choudhry NK; Isaac T, Lauffenburger JC, et al.
      Pages: 1182 - 1189
      Abstract: This cluster randomized clinical trial evaluates the effect of a remotely delivered multicomponent behaviorally tailored intervention vs usual care on adherence to medications for hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes in patients who are nonadherent to prescribed medications.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.3189
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Association Between Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitors and Lower
           Extremity Amputation
    • Authors: Chang H; Singh S, Mansour O, et al.
      Pages: 1190 - 1198
      Abstract: This population-based cohort study of commercially insured patients examines the association between use of oral medication for type 2 diabetes and lower extremity amputation, peripheral arterial disease, critical limb ischemia, osteomyelitis, and ulcer.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.3034
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitors and the Risk of Amputation
    • Authors: Fralick M; Patorno E, Fischer MA.
      Pages: 1199 - 1200
      Abstract: Sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors were approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in 2013 for patients with type 2 diabetes. They lower plasma glucose levels by inhibiting reabsorption at the proximal tubule and lowering the renal threshold for glucose excretion. Canagliflozin was the first SGLT-2 inhibitor to be approved in the United States, followed by dapagliflozin and empagliflozin in 2014 and ertugliflozin in 2017. Unlike most medications for diabetes, SGLT-2 inhibitors reduce the risk of major cardiovascular events and hospitalization for heart failure (empagliflozin and canagliflozin) and all-cause mortality (empagliflozin). There are, however, important risks associated with the use of SGLT-2 inhibitors, including diabetic ketoacidosis, urogenital infection, fracture (with canagliflozin), and, potentially, amputation.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.3025
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Quality and Quantity of Sleep and Factors Associated With Sleep
           Disturbance in Hospitalized Patients
    • Authors: Wesselius HM; van den Ende ES, Alsma J, et al.
      Pages: 1201 - 1208
      Abstract: This cross-sectional study assesses the quantity and quality of sleep and the factors associated with sleep disturbances in hospitalized patients in the Netherlands.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.2669
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Minimizing Sleep Disruption for Hospitalized Patients
    • Authors: Growdon ME; Inouye SK.
      Pages: 1208 - 1209
      Abstract: “Doctor, I had a horrible time sleeping last night.”
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.2679
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Association of Endometrial Cancer With Postmenopausal Bleeding
    • Authors: Clarke MA; Long BJ, Del Mar Morillo A, et al.
      Pages: 1210 - 1222
      Abstract: This systematic review and meta-analysis assesses the prevalence of postmenopausal bleeding among women with endometrial cancer and the risk of endometrial cancer in women with postmenopausal bleeding.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.2820
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Opportunities for Early Detection of Endometrial Cancer in Women With
           Postmenopausal Bleeding
    • Authors: Matteson KA; Robison K, Jacoby VL.
      Pages: 1222 - 1223
      Abstract: Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy and the fourth most common cancer among women in the United States. In 2018, there will be an estimated 63 230 women diagnosed with endometrial cancer. Currently, there is no effective endometrial cancer screening strategy for women who are asymptomatic. Fortunately, endometrial cancer is typically diagnosed in an early stage; 67% of women present with stage I or II disease confined to the uterus, at which point there is a 95% 5-year survival.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.2819
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Association of Statin Exposure With Histologically Confirmed Idiopathic
           Inflammatory Myositis
    • Authors: Caughey GE; Gabb GM, Ronson S, et al.
      Pages: 1224 - 1229
      Abstract: This case-control study uses data from 2 population-based databases to examine the association between current exposure to statin medications and histologically confirmed idiopathic inflammatory myositis in Australian adults.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.2859
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Statin-Associated Myopathy—An Elusive Clinical Problem
    • Authors: Curfman G.
      Pages: 1230 - 1230
      Abstract: Less is More
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.3128
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Evaluation of the Pooled Cohort Risk Equations for Cardiovascular Risk
           Prediction
    • Authors: Mora S; Wenger NK, Cook NR, et al.
      Pages: 1231 - 1240
      Abstract: This study evaluates the pooled cohort equation’s accuracy for predicting 10-year risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease among participants in the Women’s Health Initiative.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.2875
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Prediction of Cardiovascular Risk
    • Authors: Curfman GD.
      Pages: 1240 - 1241
      Abstract: Clinical guidelines for initiation of statin therapy and antihypertensive therapy rely in part on the calculation of a patient’s 10-year risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). The risk calculation is intended to allow more precise targeting of therapy to higher-risk patients who are more likely to benefit.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.3131
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Donut Falls, Wasatch National Forest, Utah
    • Pages: 1241 - 1241
      Abstract: Courtesy of: David E. Winchester, MD, MS, University of Florida College of Medicine, 1600 SW Archer Rd, PO Box 100277, Gainesville, FL 32610-0277
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.3822
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Mortality Among Unsheltered Homeless Adults in Boston, Massachusetts,
           2000-2009
    • Authors: Roncarati JS; Baggett TP, O’Connell JJ, et al.
      Pages: 1242 - 1248
      Abstract: This cohort study investigates all-cause and cause-specific mortality and age-stratified incident rate ratios among unsheltered homeless adults in Boston, Massachusetts, 2000-2009, compared with the entire Massachusetts population and also with a cohort of sheltered homeless adults in Boston.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.2924
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Death Among the Unsheltered Homeless
    • Authors: Incze M; Katz MH.
      Pages: 1248 - 1249
      Abstract: In early 2018, a United Nations special rapporteur on adequate housing made headlines during an unofficial visit to San Francisco and Oakland, California, by comparing the living conditions for those people residing on the streets of these cities with what she had observed in Mumbai, India, and by calling this state of affairs a violation of international human rights law. Indeed, it is hard to explain how, in one of the wealthiest regions of the world at a time of human history when the overall standard of living has never been higher, we have encampments of people living without toilets, sinks, showers, refrigerators, or cooking facilities.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.2919
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Lessons From the Canadian Experience With Single-Payer Health Insurance
    • Authors: Ivers N; Brown AD, Detsky AS.
      Pages: 1250 - 1255
      Abstract: This Special Communication explores the strengths, challenges, and lessons learned following the introduction of the Canadian single-payer health care system in the late 1960s, comparing this system with health care approaches in other countries, including the United States.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.3568
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Drawing Lessons From Canada’s Experience With Single-Payer Health
           Insurance
    • Authors: White J.
      Pages: 1255 - 1257
      Abstract: In this issue of JAMA Internal Medicine, Ivers et al discuss the course of Canada’s “single-payer” (or “Medicare for all”) health insurance system over the last 50 years. The article summarizes the reasons why the Canadian system can seem superior to the insurance system in the United States. Awareness of those differences is one reason why Canadians are especially wary of change; it takes little imagination for them to envision the universal coverage and other features that they could lose. The article also highlights the ways in which the Canadian system is by no means ideal—especially public concerns about constrained access to some medical care and the lack of universal coverage for pharmaceuticals. In the mid-1990s, worries about delayed access to care increased substantially in Canada and were accompanied by decreasing public satisfaction with the system.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.3707
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Antibiotic Discretion in the Treatment of Acute Uncomplicated
           Diverticulitis
    • Authors: Maraj B; Wray CM.
      Pages: 1258 - 1259
      Abstract: This Teachable Moment describes the case of a marginally housed man with a history of alcohol use disorder and essential hypertension who was seen for abdominal pain and was diagnosed with uncomplicated diverticulitis, prescribed antibiotics, and subsequently was diagnosed with Clostridium difficile.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.3507
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • HLA-B*5801 Testing to Prevent Allopurinol Hypersensitivity Syndrome
    • Authors: Quach C; Galen BT.
      Pages: 1260 - 1261
      Abstract: This Teachable Moment describes the case of a 77-year-old man with gout and hypertension who presented with allopurinol-associated adverse effects and who tested positive for the HLA-B*5801 allele.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.3556
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Calculating Health Care Waste in Washington State
    • Authors: Brown DL; Clement F.
      Pages: 1262 - 1263
      Abstract: This review summarizes a report by the Washington Health Alliance documenting the frequency of 47 low-value care practices in Washington state.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.3516
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Isorhythmic Atrioventricular Dissociation and the Purloined P Wave After
           TAVR
    • Authors: Eng M; Amsterdam E, Glassy MS.
      Pages: 1264 - 1265
      Abstract: This case report describes new left bundle branch block and disappearance of the P wave in a patient undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR).
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.2868
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Antibiotic Prescribing in US Retail Clinics, Urgent Care Centers, EDs, and
           Traditional Medical Offices
    • Authors: Palms DL; Hicks LA, Bartoces M, et al.
      Pages: 1267 - 1269
      Abstract: This cohort study compares antibiotic prescribing in 2014 among retail clinics, urgent care centers, emergency departments, and traditional medical offices in the United States.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.1632
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Overprescription in Urgent Care Clinics—The Fast and the Spurious
    • Authors: Incze MA; Redberg RF, Katz MH.
      Pages: 1269 - 1270
      Abstract: Despite clear guidelines and extensive educational campaigns aimed at reducing overprescribing of antibiotics, the problem remains. At least 30% of antibiotic prescriptions dispensed in the outpatient setting—80 million prescriptions per year in the United States—are given without an appropriate indication. Viral upper respiratory tract infections represent a frequent diagnosis for this low-value care.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.1628
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Association Between Offering Limited LVEF Echocardiograms and Overall Use
           of Echocardiography
    • Authors: Sandhu AT; Parizo J, Moradi-Ragheb N, et al.
      Pages: 1270 - 1272
      Abstract: This study examines the use of a limited transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) that evaluates only the left ventricle and its association with overall use of TTE.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.3317
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Use of Limited Transthoracic Echocardiogram
    • Authors: Katz MH.
      Pages: 1272 - 1272
      Abstract: Wouldn’t a limited transthoracic echocardiogram always provide less information than a full study' After all, a full echocardiogram will give you detailed measurements of the valves and all 4 chambers, not just limited views of the left ventricle. However, frequently, the only reason an echocardiogram is ordered is for determination of ejection fraction, such as for patients with congestive heart failure or patients undergoing cardiotoxic chemotherapy. For these patients, there is no reason to detain them or tie up the echo laboratory with a lot of irrelevant valvular measurements. And in safety net systems like the Veterans Affairs Hospital where Sandhu and colleagues describe the association between offering limited left ventricle echocardiograms and overall use of echocardiography, resources are finite. By reducing the time required to conduct a test, more patients can have the test for the same resources. Although less direct, even for insured populations, decreasing the cost and time it takes for a test by performing a more limited study can be beneficial. As costs of health care increase to pay for lower value tests, fewer people can afford insurance, businesses become less profitable because of the costs of providing health insurance, and employee wages stagnate because of health insurance costs.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.3483
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Rates of Overtreatment and Treatment-Related Adverse Effects in
           Subsegmental Pulmonary Embolism
    • Authors: Raslan IA; Chong J, Gallix B, et al.
      Pages: 1272 - 1274
      Abstract: This cohort study examines how often clinicians opt for clinical surveillance over therapeutic anticoagulation for patients with subsegmental pulmonary embolisms.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.2971
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Are We Overtreating Isolated Subsegmental Pulmonary Embolism'
    • Authors: Moores LK.
      Pages: 1274 - 1275
      Abstract: Less is More
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.2970
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Assessment of Patterns of Potentially Unsafe Use of Zolpidem Among Adults
    • Authors: Moore TJ; Mattison DR.
      Pages: 1275 - 1277
      Abstract: This study evaluates data from the US Medical Expenditure Panel Survey to determine the extent of unsafe use of zolpidem.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.3031
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Cost-effectiveness of Recommendations for the Recombinant Adjuvanted
           Zoster Subunit Vaccine
    • Authors: Le P; Rothberg MB.
      Pages: 1277 - 1278
      Abstract: This cost-effectiveness study evaluates use of the recombinant adjuvanted zoster subunit vaccine among patients 50 years and older.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.3200
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Pragmatism in Recently Published Randomized Clinical Trials
    • Authors: Janiaud P; Dal-Ré R, Ioannidis JA.
      Pages: 1278 - 1280
      Abstract: This database study evaluates the labeling, justifications, and limitations of pragmatic randomized clinical trials published in 2016.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.3321
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Opioid Death Rate Acceleration in Jurisdictions Legalizing Marijuana Use
    • Authors: Bleyer A; Barnes B.
      Pages: 1280 - 1281
      Abstract: To the Editor Two reports published in a recent issue of JAMA Internal Medicine describe 6% to 9% lower opioid prescribing rates for Medicare and Medicaid patients in states that legalized marijuana compared with states that have not. As cautioned in the accompanying editorial, however, “cannabis policy has raced ahead of cannabis science,” and more research is necessary to determine if marijuana availability ameliorates opioid mortality (marijuana-protection hypothesis).
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.3888
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Opioid Death Rate Acceleration in Jurisdictions Legalizing Marijuana
           Use—Reply
    • Authors: Bradford AC; Abraham A, Bagwell Adams G.
      Pages: 1281 - 1282
      Abstract: In Reply Bleyer and Barnes are right to call attention to the need for further investigation on the association of cannabis legalization to opioid deaths—a critical area that must be researched. In their response to our recently published article, and an article by Wen and Hockenberry, Bleyer and Barnes compared an aggregated opioid death rate for 19 states and the District of Columbia that are identified as having some form of legalized cannabis with the rate in 24 states that have no such laws. In contrast to our results, and the existing body of literature, the authors found that by December 2016, the opioid death rate had increased by 52% in states with any form of legalized cannabis compared with states with no cannabis law.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.3891
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Opioid Death Rate Acceleration in Jurisdictions Legalizing Marijuana
           Use—Reply
    • Authors: Hockenberry JM; Wen H.
      Pages: 1282 - 1282
      Abstract: In Reply Both our study and that of Bradford and colleagues have been called into question by the analysis of Bleyer and Barnes. However, their statistical treatment of states with regard to states’ policies is misleading. Rather than use the longitudinal data at their disposal to examine the changes in states’ cannabis policies over the 2010-2016 period and evaluate whether these changes affected opioid outcomes, Bleyer and Barnes assigned states a cannabis policy for the entire period based on the policy in effect in the state as of 2016. For example, in their analysis, Florida was considered as having a cannabidiol extract law from 2010 through 2016, even though the law was not in place until August 2016. Thus in their study, opioid deaths in Florida in 2010 are attributed to the 2016 law change.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.3894
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Toenail Examination Reveals Unmet Care Needs
    • Authors: Perry L.
      Pages: 1283 - 1283
      Abstract: To the Editor One week after the publication of an article by Orkaby and Schwartz on toenails as the functional hemoglobin A1c, I saw a clinic patient who had been doing well at our previous visits. She was in her 80s but had only a few chronic conditions, including type 2 diabetes, that were well controlled with oral medications only. She continued to live in her own home in the community; her grandson had moved in with her several years ago after he lost his job and fell on hard times. The arrangement worked well for both of them. She was happy to keep an eye on him—previously he had been involved with a “rough crowd,” as she put it, and having him close meant that she felt he was avoiding his previous risky activities. He helped her around the house with chores, but she still remained largely functionally independent and managed her own medications.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.4288
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Toenail Examination Reveals Unmet Care Needs—Reply
    • Authors: Schwartz A; Orkaby A.
      Pages: 1283 - 1283
      Abstract: In Reply We thank Dr Perry for sharing the tragic story about the recent death of her patient’s grandson. The story was elicited after Dr Perry noticed the patient's long toenails; the grandson had been the one to help with the intimate activity of toenail care.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.4285
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • Missing Author Initial in Byline
    • Pages: 1283 - 1283
      Abstract: In the article titled “Calculating Health Care Waste in Washington State: First, Do No Harm,” published online August 6, 2018, in JAMA Internal Medicine, the middle initial of the first author was inadvertently omitted from the byline. The first author’s full name should have appeared as “David L. Brown, MD.” This article has been corrected online.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.5060
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
  • I Have a Cold—What Do I Need to Know'
    • Authors: Incze M; Grady D, Gupta A.
      Pages: 1288 - 1288
      Abstract: This Patient Page provides information on the common cold—controlling the spread, managing the symptoms, and avoiding treatment with antibiotics.
      PubDate: Sat, 01 Sep 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.2621
      Issue No: Vol. 178, No. 9 (2018)
       
 
 
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