Journal Cover
JAMA Internal Medicine
Journal Prestige (SJR): 8.032
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 319  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 2168-6106 - ISSN (Online) 2168-6114
Published by American Medical Association Homepage  [14 journals]
  • September 2019 Issue Highlights
    • Pages: 1157 - 1159
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.5511
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • JAMA Internal Medicine
    • Pages: 1160 - 1160
      Abstract: Mission Statement: To promote the art and science of medicine and the betterment of human health by publishing manuscripts of interest and relevance to internists practicing as generalists or as medical subspecialists.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.5512
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • Preclinical Alzheimer Disease—Early Diagnosis or Overdiagnosis'
    • Authors: Langa KM; Burke JF.
      Pages: 1161 - 1162
      Abstract: This Viewpoint argues that the shift from treating patients with symptomatic Alzheimer disease to treating those with preclinical disease carries the risk of overdiagnosis.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.2629
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • The Ketogenic Diet for Obesity and Diabetes
    • Authors: Joshi S; Ostfeld RJ, McMacken M.
      Pages: 1163 - 1164
      Abstract: This Viewpoint assesses the risks and benefits associated with the ketogenic diet for treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.2633
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • Ending AIDS in the United States—If Not Now, When'
    • Authors: Havlir DV; Buchbinder SP.
      Pages: 1165 - 1166
      Abstract: This Editorial discusses the importance of quickly implementing the latest US Preventive Services Task Force recommendations for HIV screening and preexposure prophylaxis.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.1577
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • Regression to the Mean in the Medicare Hospital Readmissions Reduction
           Program
    • Authors: Joshi S; Nuckols T, Escarce J, et al.
      Pages: 1167 - 1173
      Abstract: This analysis quantifies the contribution of regression to the mean to declining readmission rates at hospitals initially penalized under the Medicare Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.1004
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • The Medical Hospital Readmission Reduction Program
    • Authors: Ody C; Cutler D.
      Pages: 1174 - 1175
      Abstract: One of the largest experiments in health care payments in recent years is the Hospital Readmission Reduction Program (HRRP), a provision of the Affordable Care Act. Roughly 20% of Medicare admissions lead to a readmission within 30 days, and many readmissions are considered prima facie evidence of poor care. Historically, readmissions were a source of revenue for hospitals but a large cost for the Medicare program. The HRRP cut hospitals’ Medicare inpatient payments as a penalty for high readmission rates on targeted conditions.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.1003
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • Inpatient Echocardiography Use and Outcomes in Adult Patients With Acute
           Myocardial Infarction
    • Authors: Pack QR; Priya A, Lagu T, et al.
      Pages: 1176 - 1185
      Abstract: This cohort study uses a large multihospital database to evaluate the association between hospital rates of echocardiogram use and outcomes in adult patients with acute myocardial infarction.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.1051
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • Association of Opioid Overdose With Opioid Prescriptions to Family Members
    • Authors: Khan NF; Bateman BT, Landon JE, et al.
      Pages: 1186 - 1192
      Abstract: This case-control study uses more than 25 million insurance claims to assess whether individuals who did not receive an opioid prescription had greater odds of overdose when a opioid prescription was dispensed to a family member.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.1064
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • Association Between Electronic Cigarette Use and Smoking Reduction in
           France
    • Authors: Gomajee R; El-Khoury F, Goldberg M, et al.
      Pages: 1193 - 1200
      Abstract: This cohort study examines the association of the regular use of electronic cigarettes with the number of cigarettes smoked per day, smoking cessation among current smokers, and smoking relapse among former smokers in France.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.1483
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • Financial Implications of 12-Month Dispensing of Oral Contraceptive Pills
           in the VA
    • Authors: Judge-Golden CP; Smith KJ, Mor MK, et al.
      Pages: 1201 - 1208
      Abstract: This economic decision model estimates the financial and reproductive health implications for implementation of a 12-month option for dispensing oral contraceptive pills in the Veterans Affairs health care system.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.1678
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • Expanding Access to Short-Acting Hormonal Contraceptive Methods in the
           United States
    • Authors: Grossman D.
      Pages: 1209 - 1210
      Abstract: In this issue of JAMA Internal Medicine, the article by Judge-Golden et al provides further evidence that dispensing a larger supply of contraception is cost-effective. This economic decision model explored the financial implications for the Veteran Affairs (VA) health care system of offering beneficiaries 12 months of oral contraceptive pills (OCPs) in a single prescription. Across a range of sensitivity analyses, the authors found that the 12-month dispensing option was cost saving to the VA compared with the standard 3-month dispensing option, largely owing to the reduction in unintended pregnancy.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.1676
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • Care Cascades After Low-Value Preoperative Testing
    • Authors: Ganguli I; Lupo C, Mainor AJ, et al.
      Pages: 1211 - 1219
      Abstract: This cohort study reviews data from fee-for-service Medicare beneficiaries without known heart disease who underwent cataract surgery to compare care cascades (tests, treatments, visits, hospitalizations, a and new diagnoses) between those who received preoperative electrocardiograms and those who did not.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.1739
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • Diagnosis and Management of Primary Hyperparathyroidism Across the VA
           Health Care System
    • Authors: Alore EA; Suliburk JW, Ramsey DJ, et al.
      Pages: 1220 - 1227
      Abstract: This cohort study examines the appropriateness of diagnostic evaluation for primary hyperparathyroidism in patients with hypercalcemia and the use of parathyroidectomy for the treatment of primary hyperparathyroidism across the Veterans Affairs health care system.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.1747
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • Applying the Guidelines for Primary Hyperparathyroidism
    • Authors: Wentworth K; Shoback D.
      Pages: 1227 - 1229
      Abstract: When the National Institutes of Health convened the first workshop devoted to the diagnosis and management of primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT) in 1990, astute clinicians had already appreciated that the classic presentation of this disorder, established decades before as symptomatic and progressive, was no longer the typical face of the disease. Primary hyperparathyroidism was being diagnosed with increasing frequency in asymptomatic patients and those for whom reduced bone mass was the main clinical finding. Guidelines published in 1991 from that first National Institutes of Health conference outlined the diagnostic criteria and management recommendations for both symptomatic and asymptomatic pHPT and laid down a framework for proposing when surgery should be pursued in asymptomatic disease. Over the next 24 years, these recommendations were updated at least 3 times (in 2002, 2009, and 2014). At present, the indications for surgical intervention in patients with asymptomatic pHPT include age 50 years or less, serum calcium 1 mg/dL or more above the upper limit of normal, urinary calcium more than 400 mg/24 hours, estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m2, osteoporosis as measured by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry, and nephrolithiasis or nephrocalcinosis as measured by imaging studies. Admittedly, these indications are based largely on expert opinion rather than data from randomized trials, because few such studies have ever been conducted in patients with pHPT.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.1738
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • Identification of Women at High Risk of Advanced Breast Cancer During
           Routine Screening
    • Authors: Kerlikowske K; Sprague BL, Tosteson AA, et al.
      Pages: 1230 - 1239
      Abstract: This cohort study assesses strategies to identify women at high risk of advanced breast cancer to target patient-practitioner discussions about the need for supplemental imaging.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.1758
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • Advising Women About Screening After Dense Breast Notification
    • Authors: Richman IB; Busch SH.
      Pages: 1240 - 1241
      Abstract: Currently, 38 states have passed breast density notification laws. These laws vary by state, but generally require physicians to inform women when they are found to have dense breasts on mammography. Many state notifications also indicate that dense breasts can obscure abnormalities on a mammogram and are a risk factor for breast cancer. Some state laws specifically suggest a role for supplemental screening. More recently, the US Food and Drug Administration announced a proposed rule that would require all mammography reports in the United States to include such a notification. Under the proposed rule, all women would receive information about their own breast density as well as a notice encouraging them to discuss the findings with their physician. For women with dense breasts, the notification would also state, “Some patients with high breast density may need other imaging tests in addition to mammograms.” While well intentioned, these notifications strike many clinicians as blunt instruments. Breast density is only 1 aspect of breast cancer risk. Limiting discussions of supplemental screening to women with dense breasts may miss some high-risk women who do not have dense breasts, whereas many women with dense breasts may be at low risk overall. Could a more nuanced assessment of risk, beyond breast density, better identify women who are at high risk of a late-stage breast cancer diagnosis despite routine screening, and thus who might benefit from supplemental screening'
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.1737
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • Nabiximols for the Treatment of Cannabis Dependence
    • Authors: Lintzeris N; Bhardwaj A, Mills L, et al.
      Pages: 1242 - 1253
      Abstract: This randomized clinical trial examines the safety and efficacy of nabiximols, an oromucosal tetrahydrocannabinol-cannabidiol medication vs placebo, in the treatment of adults with cannabis dependence.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.1993
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • Adverse Events in Long-term Care Residents Returning From Hospital
    • Authors: Kapoor A; Field T, Handler S, et al.
      Pages: 1254 - 1261
      Abstract: This cohort study evaluates records of 555 residents of 32 New England nursing homes who returned to their nursing homes after hospitalization to measure the frequency, severity, and preventability of adverse events in the 45 days after hospitalization.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.2005
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • Association of Weight Loss Interventions With Changes in NAFLD Biomarkers
    • Authors: Koutoukidis DA; Astbury NM, Tudor KE, et al.
      Pages: 1262 - 1271
      Abstract: This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluates 22 randomized clinical trials including 2588 participants with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) who underwent interventions to determine whether these interventions were associated with changes in NAFLD biomarkers.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.2248
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • Treatment of Fatty Liver Disease
    • Authors: Adler E; Brandman D.
      Pages: 1272 - 1273
      Abstract: Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents a spectrum of diseases in which excess fat deposits in the liver (steatosis, NAFL) are separate from but can progress to inflammation and fibrosis (nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, NASH), fibrosis, and cirrhosis. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease has become a major public health issue, affecting about 25% of adults worldwide and two-thirds of adults with obesity. Hepatocellular carcinoma associated with NAFLD increased 10-fold between 2000 and 2010, and trends suggest that NAFLD will emerge as the leading cause of end-stage liver disease in the coming decades. Beyond liver disease, patients with NAFLD are at significant risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.2244
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • Coagulation Testing in Patients Taking Direct Oral Anticoagulants
    • Authors: Siddiq N; Nagalla S, Choi S.
      Pages: 1274 - 1275
      Abstract: This Teachable Moment examines the case of a man taking a direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC) who received a high international normalized ratio (INR) test result during a visit to the emergency department and suggests that INR is an unreliable measure of therapeutic anticoagulation in patients taking DOACs.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.1799
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • Selecting the Appropriate Patients for Proton Pump Inhibitor
           Discontinuation
    • Authors: Platt KD; Saini SD, Kurlander JE.
      Pages: 1276 - 1277
      Abstract: This Teachable Moment examines the case of a man in his 70s who presented to the emergency department 2 weeks after discontinuation of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) to caution against abrupt PPI discontinuation in patients with multiple risk factors for peptic ulcer disease.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.2382
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • Arrhythmogenic Syncope in a Soldier First-Responder Reveals Channelopathy
    • Authors: Murphy CE; Kenny CM, Fentanes E.
      Pages: 1278 - 1280
      Abstract: This case report describes the echocardiographic findings of a military nurse in her 20s with vasovagal syncope.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.2484
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • Industry Payments to Directors of Catheterization and Electrophysiology
           Laboratories From Top US Hospitals
    • Authors: Annapureddy A; Sengodan P, Mahajan S, et al.
      Pages: 1282 - 1284
      Abstract: This analysis of 2017 data from the Open Payments Program (OPP) database examines nonresearch industry payments to directors of caronary catheterization and electrophysiology laboratories to characterize payments across 13 OPP-defined categories.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.8775
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • Interventional Cardiology Payments and Device Choices
    • Authors: Redberg RF.
      Pages: 1284 - 1285
      Abstract: The United States spends many billions of dollars on medical devices annually; cardiac devices are a significant component of these expenditures. Device pricing is quite hidden because patients are rarely billed separately for devices; rather, devices are part of a package. Many hospitals have committees that determine which type and brand of devices to use and may negotiate pricing as well. Again, these prices and negotiations are secret. Commonly, physicians are key participants in those decisions.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.8737
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • Women as Authors of Medical Journal Articles, 2008-2018
    • Authors: Hart KL; Perlis RH.
      Pages: 1285 - 1287
      Abstract: This study reviews all articles from 9 specialty and 4 cross-specialty medical journals across a 10-year period to assess trends in authorship, first authorship, and last authorship among women.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.0907
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • Strategies for Managing Expansion of Diagnosis Coding for Medicare Data
    • Authors: Tsugawa Y; Figueroa JF, Papanicolas I, et al.
      Pages: 1287 - 1290
      Abstract: This study of 100% Medicare Inpatient Files assesses strategies for managing coding of comorbidities associated with hospitalization before and after Centers for Medicare & Medicaid coding changes.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.1005
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • Prescription Patterns of Family Members After Discontinued Opioid or
           Benzodiazepine Therapy of Users
    • Authors: Barnett ML; Hicks TR, Jena AB.
      Pages: 1290 - 1292
      Abstract: This study uses data from a national database of privately insured individuals from 2007 to 2016 to examine first-prescription filling patterns exhibited by family members of high-volume users of opioids or benzodiazepine whose drug treatment has been discontinued.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.1047
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • Adoption of Digital Breast Tomosynthesis in Clinical Practice
    • Authors: Richman IB; Hoag JR, Xu X, et al.
      Pages: 1292 - 1295
      Abstract: This study uses administrative claims from an insurance database to examine adoption of digital breast tomosynthesis for cancer screening and describe regional patterns and sociodemographic characteristics associated with its use.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.1058
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • Digital Breast Tomosynthesis—Diffusion Into Practice Precedes
           Evidence
    • Authors: Melnikow J; Fenton J.
      Pages: 1295 - 1296
      Abstract: Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), a form of supplemental screening mammography, is not recommended for routine screening in any clinical practice guidelines. Nevertheless, a study by Richman et al in this issue of JAMA Internal Medicine shows that it is widely used in the United States. Based on analyses of national Blue Cross Blue Shield claims data on screening mammography, Richman et al found that DBT use during screening increased from about 13% in 2015 to more than 40% in 2017. The uptake of DBT grew significantly faster in regions with higher income and larger white populations.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.1037
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • Association Between High Discharge Rates and Skilled Nursing Facility
           Copayments
    • Authors: Chatterjee P; Qi M, Coe NB, et al.
      Pages: 1296 - 1298
      Abstract: This study uses data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to investigate the association between Medicare copayment policies and discharge rates of vulnerable patients from skilled nursing facilities.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.1209
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • All-cause and Cause-Specific Mortality Among Major League Baseball Players
    • Authors: Nguyen VT; Zafonte RD, Kponee-Shovein KZ, et al.
      Pages: 1298 - 1301
      Abstract: This study assesses the all-cause and cause-specific mortality rates among Major League Baseball players compared with the general US male population.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.1218
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • Longevity Among Major League Baseball Players—Play Ball!
    • Authors: Waterbor JW; Fleisig G.
      Pages: 1301 - 1302
      Abstract: Major League Baseball (MLB) players represent a unique population of individuals in the United States: a select group of men who possess the athleticism, strength, and acumen to navigate into organized professional baseball at the highest level and who are compensated quite well. What do we know about their health and mortality risks' In this issue of JAMA Internal Medicine, Nguyen and colleagues report findings from a retrospective cohort mortality study of men who played Major League Baseball and died between 1979 and 2013, as well as characterize their mortality risk as compared with the US male population across the same time period.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.1195
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • Unified Approach Needed to Implement Nutrition Support Services
    • Authors: Rediger K; Miles D.
      Pages: 1302 - 1303
      Abstract: To the Editor We applaud Berkowitz and colleagues’ recent Original Investigation and were encouraged that enrollment in a medically tailored meal (MTM) program was associated with fewer hospital admissions and less overall medical spending. We serve as primary care clinicians who care for a small panel of high-need, high-cost Medicaid patients at a clinic in East Baltimore that is located in a food desert. Every day, we witness the harms that food deserts and food insecurity, along with other socioeconomic disparities, inflict on the health of our community. We strongly support adopting a “food as medicine” approach to improve health equity, and we appreciate the work by Berkowitz and colleagues to demonstrate the benefits of MTM for the most vulnerable patients.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.3188
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • Unified Approach Needed to Implement Nutrition Support
           Services—Reply
    • Authors: Berkowitz SA; Terranova J, Hsu J.
      Pages: 1303 - 1303
      Abstract: In Reply We appreciate the thoughtful letter from Rediger and Miles regarding our study and offer a few additional points. Given the importance of nutrition for health, we share the view that a broad range of nutrition options should be available to patients. In our view, medically tailored meal programs are one important tool that we hope becomes more widely available.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.3193
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • Errors in Figure Headings
    • Pages: 1303 - 1304
      Abstract: In the Original Investigation titled “Association of Weight Loss Interventions With Changes in Biomarkers of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis,” published online July 1, 2019, there were errors in Figure headings. For Figures 2-4, the heading “Mean Difference in Weight, kg (95% CI)” should have been “Mean Difference in ALT U/L (95% CI),” “Standardized Mean Difference in Steatosis (95% CI),” and “Mean Difference in NAS (95% CI),” respectively. This article was corrected online.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.4091
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • Error in References
    • Pages: 1303 - 1303
      Abstract: In the Viewpoint titled “The Ketogenic Diet for Obesity and Diabetes—Enthusiasm Outpaces Evidence,” published online July 15, 2019, reference 2 was incorrect. This article has been corrected online.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.3935
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • Correction to Number in Abstract
    • Pages: 1303 - 1303
      Abstract: In the Original Investigation titled “Financial Implications of 12-Month Dispensing of Oral Contraceptive Pills in the Veterans Affairs Health Care System,” published online July 8, 2019, in the , the cohort size was incorrectly given in one instance as 240 309; the correct value is 24 309. This article was corrected online.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.3746
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • Funder and Disclaimer Added
    • Pages: 1303 - 1303
      Abstract: In the Research Letter titled “Association of Health Status With Receipt of Supplemental Security Income Among Individuals With Severe Disabilities and Very Low Income and Assets,” published online April 1, 2019, and in the June print issue, a funder and disclaimer were added. This article has been corrected online.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.3260
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • Error in Title of Table 2 and Rewording of Conflict of interest
           Disclosures
    • Pages: 1304 - 1304
      Abstract: In the Original Investigation titled “Diagnosis and Management of Primary Hyperparathyroidism Across the Veterans Affairs Health Care System,” published online July 15, 2019, the word “Hyperthyroidism” in the title of Table 2 should be replaced with “Hyperparathyroidism.” Also, the corresponding author’s Conflict of Interest disclosures should be reworded to conform to the standard language required by the Department of Veterans Affairs to read as follows: “Dr Makris reported receiving grants from Baylor College of Medicine Department of Surgery and support from the Department of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Health Administration, Office of Research and Development, and the Center for Innovations in Quality, Effectiveness and Safety (CIN 13-413), Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center, during the conduct of the study.” This article was corrected online.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.4281
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
  • My Doctor Told Me I Have Fatty Liver—What Do I Need to Know'
    • Authors: Aby ES; Benhammou JN, Tabibian JH.
      Pages: 1308 - 1308
      Abstract: This Patient Page describes nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and strategies for its treatment.
      PubDate: Sun, 01 Sep 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.1240
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 9 (2019)
       
 
 
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