Journal Cover
JAMA Internal Medicine
Journal Prestige (SJR): 8.032
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 288  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 2168-6106 - ISSN (Online) 2168-6114
Published by American Medical Association Homepage  [14 journals]
  • February 2019 Issue Highlights
    • Pages: 133 - 135
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.5476
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • JAMA Internal Medicine
    • Pages: 136 - 136
      Abstract: Mission Statement: To promote the art and science of medicine and the betterment of human health by publishing manuscripts of interest and relevance to internists practicing as generalists or as medical subspecialists.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.5477
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • A Global Public Health Victory for Tobacco Plain-Packaging Laws in
           Australia
    • Authors: Zhou S; Wakefield M.
      Pages: 137 - 138
      Abstract: This Viewpoint discusses the legal and public health ramifications of an Australian law mandating the sale of tobacco in plain packaging only.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.6480
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Precision Medicine and Advancing Clinical Care
    • Authors: Arnar DO; Palsson R.
      Pages: 139 - 140
      Abstract: This Viewpoint examines how data from an Icelandic large-scale genotyping and sequencing initiative can enhance understanding of basic molecular pathways to advance precision medicine.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.6729
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Long-term Physician-Patient Relationships—Persevering in a Practice
    • Authors: Cifu AS.
      Pages: 141 - 142
      Abstract: This article describes the benefits of maintaining a long-term physician-patient relationship rather than the trend toward more temporary relationships.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.6735
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Why Is Nonadherence to Cancer Screening Associated With Increased
           Mortality'
    • Authors: Grady D; Parks M.
      Pages: 143 - 144
      Abstract: In this issue of JAMA Internal Medicine, Pierre-Victor and Pinsky use data from the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening trial to demonstrate an association between lack of adherence to cancer screening and increased mortality from causes not related to the screening. Participants in the PLCO Cancer Screening trial were 55 to 74 years of age and generally healthy. At trial entry, participants of both sexes in the screening arm were asked to undergo chest radiographs for lung cancer and flexible sigmoidoscopy for colon cancer, men were asked to undergo prostate-specific antigen tests and digital rectal examinations for prostate cancer, and women were asked to undergo cancer antigen 125 tests and transvaginal ultrasonography for ovarian cancer. Those randomized to the control group received usual care.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.6813
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Dental Clinician–Prescribed Opioids for Adolescents and Young Adults and
           Subsequent Substance Abuse
    • Authors: Schroeder AR; Dehghan M, Newman TB, et al.
      Pages: 145 - 152
      Abstract: This cohort study using the Optum Research Database examines whether opioid prescriptions provided by dental clinicians for pain management of third molar extractions to opioid-naive US adolescents and young adults was associated with subsequent opioid use and abuse.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.5419
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Long-term Risk of Colorectal Cancer and Related Deaths After a Colonoscopy
           With Normal Findings
    • Authors: Lee JK; Jensen CD, Levin TR, et al.
      Pages: 153 - 160
      Abstract: This population-based study examines the risks of and deaths associated with colorectal cancer after a 12-year follow-up period for persons who underwent colonoscopy vs those who did not.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.5565
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Health Care Utilization and Cost Outcomes of a Comprehensive Dementia Care
           Program for Medicare Beneficiaries
    • Authors: Jennings LA; Laffan AM, Schlissel AC, et al.
      Pages: 161 - 166
      Abstract: This case-control study compares health care utilization and costs in patients participating in a dementia care program with patients in a propensity score–matched cohort.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.5579
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Smoking Cessation Interventions for Socioeconomically Disadvantaged
           Individuals
    • Authors: Vidrine DJ; Frank-Pearce SG, Vidrine JI, et al.
      Pages: 167 - 174
      Abstract: This randomized clinical trial assesses the efficacy of mobile phone–delivered cessation interventions targeted to current cigarette smokers at neighborhood sites serving racial/ethnic minority and socioeconomically disadvantaged individuals.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.5713
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Association of Scheduled vs Emergency-Only Dialysis With Health Outcomes
           and Costs in Undocumented Immigrants
    • Authors: Nguyen O; Vazquez MA, Charles L, et al.
      Pages: 175 - 183
      Abstract: This observational study compares health outcomes, utilization, and costs associated with scheduled vs emergency-only dialysis in undocumented immigrants with end-stage renal disease.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.5866
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Providing Comprehensive Health Care for Undocumented People in the United
           States
    • Authors: Martin M.
      Pages: 183 - 185
      Abstract: There are 11.3 million unauthorized, undocumented people living in the United States who cannot access health insurance through Medicaid, Medicare, or the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act exchanges. Some of these people obtain coverage via employer-based plans, private insurance, or special state-based programs. The others remain uninsured, relying on options such as out-of-pocket visits, free clinics, or emergency department services covered by the Emergency Medical Treatment and Active Labor Act.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.5847
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Parenteral Anticoagulation and Non–ST-Segment Elevation Intervention
           in Chinese Patients
    • Authors: Chen J; He P, Liu Y, et al.
      Pages: 186 - 194
      Abstract: This multicenter cohort study investigates the use of parenteral anticoagulation therapy and its association with in-hospital all-cause death and major bleeding among Chinese patients with non–ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.5953
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Anticoagulation in Non–ST-Segment Elevation Acute Coronary Syndrome
    • Authors: Curfman G.
      Pages: 195 - 195
      Abstract: Less is More
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.5946
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Association of Nonadherence to Cancer Screening Examinations With
           Mortality From Unrelated Causes
    • Authors: Pierre-Victor D; Pinsky PF.
      Pages: 196 - 203
      Abstract: This secondary analysis of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening trial evaluates the association between nonadherence to cancer screening tests and mortality, excluding mortality from cancers studied in the trial.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.5982
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Effect of a Biobehavioral Environmental Approach on Disability Among Older
           Adults
    • Authors: Szanton SL; Xue Q, Leff B, et al.
      Pages: 204 - 211
      Abstract: This randomized clinical trial evaluates a patient-driven, home-based program to reduce disability for older adults with functional disabilities.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.6026
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Home Modifications to Reduce Disability in Vulnerable Older Adults
    • Authors: Aliberti MR; Covinsky KE.
      Pages: 211 - 212
      Abstract: Functional disability, as marked by the inability to perform tasks needed to live independently, becomes increasingly common with advancing age and is strongly linked to multiple adverse health outcomes, such as depression, social isolation, hospitalization, nursing home placement, and death. The prevalence of older people needing help in 1 or more activities of daily living (ADLs) or instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) is approximately 30% among individuals in their 70s and more than 40% among those aged 80 years or older. Disability and its associated adverse outcomes are even more prevalent among low-income older adults because they have more comorbidities and less access to health care and social services. Low-income older people are particularly vulnerable and a crucial target population for prevention and amelioration of disabilities in ADLs. In this issue of JAMA Internal Medicine, Szanton and colleagues address these issues. These authors report on CAPABLE, a home-based multifactorial intervention they developed that combines planned home visits by an occupational therapist and a registered nurse with environmental interventions in the home by a home modfier.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.6414
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Association of Corticosteroid Treatment With Outcomes in Adults With
           Sepsis
    • Authors: Fang F; Zhang Y, Tang J, et al.
      Pages: 213 - 223
      Abstract: This systematic review and meta-analysis examines the efficacy and safety of corticosteroids in patients with sepsis.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.5849
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Combined Dextromethorphan and Quinidine in Patients With Dementia or
           Parkinson Disease
    • Authors: Fralick M; Sacks CA, Kesselheim AS.
      Pages: 224 - 230
      Abstract: This population-based cohort study investigates the prescribing patterns for combined dextromethorphan hydrobromide and quinidine sulfate after regulatory approval for treatment of pseudobulbar affect in patients with dementia and/or Parkinson disease.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.6112
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Assessment of Instruments for Measurement of Delirium Severity
    • Authors: Jones RN; Cizginer S, Pavlech L, et al.
      Pages: 231 - 239
      Abstract: This systematic review summarizes the criteria and methodology used to identify high-quality delirium severity instruments.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.6975
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • 2018 Update on Medical Overuse
    • Authors: Morgan DJ; Dhruva SS, Coon ER, et al.
      Pages: 240 - 246
      Abstract: This Special Communication, the fifth annual update on medical overuse, discusses 10 studies published in 2017 that are most relevant to understanding medical overuse in adults.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.5748
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Nitroimidazole Resistance in Trichomonas vaginalis Infection
    • Authors: Salas A; Hamill MM, Tuddenham S.
      Pages: 247 - 248
      Abstract: This Teachable Moment describes a previously healthy woman with persistent Trichomonas vaginalis infection that was resistant to drug treatment.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.7241
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Electrocardiographic Harbingers of Ventricular Tachycardia Arrest—A
           Moment of Pause
    • Authors: DeJong C; Nishtala A, Goldschlager N.
      Pages: 249 - 251
      Abstract: This case report describes the electrocardiographic indications and challenges involved in the diagnosis of pause-dependent torsades de pointes ventricular tachycardia.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.6220
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Diagnosing an Acutely Breathless Patient
    • Authors: McGrann P; Jackson M.
      Pages: 252 - 253
      Abstract: This report of a case describes a man in his 70s with type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia who presented to the emergency department with 4 days of progressive dizziness, shortness of breath, and chest pain on exertion.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.6485
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Bundle Branch Block Site in a Patient With a Right-Lying Heart and Wide
           QRS Complex
    • Authors: Chang Q; Liu R, Feng Z.
      Pages: 254 - 256
      Abstract: This case report presents the electrocardiographic findings in a woman with dextroversion.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.6709
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Internet Searches for Sexual Harassment and Assault, Reporting, and
           Training Since the #MeToo Movement
    • Authors: Caputi TL; Nobles AL, Ayers JW.
      Pages: 258 - 259
      Abstract: This study analyzes US internet search numbers to evaluate changes in searches for sexual harassment and assault, reporting, and training since the #MeToo movement.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.5094
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Temporal Trends in Unstable Angina Diagnosis Codes for Outpatient
           Percutaneous Coronary Interventions
    • Authors: Wadhera RK; Sukul D, Secemsky EA, et al.
      Pages: 259 - 261
      Abstract: This study examines the appropriate use of percutaneous coronary interventions in New York, Michigan, and Florida using Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project state databases.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.5124
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Gaming, Upcoding, Fraud, and the Stubborn Persistence of Unstable Angina
    • Authors: McNeely CA; Brown DL.
      Pages: 261 - 263
      Abstract: Unstable angina (UA), previously known as crescendo or preinfarction angina, is one of the acute coronary syndromes (ACS) that includes non–ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) and ST-segment elevation MI (STEMI). Unstable angina is unique among the ACS in that, despite clinical evidence of myocardial ischemia, biomarkers of myocardial necrosis are not elevated. Symptoms and signs of ischemia are usually controlled by antianginal medications, systemic anticoagulation, and antiplatelet therapy but coronary angiography and revascularization, usually by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) are generally performed on an urgent or semiurgent basis to prevent progression to MI. In the early 1990s, in an era that preceded widespread use of troponin assays, UA was one of the most common reasons for hospital admission. With the introduction of more sensitive troponin biomarkers, an increasing proportion of patients previously diagnosed with UA began being reclassified as NSTEMI based on elevation of biomarkers. For example, in the TIMI 3 trial, conducted between 1989 and 1992, 25% of patients classified as UA based on absent creatine kinase (CK)-MB measurements had conventional cardiac specific troponin I (cTnI) levels of 0.4 ng/mL or more (to convert to µg/L, multiply by 1.0), a relatively high cutoff compared with current standards. The reclassification of patients with UA to NSTEMI has continued because the upper reference limit (URL) has been adjusted downward in recognition of the increased risk of adverse events with even minimal troponin elevations. With the introduction of more sensitive troponin assays beginning in around 2010, the number of patients who present with an ACS without a rise in detectable troponin has continued to decline. In a post hoc analysis of the PROTECT-TIMI 30 trial, published in 2009, 82% of patients with typical features of UA including rest pain exceeded the URL of a high-sensitivity assay by 8 hours, thus shifting their diagnosis to NSTEMI. As a result, in 2013, Braunwald and Morrow proposed it was time to prepare a requiem for UA, and they concluded that “it is not clear that ACS events can occur without some increase in circulating cTn when measured by a high-sensitivity assay.”(p2455)
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.5967
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Inferior Vena Cava Filter Use and Mortality in Older Adults With Acute
           Pulmonary Embolism
    • Authors: Bikdeli B; Wang Y, Jimenez D, et al.
      Pages: 263 - 265
      Abstract: This study uses 3 distinct statistical approaches to examine the association between use of inferior vena cava filters and mortality rates in Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries with pulmonary embolism.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.5287
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Causes of Protected Health Information Breaches
    • Authors: Jiang J; Bai G.
      Pages: 265 - 267
      Abstract: This study evaluates the internal and external sources of and preventive steps for data breaches in health care organizations from 2009 to 2017.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.5295
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Surrogates’ Knowledge of Patient Treatment Goals and Confidence to Make
           Surrogate Treatment Decisions
    • Authors: Fried TR; Zenoni M, Iannone L, et al.
      Pages: 267 - 268
      Abstract: This study uses telephone interviews of patients and their surrogates to evaluate surrogates’ knowledge of patients’ treatment goals and confidence in their ability to make patients’ treatment decisions.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.5299
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Preparing Surrogates for Complex Decision Making
    • Authors: Sudore RL.
      Pages: 268 - 269
      Abstract: Advance care planning (ACP) has been defined as a process that supports individuals and patients in defining their values, goals, and preferences for future medical care and sharing that information with others. The main goals of ACP include preparing patients for complex medical decision making and ensuring that they receive medical care aligned with their goals in case of decisional incapacity. If patients lose decision-making capacity, surrogate decision making often falls to close family members or friends. However, in many instances, these family members and friends do not know that they were named on advance directive forms or that they may be thrust into complex surrogate decision making.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.5280
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Self-monitoring of Blood Glucose in Individuals With Type 2 Diabetes Not
           Using Insulin
    • Authors: Platt KD; Thompson AN, Lin P, et al.
      Pages: 269 - 272
      Abstract: This database analysis quantifies the rate of use and cost of self-monitoring blood glucose supplies that are potentially used inappropriately, specifically focusing on test strips.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.5700
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Media Coverage of the Benefits and Harms of the 2017 Expanded Definition
           of High Blood Pressure
    • Authors: Moynihan R; Clark J, Albarqouni L.
      Pages: 272 - 273
      Abstract: This study examines the media coverage of the expanded definition of hypertension associated with the new guidelines from the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.6201
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Ambiguities in Comfort Care Discussions
    • Authors: Umar A; Chang EY, Odebunmi I.
      Pages: 273 - 274
      Abstract: To the Editor We read with great interest the recent Perspective by Kelemen and colleages that revealed the pervasive ambiguity in the concept of comfort care. As the authors noted, comfort care is an important aspect of medical care, and we would like to laud the authors for bringing this difficult subject to light.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.7489
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Ambiguities in Comfort Care Discussions—Reply
    • Authors: Kelemen AM; Groninger H.
      Pages: 274 - 275
      Abstract: In Reply We appreciate the response by Umar and colleagues to our article. We wholeheartedly agree with the premise of early palliative care; perhaps, in the case of our article, palliative care was engaged too late in the patient’s hospital stay. Barriers to early palliative care integration include misconceptions that palliative care equates to end-of-life care, a need for culture change across disciplines and institutions, and a lack of education among health care professionals regarding the benefits of palliative care involvement. Moreover, although studies continue to underline the clinical benefits of early palliative care, current data indicates a workforce deficit of specialty-trained palliative care clinicians. Education and training on expert communication skills, symptom management, and end-of-life care must be prioritized to increase so-called primary palliative care skills among all clinicians. The use of a standardized patient simulation exercise showed promise in improving communication skills among first-year residents.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.7486
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Limitations in Methodology Assessing Blood Pressure and Need for Strict
           Exclusion Criteria—Reply
    • Authors: Brook RD; Morishita M.
      Pages: 275 - 276
      Abstract: In Reply We agree that our findings provide key evidence that air filters merit further study as an adjuvant approach to help manage hypertension. However, it is a misinterpretation of the data to state that air filters only lowered blood pressure (BP) among obese patients. The a priori primary end point was significantly met in the full study cohort (Figure 2A). The subgroup results (Figure 2C) were secondary analyses that only provided hypothesis-generating evidence for effect modification by obesity. This differential response can now be directly tested in follow-up studies.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.7483
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Limitations in the Methodology Assessing Blood Pressure and the Need for
           Strict Exclusion Criteria
    • Authors: Ramadoss V; Kotecha P.
      Pages: 275 - 275
      Abstract: To the Editor We read with great interest the recent study published in JAMA Internal Medicine by Morishita and colleagues on the effects of portable air-filtration systems on systolic blood pressure (SBP) control in elderly participants. If effective, this would be a convenient and cost-effective means of controlling cardiovascular risk in urban communities. However, we would like to point out certain limitations in this study.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.7495
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Probiotic Safety—Reasonable Certainty of No Harm—Reply
    • Authors: Cohen PA.
      Pages: 276 - 277
      Abstract: In Reply I appreciate Cabana and colleagues’ interest in my recent Viewpoint. However, they incorrectly characterize the safety standard for probiotics sold in the United States. Probiotics may be sold in a variety of products, including as a constituent of food, a food additive, or a dietary supplement. Each of these categories has different safety standards. Probiotics sold as dietary supplements, for example, are not required to have a reasonable certainty of no harm, as Cabana and colleagues suggest. Rather, the standard for supplements requires only that a supplement ingredient cannot present “a significant or unreasonable risk of illness or injury under conditions of use recommended or suggested in labeling.”
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.7492
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Probiotic Safety—Reasonable Certainty of No Harm
    • Authors: Cabana MD; Salminen S, Sanders M.
      Pages: 276 - 276
      Abstract: To the Editor The Viewpoint by Cohen that was recently published in JAMA Internal Medicine dismisses a diligent approach to probiotic safety assessment undertaken by regulatory authorities, as well as the long history of safe use of probiotics in foods.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.7498
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Women and Children First: Promoting Empowerment Through Resistance
           Education
    • Authors: McClelland KI; Petrany SM, Davies TH.
      Pages: 277 - 278
      Abstract: To the Editor Over the years, several researchers have examined the sequelae of unwanted sexual encounters resulting from the harmful perception that women and children are “weaker” individuals compared with men and adults. Given this, and although the efforts by Thurston and colleagues to promote women’s health are indeed commendable, we believe the influences of power and trauma should be extrapolated to include children as well. The terms sexual harassment and sexual assault are often applied to adult-dominated settings (ie, the workplace or higher education), and thus inherently overlook traumatic events, such as sexual abuse, endured by children. As a result, when considering Thurston and colleagues’ findings regarding women’s health, one should also incorporate the conclusions by Felitti and colleagues regarding children’s health to better understand the associations between power, trauma, and well-being.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.7837
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Women and Children First: Promoting Empowerment Through Resistance
           Education—Reply
    • Authors: Thurston RC; Matthews KA.
      Pages: 278 - 279
      Abstract: In Reply We appreciate the comments by McClelland and colleagues on our research showing that among midlife women, a history of sexual harassment and/or assault was linked to adverse health outcomes, including hypertension and clinically significant depressed mood, anxiety, and sleep problems. We agree that extending this work to consider childhood abuse and neglect as a predictor of adult health is important. In fact, we have conducted research on this topic and found that a history of childhood abuse and neglect was related to greater subclinical cardiovascular disease, a proinflammatory profile, obesity, and metabolic syndrome among women at midlife. These relations persisted when adjusting for important covariates such as race and ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and behavioral risk factors such as smoking and physical activity (Jakubowski and colleages provide a meta-analysis).
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.7813
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Patients as Perpetrators of Physician Sexual Harassment—Reply
    • Authors: Jenner S; Oertelt-Prigione S.
      Pages: 279 - 280
      Abstract: In Reply We thank Girgis and colleagues for their remarks on our recent Research Letter about sexual harassment in academic medicine and welcome the opportunity to clarify our findings.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.8016
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Patients as Perpetrators of Physician Sexual Harassment
    • Authors: Girgis C; Khatkhate G, Mangurian C.
      Pages: 279 - 279
      Abstract: To the Editor Given the high rates of sexual harassment in the workforces of science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and particularly in medicine, we are pleased to see Jenner and colleagues focus additional light onto this important issue in academic medicine. However, 2 important pieces of data presented in the tables were not the focus of this manuscript yet deserve attention: harassment by patients and gender differences.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2018.7974
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
  • Errors in the Figure 1 Caption, Table 1, and Supplement
    • Pages: 280 - 280
      Abstract: In the Original Investigation titled “Association of Parenteral Anticoagulation Therapy With Outcomes in Chinese Patients Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention for Non–ST-Segment Elevation Acute Coronary Syndrome,” published online December 28, 2018, in the caption of Figure 1, “PCIU” was changed to “PCI.” In Table 1, the units for heart failure are number (percentage), the units for hemocrit should not have been g/L, the units for total length of stents are median (interquartile range) mm, and time to procedure should have been given as <24 hours, 24-72 hours, and >72 hours, not days. There were also errors in the supplement. This article was corrected online.
      PubDate: Fri, 01 Feb 2019 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.0057
      Issue No: Vol. 179, No. 2 (2019)
       
 
 
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