Journal Cover
JAMA Internal Medicine
Journal Prestige (SJR): 8.032
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 328  
 
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ISSN (Print) 2168-6106 - ISSN (Online) 2168-6114
Published by American Medical Association Homepage  [14 journals]
  • January 2020 Issue Highlights
    • PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.4346
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • JAMA Internal Medicine
    • Pages: 4 - 4
      Abstract: Mission Statement: To promote the art and science of medicine and the betterment of human health by publishing manuscripts of interest and relevance to internists practicing as generalists or as medical subspecialists.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.4347
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Lessons From Improv Comedy to Reduce Health Disparities
    • Authors: Chin MH.
      Pages: 5 - 6
      Abstract: This article presents 4 lessons derived from improvisational and standup comedy that the author believes will improve clinical care and reduce health disparities among marginalized populations.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.5930
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Facilitating Methadone Use in Hospitals and Skilled Nursing Facilities
    • Authors: Pytell JD; Sharfstein JM, Olsen Y.
      Pages: 7 - 8
      Abstract: This Viewpoint proposes updating federal regulations to conform to evidence-based practices in the management of opioid use disorder.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.5731
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Association of a Workplace Sales Ban on Sugar-Sweetened Beverages With
           Employee Health
    • Authors: Epel ES; Hartman A, Jacobs LM, et al.
      Pages: 9 - 16
      Abstract: This before-after study and additional randomized trial evaluates whether a workplace ban on sugar-sweetened beverage sales was associated with sugar-sweetened beverage intake and cardiometabolic health among employees and whether a brief motivational intervention provides added benefits to the sales ban.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.4434
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Effect of a Tailored Hospital Elder Life Program on Postoperative Delirium
           and Function
    • Authors: Wang Y; Yue J, Xie D, et al.
      Pages: 17 - 25
      Abstract: This randomized clinical trial evaluates the effectiveness of a delirium prevention intervention incorporating family and caregiver participation for reducing postoperative delirium and functional decline in older patients in China.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.4446
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Including the Family in Perioperative Care of Older Adults
    • Authors: Tang V; Finlayson E, Covinsky K.
      Pages: 25 - 26
      Abstract: Delirium occurs frequently in hospitalized older adults, especially after a major surgical procedure. Delirium prevention in hospitalized older adults involves multicomponent nonpharmacologic interventions, such as the Hospital Elder Life Program (HELP), that target delirium risk factors. Through HELP, hospitalized older adults are assessed for their risk for developing delirium, and protocols addressing the delirium risk factors are followed. These HELP intervention protocols are often carried out by trained hospital volunteers and address patients’ orientation, nutrition, hydration, sleep, and mobility. Although shown to reduce delirium rates (ie, 15% delirium in the usual care group vs 9.9% in the HELP intervention), implementation of HELP faces barriers of cost, staffing, and culture in some health care systems.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.4202
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Effect of Distributing Essential Medicines at No Charge on Treatment
           Adherence
    • Authors: Persaud N; Bedard M, Boozary AS, et al.
      Pages: 27 - 34
      Abstract: This randomized clinical trial examines whether providing essential medicines at no charge to outpatients who reported not being able to afford medicines improves treatment adherence.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.4472
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Driving Under the Influence and Risk of Subsequent Arrest for Violent
           Crimes Among Handgun Purchasers
    • Authors: Kagawa RC; Stewart S, Wright MA, et al.
      Pages: 35 - 43
      Abstract: This longitudinal cohort study investigates whether prior convictions for driving under the influence are associated with the risk of subsequent arrests for a violent crime among handgun purchasers in California aged 21 to 49 years at the time of purchase in 2001.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.4491
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Reducing Gun Violence Using Alcohol-Related Convictions
    • Authors: Kaufman E; Morrison CN, Branas CC.
      Pages: 43 - 44
      Abstract: In this issue of JAMA Internal Medicine, Kagawa and colleagues report on their study of criminal convictions among nearly 80 000 individuals who legally purchased handguns in California between 2001 and 2013. The study’s findings suggest that legal firearm purchasers with a prior conviction for driving under the influence (DUI) of alcohol had an increased risk of subsequent arrest for violent crimes compared with purchasers with no prior criminal history. Research that explicates the criminal offenses of firearm holders, both legal and illegal, may increase understanding and help reduce firearm violence in the United States, a nation with more firearms in civilian hands than the next 25 nations with the highest totals combined.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.4498
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Effect of Depression Screening After Acute Coronary Syndromes on Quality
           of Life
    • Authors: Kronish IM; Moise N, Cheung Y, et al.
      Pages: 45 - 53
      Abstract: This randomized clinical trial examines whether systematically screening for depression in survivors of acute coronary syndromes improves quality of life and depression compared with usual care.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.4518
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Association Between Pregnancy Outcomes and Radioactive Iodine Treatment
           for Thyroid Cancer
    • Authors: Kim H; Lee K, Lee S, et al.
      Pages: 54 - 61
      Abstract: This population-based cohort study uses the Health Insurance Review and Assessment database of South Korea to examine the association between adverse pregnancy outcomes and radioactive iodine treatment after thyroidectomy among South Korean women of childbearing age with thyroid cancer.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.4644
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Association Between Fraud and Abuse Perpetrators and Medicare Beneficiary
           Health Outcomes
    • Authors: Nicholas L; Hanson C, Segal JB, et al.
      Pages: 62 - 69
      Abstract: This cross-sectional study based on Medicare claims data analyzes emergency hospitalization and mortality rates among patients who received health care services from health care professionals later dropped by Medicare for fraud and abuse violations.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.4771
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Human Costs of Medicare Fraud and Abuse
    • Authors: Ross JS.
      Pages: 69 - 69
      Abstract: The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services define Medicare fraud as knowingly submitting false claims to improperly obtain federal health care payments, as well as knowingly soliciting, receiving, offering, or paying remuneration (eg, kickbacks, bribes, or rebates) to induce or reward referrals for items or services that are eligible for reimbursement by federal health care programs. Medicare abuse is defined as practices that may directly or indirectly result in unnecessary costs to the Medicare program, including providing patients with medically unnecessary services, as well as fraudulent billing practices such as upcoding. These activities are both illegal and unethical, costing the Medicare program, and thus the broader public, billions of dollars annually. To date, attention to these activities has been driven predominantly by the financial losses incurred.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.5004
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Group Medical Visits and Intensive Weight Management for Type 2 Diabetes
    • Authors: Yancy WS; Jr, Crowley MJ, Dar MS, et al.
      Pages: 70 - 79
      Abstract: This randomized clinical trial compares the effect of intensive weight management combined with group medical visits vs group medical visits alone on glycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.4802
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Trends in Mortality for Medicare Beneficiaries Treated in the Emergency
           Department From 2009 to 2016
    • Authors: Burke LG; Epstein SK, Burke RC, et al.
      Pages: 80 - 88
      Abstract: This cross-sectional study examines trends in 30-day mortality rates associated with care in the emergency department among Medicare beneficiaries aged 65 years or older.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.4866
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Reflections on Mortality and Uncertainty in Emergency Medicine
    • Authors: Smith SW; Lee DC, Goldfrank LR.
      Pages: 88 - 90
      Abstract: Could emergency medicine (EM), which often is characterized as overutilized by patients, criticized as excessive in performing tests, labeled as unjustifiably expensive, and susceptible to diagnostic error, be doing something right' Burke and colleagues found that the mortality rate declined considerably among Medicare beneficiaries who had visited an emergency department (ED) from 2009 to 2016, particularly in patients with high-severity conditions. Given the limits of observational studies, the cause of the lower mortality rate is unknown. We suspect that both EM proponents and detractors will use the study’s analysis to validate their own health care policy conclusions.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.4858
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Mind-Body Therapies for Opioid-Treated Pain
    • Authors: Garland EL; Brintz CE, Hanley AW, et al.
      Pages: 91 - 105
      Abstract: This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluates whether mind-body therapies are associated with pain reduction and opioid-related outcome improvement in adults using opioids for pain.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.4917
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Association of Ozone Exposure With Respiratory Morbidity
    • Authors: Paulin LM; Gassett AJ, Alexis NE, et al.
      Pages: 106 - 115
      Abstract: This cohort study analyzes ozone exposure levels, smoking history, self-reported respiratory outcomes, and other demographic and clinical data of participants in the Air Pollution Study of the Subpopulations and Intermediate Outcome Measures In COPD Study.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.5498
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Shining New Light on Long-term Ozone Harms
    • Authors: Limaye VS; Knowlton K.
      Pages: 115 - 116
      Abstract: An important new study published by Paulin et al in this issue of JAMA Internal Medicine investigates the outcomes of long-term exposures to outdoor ground-level ozone air pollution in people with a history of heavy smoking. Using a comprehensive set of metrics to assess lung function, the research team identified associations between long-term ozone exposures and increased respiratory disease severity, disease symptoms, and lung disease exacerbations in a cross-sectional analysis.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.5967
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Effect of Internet-Distributed HIV Self-tests on Diagnosis and Behavior in
           Men Who Have Sex With Men
    • Authors: MacGowan RJ; Chavez PR, Borkowf CB, et al.
      Pages: 117 - 125
      Abstract: This randomized clinical trial evaluates the effect of providing HIV self-tests on frequency of testing, diagnoses of HIV infection, and sexual risk behaviors among men who have sex with men.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.5222
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • HIV Preexposure Prophylaxis—The Role of Primary Care Clinicians in
           Ending the HIV Epidemic
    • Authors: Khalili J; Landovitz RJ.
      Pages: 126 - 130
      Abstract: This Special Communication describes how primary care clinicians must play a central role in implementing widespread use of preexposure prophylaxis for those at high risk to address the spread of HIV.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.5456
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Ending the HIV Epidemic in the United States—The Roles of Increased
           Testing and Preexposure Prophylaxis
    • Authors: Janssen JM; Katz MH.
      Pages: 130 - 130
      Abstract: Advances in antiretroviral treatment enable persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection to live a normal lifespan, as long as they know that they are infected and adhere to treatment. Treatment that leads to an undetectable viral load prevents transmission of HIV to others. Since 2013, however, the rate of new HIV diagnoses in the United States has stabilized, not decreased. Continued viral transmission occurs from persons unaware of their HIV status, or not receiving effective treatment. To end the AIDS epidemic, what strategies can be used to increase the rate of early diagnosis and treatment'
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.5442
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • FDA Recommendations on the Use of Surrogate Measures as End Points in New
           Anti-infective Drug Approvals
    • Authors: Hey S; Kesselheim AS, Patel P, et al.
      Pages: 131 - 138
      Abstract: This systematic review examines FDA recommendations for primary end points in pivotal trials of new anti-infective drugs and assesses the concordance of those recommendations with the regulatory and scientific conditions for the appropriate use of surrogate measures as primary trial outcomes.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.5451
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Antimicrobial Drug Development Efficiency and Surrogate Markers of
           Clinical Benefit
    • Authors: Volberding P; Chambers HF.
      Pages: 138 - 139
      Abstract: In this issue of JAMA Internal Medicine, Hey and colleagues address the long-standing question of the optimum role of laboratory or surrogate end points in pivotal clinical trials. Their study raises concerns about how closely the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is following its own standards for applying these end points.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.5441
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Subspecialty Choices of Men and Women in Internal Medicine From 1991 to
           2016
    • Authors: Stone AT; Carlson KM, Douglas PS, et al.
      Pages: 140 - 141
      Abstract: This case series examines the percentage of women residencies and fellowships in 9 internal medicine medical subspecialties from 1991 to 2016.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.3833
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Trends in Aggregate Use and Associated Expenditures of Antihyperglycemic
           Therapies Among US Medicare Beneficiaries
    • Authors: Sumarsono A; Everett BM, McGuire DK, et al.
      Pages: 141 - 144
      Abstract: This study examines trends in aggregate use and expenditures for diabetes mellitus therapies among US Medicare Part D beneficiaries.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.3884
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Risk Factors Associated With Food Insecurity in the Medicare Population
    • Authors: Madden JM; Shetty PS, Zhang F, et al.
      Pages: 144 - 147
      Abstract: This analysis of survey data presents national estimates of food insecurity prevalence within the Medicare population.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.3900
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Miscategorization of Deaths in the US Food and Drug Administration Adverse
           Events Database
    • Authors: Meier L; Wang EY, Tomes M, et al.
      Pages: 147 - 148
      Abstract: This database study assesses the misclassification of death reports for 2 medical devices within the US Food and Drug Administration’s Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience database.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.4030
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Changes and Variation in Medicare Graduate Medical Education Payments
    • Authors: Chen C; Chung Y, Petterson S, et al.
      Pages: 148 - 150
      Abstract: This study examines the growth of Medicare graduate medical education payments per resident full-time equivalent, variation in payment rates between hospitals, and potential savings from capping these payments.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.4429
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Patterns of Work-Related Burnout in Physician-Scientists Receiving Career
           Development Awards From the National Institutes of Health
    • Authors: Perumalswami CR; Griffith KA, Jones RD, et al.
      Pages: 150 - 153
      Abstract: This survey study examines the patterns of work-related burnout in physician-scientists.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.4317
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Implementation of Federal Dependent Care Policies for Physician-Scientists
           at Leading US Medical Schools
    • Authors: Ormseth CH; Mangurian C, Jagsi R, et al.
      Pages: 153 - 157
      Abstract: This survey study explores whether leading US medical schools have policies about dependent care travel costs.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.4611
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Assessment of Pharmacy Closures in the United States From 2009 Through
           2015
    • Authors: Guadamuz JS; Alexander G, Zenk SN, et al.
      Pages: 157 - 160
      Abstract: This quality improvement study examines trends in pharmacy closures in the United States between 2009 and 2015, as well as pharmacy, community, and market factors that might be associated with such closures.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.4588
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • More Explorations Needed on Association of Electronic Cigarette Use and
           Smoking Reduction—Reply
    • Authors: Gomajee R; El-Khoury F, Melchior M.
      Pages: 160 - 161
      Abstract: In Reply In their letter in response to our Original Investigation, He and Niu suggest that the association between frequency of electronic cigarette (EC) use and smoking level may be dose dependent, which our study did not investigate. This is a valid point, as frequency of EC use, and therefore the nicotine dose received, might be relevant with regard to smoking cessation. Unfortunately, such measures are difficult to obtain in large cohort studies such as CONSTANCES (Consultants des Centres d’Examens de Santé). Some vapers take a few puffs several times a day, while others use their ECs less frequently but take more puffs each time. Additionally, other factors might also influence frequency of EC use, such nicotine dependency, nicotine dose in the e-liquid used, lengths and strength of puffs, as well as context and location of use (eg, festive, social, work, home). Prior studies of smoking cessation have considered daily EC use to be intensive, yet future research will need to yield more detailed information about the relationship between the level of use and smoking patterns in large community-based samples.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.5275
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • More Explorations Needed on Association of Electronic Cigarette Use and
           Smoking Reduction
    • Authors: He D; Niu W.
      Pages: 160 - 160
      Abstract: To the Editor We read with great interest the study by Gomajee and colleagues that shows an apparent association of regular electronic cigarette (EC) use with decreased smoking levels and increased smoking cessation attempts, as well as an increased risk of smoking relapse in the 2-year follow-up of the France general population. In the recent decade, EC use has become popular as a cessation aid among smokers, yet its effectiveness is still subject to ongoing debate. The study by Gomajee and colleagues represents a step forward toward a better understanding of long-term smoking trajectories after using ECs. We are, however, concerned about whether there is a dose-dependent association between frequency of EC use and smoking level because this study focused on only daily use of ECs. It is important to provide substantially more robust reporting of these data to better illuminate the effectiveness of EC use.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.5272
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Disclose and Manage Conflicts of Interest at Cancer Centers—Reply
    • Authors: Carr D; Welch H.
      Pages: 161 - 162
      Abstract: In Reply We appreciate the letter from leadership of the Association of American Cancer Institutes and are pleased that the findings of our study will help to inform their task force in addressing conflicts of interest. The authors are correct that we did not contact any cancer center directors directly to explore the circumstances of their industry payments. Instead, our goal was simply to communicate the payments made to directors as reported to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. We purposely did not contact—nor did we identify—any of the individuals involved.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.5547
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Disclose and Manage Conflicts of Interest at Cancer Centers
    • Authors: Jensen RA; Knudsen KE, Platanias LC.
      Pages: 161 - 161
      Abstract: To the Editor In their recently published Research Letter, Carr and Welch are right to raise concerns about the influence of industry funding on clinical research. However, their article implies that all such relationships are inherently problematic, despite the lack of details about the services provided. It is also not apparent whether any cancer center directors were contacted by the authors regarding the circumstances of their relationships to the pharmaceutical industry.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.5542
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Clinical Significance and Outcomes in Trial of Nabiximols for Treatment of
           Cannabis Dependence
    • Authors: Levin FR; Mariani JJ.
      Pages: 162 - 163
      Abstract: To the Editor We read with interest the recently published randomized clinical trial by Lintzeris and colleagues reporting that use of nabiximols was superior to placebo in reducing days of cannabis use. To date, there are no US Food and Drug Administration–approved medications for the treatment of cannabis use disorder, and novel interventions are sorely needed. The authors state that the study findings are clinically significant because there were fewer days of use in the nabiximols arm compared with the placebo arm (ie, a mean difference of 18.6 days over the study period). However, the substantiation of this assertion is not provided. Based on the data presented, the nabiximols group averaged 4.4 d/wk and the placebo group averaged 2.9 d/wk during the trial. As noted by the authors, the 2 groups did not differ at the end of study in measured health or psychosocial outcomes. This finding illustrates a dilemma that the field finds itself in with regard to nonabstinence outcomes: what degree of cannabis use reduction is clinically meaningful if there is no measured change in health or quality of life' As noted by Lee and colleagues there have been numerous primary outcomes employed in marijuana pharmacologic treatment trials, but short of abstinence, there is not a consensus on what that clinically meaningful outcome would be.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.5664
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Clinical Significance and Outcomes in Trial of Nabiximols for Treatment of
           Cannabis Dependence—Reply
    • Authors: Lintzeris N; Copeland J, Bruno R.
      Pages: 163 - 164
      Abstract: In Reply Kleinman and Ostacher assert that in our article, we “have switched primary outcomes between study registration and publication, thereby inaccurately portraying the trial results.” The study registration listed the primary end point as 4-week point prevalence abstinence by combining self-reported data from researcher interviews with the objective measures of unsanctioned cannabis use. Unsanctioned cannabis use was also reported as mean days used and percentage of positive results on urine drug screening tests.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.5670
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Clinical Significance and Outcomes in Trial of Nabiximols for Treatment of
           Cannabis Dependence
    • Authors: Kleinman RA; Ostacher MJ.
      Pages: 163 - 163
      Abstract: To the Editor The recently published Original Investigation by Lintzeris and colleagues about nabiximols for the treatment of cannabis dependence reported that cannabinoid agonist medication reduces illicit cannabis use among cannabis-dependent persons. We have some concerns about how the authors represented their data, leading us to believe that such a conclusion is not justified. The authors appear to have switched primary outcomes between study registration and publication, thereby inaccurately portraying the trial results.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.5667
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Highlighting the Need for Action Regarding Persistent Sex Bias in Research
    • Authors: Lind KE.
      Pages: 164 - 165
      Abstract: To the Editor I read the recently published Original Investigation by Anderson and colleagues with keen interest. They contributed important findings on outcomes of intensive hypertension control following hospitalization. Observational studies like theirs are vital for building our understanding of for whom and under what circumstances intensive hypertension control can be beneficial. Well-designed observational studies provide meaningful contributions to the literature where gaps in experimental data exist. Despite this contribution, the interpretation of the results and absence of attempts to address potential sex effects are concerning.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.5673
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Highlighting the Need for Action Regarding Persistent Sex Bias in
           Research—Reply
    • Authors: Anderson TS; Steinman MA.
      Pages: 165 - 165
      Abstract: In Reply We appreciate Lind’s important points on the need for observational studies that reflect the demographics, including sex, of the wider population of interest. Our study examined hospitalized older adults in the national Veterans Affairs (VA) health system. The sex demographics of our study are consistent with the population of older adults served by the national VA health system. We agree with Lind that the generalizability of our study to female patients is uncertain, as is generalizability to people treated in non-VA settings, as was noted in the Discussion section of our article. We chose to study the VA population because of the unique availability of inpatient and outpatient pharmacy and vital signs data necessary to answer our research question. Unfortunately, these data are not currently available in Medicare claims or commercial databases, which may reflect wider US demographics. Furthermore, the VA health system is one of the largest training sites for medical students and graduate medical education trainees, thus practices learned in the VA health system may be carried on to future practice settings.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.5676
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Stress Testing and Risk Prediction With Known Symptomatic Multivessel
           Coronary Artery Disease
    • Authors: Erqou S; Soares C, Wu W.
      Pages: 165 - 166
      Abstract: To the Editor In their recently published Original Investigation, Garzillo and colleagues presented an interesting 10-year follow-up analysis from the second Medical, Angioplasty, or Surgery Study (MASS II) trial. In the article, the authors present an observational (nonrandomized) comparison assessing the predictive value of stress testing in the study population and report that the presence of ischemia did not identify people at risk of major adverse cardiovascular events at 10 years. We would like to point to a number of caveats that will help in interpreting the findings of this report.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.5854
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Stress Testing and Risk Prediction in People With Known Symptomatic
           Multivessel Coronary Artery Disease—Reply
    • Authors: Garzillo C; Rezende P, Hueb W.
      Pages: 166 - 167
      Abstract: In Reply We appreciate the questions and the opportunity to clarify the points mentioned in the letter by Erqou and colleagues. This study investigated whether the presence of myocardial ischemia, documented during stress testing, identified patients at higher risk for cardiovascular events or that would evolve with worsening ventricular function over 10 years of follow-up of the second Medical, Angioplasty, or Surgery Study trial. This is the cornerstone of the study. We agree that the current report is based on observational comparison, but, in fact, this is a prospective cohort study using data from a randomized clinical trial that selected a homogeneous group of patients with multivessel coronary artery disease amenable to 3 types of treatment: medical therapy, percutaneous coronary intervention, and bypass surgery. This homogeneity is also observed in the baseline characteristics of this current analysis. Thus, these factors strengthen the methodology of the current report and differentiate it from a number of other studies that evaluated the prognostic effect of stress testing.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.5857
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Incomplete and Incorrect Information in Author Affiliations
    • Pages: 167 - 167
      Abstract: In the Original Investigation titled “Association of Radiation Dose With Prevalence of Thyroid Nodules Among Atomic Bomb Survivors Exposed in Childhood (2007-2011),” published online December 29, 2014, and in the February 2015 print issue of JAMA Internal Medicine, incomplete and incorrect information appeared in the Author Affiliations section. For the first affiliation (Department of Clinical Studies, Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki, Japan), a second location in Hiroshima should have been listed, and 4 authors originally shown as being at the Nagasaki location should have been listed at the Hiroshima location instead. In addition, the city given for the third affiliation (Department of Statistics, Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki, Japan) should have been given as Hiroshima rather than Nagasaki. This article was corrected online.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.6286
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Typographical Errors in Text and Figure
    • Pages: 167 - 167
      Abstract: In the Patient Page titled “Advance Care Planning—What Should I Know'” typographical errors were present throughout the text and Figure regarding use of the terms advance care planning and advance directive. In all instances in which the wording appears, advanced has been corrected to advance. This article was corrected online.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.6508
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Advance Care Planning
    • Authors: Landefeld J; Incze MA.
      Pages: 172 - 172
      Abstract: This Patient Page describes advance care planning and the decision-making surrounding it.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Jan 2020 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1001/jamainternmed.2019.0005
      Issue No: Vol. 180, No. 1 (2020)
       
 
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