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Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.999
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 192  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 4 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 0146-1672 - ISSN (Online) 1552-7433
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1074 journals]
  • Keeping the Goal in Sight: Testing the Influence of Narrowed Visual
           Attention on Physical Activity
    • Authors: Emily Balcetis, Matthew T. Riccio, Dustin T. Duncan, Shana Cole
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Rates of physical inactivity continue to rise in the United States. With this work, we tested the efficacy of a strategy affecting the scope of visual attention designed to promote walking as a form of exercise. Specifically, we examined the influence of narrowed attention on the frequency (Studies 1a, 1b, and 3) and efficiency (Studies 2 and 4) of physical activity in general (Studies 1 and 2) and within exercise bouts measured across multiple days (Studies 3 and 4). We provide convergent evidence by investigating both individual differences in (Studies 1 and 2) and experimentally manipulated patterns of visual attention orienting (Studies 3 and 4). We discuss implications of attentional strategies for self-regulation and fitness.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-07-19T09:21:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219861438
       
  • One Size Does Not Fit All: Tailoring Cognitive Reappraisal to Different
           Emotions
    • Authors: Allon Vishkin, Yossi Hasson, Yael Millgram, Maya Tamir
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Emotion regulation strategies have been typically studied independently of the specific emotions people try to change by using them. However, to the extent that negative emotions are inherently different from one another, people may choose different means to change them. Focusing on fear and sadness, we first mapped emotion-related content to theoretically matched reappraisal tactics. We then tested how frequently people choose such reappraisal tactics when regulating fear and sadness (Studies 1, 2, and 4a). As predicted, people were most likely to select reappraisal tactics that targeted content that was particularly relevant to the specific emotion they tried to regulate. Next, we tested whether such choices were driven by differences in the efficacy (Study 3), perceived efficacy (Study 4b), and anticipated effort (Study 4c) of regulation. Our findings demonstrate that the means people select to regulate their emotions depend on which emotions they try to regulate.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-07-19T09:19:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219861432
       
  • When and Why Being Ostracized Affects Veracity Judgments
    • Authors: Jennifer Eck, Christiane Schoel, Marc-André Reinhard, Rainer Greifeneder
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Ostracism—being ignored and excluded by others—is a ubiquitous experience with adverse effects on well-being. To prevent further exclusion and regain belonging, ostracized individuals are well advised to identify affiliation partners who are sincerely well-disposed. Humans’ ability to detect lies, however, is generally not very high. Yet, veracity judgments can become more accurate with decreasing reliance on common stereotypic beliefs about the nonverbal behavior of liars and truth-tellers. We hypothesize that ostracized (vs. included) individuals base their veracity judgments less on such stereotypical nonverbal cues if message content is affiliation-relevant. In line with this hypothesis, Experiment 1 shows that ostracized (vs. included) individuals are better at discriminating affiliation-relevant lies from truths. Experiments 2 and 3 further show that ostracized (vs. included) individuals base their veracity judgments less on stereotypical nonverbal cues if messages are of high (but not low) affiliation relevance.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-07-17T10:03:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219860135
       
  • Not Quite Monoracial: Biracial Stereotypes Explored
    • Authors: Allison L. Skinner, Sylvia P. Perry, Sarah Gaither
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Stereotypes often guide our perceptions of members of social groups. However, research has yet to document what stereotypes may exist for the fastest growing youth demographic in the United States—biracial individuals. Across seven studies (N = 1,104), we investigate what stereotypes are attributed to various biracial groups, whether biracial individuals are stereotyped as more similar to their lower status monoracial parent group (trait hypodescent), and whether contact moderates these stereotypes. Results provide evidence of some universal biracial stereotypes that are applied to all biracial groups: attractive and not fitting in or belonging. We also find that all biracial groups are attributed a number of unique stereotypes (i.e., which are not associated with their monoracial parent groups). However, across all studies, we find little evidence of trait hypodescent and no evidence that the tendency to engage in trait hypodescent varies as a function of contact.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-07-08T07:01:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219858344
       
  • When Sources Honestly Provide Their Biased Opinion: Bias as a Distinct
           Source Perception With Independent Effects on Credibility and Persuasion
    • Authors: Laura E. Wallace, Duane T. Wegener, Richard E. Petty
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Anecdotally, attributions that others are biased pervade many domains. Yet, research examining the effects of perceptions of bias is sparse, possibly due to some prior researchers conflating bias with untrustworthiness. We sought to demonstrate that perceptions of bias and untrustworthiness are separable and have independent effects. The current work examines these differences in the persuasion domain, but this distinction has implications for other domains as well. Two experiments clarify the conceptual distinction between bias (skewed perception) and untrustworthiness (dishonesty) and three studies demonstrate that source bias can have a negative effect on persuasion and source credibility beyond any parallel effects of untrustworthiness, lack of expertise, and dislikability. The current work suggests that bias is an independent, but understudied source characteristic.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-07-08T03:03:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219858654
       
  • I Should Have Known Better: Development of a Self-Report Measure of
           Gullibility
    • Authors: Alessandra K. Teunisse, Trevor I. Case, Julie Fitness, Naomi Sweller
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      The aim of this research was to explore the predictors of gullibility and to develop a self-report measure of the construct. In Studies 1 to 3, exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted on a large pool of items resulting in a 12-item scale with two factors: Persuadability and Insensitivity to cues of untrustworthiness. Study 4 confirmed the criterion validity of the scale using two distinct samples: scam victims and members of the Skeptics Society. Study 5 demonstrated positive relationships between gullibility and the self-reported persuasiveness of, and likelihood of responding to, unsolicited emails. Throughout the article, analyses of a variety of measures expected to converge with the scale provided evidence for its construct validity. Overall, these studies demonstrate that the construct of gullibility is distinct from trust, negatively related to social intelligence, and that the Gullibility Scale is a reliable and valid measure of gullibility.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-06-29T06:53:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219858641
       
  • Stepping into Perpetrators’ Shoes: How Ingroup Transgressions and
           Victimization Shape Support for Retributive Justice through
           Perspective-Taking With Perpetrators

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Mengyao Li, Bernhard Leidner, Silvia Fernandez-Campos
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Three experiments (total N = 1,061) examined the morally disengaging function of perspective-taking with ingroup perpetrators in intergroup conflict. In the context of the Iran–U.S. conflict, Americans who strongly identified with their country showed increased perspective-taking with perpetrators, which in turn led to reduced support for retributive justice in response to the perpetration rather than suffering of intergroup violence (Experiment 1; N = 191). Experiment 2 (N = 294) replicated these findings in the context of the Israel–Syria conflict with Israeli Jews and demonstrated that perspective-taking with ingroup perpetrators serves a similar function as moral disengagement. Experiment 3 (N = 576) manipulated perpetrator perspective-taking, demonstrating its causal effect on support for retributive justice, again moderated by ingroup identification. The negative implications of understanding perpetrators for addressing intergroup transgressions are discussed.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-06-27T12:35:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219858652
       
  • Why Does Social Class Affect Subjective Well-Being' The Role of Status
           and Power
    • Authors: Siyu Yu, Steven L. Blader
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      The link between social class and subjective well-being (SWB) has been an important topic of inquiry, with broad implications for understanding the psychology of social class and the determinants of SWB. Prior research on this topic has focused primarily on the extent to which social class affects SWB and the factors that moderate that impact. We extend prior work by examining the concerns that account for why social class shapes SWB. In particular, we examine the role of status and power in mediating the impact of one’s social class on one’s SWB. Across five studies, we theorize and find that status mediates the impact of social class on SWB and, moreover, that status is a stronger mediator of this link than is power. Overall, these studies advance scholarly research on the psychology of social hierarchy by clarifying the interplay between social class, status, and power in relation to SWB.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-06-15T05:08:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219853841
       
  • On the Roles of Stereotype Activation and Application in Diminishing
           Implicit Bias
    • Authors: Andrew M. Rivers, Jeffrey W. Sherman, Heather R. Rees, Regina Reichardt, Karl C. Klauer
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Stereotypes can influence social perception in undesirable ways. However, activated stereotypes are not always applied in judgments. The present research investigated how stereotype activation and application processes impact social judgments as a function of available resources for control over stereotypes. Specifically, we varied the time available to intervene in the stereotyping process and used multinomial modeling to independently estimate stereotype activation and application. As expected, social judgments were less stereotypic when participants had more time to intervene. In terms of mechanisms, stereotype application, and not stereotype activation, corresponded with reductions in stereotypic biases. With increasing time, stereotype application was reduced, reflecting the fact that controlling application is time-dependent. In contrast, stereotype activation increased with increasing time, apparently due to increased engagement with stereotypic material. Stereotype activation was highest when judgments were least stereotypical, and thus, reduced stereotyping may coincide with increased stereotype activation if stereotype application is simultaneously decreased.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-06-15T05:07:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219853842
       
  • Minority Stress, Emotion Regulation, and Executive Function: An
           Experimental Investigation of Gay and Lesbian Adults
    • Authors: Larissa A. McGarrity, David M. Huebner, Timothy W. Smith, Yana Suchy
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Minority stress is associated with emotional, cognitive, and health consequences for sexual minority individuals. Mechanisms remain poorly understood. Theory and preliminary evidence suggests that stress associated with minority identity results in negative emotions and attempts at suppression, which may contribute to depletion of executive function. This study was an experimental investigation of gay and lesbian adults (N = 141). Participants engaged in a stressful interpersonal task with a confederate with anti-gay or pro-gay attitudes. We examined how condition affected executive function, along with potential mediators (state anger, anxiety, expressive suppression). Contrary to hypotheses, participants in the anti-gay condition showed better postmanipulation cognitive performance than the pro-gay condition. This effect was partially mediated by anger. Participants in the anti-gay condition reported greater attempts at suppression, but this variable did not emerge as a mediator. This study was the first to experimentally manipulate exposure to anti-gay attitudes and measure effects on executive function.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-06-15T05:07:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219855047
       
  • Induced Social Power Improves Visual Working Memory
    • Authors: Britt Hadar, Roy Luria, Nira Liberman
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      The possibility that social power improves working memory relative to conditions of powerlessness has been invoked to explain why manipulations of power improve performance in many cognitive tasks. Yet, whether power facilitates working memory performance has never been tested directly. In three studies, we induced high or low sense of power using the episodic recall task and tested participants’ visual working memory capacity. We found that working memory capacity estimates were higher in the high-power than in the low-power condition in the standard change-detection task (Study 1), in a variation of the task that introduced distractors alongside the targets (Study 2), and in a variation that used real-world objects (Study 3). Studies 2 and 3 also tested whether high power improved working memory relative to low power by enhancing filtering efficiency, but did not find support for this hypothesis. We discuss implications for theories of both power and working memory.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-06-13T06:30:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219855045
       
  • Natural, But Not Supernatural, Literal Immortality Affirmation Attenuates
           Mortality Salience Effects on Worldview Defense in Atheists
    • Authors: Kenneth E. Vail, Melissa Soenke, Brett Waggoner, Ilianna Mavropoulou
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      The present research explored whether atheists managing death awareness would be effectively buffered by affirmations of supernatural and/or natural literal immortality. Prior data were reanalyzed, revealing ambiguous results, so further experiments were conducted. In Study 1 (n = 382), atheists were randomly assigned to a supernatural afterlife-confirmed (vs. afterlife-disconfirmed) prime, an MS (vs. control topic) prime, and then given an opportunity to engage in secular worldview defense. In Study 2 (n = 360), atheists were randomly assigned to supernatural (afterlife) versus natural (medical indefinite life extension; MILE) immortality prime, an MS (vs. control topic) prime, and then given an opportunity to engage in secular worldview defense. Atheists managing death awareness increased worldview defense in the supernatural/afterlife conditions but that effect was eliminated in the MILE condition. These findings are consistent with the terror management theory perspective on worldview defense. Implications for theory and research are discussed.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-06-13T06:29:46Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219855051
       
  • Reinstating the Resourceful Self: When and How Self-Affirmations Improve
           Executive Performance of the Powerless

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Sumaya Albalooshi, Mehrad Moeini-Jazani, Bob M. Fennis, Luk Warlop
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Research has found that lack of power impairs executive functions. In the present research, we show that this impairment is not immutable. Across three studies and focusing on inhibitory control as one of the core facets of executive functions, our investigation shows that self-affirmation attenuates the previously documented decrements in inhibitory control of the powerless (Studies 1-3). We also examine boundary conditions of this effect and demonstrate that self-affirmation is most effective insofar as the powerless lack self-esteem (Study 2). Finally, we directly test the underlying process of this effect and demonstrate that self-affirmation increases an efficacious self-view among the powerless, which in turn improves their inhibitory control abilities (Study 3). Overall, we conclude that reinstating an efficacious self-view through self-affirmation offsets the impairments in inhibitory control abilities of the powerless and reduces the cognitive performance gap between the powerless and the powerful.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-06-12T06:35:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219853840
       
  • From Me to You: Self-Compassion Predicts Acceptance of Own and
           Others’ Imperfections
    • Authors: Jia Wei Zhang, Serena Chen, Theodora K. Tomova
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Self-compassion offers many personal benefits. However, whether and how the benefits of self-compassion may transmit to others remains unclear. Across three studies, we demonstrated that one way in which the benefits of being self-compassionate can spread from the self to others is by increasing acceptance of one’s own imperfections, which may, in turn, enhance acceptance of others’ imperfections. Specifically, Studies 1 and 2 found that self-compassionate people reported more acceptance of their own flaw, which, in turn, predicted greater acceptance of their romantic partner’s and acquaintance’s flaws. Study 3 used a dyadic design with romantic couples and found that self-compassion promoted felt acceptance of one’s own flaw by both members in the relationship. This occurred by virtue of acceptance of one’s own flaw, which, in turn, promoted greater acceptance of each other’s flaws. We discuss the implications of these results for future research on self-compassion.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-06-12T06:34:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219853846
       
  • Mate Preferences for Warmth-Trustworthiness Predict Romantic Attraction in
           the Early Stages of Mate Selection and Satisfaction in Ongoing
           Relationships
    • Authors: Katherine A. Valentine, Norman P. Li, Andrea L. Meltzer, Ming-Hong Tsai
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      People seek warm and trustworthy individuals as long-term mates for numerous reasons. Indeed, such individuals are prone to cooperation, have strong parenting skills, have the ability to fulfill our need to belong, and may provide a relationship that is characterized by greater closeness, protection, acceptance, and safety. Although prior work has shown that both sexes indicate equally strong preferences for these traits in potential mates, few studies have examined whether people actually respond favorably to partners high in warmth-trustworthiness in live mating contexts. We, thus, demonstrated that people’s stated preferences for warmth-trustworthiness (a) predicted their attraction to potential mates in a live mate-selection context (Study 1) and (b) interacted with their partners’ actual traits to predict satisfaction with their marriages (Study 2). Together, these studies demonstrate the importance of partner traits associated with warmth and trustworthiness and add to recent research suggesting that people can accurately report their romantic-partner preferences.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-06-11T12:22:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219855048
       
  • Strategic Storytelling: When Narratives Help Versus Hurt the Persuasive
           Power of Facts
    • Authors: Rebecca J. Krause, Derek D. Rucker
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Stories are known to be powerful persuasive devices. Stories can capture attention, evoke emotion, and entrance listeners in a manner that reduces resistance to a message. Given the powerful persuasive potential of stories, one might deduce that it is best to embed one’s facts within a story. In contrast to this perspective, the present research suggests that coupling facts with stories can either enhance or undermine persuasion. Specifically, to understand when facts benefit from the use of stories, this work provides a deeper examination of how counterargument reduction—a common explanation for the unique persuasive capabilities of stories—operates. Across three experiments, evidence is found for when it is more effective to embed facts within a story versus to use facts alone.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-06-10T10:13:03Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219853845
       
  • If You Shared My Happiness, You Are Part of Me: Capitalization and the
           Experience of Couple Identity
    • Authors: Ariela F. Pagani, Miriam Parise, Silvia Donato, Shelly L. Gable, Dominik Schoebi
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      The way in which individuals react to a partner’s disclosure of positive news (capitalization response) is associated with relational well-being. Two studies analyzed the role of couple identity in explaining the association between perceived capitalization responses and relationship quality. A daily diary study (n = 90 couples) revealed that on days people perceived their partners’ responses as active-constructive, they reported higher levels of couple identity. A longitudinal two-wave study (n = 169 couples) showed that couple identity mediated the link between active-constructive (for both women and men) and passive-destructive responses (only for men) and relationship quality. Overall, our findings suggest that the experience of the partner’s involvement and support in good times contribute to a sense of couple identity, which over the long turn, is associated with partners’ relational well-being.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-06-10T10:12:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219854449
       
  • Investigating the Robustness of the Illusory Truth Effect Across
           Individual Differences in Cognitive Ability, Need for Cognitive Closure,
           and Cognitive Style
    • Authors: Jonas De keersmaecker, David Dunning, Gordon Pennycook, David G. Rand, Carmen Sanchez, Christian Unkelbach, Arne Roets
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      People are more inclined to believe that information is true if they have encountered it before. Little is known about whether this illusory truth effect is influenced by individual differences in cognition. In seven studies (combined N = 2,196), using both trivia statements (Studies 1-6) and partisan news headlines (Study 7), we investigate moderation by three factors that have been shown to play a critical role in epistemic processes: cognitive ability (Studies 1, 2, 5), need for cognitive closure (Study 1), and cognitive style, that is, reliance on intuitive versus analytic thinking (Studies 1, 3-7). All studies showed a significant illusory truth effect, but there was no evidence for moderation by any of the cognitive measures across studies. These results indicate that the illusory truth effect is robust to individual differences in cognitive ability, need for cognitive closure, and cognitive style.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-06-10T10:11:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219853844
       
  • Women Can Benefit From Sexual and Physical Valuation in the Context of a
           Romantic Relationship
    • Authors: Andrea L. Meltzer
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      Women are frequently valued for their sexuality and physical appearance, and there is theoretical reason to believe that the effects of such valuation depend on the context. A robust body of research demonstrates that such valuation from male strangers harms women’s self-esteem; the current studies, however, tested whether women experience more positive outcomes when such valuation emerges in the context of their romantic relationships. Study 1 used an event-based diary study to demonstrate that when partners (vs. male strangers) draw attention to women’s sexuality and physical appearance, those women report higher appearance esteem and, subsequently, higher self-esteem. Study 2 used data from two independent, longitudinal studies of newlywed couples to demonstrate that partner sexual and physical valuation has positive implications for women’s self-esteem over time. These findings highlight that sexual and physical valuation is not inherently beneficial or harmful; rather, the implications of such valuation depend on the relationship context.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-06-10T10:11:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219854443
       
  • Effect of Extraneous Affect on Health Message Reception
    • Authors: Koji J. Takahashi, Allison Earl
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.
      People often avoid paying attention to health messages. One reason is that health messages can evoke negative affect, which produces avoidance. Prior efforts to reduce disengagement focused on changing message content or buffering the self from threat, producing mixed effects. The present studies test whether inducing positively valenced, low-arousal affect independently of the message or the self, labeled extraneous affect, promotes health message receptivity. Across four studies (total N = 1,447), participants who briefly meditated (vs. a control listening task) paid more attention to messages (Study 1). Increased positive valence facilitated attention, which subsequently increased message comprehension (Studies 2-4), whereas reduced arousal directly increased message comprehension. These effects generalized across extraneous affect manipulations, settings, information domains, and levels of message threat. Taken together, extraneous affect can be leveraged to promote message receptivity. This contributes to a theoretical understanding of how affect impacts persuasion.
      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-06-10T10:10:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219855042
       
  • Ingroup Love or Outgroup Hate (or Both)' Mapping Distinct Bias
           Profiles in the Population
    • Authors: Logan Hamley, Carla A. Houkamau, Danny Osborne, Fiona Kate Barlow, Chris G. Sibley
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-05-17T06:57:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219845919
       
  • Gender, Race, and Grant Reviews: Translating and Responding to Research
           Feedback
    • Authors: Monica Biernat, Molly Carnes, Amarette Filut, Anna Kaatz
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-05-15T07:25:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219845921
       
  • I Know (What) You Are, But What Am I' The Effect of Recategorization
           Threat and Perceived Immutability on Prejudice
    • Authors: Katherine A. Fritzlen, Joy E. Phillips, David S. March, Patrick R. Grzanka, Michael A. Olson
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-05-10T07:07:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219843932
       
  • Justice Agents: Discriminated Group Members Are Perceived to be Highly
           Committed to Social Justice
    • Authors: Tamar Saguy, Saulo Fernández, Nyla R. Branscombe, Aviv Shany
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-05-09T06:10:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219845922
       
  • The Resonance of Metaphor: Evidence for Latino Preferences for Metaphor
           and Analogy
    • Authors: Peter Ondish, Dov Cohen, Kay Wallheimer Lucas, Joseph Vandello
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-05-09T06:09:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219833390
       
  • The Resistance to Change-Beliefs Scale: Validation of a New Measure of
           Conservative Ideology
    • Authors: Katherine R. G. White, Dakota Kinney, Rose H. Danek, Brandt Smith, Charles Harben
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-05-08T06:30:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219841624
       
  • Individual-Level Analyses of the Impact of Parasite Stress on Personality:
           Reduced Openness Only for Older Individuals
    • Authors: Timothy L. Mullett, Gordon D. A. Brown, Corey L. Fincher, Michal Kosinski, David Stillwell
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-05-03T10:25:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219843918
       
  • Is Gratitude Always Beneficial to Interpersonal Relationships' The
           Interplay of Grateful Disposition, Grateful Mood, and Grateful Expression
           Among Married Couples
    • Authors: Joyce L. T. Leong, Sylvia Xiaohua Chen, Helene H. L. Fung, Michael Harris Bond, Nicolson Y. F. Siu, Jay Yijie Zhu
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-05-03T10:24:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219842868
       
  • Seeking and Ensuring Interdependence: Desiring Commitment and the
           Strategic Initiation and Maintenance of Close Relationships
    • Authors: Kenneth Tan, Christopher R. Agnew, Benjamin W. Hadden
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-05-03T10:24:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219841633
       
  • Self-Expression While Drinking Alcohol: Alcohol Influences Personality
           Expression During First Impressions
    • Authors: Edward Orehek, Lauren J. Human, Michael A. Sayette, John D. Dimoff, Rachel P. Winograd, Kenneth J. Sher
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-04-30T08:47:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219843933
       
  • The Effects of Perceived Decision-Making Styles on Evaluations of Openness
           and Competence That Elicit Collaboration
    • Authors: Ming-Hong Tsai, Nadhilla Velda Melia, Verlin B. Hinsz
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-04-29T08:44:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219843934
       
  • Accuracy in Perceptions of Fundamental Social Motives: Comparisons to
           Perceptions of Big Five Traits and Associations With Friendship Quality
    • Authors: Chloe O. Huelsnitz, Rebecca Neel, Lauren J. Human
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-04-26T06:15:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219838546
       
  • Can School Diversity Policies Reduce Belonging and Achievement Gaps
           Between Minority and Majority Youth' Multiculturalism, Colorblindness,
           and Assimilationism Assessed
    • Authors: Laura Celeste, Gülseli Baysu, Karen Phalet, Loes Meeussen, Judit Kende
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-04-24T04:05:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219838577
       
  • On Ladders and Pyramids: Hierarchy’s Shape Determines Relationships
           and Performance in Groups
    • Authors: Siyu Yu, Lindred L. Greer, Nir Halevy, Lisanne van Bunderen
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-04-22T08:51:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219842867
       
  • Shaping the Body Politic: Mass Media Fat-Shaming Affects Implicit Anti-Fat
           Attitudes
    • Authors: Amanda Ravary, Mark W. Baldwin, Jennifer A. Bartz
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-04-15T04:05:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219838550
       
  • Three Decades of Research on Induced Hypocrisy: A Meta-Analysis
    • Authors: Daniel Priolo, Audrey Pelt, Roxane St. Bauzel, Lolita Rubens, Dimitri Voisin, Valerie Fointiat
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-04-13T12:18:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219841621
       
  • Social Perception of Facial Color Appearance for Human Trichromatic Versus
           Dichromatic Color Vision
    • Authors: Christopher A. Thorstenson, Adam D. Pazda, Andrew J. Elliot
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-04-13T12:18:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219841641
       
  • Challenges to Traditional Narratives of Intractable Conflict Decrease
           Ingroup Glorification
    • Authors: Quinnehtukqut McLamore, Levi Adelman, Bernhard Leidner
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-04-12T09:03:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219841638
       
  • Choosing to Regulate Emotions: Pursuing Emotion Goals in
           Autonomy-Supportive and Controlling Contexts
    • Authors: Moti Benita, Raz Kehat, Rotem Zaba, Yael Blumenkranz, Gittit Kessler, Avigail Bar-Sella, Maya Tamir
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-04-12T09:03:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219838557
       
  • Social Dominance Orientation Predicts Opposition to Hierarchy-Attenuating
           Intergroup Apologies
    • Authors: Kanishka Karunaratne, Simon M. Laham
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-04-12T09:02:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219838549
       
  • Healthier and Happier' A 3-Year Longitudinal Investigation of the
           Prospective Associations and Concurrent Changes in Health and Experiential
           Well-Being
    • Authors: Nathan W. Hudson, Richard E. Lucas, M. Brent Donnellan
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-04-12T09:01:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219838547
       
  • Conflating Temporal Advancement and Epistemic Advancement: The Progression
           Bias in Judgment and Decision Making
    • Authors: Haotian Zhou, Xilin Li, Jessica Sim
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-04-03T08:42:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219838542
       
  • Why Social Threat Motivates Malevolent Creativity
    • Authors: Matthijs Baas, Marieke Roskes, Severine Koch, Yujie Cheng, Carsten K. W. De Dreu
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-04-01T06:54:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219838551
       
  • Testing Hypersensitive Responses: Ethnic Minorities Are Not More Sensitive
           to Microaggressions, They Just Experience Them More Frequently
    • Authors: Keon West
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-03-27T04:40:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219838790
       
  • Implicit Evaluative Biases Toward Targets Varying in Race and
           Socioeconomic Status
    • Authors: Bradley D. Mattan, Jennifer T. Kubota, Tianyi Li, Samuel A. Venezia, Jasmin Cloutier
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-03-23T05:58:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219835230
       
  • Who Is Prejudiced, and Toward Whom' The Big Five Traits and
           Generalized Prejudice
    • Authors: Jarret T. Crawford, Mark J. Brandt
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-03-21T12:12:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219832335
       
  • Are Black Women and Girls Associated With Danger' Implicit Racial Bias
           at the Intersection of Target Age and Gender
    • Authors: Kelsey C. Thiem, Rebecca Neel, Austin J. Simpson, Andrew R. Todd
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-03-21T12:12:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219829182
       
  • Of Nice and Mean: The Personal Relevance of Others’ Competence
           Drives Perceptions of Warmth
    • Authors: Antonin Carrier, Benoît Dompnier, Vincent Yzerbyt
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-03-19T07:25:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219835213
       
  • Group Polarization Revisited: A Processing Effort Account
         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Janusch Sieber, Rene Ziegler
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-03-19T07:21:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219833389
       
  • The Complex Relation Between Receptivity to Pseudo-Profound Bullshit and
           Political Ideology
    • Authors: Artur Nilsson, Arvid Erlandsson, Daniel Västfjäll
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-03-18T08:45:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219830415
       
  • Lost in Multidimensional Space: Epistemic Motivations Define and
           Distinguish Negative Affect
    • Authors: Paul J. Maher, Wijnand A. P. Van Tilburg, Eric R. Igou
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-03-12T09:02:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219833395
       
  • Corrigendum
    • Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-03-11T07:05:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219832334
       
  • Maximizing Tendencies in Marriage: Accentuating the Implications of
           Readily Observable Partner Characteristics for Intimates’ Satisfaction
    • Authors: Juliana E. French, Andrea L. Meltzer
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-03-06T04:24:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219832337
       
  • Are Cheaters Sexual Hypocrites' Sexual Hypocrisy, the Self-Serving
           Bias, and Personality Style
    • Authors: Benjamin Warach, Lawrence Josephs, Bernard S. Gorman
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-03-05T10:30:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219833392
       
  • Developing a Measure of Generative Historical Consciousness From Political
           Leaders’ Speeches
    • Authors: David G. Winter, Ryan Leclerc
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-03-02T12:37:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167218823043
       
  • Parenthood Is Associated With Greater Well-Being for Fathers Than Mothers
    • Authors: S. Katherine Nelson-Coffey, Matthew Killingsworth, Kristin Layous, Steve W. Cole, Sonja Lyubomirsky
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-03-01T06:33:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219829174
       
  • “We Look (and Feel) Better Through System-Justifying Lenses”:
           System-Justifying Beliefs Attenuate the Well-Being Gap Between the
           Advantaged and Disadvantaged by Reducing Perceptions of Discrimination
    • Authors: Joaquín Bahamondes, Chris G. Sibley, Danny Osborne
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-03-01T06:31:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167219829178
       
  • On the Popularity of Agentic and Communal Narcissists: The Tit-for-Tat
           Hypothesis
    • Authors: Katrin Rentzsch, Jochen E. Gebauer
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-02-07T01:08:38Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167218824359
       
  • What Is Central to Political Belief System Networks'
         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Mark J. Brandt, Chris G. Sibley, Danny Osborne
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-01-28T04:36:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167218824354
       
  • A Compassionate Self Is a True Self' Self-Compassion Promotes
           Subjective Authenticity
    • Authors: Jia Wei Zhang, Serena Chen, Theordora K. Tomova, Begüm Bilgin, Wen Jia Chai, Tamilselvan Ramis, Hadi Shaban-Azad, Pooya Razavi, Thingujam Nutankumar, Arpine Manukyan
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-01-19T07:02:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167218820914
       
  • I Blame Therefore It Was: Rape Myth Acceptance, Victim Blaming, and Memory
           Reconstruction
    • Authors: Rael J. Dawtry, Philip J. Cozzolino, Mitchell J. Callan
      First page: 1269
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-01-11T01:20:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167218818475
       
  • Creating the Punishment Orientation Questionnaire: An Item Response Theory
           Approach
    • Authors: Susan Yamamoto, Evelyn M. Maeder
      First page: 1283
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-01-11T01:19:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167218818485
       
  • Autonomous Goal Striving Promotes a Nonlimited Theory About Willpower
    • Authors: Vanda Sieber, Lavinia Flückiger, Jutta Mata, Katharina Bernecker, Veronika Job
      First page: 1295
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-01-18T07:13:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167218820921
       
  • Do People Believe That They Are More Deontological Than Others'
    • Authors: Ming-Hui Li, Li-Lin Rao
      First page: 1308
      Abstract: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ahead of Print.

      Citation: Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin
      PubDate: 2019-01-30T03:08:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0146167218823040
       
 
 
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