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Journal Cover   New Library World
  [SJR: 0.746]   [H-I: 13]   [557 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0307-4803
   Published by Emerald Homepage  [311 journals]
  • Editorial
    • Authors: David Michael Baker
      Abstract: New Library World, Volume 116, Issue 7/8, July 2015.

      Citation: New Library World
      PubDate: 2015-05-29T11:20:56Z
      DOI: 10.1108/NLW-01-2015-0008
       
  • From the library to the Information Commons: an approach to the
           model’s development in Spain
    • Authors: Ana Reyes Pacios
      First page: 345
      Abstract: New Library World, Volume 116, Issue 7/8, July 2015.
      Purpose The aim of this article is to show the progress made by thirty-seven universities in Spain in adopting the “Information Commons” model, a strategy planed ten years ago by the Spanish University Library Network (REBUIN) to meet the demands of the European Higher Education Area. Design/methodology/approach A web survey was sent to seventy supervisors or directors of Spanish university libraries. Findings This article reveal current approaches toward the goal of convergence and provide an idea of the extent to which universities have thus far managed to integrate services and resources in the Information Commons. Not all libraries have initiated this path or it is still in its early stages and the transformation is taking place at different “speeds” or degrees of implementation. Originality/value The paper shows, for the first time, that the incomplete, scant or absent integration of university services and resources in an Information Commons has to do with multiple factors in each library. The human factor is the key element in this type of change process. Commitment, network building and synergies are thus necessary factors in the success of this process.
      Citation: New Library World
      PubDate: 2015-05-29T11:20:52Z
      DOI: 10.1108/NLW-11-2014-0136
       
  • User Agreements and MakerSpaces: A Content Analysis
    • Authors: Heather Michele Moorefield-Lang
      First page: 358
      Abstract: New Library World, Volume 116, Issue 7/8, July 2015.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to analyze the user agreements of makerspaces in public and academic libraries. User agreements, also known as maker agreements, user forms, and liability forms, can be very important documents between library patrons, staff, and faculty. User agreements are similar to the earlier creation of acceptable use policies for technology use in libraries. The author of this study will delve into the user agreements created for public and academic libraries across the United States. Design/methodology/approach The researcher used content analysis to investigate 24 different user agreements written for public and academic library makerspaces. NVivo Qualitative Data Analysis Software was integrated into this research to aid in the breakdown of commonalities across terms, themes, and purpose within the user agreements. Findings While makerspaces are a very exciting topic in the field of library science at this time, the implementation of a maker learning space is still new to many libraries. Creating a user agreement for a makerspace is newer still. Most user agreements in this study were six months to a year old. Some consistencies found across makerspace user agreements include: liability waivers, permissions for minors, safety, copyright, and technology replacement costs. Originality/value At this time most publications on makerspaces are held in the realm of popular publications (blogs, magazines, zines, etc). The body of peer-reviewed and scholarly research on makerspaces is growing. Makerspace user agreements are new to this growing field of interest and a content analysis of these documents will pave the way for the writing of future forms.
      Citation: New Library World
      PubDate: 2015-05-29T11:21:01Z
      DOI: 10.1108/NLW-12-2014-0144
       
  • Digital Citizenship Through Game Design in Minecraft
    • Authors: Valerie Hill
      First page: 369
      Abstract: New Library World, Volume 116, Issue 7/8, July 2015.
      Purpose This case study describes a library project exploring innovative options for embedding information literacy skills in the elementary school library by utilizing Minecraft, a virtual world 3D building game environment. Design/methodology/approach The small-scale descriptive study, with follow up survey, focuses on a group of 5th grade students in an after school technology club facilitated by the school librarian. The students designed and built a 3D virtual world library game for younger students to help them learn digital citizenship and information literacy. Findings Analysis of observations, interviews, and videos indicated that students were highly engaged in learning information literacy elements throughout all stages of the project from design, building, implementation, and testing of younger students. Research limitations/implications Although the small number of students enrolled in the club is a limitation, the feedback provided strong evidence of motivation for learning through gamification. Further research could assess learning outcomes with the curriculum, specifically for digital citizenship and information literacy. Practical implications Embedding information literacy into a 3D world allows students to learn computer code, mathematics, game design, and fosters collaboration while demonstrating digital citizenship. Originality/value Few articles share student-designed solutions of critical information literacy needs. This study exemplifies constructivist learning in a gaming environment.
      Citation: New Library World
      PubDate: 2015-05-29T11:20:53Z
      DOI: 10.1108/NLW-09-2014-0112
       
  • Implementing EDI X12 book acquisitions at a medium-sized university
           library
    • Authors: Paul Kelsey
      First page: 383
      Abstract: New Library World, Volume 116, Issue 7/8, July 2015.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to describe and evaluate the EDI X12 ordering and invoicing implementation at Sims Memorial Library. The article will allow practitioners at academic libraries to understand the implementation process, the types of problems and resolutions encountered during the project, and the time and potential cost savings benefits of EDI X12 book acquisitions. Design/methodology/approach A team of LOUIS (the Louisiana Library Network consortium) consultants and a SirsiDynix manager helped librarians at Sims Library to implement EDI X12 ordering using YBP’s GobiExport Plus service. Vendor and report templates with mapping configurations were established, and tests were conducted until a successful outcome was achieved. Findings EDI X12 ordering and invoicing significantly streamlined the acquisitions workflow at Sims Memorial Library. A substantial amount of time is saved compared to the previous method of manually creating purchase orders and invoices. Originality/value The article is a current case study, and the collaborative aspects and problems and resolutions encountered during the implementation offer original material. The article will offer valuable practical information and provide a blueprint for those libraries seeking to adopt EDI book acquisitions.
      Citation: New Library World
      PubDate: 2015-05-29T11:20:48Z
      DOI: 10.1108/NLW-11-2014-0130
       
  • Scholarly Communications Competencies: Open Access Training for Librarians
    • Authors: Julia E Rodriguez
      First page: 397
      Abstract: New Library World, Volume 116, Issue 7/8, July 2015.
      Purpose The purpose of this article is to describe one example of an academic library using existing internal expertise and targeted events to provide training for liaison librarians in support of new scholarly communication initiatives. Design/methodology/approach This article presents a case study of how a medium-size academic library without a designated scholarly communications librarian or office presented a series of open access training opportunities for the liaison librarians in preparation for the official launch of the institutional repository and the campus’ inaugural participation in open access week. Findings The multiple opportunities to engage with the topics in diverse ways resulted in librarians being more comfortable with discussing open access with their departmental faculty. Opinions of OA were changed as a result of attending the events. Participants found the activities to be useful and were engaged enough with the topic to ask for specific areas where they would like more training opportunities. Look to other colleagues both on campus and in the broader region to tap their expertise or explore professional organizations or free webinars. Taking the initiative to organize events that require minimal effort can have a big impact. Practical implications Librarians have limited opportunity for in-depth training to gain new competencies and re-tool their skills to match current demands, this article demonstrates that utilizing internal expertise to provide a variety of training can positively impact participants attitudes and confidence. Originality/value This article presents methods and rationale for librarians to facilitate similar professional development opportunities for building new scholarly communication competencies in support of the emerging research and scholarly publishing trends.
      Citation: New Library World
      PubDate: 2015-05-29T11:20:59Z
      DOI: 10.1108/NLW-12-2014-0140
       
  • Libraries Surviving as Entrepreneurial Organizations: A Creative
           Destruction Perspective
    • Authors: Karen I. MacDonald, Wyoma vanDuinkerken
      First page: 406
      Abstract: New Library World, Volume 116, Issue 7/8, July 2015.
      Purpose Due to a combination of environmental pressures, universities are refining their strategic mission to identify “what they do well” or “where they want to be.” Programs that align with the strategic mission of the university get funded, while other less productive, lower impact programs and services are neglected or eliminated. This is essentially a process based on business or financial decisions. In an attempt to cope with these changes, academic library administrators are assessing library services to insure that they are aligned with their university’s strategic mission. Design/methodology/approach As this results-oriented, strategic thinking culture evolves, the actual brick & mortar library will also evolve to become a technology-based information service center that facilitates campus-wide creative activities. This perspective piece will highlight some traditional functions found in academic libraries and apply various business models, including the Schumpeterian model of creative destruction, as an aid to developing the entrepreneurial culture that will be necessary if the academic library is to stay viable and relevant in the 21st century. Findings Best Practices Originality/value This perspective piece will highlight some traditional functions found in academic libraries and apply various business models, including the Schumpeterian model of creative destruction, as an aid to developing the entrepreneurial culture that will be necessary if the academic library is to stay viable and relevant in the 21st century.
      Citation: New Library World
      PubDate: 2015-05-29T11:20:58Z
      DOI: 10.1108/NLW-01-2015-0005
       
  • E- Learning from the Perspective of Library and Information Science
           Students (Case Study of Alzahra, Yazd and Payamenoor Universities)
    • Authors: Afsaneh Hazeri, Mahboobeh Farzin-Yazdi
      First page: 420
      Abstract: New Library World, Volume 116, Issue 7/8, July 2015.
      Purpose This study will investigate the attitudes of Library and Information Science students from Alzahra, Yazd, and Payamenoor Universities towards e-learning, while aiming to develop awareness in the broader LIS community of alternative and supplement solutions in the LIS educational arena. Design/methodology/approach This is a research survey conducted amongst 142 students. Data was collected via a researcher-designed questionnaire and analyzed with SPSS software using descriptive and analytical methods. Findings Based on the findings, a relatively favorable attitude of e-learning education exists, indicating the existence of a supportive culture that can offer this type of education. According to the findings, with the provision of necessary equipment and the possibility of other incentives, e.g. running workshops, a supportive culture would be more advanced. Results also revealed that e-learning systems are more effective for the purpose of some courses that are related to the use of computers and the internet, courses relating to information sources, and courses associated with the application of new technologies in libraries. Originality/value The emergence of new concepts and the advancement of technologies demands that LIS schools update their curricula. The findings of this paper ascertain the importance of equipping graduates with the knowledge and skills associated with e-learning technologies. LIS students need to gain specialized skills in the application of new technologies in libraries; the implementation of an e-learning system by LIS schools, and the delivery of electronic programs, provides an environment for them in which to experience the application of new technologies.
      Citation: New Library World
      PubDate: 2015-05-29T11:20:51Z
      DOI: 10.1108/NLW-08-2014-0102
       
  • Research Productivity of Library Scholars: Bibliometric Analysis of Growth
           and Trends of LIS Publications
    • Authors: Munazza Jabeen, Liu Yun, Muhammad Rafiq, Misbah Jabeen
      First page: 433
      Abstract: New Library World, Volume 116, Issue 7/8, July 2015.
      Purpose The purpose of this study is to explore, by a quantitative analysis, growth rates of, and trends in, global publications in the field of library and information science (LIS) produced by library science professionals Design/methodology/approach A survey approach was used. JCR (Journal Citation Reports) 2010 was the major source for selecting 40 LIS core journals. A bibliometric analysis was conducted. Visualization and mapping software was utilized to present a picture of the growth in, and trends relating to LIS publications. Findings 18,371 research articles were published from 2003 to 2012. A significant growth rate (11.37%) was found in 2009. Self-citation tendencies have been increasing, with an average rate of 38.56%. Of all publication types, “article” was the most popular among LIS researchers. China has contributed remarkably in terms of collaborative publications. Practical implications The present study could be helpful for library professionals, subject specialists and policy makers. These findings may encourage library professionals to integrate and monitor library functions through bibliometric analysis. Originality/value This paper identifies growth, trends in publications by LIS researchers through use of bibliometrics.
      Citation: New Library World
      PubDate: 2015-05-29T11:20:49Z
      DOI: 10.1108/NLW-11-2014-0132
       
  • Use of Public Relations and Publicity (PRP) by the Public Libraries in
           Lahore, Pakistan
    • Authors: Kanwal Ameen
      First page: 455
      Abstract: New Library World, Volume 116, Issue 7/8, July 2015.
      Purpose The present study aims to explore the use of public relations and publicity by the public libraries. It also intends to create awareness among the information professionals regarding the use of PRP. Design/methodology/approach The qualitative design, based on the interview method as data collection technique, was used to get the opinions and perceptions of the selected public librarians. The content analysis of the responses was made to answer the research questions. Findings The findings revealed that PRP are hardly used by the public libraries in Lahore. Research limitations/implications It will serve as guideline for further research in quantitative and qualitative manner, as it has addressed and untouched area. Practical implications It is likely that it will raise awareness among the public librarians regarding the use of PRP for creating and maintaining a strong positive image. Originality/value It will serve as guideline for further research in quantitative and qualitative manner, as it has addressed and untouched area and reports original research
      Citation: New Library World
      PubDate: 2015-05-29T11:20:50Z
      DOI: 10.1108/NLW-11-2014-0131
       
  • Hiring for Attitude and Training for Skill in the Library
    • Authors: Bruce Massis
      First page: 467
      Abstract: New Library World, Volume 116, Issue 7/8, July 2015.
      Purpose The purpose of this column is to emphasize that hiring a library employee in possession of a positive and winning attitude can pay enormous benefits for the organization far into the future. Design/methodology/approach Literature review and commentary on this topic that has been addressed by professionals, researchers and practitioners. Findings While it can be difficult to completely be certain that one has made the right choice with every hire, at least by developing a set of effective interview questions, listening closely to the candidate’s responses, and appraising any negative bent in mood or language with the objective of assessing attitude at the outset of the interview can lead to a more successful hiring experience. Originality/value The value in addressing this issue is to submit that hiring employees for their attitude and training them for their skills can result in a workplace where the positive benefits of such hires can be realized daily.
      Citation: New Library World
      PubDate: 2015-05-29T11:21:00Z
      DOI: 10.1108/NLW-12-2014-0145
       
  • Editorial
    • Authors: David Baker
      Abstract: New Library World, Volume 116, Issue 5/6, May 2015.

      Citation: New Library World
      PubDate: 2015-04-27T10:27:25Z
      DOI: 10.1108/NLW-11-2014-0129
       
  • Transforming library communication: from Gutenberg to Zuckerberg
    • Authors: Olga Einasto
      Pages: 247 - 263
      Abstract: New Library World, Volume 116, Issue 5/6, Page 247-263, May 2015.
      Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to analyse institutional and functional development of a library with the help of communication theories. The library as a social institution should have a quite strong position in today’s information society, but new ways of information search have made its position unstable. Thus, a library needs theoretical and cultural-political comprehension and reassessment. The paper tries to answer the questions as to how a library can satisfy the needs of modern society and which strategy of library communication will be in demand tomorrow. Design/methodology/approach – The theoretical background is represented by communication theories of Marshal McLuhan, Denis McQuail and Mihhail Lotman, as well as Michel Foucault’s concepts of disciplinary power and governmentality. Findings – The analysis revealed that library–user communication is based primarily on power relations, where “access” is the main keyword. The article brought out differences in library communicative processes in the “Gutenberg Galaxy” and today’s global network society, “Zuckerberg Era”. The analysis showed that library–user relationship is shifting from disciplinary power and monologue to the governmentality and new communicative forms, dialogue and participation. Research limitations/implications – The study demonstrates the possibility of implication of communication theories for library functional analysis. The new studies investigating which methods and forms of communication do libraries use today, how are the elements of power relations transforming would be very useful for the understanding of the topic. Practical implications – The study proposes to libraries some ideas that may be useful for developing the library communication strategy. Originality/value – This study, based on the communicative approach, corresponds well to library phenomenon and nature, as well as allows for reflection on the role of libraries in the society of today and future.
      Citation: New Library World
      PubDate: 2015-04-27T10:27:27Z
      DOI: 10.1108/NLW-05-2014-0055
       
  • Learning about translators from library catalog records: implications for
           readers’ advisory
    • Authors: Keren Dali, Lana Alsabbagh
      Pages: 264 - 276
      Abstract: New Library World, Volume 116, Issue 5/6, Page 264-276, May 2015.
      Purpose – The purpose of this article is to make public librarians aware of the wealth of information about translators that is contained in bibliographic records of their own library catalogs so they could use this information for the benefit of readers’ advisory (RA) work involving translated titles. Design/methodology/approach – The article uses the method of bibliographic data analysis based on 350 selected translated fiction titles (and 2,100 corresponding catalog records) from six large Canadian public libraries. Findings – As the results demonstrate, enhanced bibliographic catalog records deliver a wide spectrum of information about translators, which can be used by public libraries to provide more informed and insightful reading advice and to make more sensible purchasing decisions with regard to translated fiction. Practical implications – The study shows how the most readily available tool – a library catalog with its enhanced bibliographic records – can be utilized by public librarians for improving RA practices. It focuses on the rarely discussed translated fiction, demonstrates a sample methodological approach and makes suggestions for implementing this approach by busy public librarians in real-life situations. Originality/value – No recent studies that have investigated enhanced catalog records have dealt with translated fiction. Moreover, while authors/writers are often in the focus of RA studies, translators are often left behind the scenes, despite their crucial role in bringing international fiction to English-speaking readers.
      Citation: New Library World
      PubDate: 2015-04-27T10:27:22Z
      DOI: 10.1108/NLW-07-2014-0091
       
  • Engaging international students in academic and information literacy
    • Authors: Alison Lahlafi, Diane Rushton
      Pages: 277 - 288
      Abstract: New Library World, Volume 116, Issue 5/6, Page 277-288, May 2015.
      Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to discuss a collaborative initiative between a module leader, librarian and academic skills tutor to support information and academic literacy skills development of a group of international students from a partner college in Malaysia during their three-month study visit to Sheffield Hallam University. Design/methodology/approach – The paper explores the transferability of active learning and teaching techniques used with second-year home students to a cohort of final-year international students. It discusses the development, implementation and assessment of learning workshop activities and the use of mobile phones in the classroom to enhance student engagement. Findings – The embedded active learning and teaching techniques used with second-year home students transferred well to the international student cohort. At the end of the module, international student feedback and reference list analysis suggests that the embedding of both information and academic literacy skills within modules does support student development of these skills. Mobile technology proved both enjoyable and engaging for the students. Originality/value – The paper’s findings are transferable to other international student cohorts in UK higher education libraries and suggest ways of engaging students in information and academic skills workshops and supporting their skills development to achieve academic success.
      Citation: New Library World
      PubDate: 2015-04-27T10:26:55Z
      DOI: 10.1108/NLW-07-2014-0088
       
  • Manuscript libraries and archival description in the Caribbean
    • Authors: Lorraine M Nero
      Pages: 289 - 301
      Abstract: New Library World, Volume 116, Issue 5/6, Page 289-301, May 2015.
      Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine the indexing method used by Caribbean libraries to describe special collections and manuscripts. Design/methodology/approach – Various types of finding aids spanning 1960-2014 are used to show the pattern of descriptions adopted by the librarians. At the same time, the factors which have sustained the approach at national libraries and university libraries are highlighted. Findings – The paper concludes that while the indexing approach may be labour-intensive, this practice is perceived as developing a national and regional documentary heritage. The materials used for this study are primarily accessible to the public inclusive of published guides and online databases. Originality/value – The literature is replete with theories and cases from places such as the UK, the USA and Australia, this paper presents a perspective on the development of archival description in the Caribbean.
      Citation: New Library World
      PubDate: 2015-04-27T10:26:40Z
      DOI: 10.1108/NLW-08-2014-0098
       
  • Adult education concepts in library professional development activities
    • Authors: Ramirose Ilene Attebury
      Pages: 302 - 315
      Abstract: New Library World, Volume 116, Issue 5/6, Page 302-315, May 2015.
      Purpose – The purpose of this review is to survey the literature addressing the professional development of academic librarians in the context of adult education principles. Design/methodology/approach – This article is a literature review. Findings – The review reveals that among those activities incorporating concepts from the adult education field andragogy, transformational learning, communities of practice and instructional design are most prevalent. Originality/value – To date, no other literature review considers adult education concepts in professional development of academic librarians.
      Citation: New Library World
      PubDate: 2015-04-27T10:27:09Z
      DOI: 10.1108/NLW-08-2014-0100
       
  • “Bringing the library to you!”
    • Authors: Pauline Nicholas, Jerdaine Sterling, Rochelle Davis, Jessica C Lewis, Faith Mckoy-Johnson, Karlene Nelson, Yolanda Tugwell, Karen Tyrell
      Pages: 316 - 335
      Abstract: New Library World, Volume 116, Issue 5/6, Page 316-335, May 2015.
      Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to assess the recent outreach service efforts of the University of the West Indies (UWI) Main Library in the form of a Hall of Residence Librarian Programme. The aim of the programme was to minimize library anxiety through partnership with the Office of Students Services. Design/methodology/approach – The transition from the secondary to the tertiary level is not always the smoothest for some students. On the islands of the English-speaking Caribbean, such as Jamaica, it can be especially difficult as some matriculants have never used an automated library. These students often experience great difficulty in effectively using the library which may result in them shying away from doing so and thus negatively impact the quality of their work. The UWI, the UWI Main Library, Mona campus, Jamaica has sought to address this challenge through the development of an outreach project to the first-year students entitled the Halls of Residence Librarian (HRL) programme. Findings – This new form of library outreach on The UWI Mona campus has yielded the offering of library services in new locations, strategic partnerships, increased interactions with the first-year students and a greater awareness of these students' needs. Most importantly, it was very effective in reducing library anxiety among the first-year students. Research limitations/implications – The “low” turnout to Research Rescue was largely attributed to the fact that this programme was entirely optional for the students, and it was not affiliated with any compulsory course or class. There was also the issue of a lack of incentives to boost student attendance at these sessions. Originality/value – This initiative is untested in the English-speaking Caribbean. The paper explores the outreach efforts of the library at the Mona campus of The UWI and seeks to add to the limited body of literature on Academic Library Outreach in the Caribbean.
      Citation: New Library World
      PubDate: 2015-04-27T10:26:44Z
      DOI: 10.1108/NLW-06-2014-0080
       
  • The velocity of verbiage: speed as an element in serving academic library
           students
    • Authors: Bruce Massis
      Pages: 336 - 339
      Abstract: New Library World, Volume 116, Issue 5/6, Page 336-339, May 2015.
      Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to comment on the enhanced expectation by academic library students who require increased speed of reference and research support, where limited time and increasing distractions are a constant concern. Design/methodology/approach – Literature review and commentary on this topic that has been addressed by professionals, researchers and practitioners. Findings – The speed of access and delivery of information stand as dual support pillars in today’s academic on-ground and digitally driven library setting. The librarian must surely be cognizant of many a customer’s expectation that “instant gratification takes too long”. Originality/value – The value in addressing this issue is to suggest that, while there is an expectation that students will always receive a successful outcome in their reference or research interaction with an academic librarian, students must likewise recognize that quality must not be sacrificed in favor of speed.
      Citation: New Library World
      PubDate: 2015-04-27T10:27:04Z
      DOI: 10.1108/NLW-10-2014-0128
       
 
 
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