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Journal Cover   Nature Reviews Neuroscience
  [SJR: 14.685]   [H-I: 259]   [292 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1471-003X - ISSN (Online) 1471-0048
   Published by Nature Publishing Group Homepage  [110 journals]
  • Neural Circuits: A nucleus of fear
    • Authors: Darran Yates
      Pages: 121 - 121
      Abstract: Two studies show that the paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus is a component of fear-processing circuits.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 121 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-02-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3932
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • Sensory systems: Noisy nociception
    • Authors: Natasha Bray
      Pages: 122 - 123
      Abstract: A set of neurons in the cochlear organ of Corti is activated in response to noxious sound levels and thus mediates 'auditory nociception'.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 122 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-02-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3926
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • Synaptic transmission: Transporter trafficking
    • Authors: Katherine Whalley
      Pages: 122 - 122
      Abstract: Glutamate transporters make a crucial contribution to neuronal signalling by rapidly removing excess glutamate from the synaptic cleft. Here, the authors showed that surface trafficking of the astrocytic glutamate transporter GLT1 (also known as EAAT2) was regulated by neuronal and glial activity. Blocking the surface
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 122 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-02-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3930
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • Neuroimmunology: Immune cells drive resilience
    • Authors: Katherine Whalley
      Pages: 122 - 122
      Abstract: In recent years, the concept of a bidirectional regulatory relationship between the brain and the immune system has gained support. Here, the authors isolated lymphocytes from mice subjected to chronic social defeat stress and adoptively transferred these cells into naive mice. The recipients exhibited reduced
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 122 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-02-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3929
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • Cell biology of the neuron: Skin cells clear neuronal debris
    • Authors: Katherine Whalley
      Pages: 122 - 122
      Abstract: Cutaneous injuries can damage the somatosensory neurons that innervate the skin, and repair of these neurons requires the debris generated by degenerating axons to be removed. The authors found that, in zebrafish, cutaneous axon debris resulting from a laser-induced injury was not cleared by 'professional
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 122 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-02-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3928
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • Learning and memory: Emotional memory tagging
    • Authors: Katherine Whalley
      Pages: 122 - 122
      Abstract: In animals, short-term memories generated by weak behavioural training can be strengthened and converted to long-term memories by a subsequent novel experience, such as exposure to a new environment. The authors here showed that a similar phenomenon occurs in humans: participants' recollection of otherwise neutral
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 122 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-02-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3927
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • Visual processing: An organizing wave?
    • Authors: Darran Yates
      Pages: 122 - 123
      Abstract: Saccadic eye movements elicit travelling waves of neural activity in area V4 in macaques that might have a role in the reorganization of spatiotemporal visual information.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 122 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-02-04
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3923
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • Neurodegeneration: Selective vulnerability
    • Authors: Fiona Carr
      Pages: 123 - 123
      Abstract: The subtype of motor neurons that is most likely to degenerate early in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is prone to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in mice, owing to low levels of SIL1, an ER-associated protein.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 123 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-01-29
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3920
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • Synaptic plasticity: Cold-shocked synapses
    • Authors: Fiona Carr
      Pages: 124 - 125
      Abstract: RNA-binding motif protein 3, a cold-shock protein, promotes synaptic regeneration and is neuroprotective in mouse models of Alzheimer disease and prion infection.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 124 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-02-04
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3922
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • Pain: Reappraising pain
    • Authors: Natasha Bray
      Pages: 124 - 125
      Abstract: A functional MRI study demonstrates that the nucleus accumbens and ventromedial prefrontal cortex mediate the effects of self-regulation on pain rating.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 124 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-01-29
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3919
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • Autonomic nervous system: Go easy on the salt!
    • Authors: Sian Lewis
      Pages: 125 - 125
      Abstract: A new study shows that high dietary salt causes hypertension through disruption of a feedback circuit from arterial baroreceptors to the hypothalamus,which leads to unregulated vasopressin release and peripheral vasoconstriction.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 125 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-02-11
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3925
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • Retromer in Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease and other neurological
           disorders
    • Authors: Scott A. Small, Gregory A. Petsko
      Pages: 126 - 132
      Abstract: Retromer is a protein assembly that has a central role in endosomal trafficking, and retromer dysfunction has been linked to a growing number of neurological disorders. First linked to Alzheimer disease, retromer dysfunction causes a range of pathophysiological consequences that have been shown to contribute
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 126 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-02-11
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3896
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • Development, evolution and pathology of neocortical subplate neurons
    • Authors: Anna Hoerder-Suabedissen, Zoltán Molnár
      Pages: 133 - 146
      Abstract: Subplate neurons have an essential role in cortical circuit formation. They are among the earliest formed neurons of the cerebral cortex, are located at the junction of white and grey matter, and are necessary for correct thalamocortical axon ingrowth. Recent transcriptomic studies have provided opportunities
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 133 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-02-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3915
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • Exploring the origins of grey matter damage in multiple sclerosis
    • Authors: Massimiliano Calabrese, Roberta Magliozzi, Olga Ciccarelli, Jeroen J. G. Geurts, Richard Reynolds, Roland Martin
      Pages: 147 - 158
      Abstract: Multiple sclerosis is characterized at the gross pathological level by the presence of widespread focal demyelinating lesions of the myelin-rich white matter. However, it is becoming clear that grey matter is not spared, even during the earliest phases of the disease. Furthermore, grey matter damage
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 147 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-02-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3900
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • The connectomics of brain disorders
    • Authors: Alex Fornito, Andrew Zalesky, Michael Breakspear
      Pages: 159 - 172
      Abstract: Pathological perturbations of the brain are rarely confined to a single locus; instead, they often spread via axonal pathways to influence other regions. Patterns of such disease propagation are constrained by the extraordinarily complex, yet highly organized, topology of the underlying neural architecture; the so-called
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 159 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-02-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3901
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • Intrinsic plasticity: an emerging player in addiction
    • Authors: Saïd Kourrich, Donna J. Calu, Antonello Bonci
      Pages: 173 - 184
      Abstract: Exposure to drugs of abuse, such as cocaine, leads to plastic changes in the activity of brain circuits, and a prevailing view is that these changes play a part in drug addiction. Notably, there has been intense focus on drug-induced changes in synaptic excitability and
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 173 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-02-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3877
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • The warrior in the machine: neuroscience goes to war
    • Authors: Irene Tracey, Rod Flower
      Pages: 184 - 184
      Abstract: Nature Reviews Neuroscience15, 825–834 (2014)In table 1, methylxanthines should have been listed as adenosine A1 and A2 receptor antagonists (rather than agonists). This has been corrected in the online version of the article.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 184 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-01-21
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3914
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 3 (2015)
       
 
 
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