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Journal Cover Nature Reviews Neuroscience     [SJR: 8.65]   [H-I: 232]
   [271 followers]  Follow    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1471-003X - ISSN (Online) 1471-0048
   Published by Nature Publishing Group Homepage  [110 journals]
  • Pain: Converging on LTP
    • Authors: Darran Yates
      Pages: 63 - 63
      Abstract: Chronic pain and anxiety may be mechanistically linked by a presynaptic form of long-term potentiation that occurs at synapses in the anterior cingluate cortex.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 63 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-01-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3913
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Attention: Tuning sensory selection
    • Authors: Katherine Whalley
      Pages: 64 - 65
      Abstract: The neuregulin 1 receptor ERBB4 tunes synapse strength in the thalamic reticular nucleus as part of a circuit that regulates selective attention.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 64 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-01-05
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3899
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Navigation: The third dimension
    • Authors: Darran Yates
      Pages: 65 - 65
      Abstract: Head-direction cells fire when a mammal's head points in a specific direction in a horizontal plane and may provide 'compass' information to allow navigation, at least in two dimensions. Whether mammals possess a three-dimensional (3D) compass is less clear. Finkelstein et al. developed a
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 65 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-01-15
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3905
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Cortical Plasticity: Critical depolarization
    • Authors: Darran Yates
      Pages: 65 - 65
      Abstract: Here, the authors examined the role of depolarizing GABA in regulating critical-period plasticity in the visual cortex of rat pups. Brief, early pharmacological interference of depolarizing GABA, before the opening of the critical period, did not affect the onset of critical-period cortical plasticity but it
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 65 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-01-15
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3904
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Neural coding: Time for a song
    • Authors: Darran Yates
      Pages: 65 - 65
      Abstract: The fine temporal pattern of spiking has been shown to have an important role in encoding information in sensory systems, but it is unclear whether such temporal coding is used by the forebrain motor network in motor control. Here, the authors analysed different renditions of
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 65 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-01-15
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3903
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Sensory systems: Channelling touch
    • Authors: Darran Yates
      Pages: 65 - 65
      Abstract: The mechanisms underlying touch sensation in humans are poorly understood. Here, the authors induced human stem-cell-derived neural crest cells in vitro to produce neurons that morphologically and electrophysiologically resembled a subset of low-threshold mechanoreceptors (LTMRs), which convey touch. Deletion of the gene encoding PIEZO2,
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 65 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-01-15
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3902
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Behavioural neuroscience: Swarming away from smells
    • Authors: Natasha Bray
      Pages: 66 - 67
      Abstract: A new study shows that Drosophila melanogaster exhibits collective odour-avoidance behaviour that is dependent on mechanosensory interactions between individual flies.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 66 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-01-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3907
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Neurodegenerative disease: Restoring balance in Huntington disease
    • Authors: Katherine Whalley
      Pages: 66 - 67
      Abstract: A new study shows that boosting mTORC1 activity in the striatum can ameliorate disease phenotypes in a mouse model of Huntington disease.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 66 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-01-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3906
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Neurodegenerative disease: Factoring in astrocytes
    • Authors: Darran Yates
      Pages: 67 - 67
      Abstract: Activation of nuclear factor-κB in astrocytes leads to the release of complement factor 3, which impairs neuronal function, and this mechanism may contribute to Alzheimer disease.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 67 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-01-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3908
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Neuronal circuits: Waves of perception
    • Authors: Sian Lewis
      Pages: 68 - 68
      Abstract: It remains controversial whether cortical oscillations are an epiphenomenon or an important mechanism by which cortical information flow can be coordinated. A recent study in humans analysed the effects of γ-band-specific entrainment of cortical areas and found that interhemispheric connectivity could be increased by artificially
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 68 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-01-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3912
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Sensory systems: TLC for touch neurons
    • Authors: Sian Lewis
      Pages: 68 - 68
      Abstract: Low-threshold mechanosensory receptors (LTMRs) are important for the sense of touch. Here, the authors show that, in mice, the Aδ subtype of LTMRs (Aδ-LTMRs), which are located inside hair follicles, are tuned to be more sensitive to deflection in the caudal-to-rostral direction. This is achieved
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 68 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-01-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3911
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Motor systems: Switching sides
    • Authors: Sian Lewis
      Pages: 68 - 68
      Abstract: Lateralized movements require the coordinated contraction of different muscle groups, including trunk and limb muscles, located on opposite sides of the body, but it is not well understood how this is regulated at the spinal level. A new study shows that axial (trunk) muscles, which
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 68 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-01-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3910
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Gene expression: Different ways to splice the cake
    • Authors: Sian Lewis
      Pages: 68 - 68
      Abstract: Alternative splicing, which involves the excision of different sections of mRNA during post-transcriptional processing, provides a means of expanding transcriptomic complexity. The regulation and function of alternative splicing remain poorly understood, but a new study reveals a technique that enables in-depth analysis of alternative splicing
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 68 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-01-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3909
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Opioid and chemokine receptor crosstalk: a promising target for pain
           therapy'
    • Authors: Stéphane Mélik Parsadaniantz, Cyril Rivat, William Rostène, Annabelle Réaux-Le Goazigo
      Pages: 69 - 78
      Abstract: Chemokines and opioids are important regulators of immune, inflammatory and neuronal responses in peripheral and central pain pathways. Recent studies have provided insights into the functional interactions between chemokine receptors and opioid receptors, and their role in pain modulation. In this Progress article, we discuss
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 69 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-01-15
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3858
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Redefining the cerebellar cortex as an assembly of non-uniform Purkinje
           cell microcircuits
    • Authors: Nadia L. Cerminara, Eric J. Lang, Roy V. Sillitoe, Richard Apps
      Pages: 79 - 93
      Abstract: The adult mammalian cerebellar cortex is generally assumed to have a uniform cytoarchitecture. Differences in cerebellar function are thought to arise primarily through distinct patterns of input and output connectivity rather than as a result of variations in cortical microcircuitry. However, evidence from anatomical, physiological
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 79 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-01-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3886
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Spatial cognition in bats and rats: from sensory acquisition to multiscale
           maps and navigation
    • Authors: Maya Geva-Sagiv, Liora Las, Yossi Yovel, Nachum Ulanovsky
      Pages: 94 - 108
      Abstract: Spatial orientation and navigation rely on the acquisition of several types of sensory information. This information is then transformed into a neural code for space in the hippocampal formation through the activity of place cells, grid cells and head-direction cells. These spatial representations, in turn,
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 94 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-01-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3888
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Spreading of pathology in neurodegenerative diseases: a focus on human
           studies
    • Authors: Johannes Brettschneider, Kelly Del Tredici, Virginia M.-Y. Lee, John Q. Trojanowski
      Pages: 109 - 120
      Abstract: The progression of many neurodegenerative diseases is thought to be driven by the template-directed misfolding, seeded aggregation and cell–cell transmission of characteristic disease-related proteins, leading to the sequential dissemination of pathological protein aggregates. Recent evidence strongly suggests that the anatomical connections made by neurons —
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 109 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-01-15
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3887
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Neurophysiology: Under pressure
    • Authors: Sian Lewis
      Pages: 64 - 65
      Abstract: Obesity arising from a poor diet often leads to hypertension, and a new study shows that apdipose-derived leptin, acting on neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalams is necessary and sufficient to induce hypertension.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 64 (2015)
      PubDate: 2014-12-24
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3897
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2014)
       
  • Prefrontal cortex: Dopamine double rules
    • Authors: Natasha Bray
      Pages: 68 - 68
      Abstract: Dopamine receptor subtypes 1 and 2 in the prefrontal cortex contribute to rule-based executive function via differential but complementary effects.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 68 (2015)
      PubDate: 2014-12-24
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3895
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 2 (2014)
       
 
 
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