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Journal Cover Nature Reviews Neuroscience
  [SJR: 14.685]   [H-I: 259]   [219 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1471-003X - ISSN (Online) 1471-0048
   Published by Nature Publishing Group Homepage  [112 journals]
  • Techniques: Wide of the mark
    • Authors: Darran Yates
      Pages: 73 - 73
      Abstract: A new study shows that the transient manipulation of neural activity can sometimes have 'off-target' effects, making it challenging to determine the specific neural circuit that generates a particular behaviour.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 17, 73 (2016)
      PubDate: 2016-01-25
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn.2016.6
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 2 (2016)
       
  • Neurological disorders: A second wave
    • Authors: Natasha Bray
      Pages: 76 - 76
      Abstract: In mice, an early ablation of myelinating oligodendrocytes can trigger a secondary, CD4+ T cell-associated demyelination 30 weeks later, suggesting a possible mechanism for the onset of demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 17, 76 (2016)
      PubDate: 2016-01-25
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn.2016.5
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 2 (2016)
       
  • Emotion: Fear factors
    • Authors: Katherine Whalley
      Pages: 76 - 76
      Abstract: The neural circuitry underlying innate fear is thought to be distinct from the circuits that mediate conditioned fear, but is poorly understood. Yang et al. show that, in mice, the laterodorsal tegmentum (LDT) is activated by a TMT, a predator odorant that induces an
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 17, 76 (2016)
      PubDate: 2016-01-25
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn.2016.4
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 2 (2016)
       
  • Hippocampal processing: A new direction
    • Authors: Katherine Whalley
      Pages: 76 - 76
      Abstract: Previous studies of rodent navigation have suggested that the firing of hippocampal neurons is modulated by an animal's spatial position but not by its head direction. By recording from rat CA1 neurons during random foraging in real-world and virtual reality environments, Acharya et al.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 17, 76 (2016)
      PubDate: 2016-01-25
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn.2016.1
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 2 (2016)
       
  • Learning and memory: Mnemonic modifications
    • Authors: Katherine Whalley
      Pages: 76 - 76
      Abstract: Chromatin modifications, including histone post-translational modifications (HPTMs) and DNA methylation, are linked to learning and memory. Halder et al. assessed the functional involvement of these modifications in different stages of contextual fear conditioning (CFC) in mice. Global HPTM changes were associated with the phase
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 17, 76 (2016)
      PubDate: 2016-01-25
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn.2016.2
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 2 (2016)
       
  • Reward: Top-down control
    • Authors: Katherine Whalley
      Pages: 76 - 76
      Abstract: Impaired motivation to seek reward (anhedonia) has been proposed to be caused by changes in the top-down (cortical) control of subcortical reward pathways. Here, Ferenczi et al. combine optogenetics with functional MRI and testing of reward-related behaviours to assess this idea. They show that,
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 17, 76 (2016)
      PubDate: 2016-01-25
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn.2016.3
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 2 (2016)
       
  • The right time to learn: mechanisms and optimization of spaced learning
    • Authors: Paul Smolen, Yili Zhang, John H. Byrne
      Pages: 77 - 88
      Abstract: For many types of learning, spaced training, which involves repeated long inter-trial intervals, leads to more robust memory formation than does massed training, which involves short or no intervals. Several cognitive theories have been proposed to explain this superiority, but only recently have data begun
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 17, 77 (2016)
      PubDate: 2016-01-25
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn.2015.18
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 2 (2016)
       
  • Rediscovering area CA2: unique properties and functions
    • Authors: Serena M. Dudek, Georgia M. Alexander, Shannon Farris
      Pages: 89 - 102
      Abstract: Hippocampal area CA2 has several features that distinguish it from CA1 and CA3, including a unique gene expression profile, failure to display long-term potentiation and relative resistance to cell death. A recent increase in interest in the CA2 region, combined with the development of new
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 17, 89 (2016)
      PubDate: 2016-01-25
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn.2015.22
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 2 (2016)
       
  • Autoimmune synaptopathies
    • Authors: Sarah J. Crisp, Dimitri M. Kullmann, Angela Vincent
      Pages: 103 - 117
      Abstract: Autoantibodies targeting proteins at the neuromuscular junction are known to cause several distinct myasthenic syndromes. Recently, autoantibodies targeting neurotransmitter receptors and associated proteins have also emerged as a cause of severe, but potentially treatable, diseases of the CNS. Here, we review the clinical evidence as
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 17, 103 (2016)
      PubDate: 2016-01-25
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn.2015.27
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 2 (2016)
       
  • Should I stop or should I go' The role of complexin in
           neurotransmitter release
    • Authors: Thorsten Trimbuch, Christian Rosenmund
      Pages: 118 - 125
      Abstract: When it comes to fusion with the neuronal cell membrane, does a synaptic vesicle have a choice whether to stop or to go' Recent work suggests that complexin, a tiny protein found within the synaptic terminal, contributes to the mechanism through which this choice is
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 17, 118 (2016)
      PubDate: 2016-01-25
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn.2015.16
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 2 (2016)
       
  • Neurobiology of rodent self-grooming and its value for translational
           neuroscience
    • Authors: Allan V. Kalueff, Adam Michael Stewart, Cai Song, Kent C. Berridge, Ann M. Graybiel, John C. Fentress
      Pages: 118 - 118
      Abstract: Nature Reviews Neuroscience17, 45–59 (2016)This article was published without one of its supplementary information files (Supplementary information S6). This file has now been added online, and the article and Supplementary information S5 have been amended so that
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 17, 118 (2016)
      PubDate: 2016-01-25
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn.2015.28
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 2 (2016)
       
  • Linking early-life NMDAR hypofunction and oxidative stress in
           schizophrenia pathogenesis
    • Authors: Giles E. Hardingham, Kim Q. Do
      Pages: 125 - 134
      Abstract: Molecular, genetic and pathological evidence suggests that deficits in GABAergic parvalbumin-positive interneurons contribute to schizophrenia pathophysiology through alterations in the brain's excitation–inhibition balance that result in impaired behaviour and cognition. Although the factors that trigger these deficits are diverse, there is increasing evidence that they
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 17, 125 (2016)
      PubDate: 2016-01-14
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn.2015.19
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 2 (2016)
       
  • Neurodegenerative disease: Forming fragments
    • Authors: Fiona Carr
      Pages: 74 - 75
      Abstract: Parkinson disease-associated mutations in the gene encoding vacuolar protein sorting-associated protein 35 increase the turnover of dynamin-like protein 1 in the mitochondrial membrane of neurons, leading to mitochondrial fission and neuronal death.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 17, 74 (2016)
      PubDate: 2015-12-24
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn.2015.25
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Neurogenetics: Restoring levels
    • Authors: Fiona Carr
      Pages: 74 - 75
      Abstract: The behavioural phenotype in a mouse model of MECP2 (methyl-CpG-binding protein 2) duplication syndrome can be rescued in adulthood by normalizing MeCP2 levels.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 17, 74 (2016)
      PubDate: 2015-12-17
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn.2015.20
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Neuronal circuits: Patch work in the striatum
    • Authors: Katherine Whalley
      Pages: 75 - 75
      Abstract: The endogenous opioid enkephalin acts through δ-opioid receptors to suppress local inhibition of dorsal striatum patch output neurons.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 17, 75 (2016)
      PubDate: 2015-12-24
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn.2015.23
      Issue No: Vol. 17, No. 2 (2015)
       
 
 
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