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Nature Reviews Neuroscience    [141 followers]  Follow    
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
     ISSN (Print) 1471-003X - ISSN (Online) 1471-0048
     Published by Nature Publishing Group Homepage  [108 journals]   [SJR: 8.65]   [H-I: 232]
  • Neurogenesis: A striatal supply of new neurons
    • Authors: Leonie Welberg
      Pages: 203 - 203
      Abstract: Adult neurogenesis occurs in the human striatum.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 203 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-03-05
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3714
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 4 (2014)
       
  • Learning and memory: Don't forget the CA2
    • Authors: Sian Lewis
      Pages: 204 - 204
      Abstract: The CA2 region of the hippocampus is a disynaptic gateway between the entorhinal cortex and CA1. This study showed that in adult mice, selective inactivation of CA2 pyramidal cell output resulted in the loss of memory of a previously encountered conspecific but had no effect
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 204 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-03-12
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3719
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 4 (2014)
       
  • Pain: Stopping pain in its tracks
    • Authors: Sian Lewis
      Pages: 204 - 204
      Abstract: Inhibition of primary nociceptors by optogenetic approaches has been achieved in transgenic mice, but the genetic manipulation involved has limited its translational potential. A new study used a type of adeno-associated virus administered into the sciatic nerve in mice to express inhibitory opsins in primary
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 204 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-03-12
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3718
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 4 (2014)
       
  • Neuropharmacology: Switching on the light
    • Authors: Sian Lewis
      Pages: 204 - 204
      Abstract: Blindness can be caused by retinal degeneration and a consequent inability to interpret incoming light stimuli. Although several promising repair strategies have been proposed, they are all invasive and not without complications. Here, the authors described a novel approach involving 'photoswitch' compounds that enable neuronally
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 204 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-03-12
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3717
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 4 (2014)
       
  • Synaptic physiology: Sprint or steady pace
    • Authors: Sian Lewis
      Pages: 204 - 204
      Abstract: All synapses exhibit both evoked and spontaneous release ('minis') of neurotransmitters. Recent data have indicated that these two release modes involve distinct mechanisms, but the details are unclear. Using calcium imaging at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ), this paper showed that most NMJs exhibiting
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 204 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-03-12
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3716
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 4 (2014)
       
  • Neuroimmunology: Obesity inflames memory circuits
    • Authors: Natasha Bray
      Pages: 204 - 205
      Abstract: Adipose-derived interleukin-1β may mediate memory deficits in a mouse model of obesity.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 204 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-03-05
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3713
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 4 (2014)
       
  • Sensory systems: The hungry sense
    • Authors: Darran Yates
      Pages: 204 - 205
      Abstract: In mice, the endocannabinoid system inhibits glutamatergic signalling from the olfactory cortex to the main olfactory bulb after fasting, increasing the detection of food odours and, consequently, enhancing food consumption.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 204 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-02-26
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3711
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 4 (2014)
       
  • Sensory systems: Staying silent
    • Authors: Katherine Whalley
      Pages: 205 - 205
      Abstract: Olfactory receptors signal through G protein βγ subunits to silence the expression of other olfactory receptors within a single olfactory sensory neuron.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 205 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-03-12
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3715
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 4 (2014)
       
  • Synaptic transmission: Invasion of the astrocytes!
    • Authors: Leonie Welberg
      Pages: 206 - 207
      Abstract: Connexin 30 regulates synaptic transmission by controlling the extension of astrocytic processes into the synaptic cleft.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 206 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-03-12
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3720
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 4 (2014)
       
  • Circadian rhythms: Methylation mediates clock plasticity
    • Authors: Leonie Welberg
      Pages: 206 - 207
      Abstract: The period length of the circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus can be modulated by changes in DNA methylation induced by shortening the light–dark cycle.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 206 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-03-05
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3712
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 4 (2014)
       
  • Sensory systems: A touch of regulation
    • Authors: Darran Yates
      Pages: 207 - 207
      Abstract: Opioids, acting mainly via δ-opioid receptors, may provide broad control of cutaneous mechanosensation, including touch.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 207 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-03-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3721
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 4 (2014)
       
  • Microglial phagocytosis of live neurons
    • Authors: Guy C. Brown, Jonas J. Neher
      Pages: 209 - 216
      Abstract: Microglia, the brain's professional phagocytes, can remove dead and dying neurons as well as synapses and the processes of live neurons. However, we and others have recently shown that microglia can also execute neuronal death by phagocytosing stressed-but-viable neurons — a process that we have
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 209 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-03-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3710
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 4 (2014)
       
  • Growth and folding of the mammalian cerebral cortex: from molecules to
           malformations
    • Authors: Tao Sun, Robert F. Hevner
      Pages: 217 - 232
      Abstract: The size and extent of folding of the mammalian cerebral cortex are important factors that influence a species' cognitive abilities and sensorimotor skills. Studies in various animal models and in humans have provided insight into the mechanisms that regulate cortical growth and folding. Both protein-coding
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 217 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-03-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3707
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 4 (2014)
       
  • Disturbance of endoplasmic reticulum proteostasis in neurodegenerative
           diseases
    • Authors: Claudio Hetz, Bertrand Mollereau
      Pages: 233 - 249
      Abstract: The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a homeostatic mechanism by which cells regulate levels of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Although it is well characterized in non-neuronal cells, a proliferation of papers over the past few years has revealed a key role for
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 233 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-03-12
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3689
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 4 (2014)
       
  • Electrical synapses and their functional interactions with chemical
           synapses
    • Authors: Alberto E. Pereda
      Pages: 250 - 263
      Abstract: Brain function relies on the ability of neurons to communicate with each other. Interneuronal communication primarily takes place at synapses, where information from one neuron is rapidly conveyed to a second neuron. There are two main modalities of synaptic transmission: chemical and electrical. Far from
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 250 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-03-12
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3708
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 4 (2014)
       
  • The log-dynamic brain: how skewed distributions affect network operations
    • Authors: György Buzsáki, Kenji Mizuseki
      Pages: 264 - 278
      Abstract: We often assume that the variables of functional and structural brain parameters — such as synaptic weights, the firing rates of individual neurons, the synchronous discharge of neural populations, the number of synaptic contacts between neurons and the size of dendritic boutons — have a
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 264 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-02-26
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3687
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 4 (2014)
       
  • Functional MRI-based lie detection: scientific and societal challenges
    • Authors: Martha J. Farah, J. Benjamin Hutchinson, Elizabeth A. Phelps, Anthony D. Wagner
      Pages: 278 - 278
      Abstract: Nature Reviews Neuroscience15, 123–131 (2014)An incorrect paper was cited as reference 2 of this article. The correct paper is Ganis, G., Rosenfeld, J. P., Meixner, J., Kievit, R. A. & Schendan, H. E. Lying in the scanner:
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 278 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-02-19
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3702
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 4 (2014)
       
 
 
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