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Journal Cover Nature Reviews Neuroscience
   [243 followers]  Follow    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
     ISSN (Print) 1471-003X - ISSN (Online) 1471-0048
     Published by Nature Publishing Group Homepage  [110 journals]   [SJR: 8.65]   [H-I: 232]
  • Sleep: Let sleeping worms lie
    • Authors: Natasha Bray
      Pages: 697 - 697
      Abstract: Two new studies show that the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans displays a sleep-like state in response to heat shock and suggest that this state is necessary for recovery from cellular stress.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 697 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-10-15
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3849
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 11 (2014)
       
  • Gene therapy: Going from strength to strength
    • Authors: Sian Lewis
      Pages: 698 - 699
      Abstract: A new gene therapy approach can be used to increase size and efficiency of neuromuscular junctions with corresponding inceases in muscle strength.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 698 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-10-10
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3847
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 11 (2014)
       
  • Neurodegeneration: Active astrocytes drive inflammation
    • Authors: Katherine Whalley
      Pages: 698 - 698
      Abstract: Astrocyte activation has been linked to neurodegeneration in conditions such as multiple sclerosis (MS); however, the molecular mechanisms involved are unclear. The authors found that the enzyme that synthesizes lactosylceramide (LacCer) is upregulated in astrocytes in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (a mouse model of MS) and
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 698 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-10-01
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3844
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 11 (2014)
       
  • Depression: Mood food
    • Authors: Katherine Whalley
      Pages: 698 - 698
      Abstract: Low levels of dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are linked to anxiety and depression; however, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Larrieu et al. showed that mice that were fed a diet deficient in n-3 PUFAs exhibited behavioural changes and neuronal atrophy
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 698 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-10-01
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3842
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 11 (2014)
       
  • Learning and memory: Epigenetic exchange mechanisms
    • Authors: Katherine Whalley
      Pages: 698 - 698
      Abstract: Epigenetic mechanisms, including histone modification and DNA methylation, are known to regulate memory formation. Zovkic et al. now reveal that histone variant exchange — another form of epigenetic regulation in which variant histones are incorporated into nucleosomes — has a role in memory consolidation.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 698 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-10-01
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3843
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 11 (2014)
       
  • Sleep: Asleep but aware
    • Authors: Katherine Whalley
      Pages: 698 - 698
      Abstract: Although we cannot interact with the environment while asleep, our brains continue to process incoming stimuli. Here, individuals classified spoken words into categories (such as animals or objects) during the transition to sleep. The authors found that the neural activity patterns associated with this task
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 698 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-10-01
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3841
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 11 (2014)
       
  • Glia: Schwann cells provide life support for axons
    • Authors: Katherine Whalley
      Pages: 698 - 699
      Abstract: The regulation of Schwann cell metabolism by LKB1 is essential for the preservation of axonal integrity.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 698 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-24
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3840
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 11 (2014)
       
  • Synaptic plasticity: Timing is everything
    • Authors: Leonie Welberg
      Pages: 699 - 699
      Abstract: Dopamine regulates reinforcement-based plasticity at the single-spine level on medium spiny neurons in the striatum by increasing the gain of Hebbian plasticity.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 699 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-10-15
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3850
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 11 (2014)
       
  • Neurotransmission: Transmission takes two
    • Authors: Darran Yates
      Pages: 700 - 701
      Abstract: Two studies in rodents show that lateral habenula activity is regulated by neurons that co-release glutamate and GABA.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 700 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-10-15
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3848
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 11 (2014)
       
  • Neural circuits: Grooming's innate, innit'
    • Authors: Leonie Welberg
      Pages: 700 - 701
      Abstract: Distinct populations of neurons in the posterior dorsal part of the medial amygdala antagonistically regulate social behaviour and self-grooming, a non-social behaviour.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 700 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-10-01
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3845
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 11 (2014)
       
  • Learning and memory: Actively compensating
    • Authors: Darran Yates
      Pages: 701 - 701
      Abstract: Alzheimer's disease is characterized by episodic memory impairments and brain deposition of the peptide amyloid-β (Aβ). However, not all older people with Aβ pathology exhibit memory deficits. Elman et al.examined whether brain hyperactivity, which has been observed in such individuals, might compensate for this
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 701 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-10-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3854
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 11 (2014)
       
  • Perception: A decisive response
    • Authors: Darran Yates
      Pages: 701 - 701
      Abstract: Certain neurons in the medial temporal lobe (MTL) respond to different images and even the name of a given individual. Here, the authors assessed MTL neuron responses in a face adaptation task. Participants were shown the face of one of two well-known people (who were
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 701 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-10-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3853
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 11 (2014)
       
  • Neural circuits: Getting colder
    • Authors: Darran Yates
      Pages: 701 - 701
      Abstract: The neural circuitry that underlies the perception of skin cooling is unclear. To examine this, the authors trained mice to report temperature drops (delivered by a thermal probe applied to the forepaw skin) by licking a water dispenser. Cooling induced activity in the primary somatosensory
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 701 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-10-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3852
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 11 (2014)
       
  • Learning and memory: The left–right divide
    • Authors: Darran Yates
      Pages: 701 - 701
      Abstract: Several studies in mice have revealed that there are differences in the molecular make-up of and plasticity at CA3–CA1 pyramidal neuron synapses that depend on whether the presynaptic input comes from the left or right CA3. To detect any functional effects of this asymmetry, Shipton
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 701 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-10-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3851
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 11 (2014)
       
  • The role of orexin in motivated behaviours
    • Authors: Takeshi Sakurai
      Pages: 719 - 731
      Abstract: Wakefulness and vigilance levels are required for maintaining purposeful activities and motivated behaviours, which are often triggered by sensory information conveying external cues. An increasing body of work has suggested that orexins (also known as hypocretins) — a pair of neuropeptides that are crucial for
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 719 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-10-10
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3837
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 11 (2014)
       
  • Time cells in the hippocampus: a new dimension for mapping memories
    • Authors: Howard Eichenbaum
      Pages: 732 - 744
      Abstract: Recent studies have revealed the existence of hippocampal neurons that fire at successive moments in temporally structured experiences. Several studies have shown that such temporal coding is not attributable to external events, specific behaviours or spatial dimensions of an experience. Instead, these cells represent the
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 732 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-10-01
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3827
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 11 (2014)
       
  • Expectation in perceptual decision making: neural and computational
           mechanisms
    • Authors: Christopher Summerfield, Floris P. de Lange
      Pages: 745 - 756
      Abstract: Sensory signals are highly structured in both space and time. These structural regularities in visual information allow expectations to form about future stimulation, thereby facilitating decisions about visual features and objects. Here, we discuss how expectation modulates neural signals and behaviour in humans and other
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 745 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-10-15
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3838
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 11 (2014)
       
  • Early phytocannabinoid chemistry to endocannabinoids and beyond
    • Authors: Raphael Mechoulam, Lumír O. Hanuš, Roger Pertwee, Allyn C. Howlett
      Pages: 757 - 764
      Abstract: Isolation and structure elucidation of most of the major cannabinoid constituents — including Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC), which is the principal psychoactive molecule in Cannabis sativa — was achieved in the 1960s and 1970s. It was followed by the identification of two
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 757 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-10-15
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3811
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 11 (2014)
       
  • Learning and memory: Consolidation of fear
    • Authors: Darran Yates
      Pages: 630 - 631
      Abstract: In mice, miR-34a-mediated downregulation of Notch signalling in the basolateral amygdala enables fear memory consolidation.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 15, 630 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-08-28
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3821
      Issue No: Vol. 15, No. 10 (2014)
       
 
 
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