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Journal Cover Nature Reviews Neuroscience
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   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
     ISSN (Print) 1471-003X - ISSN (Online) 1471-0048
     Published by Nature Publishing Group Homepage  [110 journals]   [SJR: 8.65]   [H-I: 232]
  • Sensory neurons: The sense in reprogramming
    • Authors: Darran Yates
      Pages: 1 - 1
      Abstract: Mouse and human fibroblasts can be reprogrammed to become peripheral sensory neurons in vitro through overexpression of certain combinations of transcription factors.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 1 (2015)
      PubDate: 2014-12-19
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3894
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 1 (2014)
       
  • Neuroinflammation: Transport disruption in multiple sclerosis
    • Authors: Katherine Whalley
      Pages: 2 - 2
      Abstract: Impaired axonal transport is implicated in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases; but its potential role in the neuroinflammatory disease multiple sclerosis has not been determined. Using in vivo two-photon imaging, Sorbara et al. found widespread deficits in both anterograde and retrograde transport
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 2 (2015)
      PubDate: 2014-12-19
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3892
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 1 (2014)
       
  • Synaptic physiology: Human efficiency
    • Authors: Katherine Whalley
      Pages: 2 - 2
      Abstract: In terms of cognitive ability, humans outperform other species, suggesting that our brains possess enhanced information processing capacity. Testa-Silva et al. here show that human synapses can indeed relay information with high efficiency. They recorded from pairs of pyramidal neurons in human and mouse
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 2 (2015)
      PubDate: 2014-12-19
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3891
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 1 (2014)
       
  • Brain ageing: Last in, first out'
    • Authors: Katherine Whalley
      Pages: 2 - 2
      Abstract: It has been proposed that the last parts of the brain to mature are the first to degenerate as we age. By analysing structural MRI data from 484 healthy participants aged from 8 to 85 years, Douaud et al. now provide direct evidence for
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 2 (2015)
      PubDate: 2014-12-19
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3890
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 1 (2014)
       
  • Neurodevelopmental disorders: Developmental delays
    • Authors: Katherine Whalley
      Pages: 2 - 2
      Abstract: Mutations in the gene encoding fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), an RNA-binding protein expressed during brain development, lead to fragile X sydrome (FXS). Bagni and colleagues show that, in embryonic mice, loss of FMRP delays the migration of new-born neurons to the cortical plate
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 2 (2015)
      PubDate: 2014-12-19
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3889
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 1 (2014)
       
  • Neurodegenerative disease: A social role for microRNA
    • Authors: Leonie Welberg
      Pages: 2 - 3
      Abstract: Reduced sociability in frontotemporal dementia may be due, at least in part, to a reduction in miR-124 levels resulting in altered AMPA receptor composition and function in the frontal cortex.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 2 (2015)
      PubDate: 2014-12-03
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3884
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 1 (2014)
       
  • Aging: A slow slide in memory
    • Authors: Sian Lewis
      Pages: 2 - 3
      Abstract: Age-related memory impairment is thought to result from cumulative oxidative damage in neurons, but this study shows that in Drosophila melanogaster, these memory impairments are as a result of reduced D-serine production by glia.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 2 (2015)
      PubDate: 2014-11-26
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3882
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 1 (2014)
       
  • Circadian rhythms: Remembering night and day
    • Authors: Sian Lewis
      Pages: 3 - 3
      Abstract: Events that cause circadian arrhythmia such as travel across time zones or shift work impair memory formation and in hamsters this is shown to require intact circuitry in the suprachiasmatic nucleus.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 3 (2015)
      PubDate: 2014-12-10
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3885
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 1 (2014)
       
  • Visual processing: Taking an in-depth look at motion
    • Authors: Darran Yates
      Pages: 4 - 4
      Abstract: Neurons in cortical area MT have a crucial role in representing motion in depth.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 4 (2015)
      PubDate: 2014-12-19
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3893
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 1 (2014)
       
  • Sensory processing: Geniculate ganglion neurons have individual tastes
    • Authors: Natasha Bray
      Pages: 4 - 4
      Abstract: The majority of neurons in the geniculate ganglion — which receives inputs from taste receptor cells on the tongue — are singly tuned to a particular taste quality.
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 4 (2015)
      PubDate: 2014-11-26
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3883
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 1 (2014)
       
  • The mechanisms and functions of spontaneous neurotransmitter release
    • Authors: Ege T. Kavalali
      Pages: 5 - 16
      Abstract: Fast synaptic communication in the brain requires synchronous vesicle fusion that is evoked by action potential-induced Ca2+ influx. However, synaptic terminals also release neurotransmitters by spontaneous vesicle fusion, which is independent of presynaptic action potentials. A functional role for spontaneous neurotransmitter release events
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 5 (2015)
      PubDate: 2014-12-19
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3875
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 1 (2014)
       
  • The neuroprotective actions of oestradiol and oestrogen receptors
    • Authors: Maria-Angeles Arevalo, Iñigo Azcoitia, Luis M. Garcia-Segura
      Pages: 17 - 29
      Abstract: Hormones regulate homeostasis by communicating through the bloodstream to the body's organs, including the brain. As homeostatic regulators of brain function, some hormones exert neuroprotective actions. This is the case for the ovarian hormone 17β-oestradiol, which signals through oestrogen receptors (ERs) that are widely distributed
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 17 (2015)
      PubDate: 2014-11-26
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3856
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 1 (2014)
       
  • Endocannabinoid signalling and the deteriorating brain
    • Authors: Vincenzo Di Marzo, Nephi Stella, Andreas Zimmer
      Pages: 30 - 42
      Abstract: Ageing is characterized by the progressive impairment of physiological functions and increased risk of developing debilitating disorders, including chronic inflammation and neurodegenerative diseases. These disorders have common molecular mechanisms that can be targeted therapeutically. In the wake of the approval of the first cannabinoid-based drug
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 30 (2015)
      PubDate: 2014-12-19
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3876
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 1 (2014)
       
  • Sensory theories of developmental dyslexia: three challenges for research
    • Authors: Usha Goswami
      Pages: 43 - 54
      Abstract: Recent years have seen the publication of a range of new theories suggesting that the basis of dyslexia might be sensory dysfunction. In this Opinion article, the evidence for and against several prominent sensory theories of dyslexia is closely scrutinized. Contrary to the causal claims
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 43 (2015)
      PubDate: 2014-11-05
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3836
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 1 (2014)
       
  • Salience processing and insular cortical function and dysfunction
    • Authors: Lucina Q. Uddin
      Pages: 55 - 61
      Abstract: The brain is constantly bombarded by stimuli, and the relative salience of these inputs determines which are more likely to capture attention. A brain system known as the 'salience network', with key nodes in the insular cortices, has a central role in the detection of
      Citation: Nature Reviews Neuroscience 16, 55 (2015)
      PubDate: 2014-11-19
      DOI: 10.1038/nrn3857
      Issue No: Vol. 16, No. 1 (2014)
       
 
 
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