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Journal Cover Nature Neuroscience
  [SJR: 13.558]   [H-I: 325]   [414 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1097-6256 - ISSN (Online) 1546-1726
   Published by NPG Homepage  [143 journals]
  • Attention improves memory by suppressing spiking-neuron activity in the
           human anterior temporal lobe
    • Attention improves memory by suppressing spiking-neuron activity in the human anterior temporal lobe

      Attention improves memory by suppressing spiking-neuron activity in the human anterior temporal lobe, Published online: 21 May 2018; doi:10.1038/s41593-018-0148-7

      Wittig et al. show that attention in the service of verbal memory triggers a preparatory suppression of neural activity in the human anterior temporal lobe, suggesting that this region is a novel and unexpected source of attentional control.Attention improves memory by suppressing spiking-neuron activity in the human anterior temporal lobe, Published online: 2018-05-21; doi:10.1038/s41593-018-0148-72018-05-21
      DOI: 10.1038/s41593-018-0148-7
       
  • mTORC2, but not mTORC1, is required for hippocampal mGluR-LTD and
           associated behaviors
    • mTORC2, but not mTORC1, is required for hippocampal mGluR-LTD and associated behaviors

      mTORC2, but not mTORC1, is required for hippocampal mGluR-LTD and associated behaviors, Published online: 21 May 2018; doi:10.1038/s41593-018-0156-7

      mTORC1 was posited as required for hippocampal mGluR-LTD at CA1 synapses based on its pharmacological inhibition with rapamycin. Using molecular genetics, the authors show that mTORC2 but not mTORC1 is required for mGluR-LTD and associated behaviors.mTORC2, but not mTORC1, is required for hippocampal mGluR-LTD and associated behaviors, Published online: 2018-05-21; doi:10.1038/s41593-018-0156-72018-05-21
      DOI: 10.1038/s41593-018-0156-7
       
  • Distinct learning-induced changes in stimulus selectivity and interactions
           of GABAergic interneuron classes in visual cortex
    • Distinct learning-induced changes in stimulus selectivity and interactions of GABAergic interneuron classes in visual cortex

      Distinct learning-induced changes in stimulus selectivity and interactions of GABAergic interneuron classes in visual cortex, Published online: 21 May 2018; doi:10.1038/s41593-018-0143-z

      Khan et al. simultaneously measured activity from excitatory cells and three classes of inhibitory interneurons in visual cortex and show that learning differentially shapes the stimulus selectivity and interactions of multiple cell classes.Distinct learning-induced changes in stimulus selectivity and interactions of GABAergic interneuron classes in visual cortex, Published online: 2018-05-21; doi:10.1038/s41593-018-0143-z2018-05-21
      DOI: 10.1038/s41593-018-0143-z
       
  • Beyond the maternal epigenetic legacy
    • Beyond the maternal epigenetic legacy

      Beyond the maternal epigenetic legacy, Published online: 21 May 2018; doi:10.1038/s41593-018-0157-6

      In 2004, Weaver et al. published evidence in Nature Neuroscience for the lasting epigenetic impact of maternal care within the hippocampus of rat offspring. This conceptual and methodological leap contributed to the evolution of environmental and behavioral epigenetics and continues to inspire challenging questions about genes, environments, and their legacy.Beyond the maternal epigenetic legacy, Published online: 2018-05-21; doi:10.1038/s41593-018-0157-62018-05-21
      DOI: 10.1038/s41593-018-0157-6
       
  • Chronic CRH depletion from GABAergic, long-range projection neurons in the
           extended amygdala reduces dopamine release and increases anxiety
    • Chronic CRH depletion from GABAergic, long-range projection neurons in the extended amygdala reduces dopamine release and increases anxiety

      Chronic CRH depletion from GABAergic, long-range projection neurons in the extended amygdala reduces dopamine release and increases anxiety, Published online: 21 May 2018; doi:10.1038/s41593-018-0151-z

      The neuropeptide CRH is believed to induce aversive, stress-like behavioral responses. Here the authors describe a distinct population of CRH neurons in the extended amygdala that act to suppress anxiety by positively modulating dopamine release.Chronic CRH depletion from GABAergic, long-range projection neurons in the extended amygdala reduces dopamine release and increases anxiety, Published online: 2018-05-21; doi:10.1038/s41593-018-0151-z2018-05-21
      DOI: 10.1038/s41593-018-0151-z
       
  • What does dopamine mean'
    • What does dopamine mean?

      What does dopamine mean?, Published online: 14 May 2018; doi:10.1038/s41593-018-0152-y

      What does dopamine mean?What does dopamine mean?, Published online: 2018-05-14; doi:10.1038/s41593-018-0152-y2018-05-14
      DOI: 10.1038/s41593-018-0152-y
       
  • Two distinct mechanisms for experience-dependent homeostasis
    • Two distinct mechanisms for experience-dependent homeostasis

      Two distinct mechanisms for experience-dependent homeostasis, Published online: 14 May 2018; doi:10.1038/s41593-018-0150-0

      The authors revise the classical view that homeostasis of neuronal activity is achieved by negative firing rate feedback: during sensory deprivation, homeostasis occurs via the sliding threshold, which acts via firing patterns rather than rates.Two distinct mechanisms for experience-dependent homeostasis, Published online: 2018-05-14; doi:10.1038/s41593-018-0150-02018-05-14
      DOI: 10.1038/s41593-018-0150-0
       
  • Synaptic homeostasis: quality vs. quantity
    • Synaptic homeostasis: quality vs. quantity

      Synaptic homeostasis: quality vs. quantity, Published online: 14 May 2018; doi:10.1038/s41593-018-0159-4

      Synaptic connections adapt homeostatically to changes in experience to maintain optimal circuit function. A study demonstrates that different forms of synaptic homeostasis respond to distinct aspects of circuit activity, suggesting that neurons can gauge and adapt to the both the quality and quantity of circuit activity.Synaptic homeostasis: quality vs. quantity, Published online: 2018-05-14; doi:10.1038/s41593-018-0159-42018-05-14
      DOI: 10.1038/s41593-018-0159-4
       
 
 
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