for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help
Followed Journals
Journal you Follow: 0
 
Sign Up to follow journals, search in your chosen journals and, optionally, receive Email Alerts when new issues of your Followed Jurnals are published.
Already have an account? Sign In to see the journals you follow.
Journal Cover   Nature
  [SJR: 21.323]   [H-I: 829]   [2814 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0028-0836 - ISSN (Online) 1476-4687
   Published by Nature Publishing Group Homepage  [110 journals]
  • Highway to health
    • Pages: 407 - 407
      Abstract: Africa has an ambitious and welcome plan for a continent-wide centre for disease control — but if the agency is to live up to its promise, it will need substantially better resources.
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/520407a
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Decoupled ideals
    • Pages: 407 - 408
      Abstract: ‘Ecomodernist Manifesto’ reframes sustainable development, but the goal remains the same.
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-21
      DOI: 10.1038/520407b
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • There's more to come from Moore
    • Pages: 408 - 408
      Abstract: Moore's law is approaching physical limits: truly novel physics will be needed to extend it.
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-17
      DOI: 10.1038/520408a
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Why I teach evolution to Muslim students
    • Authors: Rana Dajani
      Pages: 409 - 409
      Abstract: Encouraging students to challenge ideas is crucial to fostering a generation of Muslim scientists who are free thinkers, says Rana Dajani.
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/520409a
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Cancer biology: Some mutations in cancer arrive late
    • Pages: 410 - 411
      Abstract: Subpopulations of tumour cells can harbour unique mutations that crop up later in a tumour's lifetime, and these could lead to treatment resistance.Tumours contain cells with distinct mutations. Charles Swanton of University College London and his colleagues analysed DNA sequence data from more than
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/520410d
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Glaciology: Antarctic ice shelf nears its demise
    • Pages: 410 - 410
      Abstract: The remains of an ice shelf that collapsed spectacularly in 2002 may be headed for total disintegration.The break-up of the Larsen B ice shelf was one of the largest and fastest melting events ever seen by glaciologists. Ala Khazendar of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/520410c
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Plant genetics: Sweet potato is already a GM crop
    • Pages: 410 - 410
      Abstract: The sweet-potato genome contains genes from bacteria, so is an example of a naturally occurring genetically modified (GM) plant.While combing through the genome of the domesticated sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas), Jan Kreuze of the International Potato Center in Lima, Peru, and his
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/520410b
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Microbiology: Bacterial bonanza far from the West
    • Pages: 410 - 410
      Abstract: Members of an isolated Amazon tribe in Venezuela (pictured) have the most diverse gut bacteria ever documented in humans.Maria Gloria Dominguez-Bello at New York University School of Medicine analysed oral, faecal and skin bacteria from 34 Yanomami villagers who had never met anyone from
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/520410a
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Animal behaviour: Octopus crawls with no rhythm
    • Pages: 411 - 411
      Abstract: Octopuses can move quickly in any direction, regardless of which way the eyes and body are facing.Binyamin Hochner of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem and his colleagues studied the animal's movement by analysing videos of crawling octopuses (Octopus vulgaris; pictured). They
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/520411c
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Astrophysics: Many flavours of supernova
    • Pages: 411 - 411
      Abstract: Exploding stars grouped in one family because of their similarities actually form two distinct groups. This may have important cosmic implications because the explosions, called supernovae, are the primary evidence that the Universe's expansion is accelerating.Half of type Ia supernovae seem to have similar
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/520411d
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Palaeontology: Ancient seas bore bone-fed worms
    • Pages: 411 - 411
      Abstract: Bone-eating worms devour dead whales in today's oceans, but their ancient relatives might have emerged millions of years before their modern food source.Modern Osedax worms drill distinctive holes in bone, with the oldest examples found in whale and fish bones from around 30
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/520411a
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Ecology: Like a moth to a trumpet flower
    • Pages: 411 - 411
      Abstract: Hawk-moths are better at finding nectar in flowers shaped like the bell of a trumpet than in those that resemble a flat disc.Eric Octavio Campos and his colleagues at the University of Washington in Seattle used a 3D printer to create flowers that were
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/520411b
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Animal behaviour: Dazzling colours distract predators
    • Pages: 411 - 411
      Abstract: Many animals have coloration that shifts depending on the angle from which they are viewed, and this may help them to avoid predators.This 'interference coloration' has evolved several times in beetles, birds, fish and other creatures, but it is not clear why. Thomas Pike,
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/520411e
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Seven days: 17–23 April 2015
    • Pages: 412 - 413
      Abstract: The week in science: Nobel laureate leads stem-cell initiative; German science gets a boost; and comet spews dust from its dark side.
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/520412a
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Wolf decline threatens iconic island study
    • Authors: Emma Marris
      Pages: 415 - 415
      Abstract: Just three animals remain on Isle Royale, spelling probable end of 57-year ecology project.
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-17
      DOI: 10.1038/nature.2015.17263
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Bee studies stir up pesticide debate
    • Authors: Daniel Cressey
      Pages: 416 - 416
      Abstract: The threat that neonicotinoids pose to bees becomes clearer.
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/520416a
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Drug that boosts nerve signals offers hope for multiple sclerosis
    • Authors: Heidi Ledford
      Pages: 417 - 417
      Abstract: Trialled antibody treatment thought to work by renewing the protective coating of neurons.
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/520417a
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Race to unravel Oklahoma’s artificial quakes
    • Authors: Alexandra Witze
      Pages: 418 - 419
      Abstract: Earthquakes linked to oil and gas operations prompt further research into human-induced seismic hazards.
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-21
      DOI: 10.1038/520418a
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Climate scientists join search for alien Earths
    • Authors: Jeff Tollefson
      Pages: 420 - 420
      Abstract: NASA initiative seeks to bolster interdisciplinary science in hunt for extraterrestrial life.
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-17
      DOI: 10.1038/520420a
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Oldest stone tools raise questions about their creators
    • Authors: Ewen Callaway
      Pages: 421 - 421
      Abstract: The 3.3-million-year-old implements predate the first members of the Homo genus.
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-21
      DOI: 10.1038/520421a
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Corrections
    • Pages: 421 - 421
      Abstract: The News story ‘Hope for science in fallout of nuclear deal’ (Nature520, 274–275; 2015) wrongly stated that Iran found a bank willing to accept its payment of dues to CERN. It was CERN, not Iran, that found the bank. In addition,
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-21
      DOI: 10.1038/520421b
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Forensic science: The soil sleuth
    • Authors: Chelsea Wald
      Pages: 422 - 424
      Abstract: Forensic geologist Lorna Dawson has pioneered methods to help convict criminals using the dirt from their shoes.
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-21
      DOI: 10.1038/520422a
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Chemistry: Degrees of separation
    • Authors: XiaoZhi Lim
      Pages: 426 - 427
      Abstract: Chemists hope to break China's monopoly on rare-earth elements by finding cheap, efficient ways to extract them from ore.
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/520426a
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Bibliometrics: The Leiden Manifesto for research metrics
    • Authors: Diana Hicks, Paul Wouters, Ludo Waltman, Sarah de Rijcke, Ismael Rafols
      Pages: 429 - 431
      Abstract: Use these ten principles to guide research evaluation, urge Diana Hicks, Paul Wouters and colleagues.
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/520429a
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Policy: Five priorities for the UN Sustainable Development Goals
    • Authors: Yonglong Lu, Nebojsa Nakicenovic, Martin Visbeck, Anne-Sophie Stevance
      Pages: 432 - 433
      Abstract: Restructure data-gathering and evaluation networks to address climate change, energy, food, health and water provision, say Yonglong Lu and colleagues.
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-20
      DOI: 10.1038/520432a
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Environmental economics: Pricing the planet
    • Authors: Nick Hanley
      Pages: 434 - 435
      Abstract: Nick Hanley weighs up a study that probes the economic value of nature.
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/520434a
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Library science: The word on our archival future
    • Authors: Michael Lesk
      Pages: 435 - 435
      Abstract: Michael Lesk assesses a work on the fate of the library at a time of economic and technological upheaval.
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/520435a
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Perceptual thresholds: Music inspired Newton's rainbow
    • Authors: Len Fisher
      Pages: 436 - 436
      Abstract: Isaac Newton was among the great scientists who took inspiration from music (see Nature519, 262;10.1038/519262a2015). In fact, music drove him to add two new colours to the rainbow.The medieval rainbow had just five colours: red, yellow, green, blue
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/520436a
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Epochs: Disputed start dates for Anthropocene
    • Authors: Jan Zalasiewicz
      Pages: 436 - 436
      Abstract: As members of the Anthropocene Working Group, we contend that the proposed new geological epoch should reflect a unique stratigraphic unit that is characterized by unambiguous, widespread and essentially permanent anthropogenic signatures in rock, glacial ice or marine sediments. We therefore find the two dates
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/520436b
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Data curation: Act to staunch loss of research data
    • Authors: Andrew Gonzalez, Pedro R. Peres-Neto
      Pages: 436 - 436
      Abstract: Never before have scientists had the ability to generate and collect so much data — recent estimates suggest that the global scientific output is doubling roughly every decade (see L.Bornmann and R.Mutz, preprint at http://arxiv.org/abs/1402.4578v3; 2014, and go.nature.com/nzejwh).
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/520436c
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Environment: China needs more monitoring apps
    • Authors: Jian Zhang, Xiaolei Huang
      Pages: 436 - 436
      Abstract: There are more than one billion mobile devices in China, offering huge potential for citizen scientists to contribute to a cleaner and safer environment. The scientific community should rapidly develop mobile apps to collect and monitor environmental and biodiversity data.In one example of how
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/520436d
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Dating techniques: Illuminating the past
    • Authors: Richard G. Roberts, Olav B. Lian
      Pages: 438 - 439
      Abstract: The technique of optical dating was first reported 30 years ago, and has since revolutionized studies of events that occurred during the past 500,000 years. Here, two practitioners of optical dating assess its impact and consider its future.
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/520438a
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Structural biology: Pain-sensing TRPA1 channel resolved
    • Authors: David E. Clapham
      Pages: 439 - 441
      Abstract: The TRPA1 ion channel activates pain pathways in response to noxious compounds. The structure of TRPA1 has now been solved, providing insight into how it functions. See Article p.511
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-08
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14383
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Optomechanics: Listening to quantum grains of sound
    • Authors: Ivan Favero
      Pages: 441 - 442
      Abstract: An optomechanical device has allowed quanta, or 'grains', of mechanical vibration to be counted by optical means. The system may open up new possibilities in acoustics and thermal engineering. See Letter p.522
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/520441a
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Earth science: Landscape inversion by stream piracy
    • Authors: Jérôme Lavé
      Pages: 442 - 444
      Abstract: A model suggests that active deformation in mountains causes river networks to constantly reorganize, providing an explanation for the paradoxical formation of almost flat surfaces high in craggy mountain ranges. See Letter p.526
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/520442a
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • 50 & 100 Years Ago
    • Pages: 443 - 443
      Abstract: 50 Years AgoWith sympathy and understanding, the Editor of Nature publishes the following communication from Prof. H. Newton Barber, professor of botany in the University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia ... “I recently had to read an account of the VII SCOR
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/520443a
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Sensory systems: The yin and yang of cortical oxytocin
    • Authors: Robert C. Liu
      Pages: 444 - 445
      Abstract: Female mice can learn to respond to distress calls from young mice — an ability that has now been found to be improved through signalling by the hormone oxytocin in the left auditory cortex of the brain. See Article p.499
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-15
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14386
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Regenerative biology: Neuregulin 1 makes heart muscle
    • Authors: Katherine E. Yutzey
      Pages: 445 - 446
      Abstract: Three studies reveal that augmentation of a signalling pathway involving the growth factor neuregulin 1 and its receptor protein ERBB2 can promote the generation of muscle cells in zebrafish, mice and infant heart tissue.
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/520445a
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Ecology: Shared ancestry predicts disease levels
    • Authors: Helen M. Alexander
      Pages: 446 - 447
      Abstract: Ecological factors such as host density are important predictors of disease incidence. But another key determinant may be the evolutionary history and relatedness of the host community. See Letter p.542
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/520446a
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Origin and evolution of vertebrates
    • Authors: Henry Gee
      Pages: 449 - 449
      Abstract: To celebrate the golden jubilee of On the Origin of Species, in 1909, the Linnean Society of London held a special meeting on a hot biological topic of the day — the origin of the vertebrates. Such was the lack of consensus that one
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/520449a
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Scenarios for the making of vertebrates
    • Authors: Nicholas D. Holland, Linda Z. Holland, Peter W. H. Holland
      Pages: 450 - 455
      Abstract: Over the past 200 years, almost every invertebrate phylum has been proposed as a starting point for evolving vertebrates. Most of these scenarios are outdated, but several are still seriously considered. The short-range transition from ancestral invertebrate chordates (similar to amphioxus and tunicates) to vertebrates
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14433
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • The deuterostome context of chordate origins
    • Authors: Christopher J. Lowe, D. Nathaniel Clarke, Daniel M. Medeiros, Daniel S. Rokhsar, John Gerhart
      Pages: 456 - 465
      Abstract: Our understanding of vertebrate origins is powerfully informed by comparative morphology, embryology and genomics of chordates, hemichordates and echinoderms, which together make up the deuterostome clade. Striking body-plan differences among these phyla have historically hindered the identification of ancestral morphological features, but recent progress in
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14434
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • A new heart for a new head in vertebrate cardiopharyngeal evolution
    • Authors: Rui Diogo, Robert G. Kelly, Lionel Christiaen, Michael Levine, Janine M. Ziermann, Julia L. Molnar, Drew M. Noden, Eldad Tzahor
      Pages: 466 - 473
      Abstract: It has been more than 30 years since the publication of the new head hypothesis, which proposed that the vertebrate head is an evolutionary novelty resulting from the emergence of neural crest and cranial placodes. Neural crest generates the skull and associated connective tissues, whereas
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14435
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Evolution of vertebrates as viewed from the crest
    • Authors: Stephen A. Green, Marcos Simoes-Costa, Marianne E. Bronner
      Pages: 474 - 482
      Abstract: The origin of vertebrates was accompanied by the advent of a novel cell type: the neural crest. Emerging from the central nervous system, these cells migrate to diverse locations and differentiate into numerous derivatives. By coupling morphological and gene regulatory information from vertebrates and other
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14436
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Facts and fancies about early fossil chordates and vertebrates
    • Authors: Philippe Janvier
      Pages: 483 - 489
      Abstract: The interrelationships between major living vertebrate, and even chordate, groups are now reasonably well resolved thanks to a large amount of generally congruent data derived from molecular sequences, anatomy and physiology. But fossils provide unexpected combinations of characters that help us to understand how the
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14437
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • The origin and early phylogenetic history of jawed vertebrates
    • Authors: Martin D. Brazeau, Matt Friedman
      Pages: 490 - 497
      Abstract: Fossils of early gnathostomes (or jawed vertebrates) have been the focus of study for nearly two centuries. They yield key clues about the evolutionary assembly of the group's common body plan, as well the divergence of the two living gnathostome lineages: the cartilaginous and bony
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14438
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Oxytocin enables maternal behaviour by balancing cortical inhibition
    • Authors: Bianca J. Marlin, Mariela Mitre, James A. D’amour, Moses V. Chao, Robert C. Froemke
      Pages: 499 - 504
      Abstract: Oxytocin is important for social interactions and maternal behaviour. However, little is known about when, where and how oxytocin modulates neural circuits to improve social cognition. Here we show how oxytocin enables pup retrieval behaviour in female mice by enhancing auditory cortical pup call responses.
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-15
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14402
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • CRISPR adaptation biases explain preference for acquisition of foreign DNA
    • Authors: Asaf Levy, Moran G. Goren, Ido Yosef, Oren Auster, Miriam Manor, Gil Amitai, Rotem Edgar, Udi Qimron, Rotem Sorek
      Pages: 505 - 510
      Abstract: CRISPR–Cas (clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats coupled with CRISPR-associated proteins) is a bacterial immunity system that protects against invading phages or plasmids. In the process of CRISPR adaptation, short pieces of DNA (‘spacers’) are acquired from foreign elements and integrated into the CRISPR array.
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-13
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14302
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Structure of the TRPA1 ion channel suggests regulatory mechanisms
    • Authors: Candice E. Paulsen, Jean-Paul Armache, Yuan Gao, Yifan Cheng, David Julius
      Pages: 511 - 517
      Abstract: The TRPA1 ion channel (also known as the wasabi receptor) is a detector of noxious chemical agents encountered in our environment or produced endogenously during tissue injury or drug metabolism. These include a broad class of electrophiles that activate the channel through covalent protein modification.
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-08
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14367
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Self-similar fragmentation regulated by magnetic fields in a region
           forming massive stars
    • Authors: Hua-bai Li, Ka Ho Yuen, Frank Otto, Po Kin Leung, T. K. Sridharan, Qizhou Zhang, Hauyu Liu, Ya-Wen Tang, Keping Qiu
      Pages: 518 - 521
      Abstract: Most molecular clouds are filamentary or elongated. For those forming low-mass stars (
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-03-30
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14291
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Tungsten isotopic evidence for disproportional late accretion to the Earth
           and Moon
    • Authors: Mathieu Touboul, Igor S. Puchtel, Richard J. Walker
      Pages: 530 - 533
      Abstract: Characterization of the hafnium–tungsten systematics (182Hf decaying to 182W and emitting two electrons with a half-life of 8.9 million years) of the lunar mantle will enable better constraints on the timescale and processes involved in the currently accepted giant-impact theory for the formation and evolution of the Moon, and for testing the late-accretion hypothesis. Uniform, terrestrial-mantle-like W isotopic compositions have been reported among crystallization products of the lunar magma ocean. These observations were interpreted to reflect formation of the Moon and crystallization of the lunar magma ocean after 182Hf was no longer extant—that is, more than about 60 million years after the Solar System formed. Here we present W isotope data for three lunar samples that are more precise by a factor of ≥4 than those previously reported. The new data reveal that the lunar mantle has a well-resolved 182W excess of 20.6 ± 5.1 parts per million (±2 standard deviations), relative to the modern terrestrial mantle. The offset between the mantles of the Moon and the modern Earth is best explained by assuming that the W isotopic compositions of the two bodies were identical immediately following formation of the Moon, and that they then diverged as a result of disproportional late accretion to the Earth and Moon. One implication of this model is that metal from the core of the Moon-forming impactor must have efficiently stripped the Earth’s mantle of highly siderophile elements on its way to merge with the terrestrial core, requiring a substantial, but still poorly defined, level of metal–silicate equilibration.
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-08
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14355
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Lunar tungsten isotopic evidence for the late veneer
    • Authors: Thomas S. Kruijer, Thorsten Kleine, Mario Fischer-Gödde, Peter Sprung
      Pages: 534 - 537
      Abstract: According to the most widely accepted theory of lunar origin, a giant impact on the Earth led to the formation of the Moon, and also initiated the final stage of the formation of the Earth’s core. Core formation should have removed the highly siderophile elements (HSE) from Earth’s primitive mantle (that is, the bulk silicate Earth), yet HSE abundances are higher than expected. One explanation for this overabundance is that a ‘late veneer’ of primitive material was added to the bulk silicate Earth after the core formed. To test this hypothesis, tungsten isotopes are useful for two reasons: first, because the late veneer material had a different 182W/184W ratio to that of the bulk silicate Earth, and second, proportionally more material was added to the Earth than to the Moon. Thus, if a late veneer did occur, the bulk silicate Earth and the Moon must have different 182W/184W ratios. Moreover, the Moon-forming impact would also have created 182W differences because the mantle and core material of the impactor with distinct 182W/184W would have mixed with the proto-Earth during the giant impact. However the 182W/184W of the Moon has not been determined precisely enough to identify signatures of a late veneer or the giant impact. Here, using more-precise measurement techniques, we show that the Moon exhibits a 182W excess of 27 ± 4 parts per million over the present-day bulk silicate Earth. This excess is consistent with the expected 182W difference resulting from a late veneer with a total mass and composition inferred from HSE systematics. Thus, our data independently show that HSE abundances in the bulk silicate Earth were established after the giant impact and core formation, as predicted by the late veneer hypothesis. But, unexpectedly, we find that before the late veneer, no 182W anomaly existed between the bulk silicate Earth and the Moon, even though one should have arisen through the giant impact. The origin of the homogeneous 182W of the pre-late-veneer bulk silicate Earth and the Moon is enigmatic and constitutes a challenge to current models of lunar origin.
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-08
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14360
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Eocene primates of South America and the African origins of New World
           monkeys
    • Authors: Mariano Bond, Marcelo F. Tejedor, Kenneth E. Campbell, Laura Chornogubsky, Nelson Novo, Francisco Goin
      Pages: 538 - 541
      Abstract: The platyrrhine primates, or New World monkeys, are immigrant mammals whose fossil record comes from Tertiary and Quaternary sediments of South America and the Caribbean Greater Antilles. The time and place of platyrrhine origins are some of the most controversial issues in primate palaeontology, although an African Palaeogene ancestry has been presumed by most primatologists. Until now, the oldest fossil records of New World monkeys have come from Salla, Bolivia, and date to approximately 26 million years ago, or the Late Oligocene epoch. Here we report the discovery of new primates from the 'Late Eocene epoch of Amazonian Peru, which extends the fossil record of primates in South America back approximately 10 million years. The new specimens are important for understanding the origin and early evolution of modern platyrrhine primates because they bear little resemblance to any extinct or living South American primate, but they do bear striking resemblances to Eocene African anthropoids, and our phylogenetic analysis suggests a relationship with African taxa. The discovery of these new primates brings the first appearance datum of caviomorph rodents and primates in South America back into close correspondence, but raises new questions about the timing and means of arrival of these two mammalian groups.
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-02-04
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14120
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Agrochemical control of plant water use using engineered abscisic acid
           receptors
    • Authors: Sang-Youl Park, Francis C. Peterson, Assaf Mosquna, Jin Yao, Brian F. Volkman, Sean R. Cutler
      Pages: 545 - 548
      Abstract: Rising temperatures and lessening fresh water supplies are threatening agricultural productivity and have motivated efforts to improve plant water use and drought tolerance. During water deficit, plants produce elevated levels of abscisic acid (ABA), which improves water consumption and stress tolerance by controlling guard cell aperture and other protective responses. One attractive strategy for controlling water use is to develop compounds that activate ABA receptors, but agonists approved for use have yet to be developed. In principle, an engineered ABA receptor that can be activated by an existing agrochemical could achieve this goal. Here we describe a variant of the ABA receptor PYRABACTIN RESISTANCE 1 (PYR1) that possesses nanomolar sensitivity to the agrochemical mandipropamid and demonstrate its efficacy for controlling ABA responses and drought tolerance in transgenic plants. Furthermore, crystallographic studies provide a mechanistic basis for its activity and demonstrate the relative ease with which the PYR1 ligand-binding pocket can be altered to accommodate new ligands. Thus, we have successfully repurposed an agrochemical for a new application using receptor engineering. We anticipate that this strategy will be applied to other plant receptors and represents a new avenue for crop improvement.
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-02-04
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14123
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Exit from dormancy provokes DNA-damage-induced attrition in haematopoietic
           stem cells
    • Authors: Dagmar Walter, Amelie Lier, Anja Geiselhart, Frederic B. Thalheimer, Sina Huntscha, Mirko C. Sobotta, Bettina Moehrle, David Brocks, Irem Bayindir, Paul Kaschutnig, Katja Muedder, Corinna Klein, Anna Jauch, Timm Schroeder, Hartmut Geiger, Tobias P. Dick, Tim Holland-Letz, Peter Schmezer, Steven W. Lane, Michael A. Rieger, Marieke A. G. Essers, David A. Williams, Andreas Trumpp, Michael D. Milsom
      Pages: 549 - 552
      Abstract: Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are responsible for the lifelong production of blood cells. The accumulation of DNA damage in HSCs is a hallmark of ageing and is probably a major contributing factor in age-related tissue degeneration and malignant transformation. A number of accelerated ageing syndromes are associated with defective DNA repair and genomic instability, including the most common inherited bone marrow failure syndrome, Fanconi anaemia. However, the physiological source of DNA damage in HSCs from both normal and diseased individuals remains unclear. Here we show in mice that DNA damage is a direct consequence of inducing HSCs to exit their homeostatic quiescent state in response to conditions that model physiological stress, such as infection or chronic blood loss. Repeated activation of HSCs out of their dormant state provoked the attrition of normal HSCs and, in the case of mice with a non-functional Fanconi anaemia DNA repair pathway, led to a complete collapse of the haematopoietic system, which phenocopied the highly penetrant bone marrow failure seen in Fanconi anaemia patients. Our findings establish a novel link between physiological stress and DNA damage in normal HSCs and provide a mechanistic explanation for the universal accumulation of DNA damage in HSCs during ageing and the accelerated failure of the haematopoietic system in Fanconi anaemia patients.
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-02-18
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14131
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Mitochondrial DNA stress primes the antiviral innate immune response
    • Authors: A. Phillip West, William Khoury-Hanold, Matthew Staron, Michal C. Tal, Cristiana M. Pineda, Sabine M. Lang, Megan Bestwick, Brett A. Duguay, Nuno Raimundo, Donna A. MacDuff, Susan M. Kaech, James R. Smiley, Robert E. Means, Akiko Iwasaki, Gerald S. Shadel
      Pages: 553 - 557
      Abstract: Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is normally present at thousands of copies per cell and is packaged into several hundred higher-order structures termed nucleoids. The abundant mtDNA-binding protein TFAM (transcription factor A, mitochondrial) regulates nucleoid architecture, abundance and segregation. Complete mtDNA depletion profoundly impairs oxidative phosphorylation, triggering calcium-dependent stress signalling and adaptive metabolic responses. However, the cellular responses to mtDNA instability, a physiologically relevant stress observed in many human diseases and ageing, remain poorly defined. Here we show that moderate mtDNA stress elicited by TFAM deficiency engages cytosolic antiviral signalling to enhance the expression of a subset of interferon-stimulated genes. Mechanistically, we find that aberrant mtDNA packaging promotes escape of mtDNA into the cytosol, where it engages the DNA sensor cGAS (also known as MB21D1) and promotes STING (also known as TMEM173)–IRF3-dependent signalling to elevate interferon-stimulated gene expression, potentiate type I interferon responses and confer broad viral resistance. Furthermore, we demonstrate that herpesviruses induce mtDNA stress, which enhances antiviral signalling and type I interferon responses during infection. Our results further demonstrate that mitochondria are central participants in innate immunity, identify mtDNA stress as a cell-intrinsic trigger of antiviral signalling and suggest that cellular monitoring of mtDNA homeostasis cooperates with canonical virus sensing mechanisms to fully engage antiviral innate immunity.
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-02-02
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14156
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Super-enhancers delineate disease-associated regulatory nodes in T cells
    • Authors: Golnaz Vahedi, Yuka Kanno, Yasuko Furumoto, Kan Jiang, Stephen C. J. Parker, Michael R. Erdos, Sean R. Davis, Rahul Roychoudhuri, Nicholas P. Restifo, Massimo Gadina, Zhonghui Tang, Yijun Ruan, Francis S. Collins, Vittorio Sartorelli, John J. O’Shea
      Pages: 558 - 562
      Abstract: Enhancers regulate spatiotemporal gene expression and impart cell-specific transcriptional outputs that drive cell identity. Super-enhancers (SEs), also known as stretch-enhancers, are a subset of enhancers especially important for genes associated with cell identity and genetic risk of disease. CD4+ T cells are critical for host defence and autoimmunity. Here we analysed maps of mouse T-cell SEs as a non-biased means of identifying key regulatory nodes involved in cell specification. We found that cytokines and cytokine receptors were the dominant class of genes exhibiting SE architecture in T cells. Nonetheless, the locus encoding Bach2, a key negative regulator of effector differentiation, emerged as the most prominent T-cell SE, revealing a network in which SE-associated genes critical for T-cell biology are repressed by BACH2. Disease-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms for immune-mediated disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, were highly enriched for T-cell SEs versus typical enhancers or SEs in other cell lineages. Intriguingly, treatment of T cells with the Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitor tofacitinib disproportionately altered the expression of rheumatoid arthritis risk genes with SE structures. Together, these results indicate that genes with SE architecture in T cells encompass a variety of cytokines and cytokine receptors but are controlled by a ‘guardian’ transcription factor, itself endowed with an SE. Thus, enumeration of SEs allows the unbiased determination of key regulatory nodes in T cells, which are preferentially modulated by pharmacological intervention.
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-02-16
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14154
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • ATG14 promotes membrane tethering and fusion of autophagosomes to
           endolysosomes
    • Authors: Jiajie Diao, Rong Liu, Yueguang Rong, Minglei Zhao, Jing Zhang, Ying Lai, Qiangjun Zhou, Livia M. Wilz, Jianxu Li, Sandro Vivona, Richard A. Pfuetzner, Axel T. Brunger, Qing Zhong
      Pages: 563 - 566
      Abstract: Autophagy, an important catabolic pathway implicated in a broad spectrum of human diseases, begins by forming double membrane autophagosomes that engulf cytosolic cargo and ends by fusing autophagosomes with lysosomes for degradation. Membrane fusion activity is required for early biogenesis of autophagosomes and late degradation in lysosomes. However, the key regulatory mechanisms of autophagic membrane tethering and fusion remain largely unknown. Here we report that ATG14 (also known as beclin-1-associated autophagy-related key regulator (Barkor) or ATG14L), an essential autophagy-specific regulator of the class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase complex, promotes membrane tethering of protein-free liposomes, and enhances hemifusion and full fusion of proteoliposomes reconstituted with the target (t)-SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors) syntaxin 17 (STX17) and SNAP29, and the vesicle (v)-SNARE VAMP8 (vesicle-associated membrane protein 8). ATG14 binds to the SNARE core domain of STX17 through its coiled-coil domain, and stabilizes the STX17–SNAP29 binary t-SNARE complex on autophagosomes. The STX17 binding, membrane tethering and fusion-enhancing activities of ATG14 require its homo-oligomerization by cysteine repeats. In ATG14 homo-oligomerization-defective cells, autophagosomes still efficiently form but their fusion with endolysosomes is blocked. Recombinant ATG14 homo-oligomerization mutants also completely lose their ability to promote membrane tethering and to enhance SNARE-mediated fusion in vitro. Taken together, our data suggest an autophagy-specific membrane fusion mechanism in which oligomeric ATG14 directly binds to STX17–SNAP29 binary t-SNARE complex on autophagosomes and primes it for VAMP8 interaction to promote autophagosome–endolysosome fusion.
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-02-09
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14147
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Structure of the E. coli ribosome–EF-Tu complex at <3 Å
           resolution by Cs-corrected cryo-EM
    • Authors: Niels Fischer, Piotr Neumann, Andrey L. Konevega, Lars V. Bock, Ralf Ficner, Marina V. Rodnina, Holger Stark
      Pages: 567 - 570
      Abstract: Single particle electron cryomicroscopy (cryo-EM) has recently made significant progress in high-resolution structure determination of macromolecular complexes due to improvements in electron microscopic instrumentation and computational image analysis. However, cryo-EM structures can be highly non-uniform in local resolution and all structures available to date have been limited to resolutions above 3 Å. Here we present the cryo-EM structure of the 70S ribosome from Escherichia coli in complex with elongation factor Tu, aminoacyl-tRNA and the antibiotic kirromycin at 2.65–2.9 Å resolution using spherical aberration (Cs)-corrected cryo-EM. Overall, the cryo-EM reconstruction at 2.9 Å resolution is comparable to the best-resolved X-ray structure of the E. coli 70S ribosome (2.8 Å), but provides more detailed information (2.65 Å) at the functionally important ribosomal core. The cryo-EM map elucidates for the first time the structure of all 35 rRNA modifications in the bacterial ribosome, explaining their roles in fine-tuning ribosome structure and function and modulating the action of antibiotics. We also obtained atomic models for flexible parts of the ribosome such as ribosomal proteins L9 and L31. The refined cryo-EM-based model presents the currently most complete high-resolution structure of the E. coli ribosome, which demonstrates the power of cryo-EM in structure determination of large and dynamic macromolecular complexes.
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-02-23
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14275
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Hydrogens detected by subatomic resolution protein crystallography in a
           [NiFe] hydrogenase
    • Authors: Hideaki Ogata, Koji Nishikawa, Wolfgang Lubitz
      Pages: 571 - 574
      Abstract: The enzyme hydrogenase reversibly converts dihydrogen to protons and electrons at a metal catalyst. The location of the abundant hydrogens is of key importance for understanding structure and function of the protein. However, in protein X-ray crystallography the detection of hydrogen atoms is one of the major problems, since they display only weak contributions to diffraction and the quality of the single crystals is often insufficient to obtain sub-ångström resolution. Here we report the crystal structure of a standard [NiFe] hydrogenase (∼91.3 kDa molecular mass) at 0.89 Å resolution. The strictly anoxically isolated hydrogenase has been obtained in a specific spectroscopic state, the active reduced Ni-R (subform Ni-R1) state. The high resolution, proper refinement strategy and careful modelling allow the positioning of a large part of the hydrogen atoms in the structure. This has led to the direct detection of the products of the heterolytic splitting of dihydrogen into a hydride (H−) bridging the Ni and Fe and a proton (H+) attached to the sulphur of a cysteine ligand. The Ni–H− and Fe–H− bond lengths are 1.58 Å and 1.78Å, respectively. Furthermore, we can assign the Fe–CO and Fe–CN− ligands at the active site, and can obtain the hydrogen-bond networks and the preferred proton transfer pathway in the hydrogenase. Our results demonstrate the precise comprehensive information available from ultra-high-resolution structures of proteins as an alternative to neutron diffraction and other methods such as NMR structural analysis.
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-01-26
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14110
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Respect the report
    • Authors: Ingrid Eisenstadter
      Pages: 575 - 576
      Abstract: Foundations have reporting requirements that must be followed, notes grant-director Ingrid Eisenstadter.
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/nj7548-575a
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Transference
    • Authors: Jennifer Campbell-Hicks
      Pages: 578 - 578
      Abstract: The shock of the new.
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/520578a
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548 (2015)
       
  • Phonon counting and intensity interferometry of a nanomechanical resonator
    • Authors: Justin D. Cohen, Seán M. Meenehan, Gregory S. MacCabe, Simon Gröblacher, Amir H. Safavi-Naeini, Francesco Marsili, Matthew D. Shaw, Oskar Painter
      Pages: 522 - 525
      Abstract: In optics, the ability to measure individual quanta of light (photons) enables a great many applications, ranging from dynamic imaging within living organisms to secure quantum communication. Pioneering photon counting experiments, such as the intensity interferometry performed by Hanbury Brown and Twiss to measure the angular width of visible stars, have played a critical role in our understanding of the full quantum nature of light. As with matter at the atomic scale, the laws of quantum mechanics also govern the properties of macroscopic mechanical objects, providing fundamental quantum limits to the sensitivity of mechanical sensors and transducers. Current research in cavity optomechanics seeks to use light to explore the quantum properties of mechanical systems ranging in size from kilogram-mass mirrors to nanoscale membranes, as well as to develop technologies for precision sensing and quantum information processing. Here we use an optical probe and single-photon detection to study the acoustic emission and absorption processes in a silicon nanomechanical resonator, and perform a measurement similar to that used by Hanbury Brown and Twiss to measure correlations in the emitted phonons as the resonator undergoes a parametric instability formally equivalent to that of a laser. Owing to the cavity-enhanced coupling of light with mechanical motion, this effective phonon counting technique has a noise equivalent phonon sensitivity of 0.89 ± 0.05. With straightforward improvements to this method, a variety of quantum state engineering tasks using mesoscopic mechanical resonators would be enabled, including the generation and heralding of single-phonon Fock states and the quantum entanglement of remote mechanical elements.
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14349
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548
       
  • In situ low-relief landscape formation as a result of river network
           disruption
    • Authors: Rong Yang, Sean D. Willett, Liran Goren
      Pages: 526 - 529
      Abstract: Landscapes on Earth retain a record of the tectonic, environmental and climatic history under which they formed. Landscapes tend towards an equilibrium in which rivers attain a stable grade that balances the tectonic production of elevation and with hillslopes that attain a gradient steep enough to transport material to river channels. Equilibrium low-relief surfaces are typically found at low elevations, graded to sea level. However, there are many examples of high-elevation, low-relief surfaces, often referred to as relict landscapes, or as elevated peneplains. These do not grade to sea level and are typically interpreted as uplifted old landscapes, preserving former, more moderate tectonic conditions. Here we test this model of landscape evolution through digital topographic analysis of a set of purportedly relict landscapes on the southeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau, one of the most geographically complex, climatically varied and biologically diverse regions of the world. We find that, in contrast to theory, the purported surfaces are not consistent with progressive establishment of a new, steeper, river grade, and therefore they cannot necessarily be interpreted as a remnant of an old, low relief surface. We propose an alternative model, supported by numerical experiments, in which tectonic deformation has disrupted the regional river network, leaving remnants of it isolated and starved of drainage area and thus unable to balance tectonic uplift. The implication is that the state of low relief with low erosion rate is developing in situ, rather than preserving past erosional conditions.
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14354
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548
       
  • Phylogenetic structure and host abundance drive disease pressure in
           communities
    • Authors: Ingrid M. Parker, Megan Saunders, Megan Bontrager, Andrew P. Weitz, Rebecca Hendricks, Roger Magarey, Karl Suiter, Gregory S. Gilbert
      Pages: 542 - 544
      Abstract: Pathogens play an important part in shaping the structure and dynamics of natural communities, because species are not affected by them equally. A shared goal of ecology and epidemiology is to predict when a species is most vulnerable to disease. A leading hypothesis asserts that the impact of disease should increase with host abundance, producing a ‘rare-species advantage’. However, the impact of a pathogen may be decoupled from host abundance, because most pathogens infect more than one species, leading to pathogen spillover onto closely related species. Here we show that the phylogenetic and ecological structure of the surrounding community can be important predictors of disease pressure. We found that the amount of tissue lost to disease increased with the relative abundance of a species across a grassland plant community, and that this rare-species advantage had an additional phylogenetic component: disease pressure was stronger on species with many close relatives. We used a global model of pathogen sharing as a function of relatedness between hosts, which provided a robust predictor of relative disease pressure at the local scale. In our grassland, the total amount of disease was most accurately explained not by the abundance of the focal host alone, but by the abundance of all species in the community weighted by their phylogenetic distance to the host. Furthermore, the model strongly predicted observed disease pressure for 44 novel host species we introduced experimentally to our study site, providing evidence for a mechanism to explain why phylogenetically rare species are more likely to become invasive when introduced. Our results demonstrate how the phylogenetic and ecological structure of communities can have a key role in disease dynamics, with implications for the maintenance of biodiversity, biotic resistance against introduced weeds, and the success of managed plants in agriculture and forestry.
      Citation: Nature 520, 7548 (2015)
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14372
      Issue No: Vol. 520, No. 7548
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-2015