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Journal Cover   Nature
  [SJR: 21.323]   [H-I: 829]   [2709 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0028-0836 - ISSN (Online) 1476-4687
   Published by Nature Publishing Group Homepage  [110 journals]
  • Doubtful pathways to cold tolerance in plants
    • Authors: Erika J. Edwards, Jurriaan M. de Vos, Michael J. Donoghue
      Abstract: arising from A. E. Zanne et al. Nature506, 89–92 (2014); doi:10.1038/nature12872Zanne et al. addressed an important evolutionary question: how did flowering plants repeatedly enter cold climates' Herbaceous growth, deciduous leaves, and narrow
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14393
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Zanne et al. reply
    • Authors: Amy E. Zanne, David C. Tank, William K. Cornwell, Jonathan M. Eastman, Stephen A. Smith, Richard G. FitzJohn, Daniel J. McGlinn, Brian C. O’Meara, Angela T. Moles, Peter B. Reich, Dana L. Royer, Douglas E. Soltis, Peter F. Stevens, Mark Westoby, Ian J. Wright, Lonnie Aarssen, Robert I. Bertin, Andre Calaminus, Rafaël Govaerts, Frank Hemmings, Michelle R. Leishman, Jacek Oleksyn, Pamela S. Soltis, Nathan G. Swenson, Laura Warman, Jeremy M. Beaulieu
      Abstract: replying to E. J. Edwards, J. M. de Vos & M. J. Donoghue Nature521, http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature14393 (2015)Our goal was to understand which traits facilitated angiosperm shifts into freezing climates. Building on previous work, we showed strong support for
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14394
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Wild-type microglia do not reverse pathology in mouse models of Rett
           syndrome
    • Authors: Jieqi Wang, Jan Eike Wegener, Teng-Wei Huang, Smitha Sripathy, Hector De Jesus-Cortes, Pin Xu, Stephanie Tran, Whitney Knobbe, Vid Leko, Jeremiah Britt, Ruth Starwalt, Latisha McDaniel, Chris S. Ward, Diana Parra, Benjamin Newcomb, Uyen Lao, Cynthia Nourigat, David A. Flowers, Sean Cullen, Nikolas L. Jorstad, Yue Yang, Lena Glaskova, Sebastian Vigneau, Julia Kozlitina, Michael J. Yetman, Joanna L. Jankowsky, Sybille D. Reichardt, Holger M. Reichardt, Jutta Gärtner, Marisa S. Bartolomei, Min Fang, Keith Loeb, C. Dirk Keene, Irwin Bernstein, Margaret Goodell, Daniel J. Brat, Peter Huppke, Jeffrey L. Neul, Antonio Bedalov, Andrew A. Pieper
      Abstract: arising from N. C. Derecki et al.Nature484, 105–109 (2012); doi:10.1038/nature10907
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14444
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • A patent problem
    • Pages: 159 - 160
      Abstract: Making lawsuits more risky for patent trolls is just one way to stop abuse of the system.
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521259b
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Publish or perish
    • Pages: 159 - 159
      Abstract: Universities should release reports to show what they are doing to tackle misconduct — and funders should help them to do so effectively.
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-19
      DOI: 10.1038/521259a
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • The kill switch
    • Pages: 160 - 160
      Abstract: Brain researchers and social scientists are well placed to find out what makes humans murder.
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-19
      DOI: 10.1038/521260a
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • No more hidden solutions in bioinformatics
    • Authors: Mauno Vihinen
      Pages: 261 - 261
      Abstract: Precision medicine cannot advance without full disclosure of how commercial genome sequencing and interpretation software works, says Mauno Vihinen.
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521261a
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Astronomy: Spots spotted on Vega star
    • Pages: 262 - 262
      Abstract: One of the brightest stars in the night sky seems to have surface structures called starspots — a surprising finding for this particular star.Torsten Böhm at the University of Toulouse in France and his colleagues used a telescope at France's Haute-Provence Observatory to look
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521262b
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Neuroscience: A way to regrow nerve fibres
    • Pages: 262 - 262
      Abstract: Injured neurons in fruit flies and mice regrow better when the activity of Rtca, an RNA-processing enzyme, is reduced.Permanent damage to the central nervous system can occur when injured nerve cells fail to regenerate their axons — the long, impulse-transmitting part of the nerve
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521262c
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Optics: Iron atoms slow down X-rays
    • Pages: 262 - 262
      Abstract: Researchers have made an X-ray beam travel 10,000 times slower than the speed of light — an effect seen before only for visible light.Physicists have previously slowed light waves to a crawl and even stopped them by controlling the transparency of the medium through
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521262d
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Cancer: Organoids mimic tumours
    • Pages: 262 - 263
      Abstract: Human cancer tissue that is grown into 'organoids' in the laboratory could be used to test drug responses and to personalize therapy.Organoids are 3D cultures of cancerous cells that better represent the composition of a tumour in the body than cancer-cell lines, according to
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521262e
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Animal physiology: Fish keeps warm in cold waters
    • Pages: 262 - 262
      Abstract: A fish is able to maintain a warm body temperature in deep, cold waters.Some species such as tuna can keep parts of their bodies warm, but Nicholas Wegner of the National Marine Fisheries Service in La Jolla, California, and his colleagues report that the
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521262a
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Palaeontology: Gut microbes give good fossils
    • Pages: 263 - 263
      Abstract: Gut microbes are the main driver of tissue decay when animals die, and were probably important for preserving soft-tissue anatomy in fossil animals.Philip Donoghue at the University of Bristol, UK, and his colleagues studied the brine shrimp (Artemia salina; pictured left)
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521263d
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Ecology: Rare bees barely benefit ecosystem
    • Pages: 263 - 263
      Abstract: The sheer number of the most common species in an ecosystem — rather than the level of biodiversity — determines how much the system benefits people.Conservationists have argued that biodiversity supports ecosystem services such as crop pollination. To separate out the effects of species
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521263c
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Chemical biology: Fish makes its own sunscreen
    • Pages: 263 - 263
      Abstract: Zebrafish have the genes needed to synthesize a compound that can provide protection from ultraviolet radiation.Such chemicals have been found in fish but it was thought that they came from their diet or from microbes that live in or on the animals. Taifo Mahmud
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521263b
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Astronomy: Quasar quartet in galactic nursery
    • Pages: 263 - 263
      Abstract: Astronomers have discovered a massive cluster of four quasars — a rare find of galaxies just being born.Quasars are young, bright galaxies powered by supermassive black holes and are hard to find because this youthful period is brief. Using the W. M. Keck Observatory
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521263a
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Fruit-fly paper has 1,000 authors
    • Authors: Chris Woolston
      Pages: 263 - 263
      Abstract: Genomics paper with an unusually high number of authors sets researchers buzzing on social media.
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-13
      DOI: 10.1038/521263f
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • The week in science: 15–21 May 2015
    • Pages: 264 - 265
      Abstract: WHO outlines plans for a crisis fund in wake of Ebola; rules to curb polar pollution agreed; and newly discovered rodent is named after James Bond.
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521264a
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Engineered yeast paves way for home-brew heroin
    • Authors: Rachel Ehrenberg
      Pages: 267 - 268
      Abstract: Advance holds potential for better opiate painkillers — but raises concerns about illicit use.
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-18
      DOI: 10.1038/251267a
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Aid burst lifts people out of extreme poverty
    • Authors: Declan Butler
      Pages: 269 - 269
      Abstract: Huge experiment across six nations shows lasting benefits from short-term support.
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-14
      DOI: 10.1038/nature.2015.17560
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Congress seeks to quash patent trolls
    • Authors: Heidi Ledford
      Pages: 270 - 271
      Abstract: Revised legislation would spare universities from being penalized in the same way as unscrupulous companies.
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521270a
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • UK universities slow to publish reports of misconduct investigations
    • Authors: Elizabeth Gibney
      Pages: 271 - 271
      Abstract: Few institutions have followed research integrity guidelines to the letter.
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-14
      DOI: 10.1038/nature.2015.17559
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Billion-dollar particle collider gets thumbs up
    • Authors: Edwin Cartlidge
      Pages: 272 - 272
      Abstract: Proposed US electron–ion smasher wins endorsement from influential nuclear-science panel.
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-19
      DOI: 10.1038/521272a
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Russia turns screw on science foundation
    • Authors: Quirin Schiermeier
      Pages: 273 - 273
      Abstract: Ministry of Justice threatens to label Dynasty Foundation a ‘foreign agent’.
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521273a
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Reproducibility crisis: Blame it on the antibodies
    • Authors: Monya Baker
      Pages: 274 - 276
      Abstract: Antibodies are the workhorses of biological experiments, but they are littering the field with false findings. A few evangelists are pushing for change.
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-19
      DOI: 10.1038/521274a
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Quantum physics: What is really real'
    • Authors: Zeeya Merali
      Pages: 278 - 280
      Abstract: A wave of experiments is probing the root of quantum weirdness.
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521278a
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Drugs: Regulate 'home-brew' opiates
    • Authors: Kenneth A. Oye, J. Chappell H. Lawson, Tania Bubela
      Pages: 281 - 283
      Abstract: The research community and the public require a fast, flexible response to the synthesis of morphine by engineered yeasts, urge Kenneth Oye, Tania Bubela and J. Chappell H. Lawson.
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-18
      DOI: 10.1038/521281a
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Sustainability: Clean cooking empowers women
    • Authors: Laura S. Brown, William F. Lankford
      Pages: 284 - 285
      Abstract: Putting women and girls at the centre of solar-oven programmes builds communities and reduces pollution, say Laura S. Brown and William F. Lankford.
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521284a
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Physics: Fighting for time
    • Authors: Graham Farmelo
      Pages: 286 - 287
      Abstract: Graham Farmelo enjoys an account of Einstein's clash with philosopher Henri Bergson.
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521286a
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Books in brief
    • Authors: Barbara Kiser
      Pages: 287 - 287
      Abstract: Barbara Kiser reviews five of the week's best science picks.
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521287a
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Correction
    • Pages: 288 - 288
      Abstract: The Q&A 'Geological historian' (Nature520, 294; 2015) incorrectly used “geology and surveying” instead of “geometry and surveying”, and “core seams” instead of “coal seams”.
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521288b
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Palaeontology: Tracing the backbone in China's rocks
    • Authors: Xu Xing
      Pages: 288 - 288
      Abstract: Xu Xing relishes a bilingual book on the evolution of vertebrate life in his fabulously fossil-rich country.
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521288a
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Water: Megacities running dry in Brazil
    • Authors: Richard Meganck, Karl Havens, Ricardo M. Pinto-Coelho
      Pages: 289 - 289
      Abstract: São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro are running out of drinking water owing to an extended drought and disjointed water-resource planning in Brazil. To avert social, economic and political disruption, scientific information must be translated more effectively into water policy.For example, industrial sectors need
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521289c
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Water: Halt India's groundwater loss
    • Authors: Bobban Subhadra
      Pages: 289 - 289
      Abstract: India is not doing enough to stop groundwater depletion (see M.Rodellet al. Nature460, 999–1002; 10.1038/nature082382009 and P. P.MujumdarNature521, 151–155; 10.1038/521151a2015). This could compromise its capacity to
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521289d
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Water: A drought plan for biodiversity
    • Authors: Alexander C. Lees, Peter Bowler
      Pages: 289 - 289
      Abstract: To help combat California's worst drought for more than 1,000 years, state governor Jerry Brown has called for the replacement of urban lawns with drought-tolerant landscaping (see go.nature.com/cvqw4l). Applied on a larger scale than he proposes, this move would boost the region's threatened biodiversity
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521289e
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Mutational technologies: Engage public in gene-editing policy
    • Authors: Filippa Lentzos
      Pages: 289 - 289
      Abstract: I agree that new mutational technologies such as gene editing and gain-of-function research call for public debate, global engagement and broad evaluation by experts so that policy-makers are properly informed (see Nature521, 5; 10.1038/521005a2015).The degree of experimental freedom in
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521289a
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Clinical practice: Blood-transfusion decisions not simple
    • Authors: Harvey G. Klein, Irene Cortés-Puch, Charles Natanson
      Pages: 289 - 289
      Abstract: We consider that your discussion on the possible overuse of blood transfusions simplifies a complex issue (Nature520, 24–26; 10.1038/520024a2015).Readers might infer, for example, that a standardized transfusion protocol is safer than individualized blood-management care, or that
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521289b
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Alexander Rich (1924–2015)
    • Authors: Paul Schimmel
      Pages: 291 - 291
      Abstract: Biologist who discovered ribosome clusters and 'left-handed' DNA.
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521291a
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Archaeology: Tools go back in time
    • Authors: Erella Hovers
      Pages: 294 - 295
      Abstract: The finding of 3.3-million-year-old stone flints, cores, hammers and anvils in Kenya suggests that the first stone tools were made by human ancestors that pre-dated the earliest known members of the genus Homo. See Article p.310
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521294a
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Quantum physics: Squeezed ions in two places at once
    • Authors: Tracy Northup
      Pages: 295 - 296
      Abstract: Experiments on a trapped calcium ion have again exposed the strange nature of quantum phenomena, and could pave the way for sensitive techniques to explore the boundary between the quantum and classical worlds. See Letter p.336
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521295a
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Stem cells: Asymmetric rejuvenation
    • Authors: Anu Suomalainen
      Pages: 296 - 298
      Abstract: Organelles called mitochondria are asymmetrically apportioned to the daughters of dividing stem cells according to mitochondrial age. This finding sheds light on the mechanisms underlying asymmetric stem-cell division.
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521296a
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Materials science: Magnetic alloys break the rules
    • Authors: Richard D. James
      Pages: 298 - 299
      Abstract: A family of alloys has been discovered that undergoes unexpected changes of shape when magnetized. This strange behaviour might help in unravelling the mystery of a phenomenon called magnetic hysteresis. See Letter p.340
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521298a
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Stem cells: Equilibrium established
    • Authors: Kyle M. Loh, Bing Lim
      Pages: 299 - 300
      Abstract: Pluripotent cells can produce all cell types in the body. It emerges that this state of potential is endowed by cues, including inhibition of Wnt signalling, that maintain a balance between diverse cellular outcomes. See Article p.316
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521299a
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Molecular biology: Splicing does the two-step
    • Authors: Heidi Cook-Andersen, Miles F. Wilkinson
      Pages: 300 - 301
      Abstract: An intricate recursive RNA splicing mechanism that removes especially long introns (non-coding sequences) from genes has been found to be evolutionarily conserved and more prevalent than previously thought. See Letters p.371 & p.376
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-13
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14524
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • The crystallography of correlated disorder
    • Authors: David A. Keen, Andrew L. Goodwin
      Pages: 303 - 309
      Abstract: Classical crystallography can determine structures as complicated as multi-component ribosomal assemblies with atomic resolution, but is inadequate for disordered systems—even those as simple as water ice—that occupy the complex middle ground between liquid-like randomness and crystalline periodic order. Correlated disorder nevertheless has clear crystallographic signatures
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14453
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • 3.3-million-year-old stone tools from Lomekwi 3, West Turkana, Kenya
    • Authors: Sonia Harmand, Jason E. Lewis, Craig S. Feibel, Christopher J. Lepre, Sandrine Prat, Arnaud Lenoble, Xavier Boës, Rhonda L. Quinn, Michel Brenet, Adrian Arroyo, Nicholas Taylor, Sophie Clément, Guillaume Daver, Jean-Philip Brugal, Louise Leakey, Richard A. Mortlock, James D. Wright, Sammy Lokorodi, Christopher Kirwa, Dennis V. Kent, Hélène Roche
      Pages: 310 - 315
      Abstract: Human evolutionary scholars have long supposed that the earliest stone tools were made by the genus Homo and that this technological development was directly linked to climate change and the spread of savannah grasslands. New fieldwork in West Turkana, Kenya, has identified evidence of
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14464
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • An alternative pluripotent state confers interspecies chimaeric competency
    • Authors: Jun Wu, Daiji Okamura, Mo Li, Keiichiro Suzuki, Chongyuan Luo, Li Ma, Yupeng He, Zhongwei Li, Chris Benner, Isao Tamura, Marie N. Krause, Joseph R. Nery, Tingting Du, Zhuzhu Zhang, Tomoaki Hishida, Yuta Takahashi, Emi Aizawa, Na Young Kim, Jeronimo Lajara, Pedro Guillen, Josep M. Campistol, Concepcion Rodriguez Esteban, Pablo J. Ross, Alan Saghatelian, Bing Ren, Joseph R. Ecker, Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte
      Pages: 316 - 321
      Abstract: Pluripotency, the ability to generate any cell type of the body, is an evanescent attribute of embryonic cells. Transitory pluripotent cells can be captured at different time points during embryogenesis and maintained as embryonic stem cells or epiblast stem cells in culture. Since ontogenesis is
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-06
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14413
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Neurotransmitter and psychostimulant recognition by the dopamine
           transporter
    • Authors: Kevin H. Wang, Aravind Penmatsa, Eric Gouaux
      Pages: 322 - 327
      Abstract: Na+/Cl–-coupled biogenic amine transporters are the primary targets of therapeutic and abused drugs, ranging from antidepressants to the psychostimulants cocaine and amphetamines, and to their cognate substrates. Here we determine X-ray crystal structures of the Drosophila melanogaster dopamine transporter (dDAT)
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-11
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14431
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • A strong ultraviolet pulse from a newborn type Ia supernova
    • Authors: Yi Cao, S. R. Kulkarni, D. Andrew Howell, Avishay Gal-Yam, Mansi M. Kasliwal, Stefano Valenti, J. Johansson, R. Amanullah, A. Goobar, J. Sollerman, F. Taddia, Assaf Horesh, Ilan Sagiv, S. Bradley Cenko, Peter E. Nugent, Iair Arcavi, Jason Surace, P. R. Woźniak, Daniela I. Moody, Umaa D. Rebbapragada, Brian D. Bue, Neil Gehrels
      Pages: 328 - 331
      Abstract: Type Ia supernovae are destructive explosions of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs. Although they are used empirically to measure cosmological distances, the nature of their progenitors remains mysterious. One of the leading progenitor models, called the single degenerate channel, hypothesizes that a white dwarf accretes matter from a companion star and the resulting increase in its central pressure and temperature ignites thermonuclear explosion. Here we report observations with the Swift Space Telescope of strong but declining ultraviolet emission from a type Ia supernova within four days of its explosion. This emission is consistent with theoretical expectations of collision between material ejected by the supernova and a companion star, and therefore provides evidence that some type Ia supernovae arise from the single degenerate channel.
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14440
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • No signature of ejecta interaction with a stellar companion in three type
           Ia supernovae
    • Authors: Rob P. Olling, Richard Mushotzky, Edward J. Shaya, Armin Rest, Peter M. Garnavich, Brad E. Tucker, Daniel Kasen, Steve Margheim, Alexei V. Filippenko
      Pages: 332 - 335
      Abstract: Type Ia supernovae are thought to be the result of a thermonuclear runaway in carbon/oxygen white dwarfs, but it is uncertain whether the explosion is triggered by accretion from a non-degenerate companion star or by a merger with another white dwarf. Observations of a supernova immediately following the explosion provide unique information on the distribution of ejected material and the progenitor system. Models predict that the interaction of supernova ejecta with a companion star or circumstellar debris lead to a sudden brightening lasting from hours to days. Here we present data for three supernovae that are likely to be type Ia observed during the Kepler mission with a time resolution of 30 minutes. We find no signatures of the supernova ejecta interacting with nearby companions. The lack of observable interaction signatures is consistent with the idea that these three supernovae resulted from the merger of binary white dwarfs or other compact stars such as helium stars.
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14455
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Spin–motion entanglement and state diagnosis with squeezed
           oscillator wavepackets
    • Authors: Hsiang-Yu Lo, Daniel Kienzler, Ludwig de Clercq, Matteo Marinelli, Vlad Negnevitsky, Ben C. Keitch, Jonathan P. Home
      Pages: 336 - 339
      Abstract: Mesoscopic superpositions of distinguishable coherent states provide an analogue of the ‘Schrödinger’s cat’ thought experiment. For mechanical oscillators these have primarily been realized using coherent wavepackets, for which the distinguishability arises as a result of the spatial separation of the superposed states. Here we demonstrate superpositions composed of squeezed wavepackets, which we generate by applying an internal-state-dependent force to a single trapped ion initialized in a squeezed vacuum state with nine decibel reduction in the quadrature variance. This allows us to characterize the initial squeezed wavepacket by monitoring the onset of spin–motion entanglement, and to verify the evolution of the number states of the oscillator as a function of the duration of the force. In both cases we observe clear differences between displacements aligned with the squeezed and anti-squeezed axes. We observe coherent revivals when inverting the state-dependent force after separating the wavepackets by more than 19 times the ground-state root mean squared extent, which corresponds to 56 times the root mean squared extent of the squeezed wavepacket along the displacement direction. Aside from their fundamental nature, these states may be useful for quantum metrology or quantum information processing with continuous variables.
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14458
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Non-Joulian magnetostriction
    • Authors: Harsh Deep Chopra, Manfred Wuttig
      Pages: 340 - 343
      Abstract: All magnets elongate and contract anisotropically when placed in a magnetic field, an effect referred to as Joule magnetostriction. The hallmark of Joulian magnetostriction is volume conservation, which is a broader definition applicable to self-accommodation of ferromagnetic, ferroelectric or ferroelastic domains in all functional materials. Here we report the discovery of ‘giant’ non-volume-conserving or non-Joulian magnetostriction (NJM). Whereas Joulian strain is caused by magnetization rotation, NJM is caused by facile (low-field) reorientation of magnetoelastically and magnetostatically autarkic (self-sufficient) rigid micro-‘cells’, which define the adaptive structure, the origin of which is proposed to be elastic gradients ultimately caused by charge/spin density waves. The equilibrium adaptive cellular structure is responsible for long-sought non-dissipative (hysteresis-free), linearly reversible and isotropic magnetization curves along all directions within a single crystal. Recently discovered Fe-based high magnetostriction alloys with special thermal history are identified as the first members of this newly discovered magnetic class. The NJM paradigm provides consistent interpretations of seemingly confounding properties of Fe-based alloys, offers recipes to develop new highly magnetostrictive materials, and permits simultaneously large actuation in longitudinal and transverse directions without the need for stacked composites.
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14459
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Selection on noise constrains variation in a eukaryotic promoter
    • Authors: Brian P. H. Metzger, David C. Yuan, Jonathan D. Gruber, Fabien Duveau, Patricia J. Wittkopp
      Pages: 344 - 347
      Abstract: Genetic variation segregating within a species reflects the combined activities of mutation, selection, and genetic drift. In the absence of selection, polymorphisms are expected to be a random subset of new mutations; thus, comparing the effects of polymorphisms and new mutations provides a test for selection. When evidence of selection exists, such comparisons can identify properties of mutations that are most likely to persist in natural populations. Here we investigate how mutation and selection have shaped variation in a cis-regulatory sequence controlling gene expression by empirically determining the effects of polymorphisms segregating in the TDH3 promoter among 85 strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and comparing their effects to a distribution of mutational effects defined by 236 point mutations in the same promoter. Surprisingly, we find that selection on expression noise (that is, variability in expression among genetically identical cells) appears to have had a greater impact on sequence variation in the TDH3 promoter than selection on mean expression level. This is not necessarily because variation in expression noise impacts fitness more than variation in mean expression level, but rather because of differences in the distributions of mutational effects for these two phenotypes. This study shows how systematically examining the effects of new mutations can enrich our understanding of evolutionary mechanisms. It also provides rare empirical evidence of selection acting on expression noise.
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-03-16
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14244
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Selective corticostriatal plasticity during acquisition of an auditory
           discrimination task
    • Authors: Qiaojie Xiong, Petr Znamenskiy, Anthony M. Zador
      Pages: 348 - 351
      Abstract: Perceptual decisions are based on the activity of sensory cortical neurons, but how organisms learn to transform this activity into appropriate actions remains unknown. Projections from the auditory cortex to the auditory striatum carry information that drives decisions in an auditory frequency discrimination task. To assess the role of these projections in learning, we developed a channelrhodopsin-2-based assay to probe selectively for synaptic plasticity associated with corticostriatal neurons representing different frequencies. Here we report that learning this auditory discrimination preferentially potentiates corticostriatal synapses from neurons representing either high or low frequencies, depending on reward contingencies. We observe frequency-dependent corticostriatal potentiation in vivo over the course of training, and in vitro in striatal brain slices. Our findings suggest a model in which the corticostriatal synapses made by neurons tuned to different features of the sound are selectively potentiated to enable the learned transformation of sound into action.
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-03-02
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14225
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Early reprogramming regulators identified by prospective isolation and
           mass cytometry
    • Authors: Ernesto Lujan, Eli R. Zunder, Yi Han Ng, Isabel N. Goronzy, Garry P. Nolan, Marius Wernig
      Pages: 352 - 356
      Abstract: In the context of most induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell reprogramming methods, heterogeneous populations of non-productive and staggered productive intermediates arise at different reprogramming time points. Despite recent reports claiming substantially increased reprogramming efficiencies using genetically modified donor cells, prospectively isolating distinct reprogramming intermediates remains an important goal to decipher reprogramming mechanisms. Previous attempts to identify surface markers of intermediate cell populations were based on the assumption that, during reprogramming, cells progressively lose donor cell identity and gradually acquire iPS cell properties. Here we report that iPS cell and epithelial markers, such as SSEA1 and EpCAM, respectively, are not predictive of reprogramming during early phases. Instead, in a systematic functional surface marker screen, we find that early reprogramming-prone cells express a unique set of surface markers, including CD73, CD49d and CD200, that are absent in both fibroblasts and iPS cells. Single-cell mass cytometry and prospective isolation show that these distinct intermediates are transient and bridge the gap between donor cell silencing and pluripotency marker acquisition during the early, presumably stochastic, reprogramming phase. Expression profiling reveals early upregulation of the transcriptional regulators Nr0b1 and Etv5 in this reprogramming state, preceding activation of key pluripotency regulators such as Rex1 (also known as Zfp42), Dppa2, Nanog and Sox2. Both factors are required for the generation of the early intermediate state and fully reprogrammed iPS cells, and thus represent some of the earliest known regulators of iPS cell induction. Our study deconvolutes the first steps in a hierarchical series of events that lead to pluripotency acquisition.
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-01
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14274
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Signalling thresholds and negative B-cell selection in acute lymphoblastic
           leukaemia
    • Authors: Zhengshan Chen, Seyedmehdi Shojaee, Maike Buchner, Huimin Geng, Jae Woong Lee, Lars Klemm, Björn Titz, Thomas G. Graeber, Eugene Park, Ying Xim Tan, Anne Satterthwaite, Elisabeth Paietta, Stephen P. Hunger, Cheryl L. Willman, Ari Melnick, Mignon L. Loh, Jae U. Jung, John E. Coligan, Silvia Bolland, Tak W. Mak, Andre Limnander, Hassan Jumaa, Michael Reth, Arthur Weiss, Clifford A. Lowell, Markus Müschen
      Pages: 357 - 361
      Abstract: B cells are selected for an intermediate level of B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) signalling strength: attenuation below minimum (for example, non-functional BCR) or hyperactivation above maximum (for example, self-reactive BCR) thresholds of signalling strength causes negative selection. In ∼25% of cases, acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) cells carry the oncogenic BCR-ABL1 tyrosine kinase (Philadelphia chromosome positive), which mimics constitutively active pre-BCR signalling. Current therapeutic approaches are largely focused on the development of more potent tyrosine kinase inhibitors to suppress oncogenic signalling below a minimum threshold for survival. We tested the hypothesis that targeted hyperactivation—above a maximum threshold—will engage a deletional checkpoint for removal of self-reactive B cells and selectively kill ALL cells. Here we find, by testing various components of proximal pre-BCR signalling in mouse BCR–ABL1 cells, that an incremental increase of Syk tyrosine kinase activity was required and sufficient to induce cell death. Hyperactive Syk was functionally equivalent to acute activation of a self-reactive BCR on ALL cells. Despite oncogenic transformation, this basic mechanism of negative selection was still functional in ALL cells. Unlike normal pre-B cells, patient-derived ALL cells express the inhibitory receptors PECAM1, CD300A and LAIR1 at high levels. Genetic studies revealed that Pecam1, Cd300a and Lair1 are critical to calibrate oncogenic signalling strength through recruitment of the inhibitory phosphatases Ptpn6 (ref. 7) and Inpp5d (ref. 8). Using a novel small-molecule inhibitor of INPP5D (also known as SHIP1), we demonstrated that pharmacological hyperactivation of SYK and engagement of negative B-cell selection represents a promising new strategy to overcome drug resistance in human ALL.
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-03-23
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14231
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Lipid nanoparticle siRNA treatment of Ebola-virus-Makona-infected nonhuman
           primates
    • Authors: Emily P. Thi, Chad E. Mire, Amy C. H. Lee, Joan B. Geisbert, Joy Z. Zhou, Krystle N. Agans, Nicholas M. Snead, Daniel J. Deer, Trisha R. Barnard, Karla A. Fenton, Ian MacLachlan, Thomas W. Geisbert
      Pages: 362 - 365
      Abstract: The current outbreak of Ebola virus in West Africa is unprecedented, causing more cases and fatalities than all previous outbreaks combined, and has yet to be controlled. Several post-exposure interventions have been employed under compassionate use to treat patients repatriated to Europe and the United States. However, the in vivo efficacy of these interventions against the new outbreak strain of Ebola virus is unknown. Here we show that lipid-nanoparticle-encapsulated short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) rapidly adapted to target the Makona outbreak strain of Ebola virus are able to protect 100% of rhesus monkeys against lethal challenge when treatment was initiated at 3 days after exposure while animals were viraemic and clinically ill. Although all infected animals showed evidence of advanced disease including abnormal haematology, blood chemistry and coagulopathy, siRNA-treated animals had milder clinical features and fully recovered, while the untreated control animals succumbed to the disease. These results represent the first, to our knowledge, successful demonstration of therapeutic anti-Ebola virus efficacy against the new outbreak strain in nonhuman primates and highlight the rapid development of lipid-nanoparticle-delivered siRNA as a countermeasure against this highly lethal human disease.
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-04-22
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14442
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Pioneer factors govern super-enhancer dynamics in stem cell plasticity and
           lineage choice
    • Authors: Rene C. Adam, Hanseul Yang, Shira Rockowitz, Samantha B. Larsen, Maria Nikolova, Daniel S. Oristian, Lisa Polak, Meelis Kadaja, Amma Asare, Deyou Zheng, Elaine Fuchs
      Pages: 366 - 370
      Abstract: Adult stem cells occur in niches that balance self-renewal with lineage selection and progression during tissue homeostasis. Following injury, culture or transplantation, stem cells outside their niche often display fate flexibility. Here we show that super-enhancers underlie the identity, lineage commitment and plasticity of adult stem cells in vivo. Using hair follicle as a model, we map the global chromatin domains of hair follicle stem cells and their committed progenitors in their native microenvironments. We show that super-enhancers and their dense clusters (‘epicentres’) of transcription factor binding sites undergo remodelling upon lineage progression. New fate is acquired by decommissioning old and establishing new super-enhancers and/or epicentres, an auto-regulatory process that abates one master regulator subset while enhancing another. We further show that when outside their niche, either in vitro or in wound-repair, hair follicle stem cells dynamically remodel super-enhancers in response to changes in their microenvironment. Intriguingly, some key super-enhancers shift epicentres, enabling their genes to remain active and maintain a transitional state in an ever-changing transcriptional landscape. Finally, we identify SOX9 as a crucial chromatin rheostat of hair follicle stem cell super-enhancers, and provide functional evidence that super-enhancers are dynamic, dense transcription-factor-binding platforms which are acutely sensitive to pioneer master regulators whose levels define not only spatial and temporal features of lineage-status but also stemness, plasticity in transitional states and differentiation.
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-03-18
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14289
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Recursive splicing in long vertebrate genes
    • Authors: Christopher R. Sibley, Warren Emmett, Lorea Blazquez, Ana Faro, Nejc Haberman, Michael Briese, Daniah Trabzuni, Mina Ryten, Michael E. Weale, John Hardy, Miha Modic, Tomaž Curk, Stephen W. Wilson, Vincent Plagnol, Jernej Ule
      Pages: 371 - 375
      Abstract: It is generally believed that splicing removes introns as single units from precursor messenger RNA transcripts. However, some long Drosophila melanogaster introns contain a cryptic site, known as a recursive splice site (RS-site), that enables a multi-step process of intron removal termed recursive splicing. The extent to which recursive splicing occurs in other species and its mechanistic basis have not been examined. Here we identify highly conserved RS-sites in genes expressed in the mammalian brain that encode proteins functioning in neuronal development. Moreover, the RS-sites are found in some of the longest introns across vertebrates. We find that vertebrate recursive splicing requires initial definition of an ‘RS-exon’ that follows the RS-site. The RS-exon is then excluded from the dominant mRNA isoform owing to competition with a reconstituted 5′ splice site formed at the RS-site after the first splicing step. Conversely, the RS-exon is included when preceded by cryptic promoters or exons that fail to reconstitute an efficient 5′ splice site. Most RS-exons contain a premature stop codon such that their inclusion can decrease mRNA stability. Thus, by establishing a binary splicing switch, RS-sites demarcate different mRNA isoforms emerging from long genes by coupling cryptic elements with inclusion of RS-exons.
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-13
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14466
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Genome-wide identification of zero nucleotide recursive splicing in
           Drosophila
    • Authors: Michael O. Duff, Sara Olson, Xintao Wei, Sandra C. Garrett, Ahmad Osman, Mohan Bolisetty, Alex Plocik, Susan E. Celniker, Brenton R. Graveley
      Pages: 376 - 379
      Abstract: Recursive splicing is a process in which large introns are removed in multiple steps by re-splicing at ratchet points—5′ splice sites recreated after splicing. Recursive splicing was first identified in the Drosophila Ultrabithorax (Ubx) gene and only three additional Drosophila genes have since been experimentally shown to undergo recursive splicing. Here we identify 197 zero nucleotide exon ratchet points in 130 introns of 115 Drosophila genes from total RNA sequencing data generated from developmental time points, dissected tissues and cultured cells. The sequential nature of recursive splicing was confirmed by identification of lariat introns generated by splicing to and from the ratchet points. We also show that recursive splicing is a constitutive process, that depletion of U2AF inhibits recursive splicing, and that the sequence and function of ratchet points are evolutionarily conserved in Drosophila. Finally, we identify four recursively spliced human genes, one of which is also recursively spliced in Drosophila. Together, these results indicate that recursive splicing is commonly used in Drosophila, occurs in humans, and provides insight into the mechanisms by which some large introns are removed.
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-13
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14475
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Corrigendum: Three keys to the radiation of angiosperms into freezing
           environments
    • Authors: Amy E. Zanne, David C. Tank, William K. Cornwell, Jonathan M. Eastman, Stephen A. Smith, Richard G. FitzJohn, Daniel J. McGlinn, Brian C. O'Meara, Angela T. Moles, Peter B. Reich, Dana L. Royer, Douglas E. Soltis, Peter F. Stevens, Mark Westoby, Ian J. Wright, Lonnie Aarssen, Robert I. Bertin, Andre Calaminus, Rafaël Govaerts, Frank Hemmings, Michelle R. Leishman, Jacek Oleksyn, Pamela S. Soltis, Nathan G. Swenson, Laura Warman, Jeremy M. Beaulieu
      Pages: 380 - 380
      Abstract: Nature506, 89–92 (2014); doi:10.1038/nature12872corrigendum Nature514, 394 (2014); doi:10.1038/nature13842Three readers pointed out that in this Letter we applied the threshold of 0.044 (the size at which freezing-induced embolisms are believed
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14371
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Corrigendum: Oxidant stress evoked by pacemaking in dopaminergic neurons
           is attenuated by DJ-1
    • Authors: Jaime N. Guzman, Javier Sanchez-Padilla, David Wokosin, Jyothisri Kondapalli, Ema Ilijic, Paul T. Schumacker, D. James Surmeier
      Pages: 380 - 380
      Abstract: Nature468, 696–700 (2010); doi:10.1038/nature09536In Fig. 2a of this Letter, the neuron reconstruction and the electrophysiology/calcium imaging traces were mismatched. In addition, in Fig. 2c, the wild-type SNc neurons should have been ‘(n = 5)’
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nature14487
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Relocation: Out of place
    • Authors: Paul Smaglik
      Pages: 381 - 383
      Abstract: Enforced mingling and straight-up instruction can help scientists in a foreign country.
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nj7552-381a
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Turning point: Josh Dillon
    • Authors: Virginia Gewin
      Pages: 383 - 383
      Abstract: How an astronomer invented a politically incorrect parlour game.
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nj7552-383a
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Grains of wheat
    • Authors: Alex Shvartsman
      Pages: 386 - 386
      Abstract: A lesson learned.
      Citation: Nature 521, 7552 (2015)
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521386a
      Issue No: Vol. 521, No. 7552 (2015)
       
  • Wild bees: Lone rangers
    • Authors: Lucas Laursen
      Abstract: Solitary bees receive scant attention, but research shows that they are vital pollinators of crops and wild habitats.
      Citation: Nature
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521S62a
       
  • Aerodynamics: Vortices and robobees
    • Authors: Neil Savage
      Abstract: A growing understanding of insect flight is helping scientists to build tiny flying robots.
      Citation: Nature
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521S64a
       
  • Q&A: Charles Michener
    • Authors: Julie Gould
      Abstract: Charles Michener has been studying bees for more than 80 years, and, although he has seen many changes in the field, his interest in these insects has not diminished. Now aged 96, he contributes to bee research as a Watkins distinguished professor emeritus at Kansas University in Lawrence.
      Citation: Nature
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521S66a
       
  • The beeline
    • Authors: Sarah DeWeerdt
      Abstract: Of all insects, bees — especially honeybees (Apis mellifera) — are the most lauded by humans. They have been praised by poets and writers, including Virgil and Shakespeare, and their colonies are seen as a metaphor for human societies. This affinity is no surprise: humans and bees have a long and interwoven history.
      Citation: Nature
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521S50a
       
  • Pesticides: Seeking answers amid a toxic debate
    • Authors: Michael Eisenstein
      Abstract: Some see the European Union's ban on neonicotinoid pesticides as a victory for pollinators, but the data suggest that limiting these compounds may do little to stave off honeybee losses.
      Citation: Nature
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521S52a
       
  • Microbiome: The puzzle in a bee's gut
    • Authors: Alla Katsnelson
      Abstract: By analysing bacteria that live in the digestive tracts of bees, researchers hope to learn about the role of microbes in insect health.
      Citation: Nature
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521S56a
       
  • Entomology: The bee-all and end-all
    • Abstract: Seven scientists give their opinions on the biggest challenges faced by bees and bee researchers.
      Citation: Nature
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521S57a
       
  • Animal behaviour: Nested instincts
    • Authors: Lauren Gravitz
      Abstract: The many levels of bee behaviour offer insights on everything from population dynamics to molecular changes.
      Citation: Nature
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521S60a
       
  • Bees
    • Bees

      Nature. doi:10.1038/521S47a

      Author: Michelle Grayson

      Nature2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521S47a
       
  • Meet our prime pollinators
    • Authors: Julie Gould
      Abstract: Bees do far more than just make honey. Globally, the 25,000 or so bee species play a crucial part in crop production and in promoting biodiversity.
      Citation: Nature
      PubDate: 2015-05-20
      DOI: 10.1038/521S48a
       
 
 
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