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Journal Cover Nature
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     ISSN (Print) 0028-0836 - ISSN (Online) 1476-4687
     Published by Nature Publishing Group Homepage  [110 journals]   [SJR: 14.747]   [H-I: 768]
  • Genetic rights and wrongs
    • Pages: 143 - 143
      Abstract: Australia’s decision to uphold a patent on biological material is in danger of hampering the development of diagnostic tests.
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-09
      DOI: 10.1038/513143a
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Ebola: time to act
    • Pages: 143 - 144
      Abstract: Governments and research organizations must mobilize to end the West African outbreak.
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-09
      DOI: 10.1038/513143b
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Orbital assembly
    • Pages: 144 - 144
      Abstract: The space launch of a 3D printer does not herald a brave new era — but it is a good start.
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513144a
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Make diagnostic centres a priority for Ebola crisis
    • Authors: J. Daniel Kelly
      Pages: 145 - 145
      Abstract: Bottlenecks in testing samples for Ebola leave patients stranded for days in isolation wards and raise fears of seeking treatment, says J. Daniel Kelly.
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-09
      DOI: 10.1038/513145a
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Evolution: Wooing frogs are bat bait
    • Pages: 146 - 146
      Abstract: Bats use echolocation not only to navigate, but also to spot and capture male frogs that are in the act of courting.Many male frogs inflate their vocal sacs while sending out calls to attract potential mates. Wouter Halfwerk at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513146c
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Physics: Magnets used in suspension act
    • Pages: 146 - 146
      Abstract: Researchers have developed a way to handle small objects in three dimensions using magnetic levitation, even when the objects themselves are not magnetic.George Whitesides and his team at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, suspended a non-magnetic nylon screw in a liquid that becomes magnetic
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513146d
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Genomics: How coffee got its buzz
    • Pages: 146 - 146
      Abstract: The coffee plant makes caffeine using different genes from those found in tea and cacao, suggesting that the ability to produce the stimulant evolved at least twice in plants.Victor Albert at the University of Buffalo in New York and his colleagues sequenced the genome
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513146b
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Animal behaviour: Videos teach tricks to wild monkeys
    • Pages: 146 - 146
      Abstract: Wild monkeys can learn new behaviours by watching instructional videos — a feat that had previously been accomplished only in the laboratory.Tina Gunhold at the University of Vienna and her collaborators recorded video of two captive marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) as they opened
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513146a
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • The language of deception
    • Pages: 147 - 147
      Abstract: A PLoS ONE paper on language patterns in fraudulent papers has sparked social-media speculation about new ways to spot dishonest work. Researchers at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, took advantage of a singular resource to study the linguistics of fraud: the collected
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513147f
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Biofuels: Bacteria generate propane gas
    • Pages: 147 - 147
      Abstract: Genetically engineered bacteria could one day be harnessed to make renewable propane fuel.Patrik Jones at Imperial College London, Kalim Akhtar at University College London and their colleagues introduced genes for various enzymes from different species of bacteria into Escherichia coli, so that the
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513147d
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Zoology: Archer fish show how to sharpshoot
    • Pages: 147 - 147
      Abstract: Archer fish can control the water jets they shoot from their mouths to nab prey from a variety of distances.Peggy Gerullis and Stefan Schuster at the University of Bayreuth in Germany trained the fish (Toxotes jaculatrix; pictured) to fire at specific
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513147e
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Neuroscience: Music training aids speech processing
    • Pages: 147 - 147
      Abstract: The more music training children receive, the better their brains become at distinguishing between similar speech sounds.Nina Kraus at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, and her colleagues studied children aged six to nine years from low-income neighbourhoods in Los Angeles, California, who took part
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513147c
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Marine ecology: Blue whales bounce back
    • Pages: 147 - 147
      Abstract: A population of blue whales has reached pre-whaling levels and is no longer endangered.Cole Monnahan at the University of Washington in Seattle and his colleagues modelled a population of blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) in the eastern North Pacific along with the number
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513147a
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Microbiology and immunology: Early diet shapes gut flora
    • Pages: 147 - 147
      Abstract: Breast- and bottle-fed monkeys develop distinct immune systems and communities of gut microbes.Populations of gut flora vary among adult primates, but little is known about what drives these differences. Dennis Hartigan-O'Connor of the University of California, Davis, and his colleagues found that breast-fed rhesus
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513147b
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Seven days: 5–11 September 2014
    • Pages: 148 - 149
      Abstract: The week in science: NIH finds forgotten ricin, scientists discover massive dinosaur, and greenhouse gases hit record highs.
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513148a
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Scientists split over Scottish independence vote
    • Authors: Elizabeth Gibney
      Pages: 151 - 152
      Abstract: Research could founder or flourish if Scotland leaves the United Kingdom.
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-09
      DOI: 10.1038/513151a
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Plate tectonics found on Europa
    • Authors: Alexandra Witze
      Pages: 153 - 154
      Abstract: Discovery buoys bid for mission to Jovian moon.
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-07
      DOI: 10.1038/513153a
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Chinese data hint at trigger for fatal quake
    • Authors: Jane Qiu
      Pages: 154 - 155
      Abstract: Seismic activity started to rise just as two giant reservoirs on upper Yangtze were being filled with water.
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513154a
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Correction
    • Pages: 156 - 156
      Abstract: The graphic in the News story ‘Ebola drug trials set to begin amid crisis’ (Nature513, 13–14; 2014) said that the NIAID/GSK vaccine had been shown to be safe in ‘preclinical human trials’. In fact, two components of the vaccine have been
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513156b
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • NASA to send 3D printer into space
    • Authors: Alexandra Witze
      Pages: 156 - 156
      Abstract: Machine will let astronauts create parts to order.
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513156a
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Wildlife energy: Survival of the fittest
    • Authors: Andrew Curry
      Pages: 157 - 159
      Abstract: Using a wildlife version of fitness trackers, biologists can finally measure how much energy animals need to stay alive.
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513157a
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Curing blindness: Vision quest
    • Authors: Corie Lok
      Pages: 160 - 162
      Abstract: Technologies are allowing doctors to do what was once unheard of: restore blind people's sight. Now the real challenges begin.
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513160a
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Climate policy: Rethink IPCC reports
    • Authors: Thomas F. Stocker, Gian-Kasper Plattner
      Pages: 163 - 165
      Abstract: Voluntary work alone cannot sustain the assessments carried out by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Thomas F. Stocker and Gian-Kasper Plattner call for institutional support and a longer report cycle.
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513163a
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Economics: Manufacture renewables to build energy security
    • Authors: John A. Mathews, Hao Tan
      Pages: 166 - 168
      Abstract: Countries should follow China's lead and boost markets for water, wind and solar power technologies to drive down costs, say John A. Mathews and Hao Tan.
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513166a
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Science fiction: Verne and beyond
    • Authors: Danièle Chatelain, George Slusser
      Pages: 169 - 170
      Abstract: Danièle Chatelain and George Slusser explore how French science fiction grapples with Cartesian duality.
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513169a
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Q&A: The sci-fi optimist
    • Authors: Zeeya Merali
      Pages: 170 - 171
      Abstract: Best-selling science-fiction writer Neal Stephenson's works cover everything from cryptography to Sumerian mythology. Ahead of next year's novel Seveneves, he talks about his influences, the stagnation in material technologies, and Hieroglyph, the forthcoming science-fiction anthology that he kick-started to stimulate the next generation of engineers.
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513170a
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Books in brief
    • Authors: Barbara Kiser
      Pages: 171 - 171
      Abstract: Barbara Kiser reviews five of the week's best science picks.
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513171a
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Policy: Count the social cost of oil sands too
    • Authors: Stephanie Montesanti
      Pages: 172 - 172
      Abstract: Efforts to eliminate carbon pollution should not divert attention from other pressing issues that have accompanied oil-sands development (see W. J.Palenet al. Nature510, 465–467;10.1038/510465a2014), such as indigenous rights, health inequities and social problems. In
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513172d
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Mental health: Consider human will in psychology studies
    • Authors: Warren Mansell, Timothy A. Carey
      Pages: 172 - 172
      Abstract: To achieve the improvements advocated by Emily Holmes and colleagues for psychological treatments (Nature511, 287–289;10.1038/511287a2014), researchers need to conceptually link studies of specific psychiatric disorders with fundamental processes that are shared by different disorders.Psychologists often
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513172e
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Pregnancy: No safe level of alcohol
    • Authors: Elizabeth R. Sowell, Michael E. Charness, Edward P. Riley
      Pages: 172 - 172
      Abstract: In our view, Sarah Richardson and colleagues understate the risks of alcohol consumption during pregnancy (Nature512, 131–132;10.1038/512131a2014). Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders are among the three leading causes of intellectual disability (C.O'Learyet al.
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513172c
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Pregnancy: Study the mother's DNA as well
    • Authors: Hannah Landecker
      Pages: 172 - 172
      Abstract: Research into the effects of epigenetic changes during pregnancy on the mother's long-term health is almost non-existent. This contrasts sharply with the wealth of attention paid to such cell-heritable changes, which alter gene activity but not DNA sequence, in the fetus and placenta as a
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513172b
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Scientific record: Frame retractions so they hold firm
    • Authors: Joachim Kirsch, Hans Schöler
      Pages: 172 - 172
      Abstract: The retraction last month (see Nature512, 338;10.1038/nature136612014) of the paper 'Generation of pluripotent stem cells from adult human testis' by S. Conrad et al. (Nature456, 344–349; 10.1038/nature074042008) has caused some
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513172a
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Genomics: Something to swing about
    • Authors: Michael J. O'Neill, Rachel J. O'Neill
      Pages: 174 - 175
      Abstract: The first gibbon genome to be sequenced provides clues about how genomes can be shuffled in short evolutionary time frames, and about how gibbons adapted and diversified in the jungles of southeast Asia. See Article p.195
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513174a
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Microbiology: Bacteria get vaccinated
    • Authors: Rodolphe Barrangou, Todd R. Klaenhammer
      Pages: 175 - 176
      Abstract: Infection by defective bacterial viruses that cannot replicate has now been found to be the key feature enabling bacteria to rapidly develop adaptive immunity against functional viruses.
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513175a
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Atmospheric chemistry: No equatorial divide for a cleansing radical
    • Authors: Arlene M. Fiore
      Pages: 176 - 178
      Abstract: A constraint on the global distribution of the elusive hydroxyl radical takes us a step closer towards understanding the complex, interdependent factors that control the levels of this atmospheric cleanser. See Letter p.219
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513176a
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Sustainable Development: The promise and perils of roads
    • Authors: Stephen G. Perz
      Pages: 178 - 179
      Abstract: A global map of the potential economic benefits of roads together with the environmental damage they can inflict provides a planning tool for sustainable development. See Letter p.229
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-08-27
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13744
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Oceanography: What goes down must come up
    • Authors: Raffaele Ferrari
      Pages: 179 - 180
      Abstract: A compilation of high-resolution measurements of ocean mixing collected over the past three decades reveals how deep ocean waters return to the surface — a process that helps to regulate Earth's climate.
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513179a
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Sensory systems: Sound processing takes motor control
    • Authors: Uri Livneh, Anthony Zador
      Pages: 180 - 181
      Abstract: Neurons linking the brain region that controls movement to the region involved in auditory control have been found to suppress auditory responses when mice move, but the reason for this inhibition is unclear. See Article p.189
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-08-27
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13658
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Astrophysics: Quasar complexity simplified
    • Authors: Michael S. Brotherton
      Pages: 181 - 182
      Abstract: An analysis of a sample comprising some 20,000 mass-accreting supermassive black holes, known as quasars, shows that most of the diverse properties of these cosmic beacons are explained by only two quantities. See Letter p.210
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513181a
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Assembly-line synthesis of organic molecules with tailored shapes
    • Authors: Matthew Burns, Stéphanie Essafi, Jessica R. Bame, Stephanie P. Bull, Matthew P. Webster, Sébastien Balieu, James W. Dale, Craig P. Butts, Jeremy N. Harvey, Varinder K. Aggarwal
      Pages: 183 - 188
      Abstract: Molecular ‘assembly lines’, in which organic molecules undergo iterative processes such as chain elongation and functional group manipulation, are found in many natural systems, including polyketide biosynthesis. Here we report the creation of such an assembly line using the iterative, reagent-controlled homologation of a boronic
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13711
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • A synaptic and circuit basis for corollary discharge in the auditory
           cortex
    • Authors: David M. Schneider, Anders Nelson, Richard Mooney
      Pages: 189 - 194
      Abstract: Sensory regions of the brain integrate environmental cues with copies of motor-related signals important for imminent and ongoing movements. In mammals, signals propagating from the motor cortex to the auditory cortex are thought to have a critical role in normal hearing and behaviour, yet the
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-08-27
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13724
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Gibbon genome and the fast karyotype evolution of small apes
    • Authors: Lucia Carbone, R. Alan Harris, Sante Gnerre, Krishna R. Veeramah, Belen Lorente-Galdos, John Huddleston, Thomas J. Meyer, Javier Herrero, Christian Roos, Bronwen Aken, Fabio Anaclerio, Nicoletta Archidiacono, Carl Baker, Daniel Barrell, Mark A. Batzer, Kathryn Beal, Antoine Blancher, Craig L. Bohrson, Markus Brameier, Michael S. Campbell, Oronzo Capozzi, Claudio Casola, Giorgia Chiatante, Andrew Cree, Annette Damert, Pieter J. de Jong, Laura Dumas, Marcos Fernandez-Callejo, Paul Flicek, Nina V. Fuchs, Ivo Gut, Marta Gut, Matthew W. Hahn, Jessica Hernandez-Rodriguez, LaDeana W. Hillier, Robert Hubley, Bianca Ianc, Zsuzsanna Izsvák, Nina G. Jablonski, Laurel M. Johnstone, Anis Karimpour-Fard, Miriam K. Konkel, Dennis Kostka, Nathan H. Lazar, Sandra L. Lee, Lora R. Lewis, Yue Liu, Devin P. Locke, Swapan Mallick, Fernando L. Mendez, Matthieu Muffato, Lynne V. Nazareth, Kimberly A. Nevonen, Majesta O’Bleness, Cornelia Ochis, Duncan T. Odom, Katherine S. Pollard, Javier Quilez, David Reich, Mariano Rocchi, Gerald G. Schumann, Stephen Searle, James M. Sikela, Gabriella Skollar, Arian Smit, Kemal Sonmez, Boudewijn ten Hallers, Elizabeth Terhune, Gregg W. C. Thomas, Brygg Ullmer, Mario Ventura, Jerilyn A. Walker, Jeffrey D. Wall, Lutz Walter, Michelle C. Ward, Sarah J. Wheelan, Christopher W. Whelan, Simon White, Larry J. Wilhelm, August E. Woerner, Mark Yandell, Baoli Zhu, Michael F. Hammer, Tomas Marques-Bonet, Evan E. Eichler, Lucinda Fulton, Catrina Fronick, Donna M. Muzny, Wesley C. Warren, Kim C. Worley, Jeffrey Rogers, Richard K. Wilson, Richard A. Gibbs
      Pages: 195 - 201
      Abstract: Gibbons are small arboreal apes that display an accelerated rate of evolutionary chromosomal rearrangement and occupy a key node in the primate phylogeny between Old World monkeys and great apes. Here we present the assembly and analysis of a northern white-cheeked gibbon (Nomascus leucogenys
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13679
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Comprehensive molecular characterization of gastric adenocarcinoma
    • Pages: 202 - 209
      Abstract: Gastric cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths, but analysis of its molecular and clinical characteristics has been complicated by histological and aetiological heterogeneity. Here we describe a comprehensive molecular evaluation of 295 primary gastric adenocarcinomas as part of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA)
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-07-23
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13480
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • The diversity of quasars unified by accretion and orientation
    • Authors: Yue Shen, Luis C. Ho
      Pages: 210 - 213
      Abstract: Quasars are rapidly accreting supermassive black holes at the centres of massive galaxies. They display a broad range of properties across all wavelengths, reflecting the diversity in the physical conditions of the regions close to the central engine. These properties, however, are not random, but form well-defined trends. The dominant trend is known as ‘Eigenvector 1’, in which many properties correlate with the strength of optical iron and [O iii] emission. The main physical driver of Eigenvector 1 has long been suspected to be the quasar luminosity normalized by the mass of the hole (the ‘Eddington ratio’), which is an important parameter of the black hole accretion process. But a definitive proof has been missing. Here we report an analysis of archival data that reveals that the Eddington ratio indeed drives Eigenvector 1. We also find that orientation plays a significant role in determining the observed kinematics of the gas in the broad-line region, implying a flattened, disk-like geometry for the fast-moving clouds close to the black hole. Our results show that most of the diversity of quasar phenomenology can be unified using two simple quantities: Eddington ratio and orientation.
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13712
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Probing excitonic dark states in single-layer tungsten disulphide
    • Authors: Ziliang Ye, Ting Cao, Kevin O’Brien, Hanyu Zhu, Xiaobo Yin, Yuan Wang, Steven G. Louie, Xiang Zhang
      Pages: 214 - 218
      Abstract: Transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) monolayers have recently emerged as an important class of two-dimensional semiconductors with potential for electronic and optoelectronic devices. Unlike semi-metallic graphene, layered TMDCs have a sizeable bandgap. More interestingly, when thinned down to a monolayer, TMDCs transform from indirect-bandgap to direct-bandgap semiconductors, exhibiting a number of intriguing optical phenomena such as valley-selective circular dichroism, doping-dependent charged excitons and strong photocurrent responses. However, the fundamental mechanism underlying such a strong light–matter interaction is still under intensive investigation. First-principles calculations have predicted a quasiparticle bandgap much larger than the measured optical gap, and an optical response dominated by excitonic effects. In particular, a recent study based on a GW plus Bethe–Salpeter equation (GW-BSE) approach, which employed many-body Green’s-function methodology to address electron–electron and electron–hole interactions, theoretically predicted a diversity of strongly bound excitons. Here we report experimental evidence of a series of excitonic dark states in single-layer WS2 using two-photon excitation spectroscopy. In combination with GW-BSE theory, we prove that the excitons are of Wannier type, meaning that each exciton wavefunction extends over multiple unit cells, but with extraordinarily large binding energy (∼0.7 electronvolts), leading to a quasiparticle bandgap of 2.7 electronvolts. These strongly bound exciton states are observed to be stable even at room temperature. We reveal an exciton series that deviates substantially from hydrogen models, with a novel energy dependence on the orbital angular momentum. These excitonic energy levels are experimentally found to be robust against environmental perturbations. The discovery of excitonic dark states and exceptionally large binding energy not only sheds light on the importance of many-electron effects in this two-dimensional gapped system, but also holds potential for the device application of TMDC monolayers and their heterostructures in computing, communication and bio-sensing.
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-08-27
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13734
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Observational evidence for interhemispheric hydroxyl-radical parity
    • Authors: P. K. Patra, M. C. Krol, S. A. Montzka, T. Arnold, E. L. Atlas, B. R. Lintner, B. B. Stephens, B. Xiang, J. W. Elkins, P. J. Fraser, A. Ghosh, E. J. Hintsa, D. F. Hurst, K. Ishijima, P. B. Krummel, B. R. Miller, K. Miyazaki, F. L. Moore, J. Mühle, S. O’Doherty, R. G. Prinn, L. P. Steele, M. Takigawa, H. J. Wang, R. F. Weiss, S. C. Wofsy, D. Young
      Pages: 219 - 223
      Abstract: The hydroxyl radical (OH) is a key oxidant involved in the removal of air pollutants and greenhouse gases from the atmosphere. The ratio of Northern Hemispheric to Southern Hemispheric (NH/SH) OH concentration is important for our understanding of emission estimates of atmospheric species such as nitrogen oxides and methane. It remains poorly constrained, however, with a range of estimates from 0.85 to 1.4 (refs 4, 7,8,9,10). Here we determine the NH/SH ratio of OH with the help of methyl chloroform data (a proxy for OH concentrations) and an atmospheric transport model that accurately describes interhemispheric transport and modelled emissions. We find that for the years 2004–2011 the model predicts an annual mean NH–SH gradient of methyl chloroform that is a tight linear function of the modelled NH/SH ratio in annual mean OH. We estimate a NH/SH OH ratio of 0.97 ± 0.12 during this time period by optimizing global total emissions and mean OH abundance to fit methyl chloroform data from two surface-measurement networks and aircraft campaigns. Our findings suggest that top-down emission estimates of reactive species such as nitrogen oxides in key emitting countries in the NH that are based on a NH/SH OH ratio larger than 1 may be overestimated.
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13721
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • A major advance of tropical Andean glaciers during the Antarctic cold
           reversal
    • Authors: V. Jomelli, V. Favier, M. Vuille, R. Braucher, L. Martin, P.-H. Blard, C. Colose, D. Brunstein, F. He, M. Khodri, D. L. Bourlès, L. Leanni, V. Rinterknecht, D. Grancher, B. Francou, J. L. Ceballos, H. Fonseca, Z. Liu, B. L. Otto-Bliesner
      Pages: 224 - 228
      Abstract: The Younger Dryas stadial, a cold event spanning 12,800 to 11,500 years ago, during the last deglaciation, is thought to coincide with the last major glacial re-advance in the tropical Andes. This interpretation relies mainly on cosmic-ray exposure dating of glacial deposits. Recent studies, however, have established new production rates for cosmogenic 10Be and 3He, which make it necessary to update all chronologies in this region and revise our understanding of cryospheric responses to climate variability. Here we present a new 10Be moraine chronology in Colombia showing that glaciers in the northern tropical Andes expanded to a larger extent during the Antarctic cold reversal (14,500 to 12,900 years ago) than during the Younger Dryas. On the basis of a homogenized chronology of all 10Be and 3He moraine ages across the tropical Andes, we show that this behaviour was common to the northern and southern tropical Andes. Transient simulations with a coupled global climate model suggest that the common glacier behaviour was the result of Atlantic meridional overturning circulation variability superimposed on a deglacial increase in the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration. During the Antarctic cold reversal, glaciers advanced primarily in response to cold sea surface temperatures over much of the Southern Hemisphere. During the Younger Dryas, however, northern tropical Andes glaciers retreated owing to abrupt regional warming in response to reduced precipitation and land–surface feedbacks triggered by a weakened Atlantic meridional overturning circulation. Conversely, glacier retreat during the Younger Dryas in the southern tropical Andes occurred as a result of progressive warming, probably influenced by an increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide. Considered with evidence from mid-latitude Andean glaciers, our results argue for a common glacier response to cold conditions in the Antarctic cold reversal exceeding that of the Younger Dryas.
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-08-24
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13546
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • A global strategy for road building
    • Authors: William F. Laurance, Gopalasamy Reuben Clements, Sean Sloan, Christine S. O’Connell, Nathan D. Mueller, Miriam Goosem, Oscar Venter, David P. Edwards, Ben Phalan, Andrew Balmford, Rodney Van Der Ree, Irene Burgues Arrea
      Pages: 229 - 232
      Abstract: The number and extent of roads will expand dramatically this century. Globally, at least 25 million kilometres of new roads are anticipated by 2050; a 60% increase in the total length of roads over that in 2010. Nine-tenths of all road construction is expected to occur in developing nations, including many regions that sustain exceptional biodiversity and vital ecosystem services. Roads penetrating into wilderness or frontier areas are a major proximate driver of habitat loss and fragmentation, wildfires, overhunting and other environmental degradation, often with irreversible impacts on ecosystems. Unfortunately, much road proliferation is chaotic or poorly planned, and the rate of expansion is so great that it often overwhelms the capacity of environmental planners and managers. Here we present a global scheme for prioritizing road building. This large-scale zoning plan seeks to limit the environmental costs of road expansion while maximizing its benefits for human development, by helping to increase agricultural production, which is an urgent priority given that global food demand could double by mid-century. Our analysis identifies areas with high environmental values where future road building should be avoided if possible, areas where strategic road improvements could promote agricultural development with relatively modest environmental costs, and ‘conflict areas’ where road building could have sizeable benefits for agriculture but with serious environmental damage. Our plan provides a template for proactively zoning and prioritizing roads during the most explosive era of road expansion in human history.
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-08-27
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13717
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • The evolution of the placenta drives a shift in sexual selection in
           livebearing fish
    • Authors: B. J. A. Pollux, R. W. Meredith, M. S. Springer, T. Garland, D. N. Reznick
      Pages: 233 - 236
      Abstract: The evolution of the placenta from a non-placental ancestor causes a shift of maternal investment from pre- to post-fertilization, creating a venue for parent–offspring conflicts during pregnancy. Theory predicts that the rise of these conflicts should drive a shift from a reliance on pre-copulatory female mate choice to polyandry in conjunction with post-zygotic mechanisms of sexual selection. This hypothesis has not yet been empirically tested. Here we apply comparative methods to test a key prediction of this hypothesis, which is that the evolution of placentation is associated with reduced pre-copulatory female mate choice. We exploit a unique quality of the livebearing fish family Poeciliidae: placentas have repeatedly evolved or been lost, creating diversity among closely related lineages in the presence or absence of placentation. We show that post-zygotic maternal provisioning by means of a placenta is associated with the absence of bright coloration, courtship behaviour and exaggerated ornamental display traits in males. Furthermore, we found that males of placental species have smaller bodies and longer genitalia, which facilitate sneak or coercive mating and, hence, circumvents female choice. Moreover, we demonstrate that post-zygotic maternal provisioning correlates with superfetation, a female reproductive adaptation that may result in polyandry through the formation of temporally overlapping, mixed-paternity litters. Our results suggest that the emergence of prenatal conflict during the evolution of the placenta correlates with a suite of phenotypic and behavioural male traits that is associated with a reduced reliance on pre-copulatory female mate choice.
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-07-09
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13451
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Innate immune sensing of bacterial modifications of Rho GTPases by the
           Pyrin inflammasome
    • Authors: Hao Xu, Jieling Yang, Wenqing Gao, Lin Li, Peng Li, Li Zhang, Yi-Nan Gong, Xiaolan Peng, Jianzhong Jeff Xi, She Chen, Fengchao Wang, Feng Shao
      Pages: 237 - 241
      Abstract: Cytosolic inflammasome complexes mediated by a pattern recognition receptor (PRR) defend against pathogen infection by activating caspase 1. Pyrin, a candidate PRR, can bind to the inflammasome adaptor ASC to form a caspase 1-activating complex. Mutations in the Pyrin-encoding gene, MEFV, cause a human autoinflammatory disease known as familial Mediterranean fever. Despite important roles in immunity and disease, the physiological function of Pyrin remains unknown. Here we show that Pyrin mediates caspase 1 inflammasome activation in response to Rho-glucosylation activity of cytotoxin TcdB, a major virulence factor of Clostridium difficile, which causes most cases of nosocomial diarrhoea. The glucosyltransferase-inactive TcdB mutant loses the inflammasome-stimulating activity. Other Rho-inactivating toxins, including FIC-domain adenylyltransferases (Vibrio parahaemolyticus VopS and Histophilus somni IbpA) and Clostridium botulinum ADP-ribosylating C3 toxin, can also biochemically activate the Pyrin inflammasome in their enzymatic activity-dependent manner. These toxins all target the Rho subfamily and modify a switch-I residue. We further demonstrate that Burkholderia cenocepacia inactivates RHOA by deamidating Asn 41, also in the switch-I region, and thereby triggers Pyrin inflammasome activation, both of which require the bacterial type VI secretion system (T6SS). Loss of the Pyrin inflammasome causes elevated intra-macrophage growth of B. cenocepacia and diminished lung inflammation in mice. Thus, Pyrin functions to sense pathogen modification and inactivation of Rho GTPases, representing a new paradigm in mammalian innate immunity.
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-06-11
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13449
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Viral tagging reveals discrete populations in Synechococcus viral genome
           sequence space
    • Authors: Li Deng, J. Cesar Ignacio-Espinoza, Ann C. Gregory, Bonnie T. Poulos, Joshua S. Weitz, Philip Hugenholtz, Matthew B. Sullivan
      Pages: 242 - 245
      Abstract: Microbes and their viruses drive myriad processes across ecosystems ranging from oceans and soils to bioreactors and humans. Despite this importance, microbial diversity is only now being mapped at scales relevant to nature, while the viral diversity associated with any particular host remains little researched. Here we quantify host-associated viral diversity using viral-tagged metagenomics, which links viruses to specific host cells for high-throughput screening and sequencing. In a single experiment, we screened 107 Pacific Ocean viruses against a single strain of Synechococcus and found that naturally occurring cyanophage genome sequence space is statistically clustered into discrete populations. These population-based, host-linked viral ecological data suggest that, for this single host and seawater sample alone, there are at least 26 double-stranded DNA viral populations with estimated relative abundances ranging from 0.06 to 18.2%. These populations include previously cultivated cyanophage and new viral types missed by decades of isolate-based studies. Nucleotide identities of homologous genes mostly varied by less than 1% within populations, even in hypervariable genome regions, and by 42–71% between populations, which provides benchmarks for viral metagenomics and genome-based viral species definitions. Together these findings showcase a new approach to viral ecology that quantitatively links objectively defined environmental viral populations, and their genomes, to their hosts.
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-07-13
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13459
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Carbonic anhydrases, EPF2 and a novel protease mediate CO2 control of
           stomatal development
    • Authors: Cawas B. Engineer, Majid Ghassemian, Jeffrey C. Anderson, Scott C. Peck, Honghong Hu, Julian I. Schroeder
      Pages: 246 - 250
      Abstract: Environmental stimuli, including elevated carbon dioxide levels, regulate stomatal development; however, the key mechanisms mediating the perception and relay of the CO2 signal to the stomatal development machinery remain elusive. To adapt CO2 intake to water loss, plants regulate the development of stomatal gas exchange pores in the aerial epidermis. A diverse range of plant species show a decrease in stomatal density in response to the continuing rise in atmospheric CO2 (ref. 4). To date, one mutant that exhibits deregulation of this CO2-controlled stomatal development response, hic (which is defective in cell-wall wax biosynthesis, ref. 5), has been identified. Here we show that recently isolated Arabidopsis thaliana β-carbonic anhydrase double mutants (ca1 ca4) exhibit an inversion in their response to elevated CO2, showing increased stomatal development at elevated CO2 levels. We characterized the mechanisms mediating this response and identified an extracellular signalling pathway involved in the regulation of CO2-controlled stomatal development by carbonic anhydrases. RNA-seq analyses of transcripts show that the extracellular pro-peptide-encoding gene EPIDERMAL PATTERNING FACTOR 2 (EPF2), but not EPF1 (ref. 9), is induced in wild-type leaves but not in ca1 ca4 mutant leaves at elevated CO2 levels. Moreover, EPF2 is essential for CO2 control of stomatal development. Using cell-wall proteomic analyses and CO2-dependent transcriptomic analyses, we identified a novel CO2-induced extracellular protease, CRSP (CO2 RESPONSE SECRETED PROTEASE), as a mediator of CO2-controlled stomatal development. Our results identify mechanisms and genes that function in the repression of stomatal development in leaves during atmospheric CO2 elevation, including the carbonic-anhydrase-encoding genes CA1 and CA4 and the secreted protease CRSP, which cleaves the pro-peptide EPF2, in turn repressing stomatal development. Elucidation of these mechanisms advances the understanding of how plants perceive and relay the elevated CO2 signal and provides a framework to guide future research into how environmental challenges can modulate gas exchange in plants.
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-07-06
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13452
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase opposes renal carcinoma progression
    • Authors: Bo Li, Bo Qiu, David S. M. Lee, Zandra E. Walton, Joshua D. Ochocki, Lijoy K. Mathew, Anthony Mancuso, Terence P. F. Gade, Brian Keith, Itzhak Nissim, M. Celeste Simon
      Pages: 251 - 255
      Abstract: Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), the most common form of kidney cancer, is characterized by elevated glycogen levels and fat deposition. These consistent metabolic alterations are associated with normoxic stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) secondary to von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) mutations that occur in over 90% of ccRCC tumours. However, kidney-specific VHL deletion in mice fails to elicit ccRCC-specific metabolic phenotypes and tumour formation, suggesting that additional mechanisms are essential. Recent large-scale sequencing analyses revealed the loss of several chromatin remodelling enzymes in a subset of ccRCC (these included polybromo-1, SET domain containing 2 and BRCA1-associated protein-1, among others), indicating that epigenetic perturbations are probably important contributors to the natural history of this disease. Here we used an integrative approach comprising pan-metabolomic profiling and metabolic gene set analysis and determined that the gluconeogenic enzyme fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase 1 (FBP1) is uniformly depleted in over six hundred ccRCC tumours examined. Notably, the human FBP1 locus resides on chromosome 9q22, the loss of which is associated with poor prognosis for ccRCC patients. Our data further indicate that FBP1 inhibits ccRCC progression through two distinct mechanisms. First, FBP1 antagonizes glycolytic flux in renal tubular epithelial cells, the presumptive ccRCC cell of origin, thereby inhibiting a potential Warburg effect. Second, in pVHL (the protein encoded by the VHL gene)-deficient ccRCC cells, FBP1 restrains cell proliferation, glycolysis and the pentose phosphate pathway in a catalytic-activity-independent manner, by inhibiting nuclear HIF function via direct interaction with the HIF inhibitory domain. This unique dual function of the FBP1 protein explains its ubiquitous loss in ccRCC, distinguishing FBP1 from previously identified tumour suppressors that are not consistently mutated in all tumours.
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-07-20
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13557
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Metastasis-suppressor transcript destabilization through TARBP2 binding of
           mRNA hairpins
    • Authors: Hani Goodarzi, Steven Zhang, Colin G. Buss, Lisa Fish, Saeed Tavazoie, Sohail F. Tavazoie
      Pages: 256 - 260
      Abstract: Aberrant regulation of RNA stability has an important role in many disease states. Deregulated post-transcriptional modulation, such as that governed by microRNAs targeting linear sequence elements in messenger RNAs, has been implicated in the progression of many cancer types. A defining feature of RNA is its ability to fold into structures. However, the roles of structural mRNA elements in cancer progression remain unexplored. Here we performed an unbiased search for post-transcriptional modulators of mRNA stability in breast cancer by conducting whole-genome transcript stability measurements in poorly and highly metastatic isogenic human breast cancer lines. Using a computational framework that searches RNA sequence and structure space, we discovered a family of GC-rich structural cis-regulatory RNA elements, termed sRSEs for structural RNA stability elements, which are significantly overrepresented in transcripts displaying reduced stability in highly metastatic cells. By integrating computational and biochemical approaches, we identified TARBP2, a double-stranded RNA-binding protein implicated in microRNA processing, as the trans factor that binds the sRSE family and similar structural elements—collectively termed TARBP2-binding structural elements (TBSEs)—in transcripts. TARBP2 is overexpressed in metastatic cells and metastatic human breast tumours and destabilizes transcripts containing TBSEs. Endogenous TARBP2 promotes metastatic cell invasion and colonization by destabilizing amyloid precursor protein (APP) and ZNF395 transcripts, two genes previously associated with Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s disease, respectively. We reveal these genes to be novel metastasis suppressor genes in breast cancer. The cleavage product of APP, extracellular amyloid-α peptide, directly suppresses invasion while ZNF395 transcriptionally represses a pro-metastatic gene expression program. The expression levels of TARBP2, APP and ZNF395 in human breast carcinomas support their experimentally uncovered roles in metastasis. Our findings establish a non-canonical and direct role for TARBP2 in mammalian gene expression regulation and reveal that regulated RNA destabilization through protein-mediated binding of mRNA structural elements can govern cancer progression.
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-07-09
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13466
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Serial time-resolved crystallography of photosystem II using a femtosecond
           X-ray laser
    • Authors: Christopher Kupitz, Shibom Basu, Ingo Grotjohann, Raimund Fromme, Nadia A. Zatsepin, Kimberly N. Rendek, Mark S. Hunter, Robert L. Shoeman, Thomas A. White, Dingjie Wang, Daniel James, Jay-How Yang, Danielle E. Cobb, Brenda Reeder, Raymond G. Sierra, Haiguang Liu, Anton Barty, Andrew L. Aquila, Daniel Deponte, Richard A. Kirian, Sadia Bari, Jesse J. Bergkamp, Kenneth R. Beyerlein, Michael J. Bogan, Carl Caleman, Tzu-Chiao Chao, Chelsie E. Conrad, Katherine M. Davis, Holger Fleckenstein, Lorenzo Galli, Stefan P. Hau-Riege, Stephan Kassemeyer, Hartawan Laksmono, Mengning Liang, Lukas Lomb, Stefano Marchesini, Andrew V. Martin, Marc Messerschmidt, Despina Milathianaki, Karol Nass, Alexandra Ros, Shatabdi Roy-Chowdhury, Kevin Schmidt, Marvin Seibert, Jan Steinbrener, Francesco Stellato, Lifen Yan, Chunhong Yoon, Thomas A. Moore, Ana L. Moore, Yulia Pushkar, Garth J. Williams, Sébastien Boutet, R. Bruce Doak, Uwe Weierstall, Matthias Frank, Henry N. Chapman, John C. H. Spence, Petra Fromme
      Pages: 261 - 265
      Abstract: Photosynthesis, a process catalysed by plants, algae and cyanobacteria converts sunlight to energy thus sustaining all higher life on Earth. Two large membrane protein complexes, photosystem I and II (PSI and PSII), act in series to catalyse the light-driven reactions in photosynthesis. PSII catalyses the light-driven water splitting process, which maintains the Earth’s oxygenic atmosphere. In this process, the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) of PSII cycles through five states, S0 to S4, in which four electrons are sequentially extracted from the OEC in four light-driven charge-separation events. Here we describe time resolved experiments on PSII nano/microcrystals from Thermosynechococcus elongatus performed with the recently developed technique of serial femtosecond crystallography. Structures have been determined from PSII in the dark S1 state and after double laser excitation (putative S3 state) at 5 and 5.5 Å resolution, respectively. The results provide evidence that PSII undergoes significant conformational changes at the electron acceptor side and at the Mn4CaO5 core of the OEC. These include an elongation of the metal cluster, accompanied by changes in the protein environment, which could allow for binding of the second substrate water molecule between the more distant protruding Mn (referred to as the ‘dangler’ Mn) and the Mn3CaOx cubane in the S2 to S3 transition, as predicted by spectroscopic and computational studies. This work shows the great potential for time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography for investigation of catalytic processes in biomolecules.
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-07-09
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13453
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Corrigendum: Mitofusin 2 tethers endoplasmic reticulum to mitochondria
    • Authors: Olga Martins de Brito, Luca Scorrano
      Pages: 266 - 266
      Abstract: Nature456, 605–610 (2008); doi:10.1038/nature07534In Fig. 1a of this Article, the representative image of a volume-rendered three-dimensional reconstruction of a z-stack of confocal images of endoplasmic-reticulum-targeted yellow fluorescent protein (ER-YFP) in a Mfn2−/− cell expressing MFN2
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13550
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Corrigendum: Direct recording and molecular identification of the calcium
           channel of primary cilia
    • Authors: Paul G. DeCaen, Markus Delling, Thuy N. Vien, David E. Clapham
      Pages: 266 - 266
      Abstract: Nature504, 315–318 (2013); doi:10.1038/nature12832In this Letter, Fig. 1c and e contained errors, which are corrected in Fig. 1 of this Corrigendum. In the key of Fig. 1c, the extracellular conditions for the Ba2+ and
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13631
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Job satisfaction: Divided opinions
    • Authors: Paul Smaglik, Karen Kaplan, Shirana Kelly, Dan Penny
      Pages: 267 - 269
      Abstract: Financial woes are marring researchers' enjoyment of their work.
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/nj7517-267a
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • The tiger waiting on the shore
    • Authors: Paul Currion
      Pages: 272 - 272
      Abstract: Days of remembrance.
      Citation: Nature 513, 7517 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513272a
      Issue No: Vol. 513, No. 7517 (2014)
       
  • Public health: A burning issue
    • Authors: Nidhi Subbaraman
      Pages: S16 - S17
      Abstract: An unusually high number of women from east Asia develop lung cancer. Few smoke, but that's only part of the mystery.
      Citation: Nature
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513S16a
       
  • Aetiology: Crucial clues
    • Authors: Sarah Deweerdt
      Pages: S12 - S13
      Abstract: Studies in never-smokers have revealed key lung-cancer mutations — but the cause of the disease is still a mystery.
      Citation: Nature
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513S12a
       
  • Environment: Breathing trouble
    • Authors: Traci Watson
      Pages: S14 - S15
      Abstract: Large-scale studies are confirming suspicions that air pollution significantly increases the risk of lung cancer.
      Citation: Nature
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513S14a
       
  • Personalized medicine: Special treatment
    • Authors: Michael Eisenstein
      Pages: S8 - S9
      Abstract: Therapies targeted at the specific genetics of a patient's lung cancer have proved harder to realize than expected.
      Citation: Nature
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513S8a
       
  • Immunotherapy: Chemical tricks
    • Authors: Bianca Nogrady
      Pages: S10 - S11
      Abstract: Lung cancer uses cunning mechanisms to evade the immune system. Can new antibody therapies outwit the disease'
      Citation: Nature
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513S10a
       
  • Diagnosis: Early warning system
    • Authors: Katherine Bourzac
      Pages: S4 - S6
      Abstract: The costs of lung-cancer screening overshadow the benefits of swift diagnosis — but ingenious technologies could help.
      Citation: Nature
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513S4a
       
  • Perspective: The screening imperative
    • Authors: John K. Field
      Pages: S7 - S7
      Abstract: Lung cancer kills more people than any other malignancy. Let's not delay in implementing a screening programme, says John K. Field.
      Citation: Nature
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513S7a
       
  • Lung cancer
    • Lung cancer

      Nature. doi:10.1038/513S1a

      Author: Herb Brody

      Nature2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513S1a
       
  • Epidemiology: The dominant malignancy
    • Authors: Eric Bender
      Pages: S2 - S3
      Abstract: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality. In some countries, incidence rates are dropping but survival rates for those with the disease remain low. By Eric Bender.
      Citation: Nature
      PubDate: 2014-09-10
      DOI: 10.1038/513S2a
       
 
 
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