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Journal Cover Nature
  [SJR: 21.936]   [H-I: 948]   [3736 followers]  Follow
    
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   ISSN (Print) 0028-0836 - ISSN (Online) 1476-4687
   Published by NPG Homepage  [125 journals]
  • No time to chop funding for a pivotal climate programme
    • Pages: 287 - 287
      Abstract: As the Great Barrier Reef suffers yet more potentially fatal damage, understanding Earth’s response to global warming is more crucial than ever. 
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/543287a
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Not just dwingey chimbles: dialects are alive and kicking
    • Pages: 288 - 288
      Abstract: A British Library collection of regional words and phrases shows that language is still evolving.
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/543288a
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Announcement: Transparency upgrade for Nature journals
    • Pages: 288 - 288
      Abstract: The Nature journals continue journey towards greater rigour.
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/543288b
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • How dare you call us diplomats
    • Authors: Amaya Moro-Martín
      Pages: 289 - 289
      Abstract: Amaya Moro-Martín is furious about Spanish government attempts to brand her and other exiled scientists as strategic partners.
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-14
      DOI: 10.1038/543289a
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Materials: Bone-like steel stops cracks
    • Pages: 290 - 290
      Abstract: Steel that mimics the structure of bone is resistant to cracking — a property that could be exploited to produce safer cars, aeroplanes and power plants.Conventional sheet metals are prone to failure when exposed to repeated stress, because cracks, once formed, easily spread. Inspired
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/543290a
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Evolution: Ancient sea-star lenses found
    • Pages: 290 - 290
      Abstract: Tiny lenses that could have allowed sea stars and brittle stars to respond to light may have evolved at least 57 million years earlier than previously thought.Some sea and brittle stars living today have an array of lenses on their skeletons that are thought
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/543290b
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Cancer immunotherapy: Drug success factor found
    • Pages: 290 - 290
      Abstract: The success of a cancer therapy that unleashes immune cells on tumours depends on the cells producing a protein called CD28. The molecule could serve as a biomarker for selecting individuals who are likely to respond to certain immunotherapies.Drugs that inhibit a protein called
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/543290c
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Climate change: Warming poses risk to US farming
    • Pages: 290 - 291
      Abstract: Agricultural productivity in the United States could return to pre-1980s levels by 2050 as a result of climate change.Farming in the United States, the world's largest food producer, has grown steadily more efficient since the 1950s, thanks mainly to technological improvements. Xin-Zhong Liang at
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/543290d
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Neuroscience: Super memory skills gained
    • Pages: 291 - 291
      Abstract: With the right training, people can improve their memory almost to the level of the world's top-ranked memory athletes — and the effect can be seen in brain scans.Memory athletes worldwide compete to memorize hundreds of words or other information in minutes. Martin Dresler
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/543291a
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Oceanography: Climate putting stress on oceans
    • Pages: 291 - 291
      Abstract: Nearly all of the world's oceans are already affected by climate change.Stephanie Henson at the National Oceanography Centre in Southampton, UK, and her colleagues used climate models to analyse trends in sea-surface temperature, pH, oxygen levels and primary production (a measure of food availability
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/543291b
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Evolution: Beetles repeatedly evolved mimicry
    • Pages: 291 - 291
      Abstract: Over the course of many millions of years, members of one beetle family have evolved to impersonate army ants at least a dozen separate times, adding to evidence that evolution is more predictable than once thought.Several species of rove beetle (Staphylinidae; pictured) mimic
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/543291c
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Microbiome: Yeast worsens gut disorder
    • Pages: 291 - 291
      Abstract: Yeast in the gut boosts levels of uric acid, which damages the intestinal wall and worsens bowel inflammation in mice.Gut bacteria are known to influence intestinal disease, but the role of gut fungi — such as the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (pictured)
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/543291d
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Climate change: Arctic set for rainy future
    • Pages: 291 - 291
      Abstract: More rain than snow is likely to fall in the Arctic by the end of the century, owing to global warming.At present, rain accounts for about 35% of Arctic precipitation. Richard Bintanja and Olivier Andry at the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute in De Bilt
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/543291e
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Space ravioli, coral bleaching and a LIGO pioneer dies
    • Pages: 292 - 293
      Abstract: The week in science: 10–16 March 2017.
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/543292a
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Earth’s lost history of planet-altering eruptions revealed
    • Authors: Alexandra Witze
      Pages: 295 - 296
      Abstract: Geologists unearth signs of major volcanic events stretching back 3 billion years.
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-14
      DOI: 10.1038/543295a
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • ‘Zombie’ patent fights over mutant mice return
    • Authors: Heidi Ledford
      Pages: 296 - 297
      Abstract: University takes on US National Institutes of Health over animals used for Alzheimer’s research.
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/nature.2017.21620
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • First fluorescent frog found
    • Authors: Anna Nowogrodzki
      Pages: 297 - 297
      Abstract: A rare find in land animals reveals a new way to glow.
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-13
      DOI: 10.1038/nature.2017.21616
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Synthetic yeast chromosomes help probe mysteries of evolution
    • Authors: Amy Maxmen
      Pages: 298 - 299
      Abstract: To work out how the yeast genome evolved, bioengineers are recreating it.
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-09
      DOI: 10.1038/nature.2017.21615
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Open-data contest unearths scientific gems — and controversy
    • Authors: Heidi Ledford
      Pages: 299 - 299
      Abstract: Hundreds of researchers pick through clinical trial from a major blood-pressure study, to the dismay of some who collected the information.
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-08
      DOI: 10.1038/nature.2017.21572
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Chinese mountain observatory to probe cosmic-ray origins
    • Authors: David Cyranoski
      Pages: 300 - 301
      Abstract: The massive project will intercept γ-ray showers in an unexplored energy band.
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/543300a
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • CRISPR, microbes and more are joining the war against crop killers
    • Authors: Brooke Borel
      Pages: 302 - 304
      Abstract: Agricultural scientists look beyond synthetic chemistry to battle pesticide resistance.
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-14
      DOI: 10.1038/543302a
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • A makeover for the world's most hated crop
    • Authors: Wudan Yan
      Pages: 306 - 308
      Abstract: Oil palm has a reputation as an environmental menace. Can the latest genetic research change that'
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/543306a
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • The business case for soil
    • Authors: Jess Davies
      Pages: 309 - 311
      Abstract: Action on soil sustainability must move beyond the farm and into the boardroom, urges Jess Davies.
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/543309a
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Economics: The architecture of inequality
    • Authors: Aaron Reeves
      Pages: 312 - 313
      Abstract: Aaron Reeves surveys five books on the defining social, political and economic issue of our times.
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/543312a
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Animal behaviour: World of webs
    • Authors: Philip Ball
      Pages: 314 - 314
      Abstract: Philip Ball finds himself caught up in artworks woven by thousands of South American spiders.
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/543314a
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Health and environment: Add a tax to the EU agricultural policy
    • Authors: Frank Berendse
      Pages: 315 - 315
      Abstract: As the debate heats up over the European Union's new Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) for 2020, I propose introducing a progressive tax that is based on farmers' purchase per unit area of pesticides, antibiotics and imported animal feed such as soya beans (see also F.
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/543315a
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Nature-based solutions: criteria
    • Authors: Christian Albert, Joachim H. Spangenberg, Barbara Schröter
      Pages: 315 - 315
      Abstract: The lack of a precise definition for the term 'nature-based solutions' risks making it seem arbitrary and impractical (see Nature541, 133–134;10.1038/541133b2017). We therefore propose three criteria for applying these solutions that will strengthen the concept's role in
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/543315b
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Nature-based solutions: sustainable'
    • Authors: Thomas Schaubroeck
      Pages: 315 - 315
      Abstract: Green practices, such as creating parks in cities for recreation, are being branded as 'nature-based solutions' (see also Nature541, 133–134;10.1038/541133b2017). What we need, however, are sustainable solutions that address human needs effectively over time — regardless of
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/543315c
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Nature-based solutions: business
    • Authors: Nikolaos P. Nikolaidis, Dionyssia Kolokotsa, Steven A. Banwart
      Pages: 315 - 315
      Abstract: Europe's ThinkNature project aims to promote 'nature-based solutions' across research, policy, non-governmental organizations and business (see Nature541, 133–134;10.1038/541133b2017). These solutions will guide the design of sustainable cities and territories, realize their economic-development opportunities, and promote business success
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/543315d
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Churchill: Reason travels well through time
    • Authors: Timothy C. Hawes
      Pages: 315 - 315
      Abstract: Winston Churchill was one of many renowned thinkers to speculate on extraterrestrial life (see M.LivioNature542, 289–291;10.1038/542289a2017). Another, the natural scientist Robert Hooke (1635–1703), did so almost 300 years earlier.Hooke posited that “there may be
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/543315e
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Mildred S. Dresselhaus (1930–2017)
    • Authors: D. D. L. Chung
      Pages: 316 - 316
      Abstract: 'Queen of carbon' and champion of women in science.
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/543316a
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Astrophysics: Distant galaxies lack dark matter
    • Authors: Mark Swinbank
      Pages: 318 - 319
      Abstract: The masses of nearby spiral galaxies are dominated by invisible 'dark matter'. Surprisingly, galaxies in the distant Universe seem to contain comparatively little of it. See Letter p.397
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/543318a
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Biomedicine: An improved gel for detached retinas
    • Authors: Stanley Chang
      Pages: 319 - 320
      Abstract: Surgical repair of a detached retina involves the injection of a gas or silicone oil into the eye to hold the retina in place. The development of a gel with more-desirable properties than these substances might improve the success of this procedure.
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-12
      DOI: 10.1038/nature21898
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Physiology: Bone-derived hormone suppresses appetite
    • Authors: Richard D. Palmiter
      Pages: 320 - 322
      Abstract: The glycoprotein lipocalin 2 is released from the bones of mice in a nutrient-dependent manner and binds to receptors in the brain to suppress appetite. This is the first example of bone-derived signals mediating hunger. See Article p.385
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-08
      DOI: 10.1038/nature21501
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • 50 & 100 Years Ago
    • Pages: 321 - 321
      Abstract: 50 Years AgoSeveral people have speculated on the thesis that if a sufficiently high concentration of an insect sex pheromone could be maintained in the atmosphere the sexes could not find each other for mating purposes ... Their conclusion was that this could lead
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/543321a
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Biogeochemistry: A plan for efficient use of nitrogen fertilizers
    • Authors: Xin Zhang
      Pages: 322 - 323
      Abstract: A global analysis finds that nitrogen fertilizers could be used more efficiently if their international distribution across croplands was altered — a measure that would also decrease nitrogen pollution.
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/543322a
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Ecology: Coral crisis captured
    • Authors: Anna Armstrong
      Pages: 323 - 323
      Abstract: Ocean warming has triggered three major bleaching episodes on the Great Barrier Reef over the past two decades. On page 373, Hughes et al. present an analysis of the extent and severity of these events (T. P.Hugheset al. Nature
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/543323a
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Cell biology: Sort and destroy
    • Authors: Agnieszka Chacinska
      Pages: 324 - 325
      Abstract: Aggregates are aberrant, non-functional forms of protein that often build up in cells in response to stress. Organelles called mitochondria have now been found to be active players in the clearance of these protein aggregates. See Letter p.443
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-01
      DOI: 10.1038/nature21892
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Applied physics: 3D imaging for microchips
    • Authors: Ryan Wilkinson
      Pages: 325 - 325
      Abstract: Semiconductor-based devices called integrated circuits (ICs) are used extensively in modern electronics. However, techniques for producing 3D images of these devices are often inefficient or destructive. In this issue, Holler et al. report a method for generating high-resolution images of ICs that overcomes these
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/543325a
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Molecular biology: A hidden competitive advantage of disorder
    • Authors: P. Andrew Chong, Julie D. Forman-Kay
      Pages: 325 - 326
      Abstract: The cellular response to low oxygen levels is regulated by a process in which one protein is ousted from a binding site by another. It emerges that protein disorder allows the displacement to occur remarkably efficiently. See Letter p.447
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-08
      DOI: 10.1038/nature21893
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Plants
    • Authors: Orli Bahcall, Angela K. Eggleston, Sadaf Shadan
      Pages: 327 - 327
      Abstract: Food, clothing and shelter — these are just a few of the provisions that plants can supply. As sources of energy and therapeutic drugs, and with a role in providing clean air, there are many other examples of the relevance of plants and plant science
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/543327a
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Plant signalling in symbiosis and immunity
    • Authors: Cyril Zipfel, Giles E. D. Oldroyd
      Pages: 328 - 336
      Abstract: Plants encounter a myriad of microorganisms, particularly at the root–soil interface, that can invade with detrimental or beneficial outcomes. Prevalent beneficial associations between plants and microorganisms include those that promote plant growth by facilitating the acquisition of limiting nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus. But
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/nature22009
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • The plant perceptron connects environment to development
    • Authors: Ben Scheres, Wim H. van der Putten
      Pages: 337 - 345
      Abstract: Plants cope with the environment in a variety of ways, and ecological analyses attempt to capture this through life-history strategies or trait-based categorization. These approaches are limited because they treat the trade-off mechanisms that underlie plant responses as a black box. Approaches that involve the
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/nature22010
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Genomic innovation for crop improvement
    • Authors: Michael W. Bevan, Cristobal Uauy, Brande B. H. Wulff, Ji Zhou, Ksenia Krasileva, Matthew D. Clark
      Pages: 346 - 354
      Abstract: Crop production needs to increase to secure future food supplies, while reducing its impact on ecosystems. Detailed characterization of plant genomes and genetic diversity is crucial for meeting these challenges. Advances in genome sequencing and assembly are being used to access the large and complex
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/nature22011
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Quantum design of photosynthesis for bio-inspired solar-energy conversion
    • Authors: Elisabet Romero, Vladimir I. Novoderezhkin, Rienk van Grondelle
      Pages: 355 - 365
      Abstract: Photosynthesis is the natural process that converts solar photons into energy-rich products that are needed to drive the biochemistry of life. Two ultrafast processes form the basis of photosynthesis: excitation energy transfer and charge separation. Under optimal conditions, every photon that is absorbed is used
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/nature22012
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Mineral supply for sustainable development requires resource governance
    • Authors: Saleem H. Ali, Damien Giurco, Nicholas Arndt, Edmund Nickless, Graham Brown, Alecos Demetriades, Ray Durrheim, Maria Amélia Enriquez, Judith Kinnaird, Anna Littleboy, Lawrence D. Meinert, Roland Oberhänsli, Janet Salem, Richard Schodde, Gabi Schneider, Olivier Vidal, Natalia Yakovleva
      Pages: 367 - 372
      Abstract: Successful delivery of the United Nations sustainable development goals and implementation of the Paris Agreement requires technologies that utilize a wide range of minerals in vast quantities. Metal recycling and technological change will contribute to sustaining supply, but mining must continue and grow for the
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/nature21359
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Global warming and recurrent mass bleaching of corals
    • Authors: Terry P. Hughes, James T. Kerry, Mariana Álvarez-Noriega, Jorge G. Álvarez-Romero, Kristen D. Anderson, Andrew H. Baird, Russell C. Babcock, Maria Beger, David R. Bellwood, Ray Berkelmans, Tom C. Bridge, Ian R. Butler, Maria Byrne, Neal E. Cantin, Steeve Comeau, Sean R. Connolly, Graeme S. Cumming, Steven J. Dalton, Guillermo Diaz-Pulido, C. Mark Eakin, Will F. Figueira, James P. Gilmour, Hugo B. Harrison, Scott F. Heron, Andrew S. Hoey, Jean-Paul A. Hobbs, Mia O. Hoogenboom, Emma V. Kennedy, Chao-yang Kuo, Janice M. Lough, Ryan J. Lowe, Gang Liu, Malcolm T. McCulloch, Hamish A. Malcolm, Michael J. McWilliam, John M. Pandolfi, Rachel J. Pears, Morgan S. Pratchett, Verena Schoepf, Tristan Simpson, William J. Skirving, Brigitte Sommer, Gergely Torda, David R. Wachenfeld, Bette L. Willis, Shaun K. Wilson
      Pages: 373 - 377
      Abstract: During 2015–2016, record temperatures triggered a pan-tropical episode of coral bleaching, the third global-scale event since mass bleaching was first documented in the 1980s. Here we examine how and why the severity of recurrent major bleaching events has varied at multiple scales, using aerial and
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/nature21707
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Integrated genomic and molecular characterization of cervical cancer
    • Pages: 378 - 384
      Abstract: Cervical cancer remains one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Here we report the extensive molecular characterization of 228 primary cervical cancers, one of the largest comprehensive genomic studies of cervical cancer to date. We observed notable APOBEC mutagenesis patterns and identified SHKBP1
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01-23
      DOI: 10.1038/nature21386
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • MC4R-dependent suppression of appetite by bone-derived lipocalin 2
    • Authors: Ioanna Mosialou, Steven Shikhel, Jian-Min Liu, Antonio Maurizi, Na Luo, Zhenyan He, Yiru Huang, Haihong Zong, Richard A. Friedman, Jonathan Barasch, Patricia Lanzano, Liyong Deng, Rudolph L. Leibel, Mishaela Rubin, Thomas Nicholas, Wendy Chung, Lori M. Zeltser, Kevin W. Williams, Jeffrey E. Pessin, Stavroula Kousteni
      Pages: 385 - 390
      Abstract: Bone has recently emerged as a pleiotropic endocrine organ that secretes at least two hormones, FGF23 and osteocalcin, which regulate kidney function and glucose homeostasis, respectively. These findings have raised the question of whether other bone-derived hormones exist and what their potential functions are. Here
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-08
      DOI: 10.1038/nature21697
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Molecular basis of ancestral vertebrate electroreception
    • Authors: Nicholas W. Bellono, Duncan B. Leitch, David Julius
      Pages: 391 - 396
      Abstract: Elasmobranch fishes, including sharks, rays, and skates, use specialized electrosensory organs called ampullae of Lorenzini to detect extremely small changes in environmental electric fields. Electrosensory cells within these ampullae can discriminate and respond to minute changes in environmental voltage gradients through an unknown mechanism. Here
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-06
      DOI: 10.1038/nature21401
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Strongly baryon-dominated disk galaxies at the peak of galaxy formation
           ten billion years ago
    • Authors: R. Genzel, N. M. Förster Schreiber, H. Übler, P. Lang, T. Naab, R. Bender, L. J. Tacconi, E. Wisnioski, S. Wuyts, T. Alexander, A. Beifiori, S. Belli, G. Brammer, A. Burkert, C. M. Carollo, J. Chan, R. Davies, M. Fossati, A. Galametz, S. Genel, O. Gerhard, D. Lutz, J. T. Mendel, I. Momcheva, E. J. Nelson, A. Renzini, R. Saglia, A. Sternberg, S. Tacchella, K. Tadaki, D. Wilman
      Pages: 397 - 401
      Abstract: In the cold dark matter cosmology, the baryonic components of galaxies—stars and gas—are thought to be mixed with and embedded in non-baryonic and non-relativistic dark matter, which dominates the total mass of the galaxy and its dark-matter halo. In the local (low-redshift) Universe, the mass of dark matter within a galactic disk increases with disk radius, becoming appreciable and then dominant in the outer, baryonic regions of the disks of star-forming galaxies. This results in rotation velocities of the visible matter within the disk that are constant or increasing with disk radius—a hallmark of the dark-matter model. Comparisons between the dynamical mass, inferred from these velocities in rotational equilibrium, and the sum of the stellar and cold-gas mass at the peak epoch of galaxy formation ten billion years ago, inferred from ancillary data, suggest high baryon fractions in the inner, star-forming regions of the disks. Although this implied baryon fraction may be larger than in the local Universe, the systematic uncertainties (owing to the chosen stellar initial-mass function and the calibration of gas masses) render such comparisons inconclusive in terms of the mass of dark matter. Here we report rotation curves (showing rotation velocity as a function of disk radius) for the outer disks of six massive star-forming galaxies, and find that the rotation velocities are not constant, but decrease with radius. We propose that this trend arises because of a combination of two main factors: first, a large fraction of the massive high-redshift galaxy population was strongly baryon-dominated, with dark matter playing a smaller part than in the local Universe; and second, the large velocity dispersion in high-redshift disks introduces a substantial pressure term that leads to a decrease in rotation velocity with increasing radius. The effect of both factors appears to increase with redshift. Qualitatively, the observations suggest that baryons in the early (high-redshift) Universe efficiently condensed at the centres of dark-matter haloes when gas fractions were high and dark matter was less concentrated.
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/nature21685
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • High-resolution non-destructive three-dimensional imaging of integrated
           circuits
    • Authors: Mirko Holler, Manuel Guizar-Sicairos, Esther H. R. Tsai, Roberto Dinapoli, Elisabeth Müller, Oliver Bunk, Jörg Raabe, Gabriel Aeppli
      Pages: 402 - 406
      Abstract: Modern nanoelectronics has advanced to a point at which it is impossible to image entire devices and their interconnections non-destructively because of their small feature sizes and the complex three-dimensional structures resulting from their integration on a chip. This metrology gap implies a lack of direct feedback between design and manufacturing processes, and hampers quality control during production, shipment and use. Here we demonstrate that X-ray ptychography—a high-resolution coherent diffractive imaging technique—can create three-dimensional images of integrated circuits of known and unknown designs with a lateral resolution in all directions down to 14.6 nanometres. We obtained detailed device geometries and corresponding elemental maps, and show how the devices are integrated with each other to form the chip. Our experiments represent a major advance in chip inspection and reverse engineering over the traditional destructive electron microscopy and ion milling techniques. Foreseeable developments in X-ray sources, optics and detectors, as well as adoption of an instrument geometry optimized for planar rather than cylindrical samples, could lead to a thousand-fold increase in efficiency, with concomitant reductions in scan times and voxel sizes.
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/nature21698
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Enzymatic mineralization generates ultrastiff and tough hydrogels with
           tunable mechanics
    • Authors: Nicolas Rauner, Monika Meuris, Mirjana Zoric, Joerg C. Tiller
      Pages: 407 - 410
      Abstract: The cartilage and skin of animals, which are made up of more than fifty per cent water, are rather stiff (having elastic moduli of up to 100 megapascals) as well as tough and hard to break (with fracture energies of up to 9,000 joules per square metre). Such features make these biological materials mechanically superior to existing synthetic hydrogels. Lately, progress has been made in synthesizing tough hydrogels, with double-network hydrogels achieving the toughness of skin and inorganic–organic composites showing even better performance. However, these materials owe their toughness to high stretchability; in terms of stiffness, synthetic hydrogels cannot compete with their natural counterparts, with the best examples having elastic moduli of just 10 megapascals or less. Previously, we described the enzyme-induced precipitation and crystallization of hydrogels containing calcium carbonate, but the resulting materials were brittle. Here we report the enzyme-induced formation of amorphous calcium phosphate nanostructures that are homogenously distributed within polymer hydrogels. Our best materials have fracture energies of 1,300 joules per square metre even in their fully water-swollen state—a value superior to that of most known water-swollen synthetic materials. We are also able to modulate their stiffness up to 440 megapascals, well beyond that of cartilage and skin. Furthermore, the highly filled composite materials can be designed to be optically transparent and to retain most of their stretchability even when notched. We show that percolation drives the mechanical properties, particularly the high stiffness, of our uniformly mineralized hydrogels.
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-01
      DOI: 10.1038/nature21392
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Biofuel blending reduces particle emissions from aircraft engines at
           cruise conditions
    • Authors: Richard H. Moore, Kenneth L. Thornhill, Bernadett Weinzierl, Daniel Sauer, Eugenio D’Ascoli, Jin Kim, Michael Lichtenstern, Monika Scheibe, Brian Beaton, Andreas J. Beyersdorf, John Barrick, Dan Bulzan, Chelsea A. Corr, Ewan Crosbie, Tina Jurkat, Robert Martin, Dean Riddick, Michael Shook, Gregory Slover, Christiane Voigt, Robert White, Edward Winstead, Richard Yasky, Luke D. Ziemba, Anthony Brown, Hans Schlager, Bruce E. Anderson
      Pages: 411 - 415
      Abstract: Aviation-related aerosol emissions contribute to the formation of contrail cirrus clouds that can alter upper tropospheric radiation and water budgets, and therefore climate. The magnitude of air-traffic-related aerosol–cloud interactions and the ways in which these interactions might change in the future remain uncertain. Modelling studies of the present and future effects of aviation on climate require detailed information about the number of aerosol particles emitted per kilogram of fuel burned and the microphysical properties of those aerosols that are relevant for cloud formation. However, previous observational data at cruise altitudes are sparse for engines burning conventional fuels, and no data have previously been reported for biofuel use in-flight. Here we report observations from research aircraft that sampled the exhaust of engines onboard a NASA DC‐8 aircraft as they burned conventional Jet A fuel and a 50:50 (by volume) blend of Jet A fuel and a biofuel derived from Camelina oil. We show that, compared to using conventional fuels, biofuel blending reduces particle number and mass emissions immediately behind the aircraft by 50 to 70 per cent. Our observations quantify the impact of biofuel blending on aerosol emissions at cruise conditions and provide key microphysical parameters, which will be useful to assess the potential of biofuel use in aviation as a viable strategy to mitigate climate change.
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/nature21420
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Rheological separation of the megathrust seismogenic zone and episodic
           tremor and slip
    • Authors: Xiang Gao, Kelin Wang
      Pages: 416 - 419
      Abstract: Episodic tremor and accompanying slow slip, together called ETS, is most often observed in subduction zones of young and warm subducting slabs. ETS should help us to understand the mechanics of subduction megathrusts, but its mechanism is still unclear. It is commonly assumed that ETS represents a transition from seismic to aseismic behaviour of the megathrust with increasing depth, but this assumption is in contradiction with an observed spatial separation between the seismogenic zone and the ETS zone. Here we propose a unifying model for the necessary geological condition of ETS that explains the relationship between the two zones. By developing numerical thermal models, we examine the governing role of thermo-petrologically controlled fault zone rheology (frictional versus viscous shear). High temperatures in the warm-slab environment cause the megathrust seismogenic zone to terminate before reaching the depth of the intersection of the continental Mohorovičić discontinuity (Moho) and the subduction interface, called the mantle wedge corner. High pore-fluid pressures around the mantle wedge corner give rise to an isolated friction zone responsible for ETS. Separating the two zones is a segment of semi-frictional or viscous behaviour. The new model reconciles a wide range of seemingly disparate observations and defines a conceptual framework for the study of slip behaviour and the seismogenesis of major faults.
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-06
      DOI: 10.1038/nature21389
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Paleoproterozoic sterol biosynthesis and the rise of oxygen
    • Authors: David A. Gold, Abigail Caron, Gregory P. Fournier, Roger E. Summons
      Pages: 420 - 423
      Abstract: Natural products preserved in the geological record can function as ‘molecular fossils’, providing insight into organisms and physiologies that existed in the deep past. One important group of molecular fossils is the steroidal hydrocarbons (steranes), which are the diagenetic remains of sterol lipids. Complex sterols with modified side chains are unique to eukaryotes, although simpler sterols can also be synthesized by a few bacteria. Sterol biosynthesis is an oxygen-intensive process; thus, the presence of complex steranes in ancient rocks not only signals the presence of eukaryotes, but also aerobic metabolic processes. In 1999, steranes were reported in 2.7 billion year (Gyr)-old rocks from the Pilbara Craton in Australia, suggesting a long delay between photosynthetic oxygen production and its accumulation in the atmosphere (also known as the Great Oxidation Event) 2.45–2.32 Gyr ago. However, the recent reappraisal and rejection of these steranes as contaminants pushes the oldest reported steranes forward to around 1.64 Gyr ago (ref. 6). Here we use a molecular clock approach to improve constraints on the evolution of sterol biosynthesis. We infer that stem eukaryotes shared functionally modern sterol biosynthesis genes with bacteria via horizontal gene transfer. Comparing multiple molecular clock analyses, we find that the maximum marginal probability for the divergence time of bacterial and eukaryal sterol biosynthesis genes is around 2.31 Gyr ago, concurrent with the most recent geochemical evidence for the Great Oxidation Event. Our results therefore indicate that simple sterol biosynthesis existed well before the diversification of living eukaryotes, substantially predating the oldest detected sterane biomarkers (approximately 1.64 Gyr ago), and furthermore, that the evolutionary history of sterol biosynthesis is tied to the first widespread availability of molecular oxygen in the ocean–atmosphere system.
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-06
      DOI: 10.1038/nature21412
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Interplay between metabolic identities in the intestinal crypt supports
           stem cell function
    • Authors: Maria J. Rodríguez-Colman, Matthias Schewe, Maaike Meerlo, Edwin Stigter, Johan Gerrits, Mia Pras-Raves, Andrea Sacchetti, Marten Hornsveld, Koen C. Oost, Hugo J. Snippert, Nanda Verhoeven-Duif, Riccardo Fodde, Boudewijn M. T. Burgering
      Pages: 424 - 427
      Abstract: The small intestinal epithelium self-renews every four or five days. Intestinal stem cells (Lgr5+ crypt base columnar cells (CBCs)) sustain this renewal and reside between terminally differentiated Paneth cells at the bottom of the intestinal crypt. Whereas the signalling requirements for maintaining stem cell function and crypt homeostasis have been well studied, little is known about how metabolism contributes to epithelial homeostasis. Here we show that freshly isolated Lgr5+ CBCs and Paneth cells from the mouse small intestine display different metabolic programs. Compared to Paneth cells, Lgr5+ CBCs display high mitochondrial activity. Inhibition of mitochondrial activity in Lgr5+ CBCs or inhibition of glycolysis in Paneth cells strongly affects stem cell function, as indicated by impaired organoid formation. In addition, Paneth cells support stem cell function by providing lactate to sustain the enhanced mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in the Lgr5+ CBCs. Mechanistically, we show that oxidative phosphorylation stimulates p38 MAPK activation by mitochondrial reactive oxygen species signalling, thereby establishing the mature crypt phenotype. Together, our results reveal a critical role for the metabolic identity of Lgr5+ CBCs and Paneth cells in supporting optimal stem cell function, and we identify mitochondria and reactive oxygen species signalling as a driving force of cellular differentiation.
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-08
      DOI: 10.1038/nature21673
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Class IIa HDAC inhibition reduces breast tumours and metastases through
           anti-tumour macrophages
    • Authors: Jennifer L. Guerriero, Alaba Sotayo, Holly E. Ponichtera, Jessica A. Castrillon, Alexandra L. Pourzia, Sara Schad, Shawn F. Johnson, Ruben D. Carrasco, Suzan Lazo, Roderick T. Bronson, Scott P. Davis, Mercedes Lobera, Michael A. Nolan, Anthony Letai
      Pages: 428 - 432
      Abstract: Although the main focus of immuno-oncology has been manipulating the adaptive immune system, harnessing both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system might produce superior tumour reduction and elimination. Tumour-associated macrophages often have net pro-tumour effects, but their embedded location and their untapped potential provide impetus to discover strategies to turn them against tumours. Strategies that deplete (anti-CSF-1 antibodies and CSF-1R inhibition) or stimulate (agonistic anti-CD40 or inhibitory anti-CD47 antibodies) tumour-associated macrophages have had some success. We hypothesized that pharmacologic modulation of macrophage phenotype could produce an anti-tumour effect. We previously reported that a first-in-class selective class IIa histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, TMP195, influenced human monocyte responses to the colony-stimulating factors CSF-1 and CSF-2 in vitro. Here, we utilize a macrophage-dependent autochthonous mouse model of breast cancer to demonstrate that in vivo TMP195 treatment alters the tumour microenvironment and reduces tumour burden and pulmonary metastases by modulating macrophage phenotypes. TMP195 induces the recruitment and differentiation of highly phagocytic and stimulatory macrophages within tumours. Furthermore, combining TMP195 with chemotherapy regimens or T-cell checkpoint blockade in this model significantly enhances the durability of tumour reduction. These data introduce class IIa HDAC inhibition as a means to harness the anti-tumour potential of macrophages to enhance cancer therapy.
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-08
      DOI: 10.1038/nature21409
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • SZT2 dictates GATOR control of mTORC1 signalling
    • Authors: Min Peng, Na Yin, Ming O. Li
      Pages: 433 - 437
      Abstract: Mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) integrates nutrient signals to control cell growth and organismal homeostasis across eukaryotes. The evolutionarily conserved GATOR complex regulates mTORC1 signalling through Rag GTPases, and GATOR1 displays GTPase activating protein (GAP) activity for RAGA and RAGB (RAGA/B) and GATOR2 has been proposed to be an inhibitor of GATOR1. Furthermore, the metazoan-specific SESN proteins function as guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors (GDIs) for RAGA/B, and interact with GATOR2 with unknown effects. Here we show that SZT2 (seizure threshold 2), a metazoan-specific protein mutated in epilepsy, recruits a fraction of mammalian GATOR1 and GATOR2 to form a SZT2-orchestrated GATOR (SOG) complex with an essential role in GATOR- and SESN-dependent nutrient sensing and mTORC1 regulation. The interaction of SZT2 with GATOR1 and GATOR2 was synergistic, and an intact SOG complex was required for its localization at the lysosome. SZT2 deficiency resulted in constitutive mTORC1 signalling in cells under nutrient-deprived conditions and neonatal lethality in mice, which was associated with failure to inactivate mTORC1 during fasting. Hyperactivation of mTORC1 in SZT2-deficient cells could be partially corrected by overexpression of the GATOR1 component DEPDC5, and by the lysosome-targeted GATOR2 component WDR59 or lysosome-targeted SESN2. These findings demonstrate that SZT2 has a central role in dictating GATOR-dependent nutrient sensing by promoting lysosomal localization of SOG, and reveal an unexpected function of lysosome-located GATOR2 in suppressing mTORC1 signalling through SESN recruitment.
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-02-15
      DOI: 10.1038/nature21378
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • KICSTOR recruits GATOR1 to the lysosome and is necessary for nutrients to
           regulate mTORC1
    • Authors: Rachel L. Wolfson, Lynne Chantranupong, Gregory A. Wyant, Xin Gu, Jose M. Orozco, Kuang Shen, Kendall J. Condon, Sabrina Petri, Jibril Kedir, Sonia M. Scaria, Monther Abu-Remaileh, Wayne N. Frankel, David M. Sabatini
      Pages: 438 - 442
      Abstract: The mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a central regulator of cell growth that responds to diverse environmental signals and is deregulated in many human diseases, including cancer and epilepsy. Amino acids are a key input to this system, and act through the Rag GTPases to promote the translocation of mTORC1 to the lysosomal surface, its site of activation. Multiple protein complexes regulate the Rag GTPases in response to amino acids, including GATOR1, a GTPase activating protein for RAGA, and GATOR2, a positive regulator of unknown molecular function. Here we identify a protein complex (KICSTOR) that is composed of four proteins, KPTN, ITFG2, C12orf66 and SZT2, and that is required for amino acid or glucose deprivation to inhibit mTORC1 in cultured human cells. In mice that lack SZT2, mTORC1 signalling is increased in several tissues, including in neurons in the brain. KICSTOR localizes to lysosomes; binds and recruits GATOR1, but not GATOR2, to the lysosomal surface; and is necessary for the interaction of GATOR1 with its substrates, the Rag GTPases, and with GATOR2. Notably, several KICSTOR components are mutated in neurological diseases associated with mutations that lead to hyperactive mTORC1 signalling. Thus, KICSTOR is a lysosome-associated negative regulator of mTORC1 signalling, which, like GATOR1, is mutated in human disease.
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-02-15
      DOI: 10.1038/nature21423
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Cytosolic proteostasis through importing of misfolded proteins into
           mitochondria
    • Authors: Linhao Ruan, Chuankai Zhou, Erli Jin, Andrei Kucharavy, Ying Zhang, Zhihui Wen, Laurence Florens, Rong Li
      Pages: 443 - 446
      Abstract: Loss of proteostasis underlies ageing and neurodegeneration characterized by the accumulation of protein aggregates and mitochondrial dysfunction. Although many neurodegenerative-disease-associated proteins can be found in mitochondria, it remains unclear how mitochondrial dysfunction and protein aggregation could be related. In dividing yeast cells, protein aggregates that form under stress or during ageing are preferentially retained by the mother cell, in part through tethering to mitochondria, while the disaggregase Hsp104 helps to dissociate aggregates and thereby enables refolding or degradation of misfolded proteins. Here we show that, in yeast, cytosolic proteins prone to aggregation are imported into mitochondria for degradation. Protein aggregates that form under heat shock contain both cytosolic and mitochondrial proteins and interact with the mitochondrial import complex. Many aggregation-prone proteins enter the mitochondrial intermembrane space and matrix after heat shock, and some do so even without stress. Timely dissolution of cytosolic aggregates requires the mitochondrial import machinery and proteases. Blocking mitochondrial import but not proteasome activity causes a marked delay in the degradation of aggregated proteins. Defects in cytosolic Hsp70s leads to enhanced entry of misfolded proteins into mitochondria and elevated mitochondrial stress. We term this mitochondria-mediated proteostasis mechanism MAGIC (mitochondria as guardian in cytosol) and provide evidence that it may exist in human cells.
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-01
      DOI: 10.1038/nature21695
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Hypersensitive termination of the hypoxic response by a disordered protein
           switch
    • Authors: Rebecca B. Berlow, H. Jane Dyson, Peter E. Wright
      Pages: 447 - 451
      Abstract: The cellular response to hypoxia is critical for cell survival and is fine-tuned to allow cells to recover from hypoxic stress and adapt to heterogeneous or fluctuating oxygen levels. The hypoxic response is mediated by the α-subunit of the transcription factor HIF-1 (HIF-1α), which interacts through its intrinsically disordered C-terminal transactivation domain with the TAZ1 (also known as CH1) domain of the general transcriptional coactivators CBP and p300 to control the transcription of critical adaptive genes. One such gene encodes CITED2, a negative feedback regulator that attenuates HIF-1 transcriptional activity by competing for TAZ1 binding through its own disordered transactivation domain. Little is known about the molecular mechanism by which CITED2 displaces the tightly bound HIF-1α from their common cellular target. The HIF-1α and CITED2 transactivation domains bind to TAZ1 through helical motifs that flank a conserved LP(Q/E)L sequence that is essential for negative feedback regulation. Here we show that human CITED2 displaces HIF-1α by forming a transient ternary complex with TAZ1 and HIF-1α and competing for a shared binding site through its LPEL motif, thus promoting a conformational change in TAZ1 that increases the rate of HIF-1α dissociation. Through allosteric enhancement of HIF-1α release, CITED2 activates a highly responsive negative feedback circuit that rapidly and efficiently attenuates the hypoxic response, even at modest CITED2 concentrations. This hypersensitive regulatory switch is entirely dependent on the unique flexibility and binding properties of these intrinsically disordered proteins and probably exemplifies a common strategy used by the cell to respond rapidly to environmental signals.
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-08
      DOI: 10.1038/nature21705
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Corrigendum: Interaction between RasV12 and scribbled clones induces
           tumour growth and invasion
    • Authors: Ming Wu, José Carlos Pastor-Pareja, Tian Xu
      Pages: 452 - 452
      Abstract: Nature463, 545–548 (2010); doi:10.1038/nature08702In this Letter, Fig. 2h was inadvertently a duplicate of Fig. 2m, owing to figure reformatting after the manuscript had been accepted. The correct image for the Upd//+ experiment in Fig. 2h is
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-02-15
      DOI: 10.1038/nature21397
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Corrigendum: Upward revision of global fossil fuel methane emissions based
           on isotope database
    • Authors: Stefan Schwietzke, Owen A. Sherwood, Lori M. P. Bruhwiler, John B. Miller, Giuseppe Etiope, Edward J. Dlugokencky, Sylvia Englund Michel, Victoria A. Arling, Bruce H. Vaughn, James W. C. White, Pieter P. Tans
      Pages: 452 - 452
      Abstract: Nature538, 88–91 (2016); doi:10.1038/nature19797In this Letter, Supplementary Figs 10 and 12 were not updated. The analyses, calculations, and text are correct. The Supplementary Information to this Corrigendum contains the corrected Supplementary Figs 10 and 12.
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-02-15
      DOI: 10.1038/nature21422
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Outside the lab: Field your A Team
    • Authors: Kendall Powell
      Pages: 453 - 455
      Abstract: Life in the field can be gruelling — and so it is up to team leaders to turn the research grind into an adventurous and valuable experience for everyone.
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/nj7645-453a
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Bias: Equality in research
    • Pages: 455 - 455
      Abstract: Research alliance seeks to stamp out biased practices.
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/nj7645-455a
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Salaries: Gender pay disparity
    • Pages: 455 - 455
      Abstract: Women in US academic administration earn less than men.
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/nj7645-455b
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
  • Green boughs will cover thee
    • Authors: Sarah L. Byrne
      Pages: 458 - 458
      Abstract: Sibling rivalry.
      Citation: Nature 543, 7645 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1038/543458a
      Issue No: Vol. 543, No. 7645 (2017)
       
 
 
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