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Nature    [1883 followers]  Follow    
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
     ISSN (Print) 0028-0836 - ISSN (Online) 1476-4687
     Published by Nature Publishing Group Homepage  [108 journals]   [SJR: 14.747]   [H-I: 768]
  • The democracy carousel
    • Pages: 287 - 287
      Abstract: European law has allowed citizens to force a debate on human embryonic stem cells less than a year after the previous one. This fruitless democratic exercise has left scientists spinning in uncertainty.
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508287a
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Cancer crossroads
    • Pages: 287 - 288
      Abstract: Efforts to understand cancer genomes should take on a fresh focus.
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508287b
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Practical nonsense
    • Pages: 288 - 288
      Abstract: Downgrading practical science will impede UK students in the global workplace
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508288a
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Beware of backroom deals in the name of 'science'
    • Authors: Colin Macilwain
      Pages: 289 - 289
      Abstract: The term 'sound science' has become Orwellian double-speak for various forms of pro-business spin, says Colin Macilwain.
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508289a
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Ecology: Fallen trees form a sea-floor feast
    • Pages: 290 - 290
      Abstract: Dead trees at the bottom of the ocean host a diverse range of bacteria, fungi and molluscs (pictured; a cent is included for scale).Craig McClain of the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center in Durham, North Carolina, and James Barry of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508290a
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Photonics: Light goes one way on a chip
    • Pages: 290 - 290
      Abstract: A device that controls light so that it travels in just one direction could be used in high-speed computers that carry signals using light, rather than electric charges.A team led by Lan Yang and Şahin Kaya Özdemir at Washington University in St. Louis created
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508290b
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Evolution: Ancient lion DNA yields family tree
    • Pages: 290 - 290
      Abstract: Five genetically distinct lion populations roam in Africa and Asia — a finding that hints at greater diversity in these animals than previously thought.A team led by Ross Barnett, now at the University of Copenhagen, analysed mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) from the remains of 14
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508290c
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Conservation biology: Unique birds top conservation list
    • Pages: 290 - 291
      Abstract: An analysis of evolutionary relationships between all of the world's known birds prioritizes some of them for conservation on the basis of their genetic uniqueness.Walter Jetz of Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, Arne Mooers of Simon Fraser University in Burnaby, Canada, and their
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508290d
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Civil engineering: Seismic 'shield' stops quake shake
    • Pages: 291 - 291
      Abstract: An array of deep holes in the ground seems to lessen shaking in certain locations during a simulated earthquake.Stéphane Brûlé of soil-engineering company Ménard in Nozay, France, and his colleagues drilled a grid of boreholes 5 metres deep into the soil near Grenoble. A
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508291a
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Neurobiology: Surprising effects of prion drug
    • Pages: 291 - 291
      Abstract: A chemical that combats pathogenic prion proteins in infected mouse cells worsens the problem in cells from other species. The finding could explain why the drug, quinacrine, has been ineffective in many clinical trials.Prion infections turn healthy proteins into abnormally folded forms, which cause
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508291b
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Materials: Printer squirts out nanotubes
    • Pages: 291 - 291
      Abstract: Inkjet printers can produce thin films of carbon nanotubes for use as electrodes in stretchy electronic circuits.Yongtaek Hong and his colleagues at Seoul National University printed layers of single-walled carbon nanotubes onto a stretchable silicon-based material. The authors found that the electrical properties of
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508291c
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Neuroscience: Turn on the light to make myelin
    • Pages: 291 - 291
      Abstract: Brain circuits change throughout life, and researchers in California have discovered a mechanism for one such change: the thickening of the myelin sheath that surrounds nerve fibres and helps neurons to fire.Michelle Monje and her co-workers at Stanford University School of Medicine studied mice
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508291d
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Biomechanics: Fast moves of fleeing fruit flies
    • Pages: 291 - 291
      Abstract: To dodge predators, flies in flight execute banked turns in just a few wingbeats — much faster than the steering motions that have been previously observed in flies.Michael Dickinson and his colleagues at the University of Washington in Seattle used three high-speed cameras operating
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508291e
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Lionfish prove a main draw on Twitter
    • Pages: 291 - 291
      Abstract: What types of research papers move a scientist to turn from test tube or data-crunch to spread the word on social media' Here are some papers that saw Twitter activity from researchers in early April.Lionfish took a bite of Twitter attention at the start
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508291f
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Seven days: 11–17 April 2014
    • Pages: 292 - 293
      Abstract: The week in science: Japan reapproves use of nuclear power, second sighting of an exotic tetraquark, and biotech stocks plunge.
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508292a
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Hepatitis C drugs not reaching poor
    • Authors: Ewen Callaway
      Pages: 295 - 296
      Abstract: Treatment guidelines for virus highlight challenge of paying for expensive drugs in low-income countries.
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-15
      DOI: 10.1038/508295a
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Sperm RNA carries marks of trauma
    • Authors: Virginia Hughes
      Pages: 296 - 297
      Abstract: Stress alters the expression of small RNAs in male mice and leads to depressive behaviours in later generations.
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-14
      DOI: 10.1038/508296a
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Panel homes in on sites for γ-ray detector
    • Authors: Elizabeth Gibney
      Pages: 297 - 297
      Abstract: Cherenkov Telescope Array will track high-energy photons to probe black holes, dark matter and relativity.
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-15
      DOI: 10.1038/508297a
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • IPCC report under fire
    • Authors: Quirin Schiermeier
      Pages: 298 - 298
      Abstract: Critics attack panel’s lack of specific guidance on how countries should lower emissions.
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-15
      DOI: 10.1038/508298a
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Biologist defiant over stem-cell method
    • Authors: David Cyranoski
      Pages: 299 - 299
      Abstract: Japanese author of controversial papers denies wrongdoing and stands by results as testing of her protocol begins.
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-15
      DOI: 10.1038/508299a
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Mini satellites prove their scientific power
    • Authors: Nicola Jones
      Pages: 300 - 301
      Abstract: Proliferation of ‘CubeSats’ offers fresh and fast way to gather space data.
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508300a
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Correction
    • Pages: 301 - 301
      Abstract: The photo that accompanied the News story ‘Ukraine’s science in turmoil’ (Nature508, 15–16; 2014) was not of the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory as stated but of a military radar station in the region. The correct image of the observatory can be seen
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508301a
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Power from the oceans: Blue energy
    • Authors: Jeff Tollefson
      Pages: 302 - 304
      Abstract: After years in the doldrums, the quest to harvest energy from the oceans is gathering speed.
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-15
      DOI: 10.1038/508302a
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Toxicology: The plastics puzzle
    • Authors: Josie Glausiusz
      Pages: 306 - 308
      Abstract: When toxicologists warned that the plastics ingredient BPA might be harmful, consumers clamoured for something new. But problems persist.
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508306a
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Policy: Bring sustainable energy to the developing world
    • Authors: Reid Detchon, Richenda Van Leeuwen
      Pages: 309 - 311
      Abstract: Investment and policies must support cheap, clean energy technologies to cut both poverty and climate change, say Reid Detchon and Richenda Van Leeuwen.
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508309a
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Publishing: Credit where credit is due
    • Authors: Liz Allen, Jo Scott, Amy Brand, Marjorie Hlava, Micah Altman
      Pages: 312 - 313
      Abstract: Liz Allen, Amy Brand, Jo Scott, Micah Altman and Marjorie Hlava are trialling digital taxonomies to help researchers to identify their contributions to collaborative projects.
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508312a
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Astronomy: Art of the eclipse
    • Authors: Jay M. Pasachoff, Roberta J. M. Olson
      Pages: 314 - 315
      Abstract: As the next solar eclipse approaches, Jay M. Pasachoff and Roberta J. M. Olson ponder how artists from the early Renaissance onwards have interpreted the phenomenon.
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508314a
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Geology: Parsing eruptions
    • Authors: Ted Nield
      Pages: 316 - 317
      Abstract: Ted Nield weighs up histories of two momentous volcanic events in Iceland and Indonesia.
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508316a
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Animal behaviour: Nomads of necessity
    • Authors: Joel Greenberg
      Pages: 317 - 318
      Abstract: Joel Greenberg casts an ornithologist's eye on a wide-ranging reading of animal migration.
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508317a
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Books in brief
    • Authors: Barbara Kiser
      Pages: 318 - 318
      Abstract: In this manifesto for a logical linguistics, one of John H. McWhorter's many intriguing examples hinges on the colour blue. To an English speaker, it is one subtly graded hue, from robin's-egg to deep navy. To a Russian, pale and dark blue are different colours.
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508318a
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Energy: China leads the way on renewables
    • Authors: John A. Mathews, Hao Tan
      Pages: 319 - 319
      Abstract: The boom in renewable energy being led by China, India, Europe, the United States and Japan is key to the mitigation of carbon emissions (see Nature507, 300–302; 201410.1038/507300a). Last year marked an important turning point for China's renewable-energy
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508319a
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Rechargeables: Vanadium batteries will be cost-effective
    • Authors: Huamin Zhang
      Pages: 319 - 319
      Abstract: Vanadium flow batteries are an attractive commercial proposition because they are safe and environmentally friendly, use recyclable electrolytes, have a long cycle life (around 13,000 cycles) and last for more than 15 years. Their cost is not as prohibitive as believed (Nature507,
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508319b
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Reproducibility: A trading scheme to reduce false results
    • Authors: Michael E. McCullough, David L. Kelly
      Pages: 319 - 319
      Abstract: Cap-and-trade systems have proved useful in cutting pollutants such as sulphur dioxide, nitrogen oxides and lead additives in petrol (see L. H.GoulderJ. Econ. Perspect.27, 87–102; 2013). We suggest that they could also be applied to reduce pollution
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508319c
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Animal models: Mouse already being charted gene by gene
    • Authors: Steve Brown
      Pages: 319 - 319
      Abstract: Steve Perrin's call to make mouse studies work (Nature507, 423–425; 201410.1038/507423a) resonates with the goals and practices of the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (see www.impc.org).The consortium's ten-year goal is to generate a 'knockout' mutant for
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508319d
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Laboratory training: Experimentation is science's lifeblood
    • Authors: John Skoyles
      Pages: 319 - 319
      Abstract: No one can become a genuine scientist without doing practical work, as John Baruch points out (see Nature507, 141; 201410.1038/507141a) — whether it is at the lab bench or desk. But it is not the successful experiments that count so
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508319e
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Evolutionary biology: Dating chimpanzees
    • Authors: Michael Haslam
      Pages: 322 - 323
      Abstract: Genetic research has tracked lineages of male chimpanzees thousands of years into the past, opening the door to the study of long-term behavioural evolution in our close primate relatives.
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508322a
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Genetics: Up and down in Down's syndrome
    • Authors: Benjamin D. Pope, David M. Gilbert
      Pages: 323 - 324
      Abstract: A comparison of identical human twins, only one of whom has Down's syndrome, reveals a genome-wide flattening of gene-expression levels in the affected individual. See Article p.345
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508323a
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Organic chemistry: Catalysis marches on
    • Authors: James P. Morken
      Pages: 324 - 325
      Abstract: A fresh take on an established chemical reaction has solved a long-standing problem in organic synthesis: how to prepare single mirror-image isomers of groups known as isolated quaternary stereocentres. See Article p.340
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-09
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13225
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Synthetic biology: Biocircuits in synchrony
    • Authors: Ricard Solé, Javier Macía
      Pages: 326 - 327
      Abstract: Cellular biocircuit design has taken a major step forward. The circuit reuses the cell's own protein-degradation system to synchronize the expression of two synthetic modules throughout an entire bacterial population. See Letter p.387
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-09
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13224
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Thermoelectricity: The ugly duckling
    • Authors: Joseph P. Heremans
      Pages: 327 - 328
      Abstract: Single crystals of tin selenide have been shown to display, along one crystallographic direction of their high-temperature state, the highest thermoelectric efficiency of any bulk material. See Letter p.373
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508327a
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Cell biology: The stressful influence of microbes
    • Authors: Suzanne Wolff, Andrew Dillin
      Pages: 328 - 329
      Abstract: An investigation into cellular stress responses reveals how cell compartments called mitochondria use information about the surrounding metabolites and microorganisms to protect themselves from damage. See Letter p.406
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-02
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13220
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Correction
    • Pages: 329 - 329
      Abstract: The News & Views article 'Tuberculosis: Drug discovery goes au naturel' by Clifton E. Barry (Nature506, 436–437; 2014) incorrectly described the pharmaceutical company Lepetit as being French. It is an Italian firm.
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508329a
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • The ensemble nature of allostery
    • Authors: Hesam N. Motlagh, James O. Wrabl, Jing Li, Vincent J. Hilser
      Pages: 331 - 339
      Abstract: Allostery is the process by which biological macromolecules (mostly proteins) transmit the effect of binding at one site to another, often distal, functional site, allowing for regulation of activity. Recent experimental observations demonstrating that allostery can be facilitated by dynamic and intrinsically disordered proteins have resulted in a new paradigm for understanding allosteric mechanisms, which focuses on the conformational ensemble and the statistical nature of the interactions responsible for the transmission of information. Analysis of allosteric ensembles reveals a rich spectrum of regulatory strategies, as well as a framework to unify the description of allosteric mechanisms from different systems.
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13001
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Enantioselective construction of remote quaternary stereocentres
    • Authors: Tian-Sheng Mei, Harshkumar H. Patel, Matthew S. Sigman
      Pages: 340 - 344
      Abstract: Small molecules that contain all-carbon quaternary stereocentres—carbon atoms bonded to four distinct carbon substituents—are found in many secondary metabolites and some pharmaceutical agents. The construction of such compounds in an enantioselective fashion remains a long-standing challenge to synthetic organic chemists. In particular, methods for synthesizing
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-09
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13231
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Domains of genome-wide gene expression dysregulation in Down’s
           syndrome
    • Authors: Audrey Letourneau, Federico A. Santoni, Ximena Bonilla, M. Reza Sailani, David Gonzalez, Jop Kind, Claire Chevalier, Robert Thurman, Richard S. Sandstrom, Youssef Hibaoui, Marco Garieri, Konstantin Popadin, Emilie Falconnet, Maryline Gagnebin, Corinne Gehrig, Anne Vannier, Michel Guipponi, Laurent Farinelli, Daniel Robyr, Eugenia Migliavacca, Christelle Borel, Samuel Deutsch, Anis Feki, John A. Stamatoyannopoulos, Yann Herault, Bas van Steensel, Roderic Guigo, Stylianos E. Antonarakis
      Pages: 345 - 350
      Abstract: Trisomy 21 is the most frequent genetic cause of cognitive impairment. To assess the perturbations of gene expression in trisomy 21, and to eliminate the noise of genomic variability, we studied the transcriptome of fetal fibroblasts from a pair of monozygotic twins discordant for trisomy
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13200
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Brainstem nucleus MdV mediates skilled forelimb motor tasks
    • Authors: Maria Soledad Esposito, Paolo Capelli, Silvia Arber
      Pages: 351 - 356
      Abstract: Translating the behavioural output of the nervous system into movement involves interaction between brain and spinal cord. The brainstem provides an essential bridge between the two structures, but circuit-level organization and function of this intermediary system remain poorly understood. Here we use intersectional virus tracing
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-02-02
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13023
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Skilled reaching relies on a V2a propriospinal internal copy circuit
    • Authors: Eiman Azim, Juan Jiang, Bror Alstermark, Thomas M. Jessell
      Pages: 357 - 363
      Abstract: The precision of skilled forelimb movement has long been presumed to rely on rapid feedback corrections triggered by internally directed copies of outgoing motor commands, but the functional relevance of inferred internal copy circuits has remained unclear. One class of spinal interneurons implicated in the
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-02-02
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13021
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Isotopic links between atmospheric chemistry and the deep sulphur cycle on
           Mars
    • Authors: Heather B. Franz, Sang-Tae Kim, James Farquhar, James M. D. Day, Rita C. Economos, Kevin D. McKeegan, Axel K. Schmitt, Anthony J. Irving, Joost Hoek, James Dottin III
      Pages: 364 - 368
      Abstract: The geochemistry of Martian meteorites provides a wealth of information about the solid planet and the surface and atmospheric processes that occurred on Mars. The degree to which Martian magmas may have assimilated crustal material, thus altering the geochemical signatures acquired from their mantle sources, is unclear. This issue features prominently in efforts to understand whether the source of light rare-earth elements in enriched shergottites lies in crustal material incorporated into melts or in mixing between enriched and depleted mantle reservoirs. Sulphur isotope systematics offer insight into some aspects of crustal assimilation. The presence of igneous sulphides in Martian meteorites with sulphur isotope signatures indicative of mass-independent fractionation suggests the assimilation of sulphur both during passage of magmas through the crust of Mars and at sites of emplacement. Here we report isotopic analyses of 40 Martian meteorites that represent more than half of the distinct known Martian meteorites, including 30 shergottites (28 plus 2 pairs, where pairs are separate fragments of a single meteorite), 8 nakhlites (5 plus 3 pairs), Allan Hills 84001 and Chassigny. Our data provide strong evidence that assimilation of sulphur into Martian magmas was a common occurrence throughout much of the planet’s history. The signature of mass-independent fractionation observed also indicates that the atmospheric imprint of photochemical processing preserved in Martian meteoritic sulphide and sulphate is distinct from that observed in terrestrial analogues, suggesting fundamental differences between the dominant sulphur chemistry in the atmosphere of Mars and that in the atmosphere of Earth.
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13175
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Coherent suppression of electromagnetic dissipation due to superconducting
           quasiparticles
    • Authors: Ioan M. Pop, Kurtis Geerlings, Gianluigi Catelani, Robert J. Schoelkopf, Leonid I. Glazman, Michel H. Devoret
      Pages: 369 - 372
      Abstract: Owing to the low-loss propagation of electromagnetic signals in superconductors, Josephson junctions constitute ideal building blocks for quantum memories, amplifiers, detectors and high-speed processing units, operating over a wide band of microwave frequencies. Nevertheless, although transport in superconducting wires is perfectly lossless for direct current, transport of radio-frequency signals can be dissipative in the presence of quasiparticle excitations above the superconducting gap. Moreover, the exact mechanism of this dissipation in Josephson junctions has never been fully resolved experimentally. In particular, Josephson’s key theoretical prediction that quasiparticle dissipation should vanish in transport through a junction when the phase difference across the junction is π (ref. 2) has never been observed. This subtle effect can be understood as resulting from the destructive interference of two separate dissipative channels involving electron-like and hole-like quasiparticles. Here we report the experimental observation of this quantum coherent suppression of quasiparticle dissipation across a Josephson junction. As the average phase bias across the junction is swept through π, we measure an increase of more than one order of magnitude in the energy relaxation time of a superconducting artificial atom. This striking suppression of dissipation, despite the presence of lossy quasiparticle excitations above the superconducting gap, provides a powerful tool for minimizing decoherence in quantum electronic systems and could be directly exploited in quantum information experiments with superconducting quantum bits.
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13017
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Ultralow thermal conductivity and high thermoelectric figure of merit in
           SnSe crystals
    • Authors: Li-Dong Zhao, Shih-Han Lo, Yongsheng Zhang, Hui Sun, Gangjian Tan, Ctirad Uher, C. Wolverton, Vinayak P. Dravid, Mercouri G. Kanatzidis
      Pages: 373 - 377
      Abstract: The thermoelectric effect enables direct and reversible conversion between thermal and electrical energy, and provides a viable route for power generation from waste heat. The efficiency of thermoelectric materials is dictated by the dimensionless figure of merit, ZT (where Z is the figure of merit and T is absolute temperature), which governs the Carnot efficiency for heat conversion. Enhancements above the generally high threshold value of 2.5 have important implications for commercial deployment, especially for compounds free of Pb and Te. Here we report an unprecedented ZT of 2.6 ± 0.3 at 923 K, realized in SnSe single crystals measured along the b axis of the room-temperature orthorhombic unit cell. This material also shows a high ZT of 2.3 ± 0.3 along the c axis but a significantly reduced ZT of 0.8 ± 0.2 along the a axis. We attribute the remarkably high ZT along the b axis to the intrinsically ultralow lattice thermal conductivity in SnSe. The layered structure of SnSe derives from a distorted rock-salt structure, and features anomalously high Grüneisen parameters, which reflect the anharmonic and anisotropic bonding. We attribute the exceptionally low lattice thermal conductivity (0.23 ± 0.03 W m−1 K−1 at 973 K) in SnSe to the anharmonicity. These findings highlight alternative strategies to nanostructuring for achieving high thermoelectric performance.
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13184
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Mid-latitude interhemispheric hydrologic seesaw over the past 550,000
           years
    • Authors: Kyoung-nam Jo, Kyung Sik Woo, Sangheon Yi, Dong Yoon Yang, Hyoun Soo Lim, Yongjin Wang, Hai Cheng, R. Lawrence Edwards
      Pages: 378 - 382
      Abstract: An interhemispheric hydrologic seesaw—in which latitudinal migrations of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) produce simultaneous wetting (increased precipitation) in one hemisphere and drying in the other—has been discovered in some tropical and subtropical regions. For instance, Chinese and Brazilian subtropical speleothem (cave formations such as stalactites and stalagmites) records show opposite trends in time series of oxygen isotopes (a proxy for precipitation variability) at millennial to orbital timescales, suggesting that hydrologic cycles were antiphased in the northerly versus southerly subtropics. This tropical to subtropical hydrologic phenomenon is likely to be an initial and important climatic response to orbital forcing. The impacts of such an interhemispheric hydrologic seesaw on higher-latitude regions and the global climate system, however, are unknown. Here we show that the antiphasing seen in the tropical records is also present in both hemispheres of the mid-latitude western Pacific Ocean. Our results are based on a new 550,000-year record of the growth frequency of speleothems from the Korean peninsula, which we compare to Southern Hemisphere equivalents. The Korean data are discontinuous and derived from 24 separate speleothems, but still allow the identification of periods of peak speleothem growth and, thus, precipitation. The clear hemispheric antiphasing indicates that the sphere of influence of the interhemispheric hydrologic seesaw over the past 550,000 years extended at least to the mid-latitudes, such as northeast Asia, and that orbital-timescale ITCZ shifts can have serious effects on temperate climate systems. Furthermore, our result implies that insolation-driven ITCZ dynamics may provoke water vapour and vegetation feedbacks in northern mid-latitude regions and could have regulated global climate conditions throughout the late Quaternary ice age cycles.
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-03-30
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13076
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • A new fossil species supports an early origin for toothed whale
           echolocation
    • Authors: Jonathan H. Geisler, Matthew W. Colbert, James L. Carew
      Pages: 383 - 386
      Abstract: Odontocetes (toothed whales, dolphins and porpoises) hunt and navigate through dark and turbid aquatic environments using echolocation; a key adaptation that relies on the same principles as sonar. Among echolocating vertebrates, odontocetes are unique in producing high-frequency vocalizations at the phonic lips, a constriction in the nasal passages just beneath the blowhole, and then using air sinuses and the melon to modulate their transmission. All extant odontocetes seem to echolocate; however, exactly when and how this complex behaviour—and its underlying anatomy—evolved is largely unknown. Here we report an odontocete fossil, Oligocene in age (approximately 28 Myr ago), from South Carolina (Cotylocara macei, gen. et sp. nov.) that has several features suggestive of echolocation: a dense, thick and downturned rostrum; air sac fossae; cranial asymmetry; and exceptionally broad maxillae. Our phylogenetic analysis places Cotylocara in a basal clade of odontocetes, leading us to infer that a rudimentary form of echolocation evolved in the early Oligocene, shortly after odontocetes diverged from the ancestors of filter-feeding whales (mysticetes). This was followed by enlargement of the facial muscles that modulate echolocation calls, which in turn led to marked, convergent changes in skull shape in the ancestors of Cotylocara, and in the lineage leading to extant odontocetes.
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-03-12
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13086
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Rapid and tunable post-translational coupling of genetic circuits
    • Authors: Arthur Prindle, Jangir Selimkhanov, Howard Li, Ivan Razinkov, Lev S. Tsimring, Jeff Hasty
      Pages: 387 - 391
      Abstract: One promise of synthetic biology is the creation of genetic circuitry that enables the execution of logical programming in living cells. Such ‘wet programming’ is positioned to transform a wide and diverse swathe of biotechnology ranging from therapeutics and diagnostics to water treatment strategies. Although progress in the development of a library of genetic modules continues apace, a major challenge for their integration into larger circuits is the generation of sufficiently fast and precise communication between modules. An attractive approach is to integrate engineered circuits with host processes that facilitate robust cellular signalling. In this context, recent studies have demonstrated that bacterial protein degradation can trigger a precise response to stress by overloading a limited supply of intracellular proteases. Here we use protease competition to engineer rapid and tunable coupling of genetic circuits across multiple spatial and temporal scales. We characterize coupling delay times that are more than an order of magnitude faster than standard transcription-factor-based coupling methods (less than 1 min compared with ∼20–40 min) and demonstrate tunability through manipulation of the linker between the protein and its degradation tag. We use this mechanism as a platform to couple genetic clocks at the intracellular and colony level, then synchronize the multi-colony dynamics to reduce variability in both clocks. We show how the coupled clock network can be used to encode independent environmental inputs into a single time series output, thus enabling frequency multiplexing (information transmitted on a common channel by distinct frequencies) in a genetic circuit context. Our results establish a general framework for the rapid and tunable coupling of genetic circuits through the use of native ‘queueing’ processes such as competitive protein degradation.
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-09
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13238
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Apical constriction drives tissue-scale hydrodynamic flow to mediate cell
           elongation
    • Authors: Bing He, Konstantin Doubrovinski, Oleg Polyakov, Eric Wieschaus
      Pages: 392 - 396
      Abstract: Epithelial folding mediated by apical constriction converts flat epithelial sheets into multilayered, complex tissue structures and is used throughout development in most animals. Little is known, however, about how forces produced near the apical surface of the tissue are transmitted within individual cells to generate the global changes in cell shape that characterize tissue deformation. Here we apply particle tracking velocimetry in gastrulating Drosophila embryos to measure the movement of cytoplasm and plasma membrane during ventral furrow formation. We find that cytoplasmic redistribution during the lengthening phase of ventral furrow formation can be precisely described by viscous flows that quantitatively match the predictions of hydrodynamics. Cell membranes move with the ambient cytoplasm, with little resistance to, or driving force on, the flow. Strikingly, apical constriction produces similar flow patterns in mutant embryos that fail to form cells before gastrulation (‘acellular’ embryos), such that the global redistribution of cytoplasm mirrors the summed redistribution occurring in individual cells of wild-type embryos. Our results indicate that during the lengthening phase of ventral furrow formation, hydrodynamic behaviour of the cytoplasm provides the predominant mechanism transmitting apically generated forces deep into the tissue and that cell individualization is dispensable.
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-03-02
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13070
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • A committed precursor to innate lymphoid cells
    • Authors: Michael G. Constantinides, Benjamin D. McDonald, Philip A. Verhoef, Albert Bendelac
      Pages: 397 - 401
      Abstract: Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) specialize in the rapid secretion of polarized sets of cytokines and chemokines to combat infection and promote tissue repair at mucosal barriers. Their diversity and similarities with previously characterized natural killer (NK) cells and lymphoid tissue inducers (LTi) have prompted a provisional classification of all innate lymphocytes into groups 1, 2 and 3 solely on the basis of cytokine properties, but their developmental pathways and lineage relationships remain elusive. Here we identify and characterize a novel subset of lymphoid precursors in mouse fetal liver and adult bone marrow that transiently express high amounts of PLZF, a transcription factor previously associated with NK T cell development, by using lineage tracing and transfer studies. PLZFhigh cells were committed ILC progenitors with multiple ILC1, ILC2 and ILC3 potential at the clonal level. They excluded classical LTi and NK cells, but included a peculiar subset of NK1.1+DX5− ‘NK-like’ cells residing in the liver. Deletion of PLZF markedly altered the development of several ILC subsets, but not LTi or NK cells. PLZFhigh precursors also expressed high amounts of ID2 and GATA3, as well as TOX, a known regulator of PLZF-independent NK and LTi lineages. These findings establish novel lineage relationships between ILC, NK and LTi cells, and identify the common precursor to ILCs, termed ILCP. They also reveal the broad, defining role of PLZF in the differentiation of innate lymphocytes.
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-02-09
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13047
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Protection against filovirus diseases by a novel broad-spectrum nucleoside
           analogue BCX4430
    • Authors: Travis K. Warren, Jay Wells, Rekha G. Panchal, Kelly S. Stuthman, Nicole L. Garza, Sean A. Van Tongeren, Lian Dong, Cary J. Retterer, Brett P. Eaton, Gianluca Pegoraro, Shelley Honnold, Shanta Bantia, Pravin Kotian, Xilin Chen, Brian R. Taubenheim, Lisa S. Welch, Dena M. Minning, Yarlagadda S. Babu, William P. Sheridan, Sina Bavari
      Pages: 402 - 405
      Abstract: Filoviruses are emerging pathogens and causative agents of viral haemorrhagic fever. Case fatality rates of filovirus disease outbreaks are among the highest reported for any human pathogen, exceeding 90% (ref. 1). Licensed therapeutic or vaccine products are not available to treat filovirus diseases. Candidate therapeutics previously shown to be efficacious in non-human primate disease models are based on virus-specific designs and have limited broad-spectrum antiviral potential. Here we show that BCX4430, a novel synthetic adenosine analogue, inhibits infection of distinct filoviruses in human cells. Biochemical, reporter-based and primer-extension assays indicate that BCX4430 inhibits viral RNA polymerase function, acting as a non-obligate RNA chain terminator. Post-exposure intramuscular administration of BCX4430 protects against Ebola virus and Marburg virus disease in rodent models. Most importantly, BCX4430 completely protects cynomolgus macaques from Marburg virus infection when administered as late as 48 hours after infection. In addition, BCX4430 exhibits broad-spectrum antiviral activity against numerous viruses, including bunyaviruses, arenaviruses, paramyxoviruses, coronaviruses and flaviviruses. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of non-human primate protection from filovirus disease by a synthetic drug-like small molecule. We provide additional pharmacological characterizations supporting the potential development of BCX4430 as a countermeasure against human filovirus diseases and other viral diseases representing major public health threats.
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-03-02
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13027
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Caenorhabditis elegans pathways that surveil and defend mitochondria
    • Authors: Ying Liu, Buck S. Samuel, Peter C. Breen, Gary Ruvkun
      Pages: 406 - 410
      Abstract: Mitochondrial function is challenged by toxic by-products of metabolism as well as by pathogen attack. Caenorhabditis elegans normally responds to mitochondrial dysfunction with activation of mitochondrial-repair, drug-detoxification and pathogen-response pathways. Here, from a genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screen, we identified 45 C. elegans genes that are required to upregulate detoxification, pathogen-response and mitochondrial-repair pathways after inhibition of mitochondrial function by drug-induced or genetic disruption. Animals defective in ceramide biosynthesis are deficient in mitochondrial surveillance, and addition of particular ceramides can rescue the surveillance defects. Ceramide can also rescue the mitochondrial surveillance defects of other gene inactivations, mapping these gene activities upstream of ceramide. Inhibition of the mevalonate pathway, either by RNAi or statin drugs, also disrupts mitochondrial surveillance. Growth of C. elegans with a significant fraction of bacterial species from their natural habitat causes mitochondrial dysfunction. Other bacterial species inhibit C. elegans defence responses to a mitochondrial toxin, revealing bacterial countermeasures to animal defence.
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-02
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13204
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • miRNAs trigger widespread epigenetically activated siRNAs from transposons
           in Arabidopsis
    • Authors: Kate M. Creasey, Jixian Zhai, Filipe Borges, Frederic Van Ex, Michael Regulski, Blake C. Meyers, Robert A. Martienssen
      Pages: 411 - 415
      Abstract: In plants, post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) is mediated by DICER-LIKE 1 (DCL1)-dependent microRNAs (miRNAs), which also trigger 21-nucleotide secondary short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) via RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE 6 (RDR6), DCL4 and ARGONAUTE 1 (AGO1), whereas transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) of transposons is mediated by 24-nucleotide heterochromatic (het)siRNAs, RDR2, DCL3 and AGO4 (ref. 4). Transposons can also give rise to abundant 21-nucleotide ‘epigenetically activated’ small interfering RNAs (easiRNAs) in DECREASED DNA METHYLATION 1 (ddm1) and DNA METHYLTRANSFERASE 1 (met1) mutants, as well as in the vegetative nucleus of pollen grains and in dedifferentiated plant cell cultures. Here we show that easiRNAs in Arabidopsis thaliana resemble secondary siRNAs, in that thousands of transposon transcripts are specifically targeted by more than 50 miRNAs for cleavage and processing by RDR6. Loss of RDR6, DCL4 or DCL1 in a ddm1 background results in loss of 21-nucleotide easiRNAs and severe infertility, but 24-nucleotide hetsiRNAs are partially restored, supporting an antagonistic relationship between PTGS and TGS. Thus miRNA-directed easiRNA biogenesis is a latent mechanism that specifically targets transposon transcripts, but only when they are epigenetically reactivated during reprogramming of the germ line. This ancient recognition mechanism may have been retained both by transposons to evade long-term heterochromatic silencing and by their hosts for genome defence.
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-03-16
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13069
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Structural basis for translocation by AddAB helicase–nuclease and
           its arrest at χ sites
    • Authors: Wojciech W. Krajewski, Xin Fu, Martin Wilkinson, Nora B. Cronin, Mark S. Dillingham, Dale B. Wigley
      Pages: 416 - 419
      Abstract: In bacterial cells, processing of double-stranded DNA breaks for repair by homologous recombination is dependent upon the recombination hotspot sequence χ (Chi) and is catalysed by either an AddAB- or RecBCD-type helicase–nuclease (reviewed in refs 3, 4). These enzyme complexes unwind and digest the DNA duplex from the broken end until they encounter a χ sequence, whereupon they produce a 3′ single-stranded DNA tail onto which they initiate loading of the RecA protein. Consequently, regulation of the AddAB/RecBCD complex by χ is a key control point in DNA repair and other processes involving genetic recombination. Here we report crystal structures of Bacillus subtilis AddAB in complex with different χ-containing DNA substrates either with or without a non-hydrolysable ATP analogue. Comparison of these structures suggests a mechanism for DNA translocation and unwinding, suggests how the enzyme binds specifically to χ sequences, and explains how χ recognition leads to the arrest of AddAB (and RecBCD) translocation that is observed in single-molecule experiments.
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-03-16
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13037
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Corrigendum: Ptpn11 deletion in a novel progenitor causes
           metachondromatosis by inducing hedgehog signalling
    • Authors: Wentian Yang, Jianguo Wang, Douglas C. Moore, Haipei Liang, Mark Dooner, Qian Wu, Richard Terek, Qian Chen, Michael G. Ehrlich, Peter J. Quesenberry, Benjamin G. Neel
      Pages: 420 - 420
      Abstract: Nature499, 491–495 (2013); doi:10.1038/nature12396After publication of this Letter, we became aware that we had not reported the details of construction and validation of our floxed conditional deletion Ptpn11 allele. These details are presented in the Supplementary
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13170
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Corrigendum: Identification of pre-leukaemic haematopoietic stem cells in
           acute leukaemia
    • Authors: Liran I. Shlush, Sasan Zandi, Amanda Mitchell, Weihsu Claire Chen, Joseph M. Brandwein, Vikas Gupta, James A. Kennedy, Aaron D. Schimmer, Andre C. Schuh, Karen W. Yee, Jessica L. McLeod, Monica Doedens, Jessie J. F. Medeiros, Rene Marke, Hyeoung Joon Kim, Kwon Lee, John D. McPherson, Thomas J. Hudson, The HALT Pan-Leukemia Gene Panel Consortium, Andrew M. K. Brown, Fouad Yousif, Quang M. Trinh, Lincoln D. Stein, Mark D. Minden, Jean C. Y. Wang, John E. Dick
      Pages: 420 - 420
      Abstract: Nature506, 328–333 (2014); doi:10.1038/nature13038Author Fouad Yousif (of the Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, Canada) should have been included in the author list after Andrew M. K. Brown with affiliation number 7 and listed in the Author
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13190
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Corrigendum: Regulatory evolution through divergence of a phosphoswitch in
           the transcription factor CEBPB
    • Authors: Vincent J. Lynch, Gemma May, Günter P. Wagner
      Pages: 420 - 420
      Abstract: Nature480, 383–386 (2011); doi:10.1038/nature10595We inadvertently included a duplicate gel image in the lower right panel of Fig. 3c of this Letter. The gel image should show the loading control (‘Input’) for the image directly above it (lanes
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/nature13201
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Tactical tenure manoeuvres
    • Authors: Virginia Gewin
      Pages: 421 - 423
      Abstract: The tenure process is stressful, but there are ways to prepare for it. And one denial need not curtail a life in academia.
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/nj7496-421a
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Turning point: Joel Elmquist
    • Authors: Paul Smaglik
      Pages: 423 - 423
      Abstract: Making time for protégés is the key to great guidance, says award-winning mentor.
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/nj7496-423a
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • The vermilion market
    • Authors: Preston Grassmann
      Pages: 426 - 426
      Abstract: Where thoughts crystallize.
      Citation: Nature 508, 7496 (2014)
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508426a
      Issue No: Vol. 508, No. 7496 (2014)
       
  • Obesity
    • Obesity

      Nature. doi:10.1038/508S49a

      Author: Tony Scully

      Nature2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508S49a
       
  • Society at large
    • Authors: Tony Scully
      Pages: S50 - S51
      Abstract: The increasing prevalence of obesity is a worldwide phenomenon, affecting peoples from diverse cultural and economic backgrounds. By Tony Scully.
      Citation: Nature
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508S50a
       
  • Cell physiology: The changing colour of fat
    • Authors: Brian Owens
      Pages: S52 - S53
      Abstract: The different functions of white, brown and beige fat might yield new targets in the fight against obesity and metabolic disease.
      Citation: Nature
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508S52a
       
  • Treatment: Marginal gains
    • Authors: Emily Anthes
      Pages: S54 - S56
      Abstract: Behavioural interventions work, but not for everyone, and weight regain is common. Are there better ways to treat obesity'
      Citation: Nature
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508S54a
       
  • Perspective: Obesity is not a disease
    • Authors: D. L. Katz
      Pages: S57 - S57
      Abstract: The misguided urge to pathologize this condition reflects society's failure to come to terms with the need for prevention, says D. L. Katz.
      Citation: Nature
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508S57a
       
  • Heritability: The family roots of obesity
    • Authors: Cassandra Willyard
      Pages: S58 - S60
      Abstract: Scores of genes are implicated in obesity, but they cannot account for a family's predisposition to obesity. Are there other ways parents can influence their children'
      Citation: Nature
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508S58a
       
  • Microbiome: A complicated relationship status
    • Authors: Sarah Deweerdt
      Pages: S61 - S63
      Abstract: Nothing is simple about the links between the bacteria living in our guts and obesity.
      Citation: Nature
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508S61a
       
  • Neuroscience: Dissecting appetite
    • Authors: Bijal P. Trivedi
      Pages: S64 - S65
      Abstract: A slew of new technologies are helping to map the neural circuits that control when, and how much, we eat.
      Citation: Nature
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508S64a
       
  • Perspective: Tricks of the trade
    • Authors: Stephen J. Simpson, David Raubenheimer
      Pages: S66 - S66
      Abstract: Processed foods that dilute protein content subvert our appetite control systems, say Stephen J. Simpson and David Raubenheimer.
      Citation: Nature
      PubDate: 2014-04-16
      DOI: 10.1038/508S66a
       
 
 
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