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  Subjects -> CONSERVATION (Total: 140 journals)
Showing 1 - 37 of 37 Journals sorted alphabetically
Advanced Sustainable Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
African Journal of Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
African Journal of Range & Forage Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
African Journal of Wildlife Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
AICCM Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Ambiens. Revista Iberoamericana Universitaria en Ambiente, Sociedad y Sustentabilidad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Journal of Rural Development     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
American Museum Novitates     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Animal Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Aquaculture, Aquarium, Conservation & Legislation - International Journal of the Bioflux Society     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Aquatic Conservation Marine and Freshwater Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Arcada : Revista de conservación del patrimonio cultural     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archeomatica     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Arid Land Research and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Asian Journal of Sustainability and Social Responsibility     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Plant Conservation: Journal of the Australian Network for Plant Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Biodiversity and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 244)
Biological Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 376)
Business Strategy and the Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Catalysis for Sustainable Energy     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Challenges in Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Chelonian Conservation and Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Conservación Vegetal     Open Access  
Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Conservation Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 335)
Conservation Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Conservation Science     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Conservation Science and Practice     Open Access  
Diversity and Distributions     Open Access   (Followers: 44)
Earth's Future     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Eastern European Countryside     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Eco-Entrepreneur     Open Access  
Ecological Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 199)
Ecological Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Ecological Restoration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 95)
Ecology and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 51)
Environment and Natural Resources Journal     Open Access  
Environmental and Resource Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Environmental and Sustainability Indicators     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Environmental Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Ethnobiology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
European Countryside     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Forest Policy and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Forum Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 43)
Functional Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Future Anterior     Full-text available via subscription  
Global Ecology and Biogeography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 74)
Global Ecology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Human Dimensions of Wildlife: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Ideas in Ecology and Evolution     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
In Situ. Revue des patrimoines     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indonesian Journal of Conservation     Open Access  
Indonesian Journal of Sustainability Accounting and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Interações (Campo Grande)     Open Access  
Interdisciplinary Environmental Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Architectural Heritage: Conservation, Analysis, and Restoration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Biodiversity and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Biodiversity Science and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Environment and Pollution     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Global Energy Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Social Ecology and Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Sustainable Development and World Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Soil and Water Conservation Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Intervención     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal for Nature Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Journal for the Study of Religion, Nature and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of East African Natural History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Ecology and The Natural Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Industrial Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of International Wildlife Law & Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Paper Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Rural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Sustainable Mining     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of the American Institute for Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the Institute of Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Threatened Taxa     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Urban Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Julius-Kühn-Archiv     Open Access  
Lakes & Reservoirs Research & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Landscape and Urban Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Madagascar Conservation & Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Madera y Bosques     Open Access  
Media Konservasi     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Monographs of the Western North American Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription  
Natural Resources and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Natural Resources Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Nature Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 36)
Nature Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Natureza & Conservação : Brazilian Journal of Nature Conservation     Open Access  
Neotropical Biology and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Nepalese Journal of Development and Rural Studies     Open Access  
Northeastern Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Northwestern Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription  
Novos Cadernos NAEA     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
npj Urban Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Nusantara Bioscience     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ocean Acidification     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
One Ecosystem     Open Access  
Oryx     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Pacific Conservation Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Park Watch     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Proceedings of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Process Integration and Optimization for Sustainability     Hybrid Journal  
Rangeland Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Recursos Rurais     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Recycling     Open Access  
Resources, Conservation & Recycling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Resources, Conservation & Recycling : X     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Restoration Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Revista de Ciencias Ambientales     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista de Direito e Sustentabilidade     Open Access  
Revista Meio Ambiente e Sustentabilidade     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Memorare     Open Access  
Rural Sustainability Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Savana Cendana     Open Access  
Society & Natural Resources: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Socio-Ecological Practice Research     Hybrid Journal  
Soil Ecology Letters     Hybrid Journal  
Southeastern Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Southern Forests : a Journal of Forest Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Studies in Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Sustainable Earth     Open Access  
Sustainable Environment Agricultural Science (SEAS)     Open Access  
Sustentabilidade em Debate     Open Access  
Tanzania Journal of Forestry and Nature Conservation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
The American Midland Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
The Southwestern Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Tropical Conservation Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Tropical Ecology     Hybrid Journal  
VITRUVIO : International Journal of Architectural Technology and Sustainability     Open Access  
Water Conservation Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Western North American Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Wildfowl     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Wildlife Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Wildlife Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
World Review of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)

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Natureza & Conservação : Brazilian Journal of Nature Conservation
Number of Followers: 0  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 1679-0073
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3203 journals]
  • The importance of restoration areas to conserve bird species in a highly
           fragmented Atlantic forest landscape

    • Authors: Paulo Cesar Araújo Santos Junior; Fernanda Cristina Marques; Marcos Robalinho Lima; Luiz dos Anjos
      Pages: 1 - 7
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 March 2016
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Paulo Cesar Araújo Santos Junior, Fernanda Cristina Marques, Marcos Robalinho Lima, Luiz dos Anjos
      In this study, we tested the potential of restored areas to maintain biodiversity in the scope of a recently proposed category of protected area called “Restoration Reserves”. To accomplish this, we compared bird richness and functional group structure of two small forest fragments (<250ha) with adjacent recently reforested areas (9 and 7 years of reforestation). Reforested areas had equal or higher bird richness and similar functional group structure. These results indicate that reforested areas are capable of maintaining current levels of biodiversity and reducing species extinction debt in small forest fragments, which is the main purpose of “Restoration Reserves”. However, when we compared a large forest fragment with an old adjacent reforested area (20 years of reforestation), we found that it was of limited value for certain functional groups. Therefore, “Restoration Reserves” could provide essential additional habitat in highly fragmented landscapes that consists mainly of small forest fragments.

      PubDate: 2016-03-22T15:31:35Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2016.03.001
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 1 (2016)
       
  • Do the size and shape of spatial units jeopardize the road mortality-risk
           factors estimates'

    • Authors: Clara Grilo; Thálita de Resende Cardoso; Ricardo Solar; Alex Bager
      Pages: 8 - 13
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 February 2016
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Clara Grilo, Thálita de Resende Cardoso, Ricardo Solar, Alex Bager
      We aimed to evaluate the role of spatial units with different shapes and sizes on road-kill modeling for small vertebrate species. We used the road-kill records of two reptiles, water snake (Helicops infrataeniatus) and D’Orbigny's slider turtle (Trachemys dorbigni), and three mammals, white-eared opossum (Didelphis albiventris), coypu (Myocastor coypus) and Molina's Hog-nosed skunk (Conepatus chinga). Hierarchical partitioning was used to evaluate the independent influence of different land-use classes on road-kill by varying the shape and size of the spatial units. Variables that most explained road-kill were consistent over the different spatial unit types. The standard size seemed to be a reasonable solution for these species. Prior analysis with several sizes and shapes is needed to identify the appropriate spatial unit to model road-kill occurrence for larger vertebrates with different history traits.

      PubDate: 2016-02-11T06:06:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2016.01.001
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 1 (2016)
       
  • Patterns of granivory in Acacia cyclops stands under biological control in
           South Africa

    • Authors: Thabiso Michael Mokotjomela
      Pages: 14 - 19
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 March 2016
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Thabiso Michael Mokotjomela
      Low seed abundance associated with effect of biological control agents in an invasive shrub Acacia cyclops may limit its seed banks and further spread of the remaining seed crop in the South-western Cape, South Africa. However, there is a limited knowledge on how a reduced seed abundance, and vegetation cover which is positively correlated to seed bank size, affects patterns of granivory in A. cyclops stands. To fill this knowledge gap, granivory rates were measured using seed exclosure cages located both in closed and open A. cyclops tree canopy covers. Fresh seeds of A. cyclops were presented in tens per cage, and monitored in four-hour intervals of the day during the seeding season (December–July, 2013). Overall, results revealed that seed removal by rodents (74%) was not affected by vegetation cover, and thus leaving about 10% of seeds with limited dispersal chances in the afternoons by birds and mammals. Conversely, seed removal by invertebrates (16%) was lowest among treatments, and was restricted in low tree canopy cover possibly due to competition for seeds under shady canopy. In combination, biological control agents and rodents’ seed predation may effectively reduce seed banks of A. cyclops and invasion of this species in South Africa.

      PubDate: 2016-03-10T12:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2016.02.002
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 1 (2016)
       
  • Tidal pools as habitat for juveniles of the goliath grouper Epinephelus
           itajara (Lichtenstein 1822) in the Amazonian coastal zone, Brazil

    • Authors: Cleonice Maria Cardoso Lobato; Bruno Eleres Soares; Tiago Octavio Ruffeil Begot; Luciano Fogaça de Assis Montag
      Pages: 20 - 23
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 February 2016
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Cleonice Maria Cardoso Lobato, Bruno Eleres Soares, Tiago Octavio Begot Ruffeil, Luciano Fogaça de Assis Montag
      The goliath grouper Epinephelus itajara (Lichtenstein 1822) (Perciformes: Epinephelidae) occurs in marine and estuarine waters between Florida and south of Brazil in the Atlantic Ocean. E. itajara is a critically endangered species and the knowledge about its habitat use is essential for its conservation, since it can reveal nursery habitats that must be priority in management planning. Herein, we recorded the occurrence of ten juveniles specimens of E. itajara in tide pools in the Amazonian coastal zone.

      PubDate: 2016-02-11T06:06:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2015.12.001
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 1 (2016)
       
  • Neglect of ecosystems services by mining, and the worst environmental
           disaster in Brazil

    • Authors: Ana Carolina de Oliveira Neves; Flávia Peres Nunes; Felipe Alencar de Carvalho; Geraldo Wilson Fernandes
      Pages: 24 - 27
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 March 2016
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Ana Carolina de Oliveira Neves, Flávia Peres Nunes, Felipe Alencar de Carvalho, Geraldo Wilson Fernandes


      PubDate: 2016-03-29T16:39:04Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2016.03.002
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 1 (2016)
       
  • Impacts of deforestation on some orchids of São Paulo State, Brazil

    • Authors: Jean Carlos Cardoso; Jaime A. Teixeira da Silva; Wagner A. Vendrame
      Pages: 28 - 32
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 March 2016
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Jean Carlos Cardoso, Jaime Teixeira da Silva, Wagner Vendrame


      PubDate: 2016-03-10T12:15:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2016.02.001
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 1 (2016)
       
  • Conservation of the Amazon rainforest: the role of environmental NGO's

    • Authors: Ricardo Aleixo Correia
      Pages: 33 - 34
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 February 2016
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Ricardo Aleixo Correia


      PubDate: 2016-02-11T06:06:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2015.12.002
      Issue No: Vol. 14, No. 1 (2016)
       
  • Análise crítica da Lei de Proteção da Vegetação Nativa (2012), que
           substituiu o antigo Código Florestal: atualizações e ações em curso

    • Authors: Pedro H.S. Brancalion; Letícia C. Garcia; Rafael Loyola; Ricardo R. Rodrigues; Valério D. Pillar; Thomas M. Lewinsohn
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 March 2016
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Pedro H.S. Brancalion, Letícia C. Garcia, Rafael Loyola, Ricardo R. Rodrigues, Valério Pillar, Thomas M. Lewinsohn
      A Lei de Proteção da Vegetação Nativa (LPVN), que substituiu o Código Florestal de 1965, encontra‐se ainda em fase de regulamentação em nível federal e estadual e a constitucionalidade de algumas alterações ainda está sendo questionada. Visando subsidiar a tomada de decisão por parte de juristas e agentes públicos, bem como informar o público geral, apresentamos uma análise equilibrada das consequências positivas e negativas dessa lei à luz do conhecimento científico. Avanços importantes foram observados nos sistemas de controle e incentivo, que propuseram novos mecanismos e políticas públicas para subsidiar a implantação dessa lei. Os principais retrocessos ambientais foram: i) a remoção da proteção de áreas ambientalmente sensíveis, ii) a concessão de anistia de multas aplicadas por violações à lei anterior e iii) a permissão de manter atividades agropecuárias e infraestrutura em áreas protegidas, sem necessidade de recuperação total da vegetação nativa. A fragilização da LPVN pode comprometer a proteção do solo e dos mananciais, a conservação da biodiversidade e a produção agropecuária, sem trazer benefícios evidentes para o país. Nesse contexto, recomendamos: i) que o conhecimento científico e a maior participação da sociedade embasem a tomada de decisão pelo Poder Judiciário e a correção de possíveis distorções na LPVN por estados e municípios, por meio de regulamentações apropriadas; ii) que se fortaleçam os órgãos de assistência técnica rural para fomentar a implantação da lei; iii) que se desenvolvam mecanismos de estímulo para desenvolver a cadeia de negócios da recuperação da vegetação nativa; iv) que a compensação da Reserva Legal se atente a critérios ambientais para seu planejamento; e que v) o cumprimento das demandas da lei seja aferido também com base na qualidade da vegetação que é recuperada. The Native Vegetation Protection Law (NVPL) of Brazil, which replaced the Forest Code from 1965, is still undergoing regulation at federal and state levels, and the constitutionality of some clauses are still in question. In order to support legal rulings, decisions by public officers, and to inform other stakeholders, we present a balanced assessment of the positive and negative consequences of NVPL in light of current scientific knowledge. Key advances were noted in the systems of controls and incentives, which promoted new mechanisms and policies to support the implementation of this law. The main environmental setbacks were i) the removal of protection of certain environmentally fragile areas, ii) the concession of amnesty of fines incurred for violating the preceding legislation, iii) allowing continuous farming or maintenance of infrastructure in areas protected by law, without full recovery native vegetation. The weakening of NVPL may hamper soil and watershed protection, biodiversity conservation, and even agricultural productivity, without manifest benefits for the country. On that account, we recommend: i) that judiciary rulings and state and county regulations to correct pending issues with the NVPL based on scientific knowledge and with wider citizen participation; ii) the strengthening of agencies for rural technical assistance; iii) the development of incentives to develop the supply chain for native vegetation recovery; iv) the regulation of compensation for Legal Reserves based on clear and robust environmental criteria; and that v) that the assessment of legal compliance has also to be based on the environmental quality of recovered areas.

      PubDate: 2016-03-29T16:39:04Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2016.03.004
      Issue No: Vol. 14 (2016)
       
  • A critical analysis of the Native Vegetation Protection Law of Brazil
           (2012): updates and ongoing initiatives

    • Authors: Pedro H.S. Brancalion; Letícia C. Garcia; Rafael Loyola; Ricardo R. Rodrigues; Valério D. Pillar; Thomas M. Lewinsohn
      Pages: 1 - 15
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 April 2016
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Pedro H.S. Brancalion, Letícia C. Garcia, Rafael Loyola, Ricardo R. Rodrigues, Valério Pillar, Thomas M. Lewinsohn
      The Native Vegetation Protection Law of Brazil, which replaced the Forest Code from 1965, is still undergoing regulation at federal and state levels, and the constitutionality of some clauses are still in question. In order to support legal rulings, decisions by public officers, and to inform other stakeholders, we present a balanced assessment of the positive and negative consequences of Native Vegetation Protection Law in light of current scientific knowledge. Key advances were noted in the systems of controls and incentives, which promoted new mechanisms and policies to support the implementation of this law. The main environmental setbacks were (i) the removal of protection of certain environmentally fragile areas, (ii) the concession of amnesty of fines incurred for violating the preceding legislation, (iii) allowing continuous farming or maintenance of infrastructure in areas protected by law, without full recovery of native vegetation. The weakening of Native Vegetation Protection Law may hamper soil and watershed protection, biodiversity conservation, and even agricultural productivity, without manifest benefits for the country. On that account, we recommend that: (i) judiciary rulings and state and county regulations to correct pending issues with the Native Vegetation Protection Law based on scientific knowledge and with wider citizen participation; (ii) the strengthening of agencies for rural technical assistance; (iii) the development of incentives to develop the supply chain for native vegetation recovery; (iv) the regulation of compensation for Legal Reserves based on clear and robust environmental criteria; and (v) the assessment of legal compliance has also to be based on the environmental quality of recovered areas.

      PubDate: 2016-04-03T18:30:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2016.03.003
      Issue No: Vol. 14 (2016)
       
  • Prioritizing rare tree species of the Cerrado-Amazon ecotone: warnings and
           

    • Authors: Everton A. Maciel; Ary T. Oliveira-Filho; Pedro V. Eisenlohr
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 November 2016
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Everton A. Maciel, Ary T. Oliveira-Filho, Pedro V. Eisenlohr
      Many locally and regionally rare species are not covered by red lists, thus compromising conservation strategies. This is the case with ecotones. After applying three rarity criteria based on both geographic range and on local occurrences to 1755 species of a large transitional zone in South America, we discuss how the priority hierarchy found in the study region can be combined with red books in decision-making to reduce the gaps left by the classification systems adopted by these lists. We point out clear directions about how these species can be used to guide decision making in ecotones, including identifying species of interest for conservation that have not yet been included in red lists, structuring a species group of narrow distribution occurring in areas adjacent to ecological transitions into a hierarchy of priorities for conservation, and using species of the highest hierarchy position in decision making. We believe that the combination of regional lists with national and international red lists is an interesting strategy in the management of species for conservation.

      PubDate: 2016-11-15T01:56:23Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2016.10.002
       
  • Deep into the mud: ecological and socio-economic impacts of the dam breach
           in Mariana, Brazil

    • Authors: Geraldo Wilson Fernandes; Fernando F. Goulart; Bernardo D. Ranieri; Marcel S. Coelho; Kirsten Dales; Nina Boesche; Mercedes Bustamante; Felipe A. Carvalho; Daniel C. Carvalho; Rodolfo Dirzo; Stephannie Fernandes; Pedro M. Galetti; Virginia E. Garcia Millan; Christian Mielke; Jorge L. Ramirez; Ana Neves; Christian Rogass; Sérvio P. Ribeiro; Aldicir Scariot; Britaldo Soares-Filho
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 November 2016
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Geraldo Wilson Fernandes, Fernando F. Goulart, Bernardo D. Ranieri, Marcel S. Coelho, Kirsten Dales, Nina Boesche, Mercedes Bustamante, Felipe A. Carvalho, Daniel C. Carvalho, Rodolfo Dirzo, Stephannie Fernandes, Pedro M. Galetti, Virginia E. Garcia Millan, Christian Mielke, Jorge L. Ramirez, Ana Neves, Christian Rogass, Sérvio P. Ribeiro, Aldicir Scariot, Britaldo Soares-Filho
      We review the ecological and socio-economic impacts of the catastrophic dam failure in Mariana, Brazil. Tailing management practices by Samarco mining company ultimately caused a dam breach that abruptly discharged between 55 and 62millionm3 of tailings into the Doce River watershed. On November 5th, 2015, a tsunami of slurry engulfed the small district of Bento Rodrigues, loading the Doce River and its estuary with toxic tailings along a 663.2km trajectory, extending impacts to the Atlantic coast. Acute ecological impacts will adversely affect livelihoods of more than 1 million people in 41 riparian municipalities by reducing local access to fisheries resources, clean water, crop production sites, hydroelectric power generation and raw materials. The threats to riverine human communities are particularly critical for the disadvantaged populations from remote areas that rely on subsistence agriculture and fisheries, and are uniquely vulnerable to long-term heavy metal exposure. At the landscape scale, we predict multiple negative impacts, ranging from alterations of the genetic diversity of fish populations to long-term vegetation loss and poor regeneration in contaminated areas. Consequently, compromised soil stability and runoff control will increase the risk of further geomorphologic disturbance, including landslides, bank failure and mass movements. We propose spatially explicit long-term monitoring frameworks and prioritary mitigation measures to cope with acute and chronic risks. We posit that, from a national perspective, disastrous impacts like that of Doce River may become more frequent, given the recent regulatory changes that undermine both institutional governance structures and enforcement of environmental regulation.

      PubDate: 2016-11-08T01:50:12Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2016.10.003
       
  • Conservation of grassland birds in South Brazil: a land management
           perspective

    • Authors: Carla Suertegaray Fontana; Graziela Dotta; Cybele Kelm Marques; Márcio Repenning; Carlos Eduardo Agne; Rogério Jaworski dos Santos
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 November 2016
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Carla Suertegaray Fontana, Graziela Dotta, Cybele Kelm Marques, Márcio Repenning, Carlos Eduardo Agne, Rogério Jaworski dos Santos
      We explored how grassland birds responded to three different managements in grassland areas. Moreover, we examined whether bird's communities were different depending on the biome grasslands were inserted. We carried out bird surveys in six private farms in the Upland grasslands (Atlantic Forest biome) and the Pampas grasslands (Pampa biome). Land use included: (1) natural grasslands – paddocks with cattle stocking around 0.8animal units/ha, without improvement/crop plantation in the last four years; (2) improved grasslands – grasslands with usage of fertilizers and forage improvement with exotic species, and (3) cultivated fields – forage/crop plantations. Threatened and restricted grassland birds were found in natural grasslands areas while more common species occurred in improved grasslands and cultivated fields. Bird community was different in the biomes with some species more related to the Upland grasslands and others to the Pampas. We highlighted the importance of natural grasslands and its management in private farms to maintain grassland bird species richness and their abundance in south Brazil.

      PubDate: 2016-11-08T01:50:12Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2016.09.005
       
  • Assembly patterns and functional diversity of tree species in a
           successional gradient of Araucaria forest in Southern Brazil

    • Authors: José Vicente-Silva; Rodrigo S. Bergamin; Kátia J. Zanini; Valério D. Pillar; Sandra C. Müller
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 October 2016
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): José Vicente-Silva, Rodrigo S. Bergamin, Kátia J. Zanini, Valério D. Pillar, Sandra C. Müller
      Functional analysis of secondary succession may allow identifying and predicting processes of community assembly, which can be simultaneously driven by factors related to ecological filters and neutral forces. This study evaluated trait-convergence assembly patterns and trait-divergence assembly patterns in successional areas of Araucaria forest. Plant species were sampled in both the upper and lower strata and were described by 15 functional traits. Data analyses were based on multiplication and Procrustes adjustment of matrices, which permit to discriminate trait-convergence assembly patterns and trait-divergence assembly patterns along the forest succession (our environmental variable), and the influence of phylogeny on these patterns. Initial and late forests were highly different in species composition, but the regenerating stratum was already more similar especially in functional terms. Traits related to the acquisitive-conservative trade-off (wood density, leaf nitrogen content, leaf area, leaf dry matter content) revealed strong convergent patterns of successional changes. Moreover divergence was maximized by specific leaf area, seed mass, deciduousness, and dispersal mode, showing a higher functional diversity in late Araucaria forests.

      PubDate: 2016-11-01T01:26:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2016.09.006
       
  • Longitudinal gradient effects on the stream fish metacommunity

    • Authors: Rodrigo S. Almeida; Maurício Cetra
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 October 2016
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Rodrigo S. Almeida, Maurício Cetra
      Understanding the influence of local and regional factors that structure biological communities can be useful in environmental conservation. Our objective was to verify whether a fish metacommunity in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest has a nonrandom structure along the longitudinal stream gradient. To do so, we applied the elements of metacommunity structure to examine fish distribution patterns at the micro-basin extent for 20 stream fish assemblages. Stream fish species were independently distributed following the Gleasonian pattern. The Gleasonian pattern suggested that the communities varied continuously over space, potentially reflecting the degree to which species tolerances overlap. The metacommunity structure may have resulted from the environmental gradient and has a high beta diversity. The upstream reaches have higher values from regional variables (confluence distance and declivity) and slower values on variables representing a local scale (temperature, conductivity, depth, and width). Knowing the type of structure and the drivers that shape a metacommunity, we suggested that ensuring the connectivity of streams is a good conservation strategy as the species move from one to another, being very dependent on the colonization source. This environmental management can affect biodiversity at local and regional scales, thus we would require devoting local conservation efforts to a large number of different reaches of streams and in a micro-basin regional scale.

      PubDate: 2016-11-01T01:26:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2016.10.001
       
  • Participative mapping of cultural ecosystem services in Pedra Branca State
           Park, Brazil

    • Authors: Fernando P. Ribeiro; Katia T. Ribeiro
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 October 2016
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Fernando P. Ribeiro, Katia T. Ribeiro
      Many studies have identified the benefits conferred to urban citizens by the relationship with protected natural areas, but in Brazil, with many important urban green areas, studies about how these benefits are perceived and managed are still quite rare. This study aimed to evaluate the immaterial benefits of Pedra Branca State Park, the largest urban park in Brazil, located in Rio de Janeiro, the second most populous Brazilian city. Using participative GIS procedures, we mapped and assessed the perception of 68 users, among visitors, residents and park staff, about seven cultural ecosystem services: aesthetic values, social relations, recreation & ecotourism, knowledge systems & educational values, cultural heritage, cultural diversity, spiritual & religious values. Results indicated that the park offers significant immaterial benefits to respondents, with aesthetic values and recreation & ecotourism being the most frequently perceived. Differences in perceptions between the three groups of users were found. Possible implications of these results for park management, mainly visitation and conflicts with residents and neighbors, are discussed.

      PubDate: 2016-11-01T01:26:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2016.09.004
       
  • Processes related to habitat selection, diversity and niche similarity in
           assemblages of non-volant small mammals at grassland–forest ecotones

    • Authors: André Luís Luza; Gislene Lopes Gonçalves; Valério D. Pillar; Sandra Maria Hartz
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 October 2016
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): André Luís Luza, Gislene Lopes Gonçalves, Valério D. Pillar, Sandra Maria Hartz
      Habitat suitability for mammal species in grassland/forest ecotones may be affected by changes in abiotic conditions (e.g. light incidence), grazing and burning disturbances, and woody encroachment. We evaluate models addressing the role of such factors on structuring non-volant small mammal assemblages considering (1) only disturbed and (2) all ecotones (disturbed and undisturbed). A complete model (i.e., abiotic gradients, disturbances and woody encroachment) was the most plausible for abundance considering all ecotones, and for niche similarity considering both all and only disturbed ecotones. Niche similarity increased with distance from hydric resources, and abundance with increasing vegetation height. Further, disturbed habitats harbored simplified species assemblages. Habitat selection was detected in all ecotones due to the occurrence of habitat-specialist species on undisturbed sites. We did not find an exclusive influence of woody encroachment on mammal diversity. Patterns described here are relevant for management of productive lands and for biodiversity conservation.

      PubDate: 2016-11-01T01:26:36Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2016.09.003
       
  • Where do seedlings for Restinga restoration come from and where should
           they come from'

    • Authors: Julia Dias de Freitas; Ricardo Bertoncello; Alexandre Adalardo de Oliveira; Adriana Maria Zanforlin Martini
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 September 2016
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Julia Dias de Freitas, Ricardo Bertoncello, Alexandre Adalardo de Oliveira, Adriana Maria Zanforlin Martini
      In a study specifically designed to quantify the production of seedlings grown from seeds collected in Restinga, we found only six from 122 surveyed nurseries in São Paulo state producing local seedlings. Total number of commercially produced seedlings was relatively low. Thus, we compared it with the number of legally committed seedlings to restoration projects in seaside towns in São Paulo state. We found local seedling production representing only one third (32%) of legally committed seedlings. Given this discrepancy between production and demand, we presumed that most of seedlings used in restoration projects in seaside towns has come from other regions. In view of this, we discuss some aspects of the debate about introduction of exogenous seedlings in restoration projects, highlighting the recent literature recommendations for singular ecosystems, such as coastal plain vegetation. We highlighted some potential negative effects on the long-term ecological restoration success and presented some alternative policy actions in order to encourage local seedling production and to register seedling provenance.

      PubDate: 2016-10-03T02:13:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2016.09.002
       
  • Afforestation of savannas: an impending ecological disaster

    • Authors: Geraldo Wilson Fernandes; Marcel Serra Coelho; Ricardo Bomfim Machado; Manuel Eduardo Ferreira; Ludmilla Moura de Souza Aguiar; Rodolfo Dirzo; Aldicir Scariot; Cassiomar Rodrigues Lopes
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 September 2016
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Geraldo Wilson Fernandes, Marcel Serra Coelho, Ricardo Bomfim Machado, Manuel Eduardo Ferreira, Ludmilla Moura de Souza Aguiar, Rodolfo Dirzo, Aldicir Scariot, Cassiomar Rodrigues Lopes


      PubDate: 2016-09-26T01:43:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2016.08.002
       
  • So many to so few: new conservation stories and life history tales

    • Authors: José Alexandre Felizola Diniz-Filho
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 September 2016
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): José Alexandre Felizola Diniz-Filho


      PubDate: 2016-09-26T01:43:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2016.09.001
       
  • Forests, shrublands and grasslands in southern Brazil are neglected and
           have specific needs for their conservation. Reply to Overbeck et al

    • Authors: Marcos B. Carlucci; André Luís Luza; Sandra Maria Hartz; Leandro D.S. Duarte
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 September 2016
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Marcos B. Carlucci, André Luís Luza, Sandra Maria Hartz, Leandro D.S. Duarte


      PubDate: 2016-09-26T01:43:08Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2016.08.001
       
  • Combining Econegotiations and Threat Reduction Assessments to estimate
           success of conservation: lessons learned in the black-faced lion tamarin
           conservation program

    • Authors: Alexandre Túlio Amaral Nascimento; Camila Nali; Lucia Schmidlin; Rosângela Marques; Maria Rodeano; Suzana M. Padua; Claudio B. Valladares-Padua; Fabiana Prado; Maria das Graças de Souza; Gustavo A.B. da Fonseca
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 September 2016
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Alexandre Túlio Amaral Nascimento, Camila Nali, Lucia Schmidlin, Rosângela Marques, Maria Rodeano, Suzana M. Padua, Claudio B. Valladares-Padua, Fabiana Prado, Maria das Graças de Souza, Gustavo A.B. da Fonseca
      This study shares the experience of the Integrated Conservation Program for the black-faced lion tamarin, Leontopithecus caissara, on measuring its conservation success. We present the program history and evaluate its impact from 2005 until 2014 in the Ariri region, at Cananeia, São Paulo, Brazil. To assess impact we combined an evaluation of the Econegotiation, a strategy that looks for involve various social segments into conservation through participative forums, with the Threat Reduction Assessment. Econegotiations analysis made possible to estimate the reduction of direct threats, which is considered the most difficult step in the application of Threat Reduction Assessment. We identified a 20–30% reduction in threats, expressed by better political coherence and use of natural resources within the region. Our study revealed two factors that influence the success of integrated conservation and development projects: (i) the ability to integrate in the local context and influence it to make biodiversity conservation an interest shared by diverse actors and leaders, and (ii) the weight of our biocentric vision in defining the target condition constrains the calculation of Threat Reduction Assessment. As lessons learned, we highlight vital aspects to consider in conservation and sustainability: (i) initial effort to know the territory's social, cultural, and economic profile; (ii) clarity of direction and focus on the program's mission; (iii) consolidation of partnerships at all levels; and (iv) strategy to discuss, understand, and overcome conflicts, such as Econegotiations in the black-faced lion tamarin program, can act on critical threats and identify approaches and partnerships to reduce them.

      PubDate: 2016-09-04T00:54:51Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2016.06.001
       
  • Evaluation of Global Positioning System telemetry collar performance in
           the tropical Andes of southern Ecuador

    • Authors: Meghan J. Camp; Janet L. Rachlow; Rodrigo Cisneros; David Roon; Reid J. Camp
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 August 2016
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Meghan J. Camp, Janet L. Rachlow, Rodrigo Cisneros, David Roon, Reid J. Camp
      The objective of this study was to evaluate if canopy cover, topographic obstruction of the sky, and differences among vegetation type affected performance of global positioning system (GPS) telemetry in southern Ecuador. A GPS collar was placed at 30 test sites in Podocarpus National Park, Ecuador, and we estimated canopy cover and topographic obstruction at each site. The mean fix success rate was 87.7% (SD=22.3%), and the mean location error for test sites was 9.7m (SD=4.17m). Canopy cover significantly reduced the performance of GPS telemetry in our study area both in terms of location error and fix acquisition rate. However, topographic obstruction did not significantly influence location errors or fix acquisition rate. Screening data to remove less accurate, two-dimensional fixes resulted in an 11% data loss and reduced the mean location error by 3.8m. Understanding how habitat variables influence fix acquisition and location errors of GPS collars will assist researchers in evaluating potential biases and developing methods to correct for the effect of such biases on analyses of habitat use and animal movements in the tropical Andes in southern Ecuador.

      PubDate: 2016-08-25T00:47:10Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2016.07.002
       
  • Range maps and checklists provide similar estimates of taxonomic and
           phylogenetic alpha diversity, but less so for beta diversity, of Brazilian
           Atlantic Forest anurans

    • Authors: Fernando R. da Silva; Diogo B. Provete; Bradford A. Hawkins
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 August 2016
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Fernando R. da Silva, Diogo B. Provete, Bradford A. Hawkins
      Macroecological and biogeographical studies have assumed that range map data should be used only at coarser grains due to false presences (errors of commission) at small grains. This has been explored using mostly species richness, underrepresenting other potentially informative biodiversity metrics. Here, we evaluated these issues by quantifying the extent to which taxonomic and phylogenetic alpha and beta diversity patterns calculated using anuran range maps at three cell sizes (1×1km, 5×5km, and 10×10km) differ from the patterns calculated based on checklists in 14 protected areas along the southern range of the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. We found that range maps and checklists generated reasonably similar spatial richness patterns in all cell sizes (r ≥0.80 in all cases) and slightly weaker, but still correlated alpha phylogenetic diversity patterns (0.78≤ r ≤0.81). We also found that taxonomic (r ≤0.76) and phylogenetic (r ≤0.68) beta diversities had lower correlations than alpha spatial patterns. Therefore, range maps have value in documenting alpha biodiversity patterns, as well as beta diversity at more marginal levels, for tropical species at scales relevant to local conservation efforts.

      PubDate: 2016-08-25T00:47:10Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2016.07.001
       
  • Trends in studies of Brazilian stream fish assemblages

    • Authors: Murilo S. Dias; Jansen Zuanon; Thiago B.A. Couto; Marla Carvalho; Lucélia N. Carvalho; Helder M.V. Espírito-Santo; Renata Frederico; Rafael P. Leitão; Amanda F. Mortati; Tiago H.S. Pires; Gislene Torrente-Vilara; Julio do Vale; Maeda B. dos Anjos; Fernando P. Mendonça; Pablo A. Tedesco
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 August 2016
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Murilo S. Dias, Jansen Zuanon, Thiago B.A. Couto, Marla Carvalho, Lucélia N. Carvalho, Helder M.V. Espírito-Santo, Renata Frederico, Rafael P. Leitão, Amanda F. Mortati, Tiago H.S. Pires, Gislene Torrente-Vilara, Julio do Vale, Maeda B. dos Anjos, Fernando P. Mendonça, Pablo A. Tedesco
      Studies about fish assemblages in Brazilian streams have grown in recent years, however, it remains unclear whether this increase is followed by increments in the diversity of addressed topics and theoretical frameworks adopted by researchers. We performed a systematic search for Brazilian studies on stream fish assemblages recording study region, publication year, objectives, and spatial and temporal scales adopted. The number of studies is unevenly distributed among regions. Most papers describe the general structure of local fish assemblages and their scientific objectives have not varied through time. Studies have been conducted mainly at small temporal and spatial scales, though the latter is increasing over time. We argue for the need of focusing on recently developed ecological theories and frameworks, and expanding the temporal and spatial scales of studies. These changes will improve regional and local conservation policies, and the visibility of aquatic Brazilian research in the global scientific community.

      PubDate: 2016-08-25T00:47:10Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2016.06.003
       
  • Environmental licensing on rhodolith beds: insights from a worm

    • Authors: Cinthya Simone Gomes Santos; Jaqueline Barreto Lino; Priscila de Cerqueira Veras; Gilberto Menezes Amado-Filho; Ronaldo Bastos Francini-Filho; Fabio Santos Motta; Rodrigo Leão de Moura; Guilherme Henrique Pereira-Filho
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 July 2016
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Cinthya Simone Gomes Santos, Jaqueline Barreto Lino, Priscila de Cerqueira Veras, Gilberto Menezes Amado-Filho, Ronaldo Bastos Francini-Filho, Fabio Santos Motta, Rodrigo Leão de Moura, Guilherme Henrique Pereira-Filho
      Rhodoliths are free-living nodules formed by crustose coralline algae that promote multi-dimensional microhabitats for a highly diverse community. Because their CaCO3 production, rhodolith beds constitute areas of interest for mining activities. On the other hand, other goods and services provided by these environments such as nurseries habitats, fishing and climate regulation remain undersized. Besides directly CaCO3 exploitation, these diverse ecosystems within the Brazilian economic exclusive zone are often covering potentially sites for oil and gas extraction. The IBAMA (Environmental Agency of the Brazilian government) have been applying the precautionary principle to deny requests for oil/gas drilling activities where rhodolith beds occur. Here, we discuss recent data about diversity associated with rhodoliths and also record the “rare” worm Nuchalosyllis cf. maiteae. More than the distribution of one only species, our finding is an emblematic example of our infancy knowledge state about diversity associated with rhodolith beds in southwestern Atlantic. We argue that these knowledge is still insufficient to subside any attempt in classify priorities areas for oil wells drilling. In addition, we claim that the precautionary principle adopted by IBAMA must prevalence until we have robust data allowing predictions concerning higher or lower biodiversity associated with rhodolith beds.

      PubDate: 2016-07-13T21:24:09Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2016.06.002
       
  • The challenges of implementing a legal framework for Payment for Ecosystem
           Services in Santa Catarina, Brazil

    • Authors: Gisele Garcia Alarcon; Luis Antônio dos Santos de Freitas; Glauber Oliveira da Fountoura; Carolina Ximenes de Macedo; Daniel Casarin Ribeiro
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 June 2016
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Gisele Garcia Alarcon, Luis Antônio dos Santos de Freitas, Glauber Oliveira da Fountoura, Carolina Ximenes de Macedo, Daniel Casarin Ribeiro


      PubDate: 2016-06-07T15:12:27Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2016.05.003
       
  • Conservation of mosaics calls for a perspective that considers all types
           of mosaic-patches. Reply to Luza et al.

    • Authors: Gerhard Ernst Overbeck; Pedro Maria Abreu Ferreira; Valério D. Pillar
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 June 2016
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Gerhard Ernst Overbeck, Pedro Maria de Abreu Ferreira, Valério Pillar


      PubDate: 2016-06-07T15:12:27Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2016.05.002
       
  • Domestic dogs in protected areas: a threat to Brazilian mammals'

    • Authors: Isadora Lessa; Tainah Corrêa Seabra Guimarães; Helena de Godoy Bergallo; André Cunha; Emerson M. Vieira
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 May 2016
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Isadora Lessa, Tainah Corrêa Seabra Guimarães, Helena de Godoy Bergallo, André Cunha, Emerson Vieira
      The presence of domestic dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) in Brazilian protected areas is fairly frequent. The interaction of such dogs with native animals leads to population declines for many species, particularly carnivores. In this paper the main threats dogs bring about Brazilian biodiversity are assessed with a focus on protected areas. We collected information from papers on the interaction of dogs and wildlife species as well as from interviews with National Park managers. Studies in protected areas in Brazil listed 37 native species affected by the presence of dogs due to competition, predation, or pathogen transmission. Among the 69 threatened species of the Brazilian fauna, 55% have been cited in studies on dogs. Dog occurrence was assessed for 31 National Parks in Brazil. The presence of human residents and hunters in protected areas were the factors most often quoted as facilitating dog occurrence. These may be feral, street or domestically owned dogs found in protected areas in urban, rural or natural areas. Effective actions to control this invasive alien species in natural areas must consider dog dependence upon humans, pathways of entry, and the surrounding landscape and context.

      PubDate: 2016-05-26T14:04:48Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2016.05.001
       
  • Grassland degradation and restoration: a conceptual framework of stages
           and thresholds illustrated by southern Brazilian grasslands

    • Authors: Bianca O. Andrade; Christiane Koch; Ilsi I. Boldrini; Eduardo Vélez-Martin; Heinrich Hasenack; Julia-Maria Hermann; Johannes Kollmann; Valério D. Pillar; Gerhard E. Overbeck
      Pages: 95 - 104
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 September 2015
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Bianca Andrade, Christiane Koch, Ilsi Boldrini, Eduardo Vélez-Martin, Heinrich Hasenack, Julia-Maria Hermann, Johannes Kollmann, Valério Pillar, Gerhard Overbeck
      Land degradation is a complex concept that integrates different aspects, including changes in soil conditions, biodiversity, productivity and socio-economic implications, compared to a reference state. We propose a new conceptual framework to analyze degradation stages and restoration thresholds in species-rich natural grasslands. The framework integrates different degradation stages with their respective thresholds and describes key processes of land-use change that lead to certain stages and thresholds. Specifically, we discuss two scenarios of grassland degradation, i.e. unsuitable grassland management and complete change of land use, sometimes followed by spontaneous recovery. We illustrate the framework with the case of south Brazilian grasslands, which are rich in biodiversity, but suffer from a series of degradation processes and are poorly considered from a conservation perspective. The conceptual framework can be applied by studies on degradation and restorability of tropical and subtropical grasslands after changes in management or transition to other land use; it will facilitate decisions on alternative management and conservation.

      PubDate: 2015-09-25T11:55:37Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2015.08.002
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • The ecosystem service approach and its application as a tool for
           integrated coastal management

    • Authors: Carla I. Elliff; Ruy K.P. Kikuchi
      Pages: 105 - 111
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 October 2015
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Carla I. Elliff, Ruy K.P. Kikuchi
      Ecosystem services are the benefits that natural environments supply to human beings. Due to the immense diversity of ecosystems and objectives for which their services are being assessed, there are no standard methodologies for this type of evaluation. The high biodiversity and geodiversity of the coastal zone allow a wide range of services. However, deleterious impacts to the environment threaten the delivery of these services and, consequently, the human well-being they lead to. The coastal zone, with its multiple users and impacts, is a case in which an ecosystem-based approach would bring many benefits within the scope of an integrated coastal management strategy. By considering the ecosystem services supplied by the coastal zone, it is possible to make well-informed decisions. The objective of the present study was to carry out a revision on ecosystem services and their application within the context of coastal management.

      PubDate: 2015-10-30T17:01:20Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2015.10.001
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Functional diversity: an overview of its history and applicability

    • Authors: Livia Maira Orlandi Laureto; Marcus Vinicius Cianciaruso; Diogo Soares Menezes Samia
      Pages: 112 - 116
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 November 2015
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Livia Maira Orlandi Laureto, Marcus Vinicius Cianciaruso, Diogo Soares Menezes Samia
      Ecological investigations are increasingly using functional diversity in order to understand different patterns, such as species occurrence, species competitive abilities, and the influence of biological communities on ecosystem functioning. Here we provide an overview of the history and applicability of functional diversity in ecological studies. We found that the idea of functional diversity emerged many times and in distinct fields over the years. Functional diversity was conceived as an alternative classification to measure the ecological importance of species in a community, as well as a way to understand how biodiversity affects specific ecosystem functions. Gradually, new questions regarding functional traits emerged. Some examples include understanding species competitive abilities, patterns of species co-occurrence, community assembly, and the role of different traits on ecosystem functioning. The increasing use of functional-based approaches fueled the search for new metrics aiming at accurately estimating functional diversity and, consequently, categorical-based classifications of functional traits have been gradually replaced by continuous multi-trait approaches. More recently, the role of functional diversity was recognized as a key factor to maintain important functions and services of ecosystems. We present empirical evidence supporting this statement.

      PubDate: 2015-11-29T22:23:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2015.11.001
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Another blown in the wind: bats and the licensing of wind farms in Brazil

    • Authors: Rebeca Beltrão Valença; Enrico Bernard
      Pages: 117 - 122
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 October 2015
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Rebeca Beltrão Valença, Enrico Bernard
      Brazil is the third largest market for new investments in wind power in the world and thousands of turbines will become operational in the coming years. Wind power is necessary but, as any other source of energy, it has environmental impacts, especially on bats. Due to such rapid expansion and the volume of investiments on course, an analysis of the current environmental licensing of wind farms in Brazil is necessary. Here we compared normatives from Brazil with similar ones from Portugal, the United States and Canada. By using 21 driving questions, we detected that there is no an international standard in the licensing of wind farms, ranging from simplified to rigorous approaches, from mandatory to voluntary normatives. Despite having specific and mandatory legislation dated from 2014, Brazil's federal and state normatives have a vague and relaxed approach regarding the possible impacts of wind farms on bats. Larger wind parks can be fractioned in smaller units, licensed based on simplified and less rigorous studies, but with no explanation on how or when such fractionating may occur, neither details on when adopt it. Only Brazilian legislations do not clearly specify the procedures and the minimum necessary effort for pre and post-installation, and which should be the mitigation measures adopted for the impacts of wind farms. The Brazilian federal and state normatives must be revised and until that, the current EIA procedures should be seen as insufficient to accurately determine the real impact of wind farms on the Brazilian bat fauna.

      PubDate: 2015-10-10T13:56:47Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2015.09.001
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • How to avoid fish introductions in Brazil: education and information as
           alternatives

    • Authors: Valter M. Azevedo-Santos; Fernando Mayer Pelicice; Dilermando Pereira Lima-Junior; André Lincoln Barroso Magalhães; Mario Luis Orsi; Jean Ricardo Simões Vitule; Angelo Antonio Agostinho
      Pages: 123 - 132
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 September 2015
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Valter Azevedo-Santos, Fernando Mayer Pelicice, Dilermando Pereira Lima-Junior, André Lincoln Barroso Magalhães, Mario Luis Orsi, Jean Ricardo Simões Vitule, Angelo Antonio Agostinho
      In Brazil, the introduction of non-native fish is commonplace, and the only existing measure to address this problem is the normative approach (i.e., laws and inspections). However, this approach has failed to control or prevent introductions because enforcing laws in a country the size of a continent, where inspections and monitoring are minimal or non-existent, is difficult. In addition, society is generally unaware of this issue. More effective actions or complementary preventive measures are urgently needed, and the most promising approach is to change human behavior via educational opportunities. In this short essay, we propose that exposing society to high quality information is a powerful alternative because well-informed people naturally make more rational and balanced decisions. For example, informed stakeholders may be more cautious when handling non-native species, may adopt appropriate management practices and may cease deliberate releases. Moreover, a well-informed society will naturally avoid or prevent harmful activities that may lead to the introduction of alien species. From this perspective, this short essay explores opportunities to implement educational practices for containing new introductions. First, we present the primary activities that are responsible for the introduction of non-native fish in Brazil (i.e., aquaculture, fishkeeping and sport fishing) and then suggest simple educational pathways that are specific to each activity. In addition, we advocate for the inclusion of invasion biology in formal education to educate society as a whole. If the topic receives the necessary attention in the educational curriculum, then education will play a central role in creating new behavioral standards, awareness and responsibility at different societal levels, with the primary goal of reducing the rate of new fish introductions.

      PubDate: 2015-09-20T09:27:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2015.06.002
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • The effects of habitat availability and quality on small mammals abundance
           in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest

    • Authors: Reginaldo Honorato; Renato Crouzeilles; Mariana S. Ferreira; Carlos E.V. Grelle
      Pages: 133 - 138
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 December 2015
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Reginaldo Honorato, Renato Crouzeilles, Mariana Ferreira, Carlos Grelle
      Different causal mechanisms have been suggested to explain species decline in fragmented landscapes, mainly those related with the amount and configuration of habitat for species (habitat availability), and those related with the habitat patch quality. Here we quantify the effects of habitat availability and quality on the abundance of three small mammals in a landscape at the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. We compared species with different habitat preferences and dispersal abilities (Nectomys squamipes, Marmosa paraguayana and Didelphis aurita). The most sensitivity species to fragmentation (N. squamipes) was affected by habitat quality variables only, while the least sensitive species (D. aurita) did not suffer any effect of habitat quality and availability. M. paraguayana, a species with an intermediate degree of sensitivity, responded to both habitat quality and availability. We recommend combining information on both habitat availability and quality to unravel species persistence in fragmented landscapes.

      PubDate: 2015-12-15T05:36:49Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2015.11.010
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Time-lags in primate occupancy: a study case using dynamic models

    • Authors: Lilian Patricia Sales; Matthew Warrington Hayward; Ludimilla Zambaldi; Marcelo Passamani; Fabiano Rodrigues de Melo; Rafael Loyola
      Pages: 139 - 144
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 November 2015
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Lilian Patricia Sales, Matthew Warrington Hayward, Ludimilla Zambaldi, Marcelo Passamani, Fabiano Rodrigues de Melo, Rafael Loyola
      Species response to land-use changes are usually assessed by investigating factors affecting distribution, with a single snapshot in time. However, several processes can lead to a same pattern. Focusing on observed, short-term patterns limits our ability to make inferences about ecological processes and responses to environmental change over time. In this study, we assessed changes in occupancy of two primate species in southeastern Brazil, following a major habitat loss due to implementation of a hydroelectric dam. Occupancy was assessed before dam construction and 11 years after, while explicitly accounting for imperfect detection. We assessed the effect of forest patch size and isolation on occupancy and rates of extinction and colonization, driven by landscape modification. Then we calculated occupancy under metapopulation equilibrium and expected time-lags resulting from non-equilibrium. We compared two primate species inhabiting forest patches, the black penciled marmoset Callithrix penicilatta and the black-fronted titi monkey Callicebus nigrifrons, with markedly different ecological characteristics. Those differences may explain why occupancy dynamics were driven by distinct elements. A fast response to habitat changes was observed only for marmoset, an opportunistic species. However, non-equilibrium states and the possibility of time-lag effects were observed for titi monkey, a species dependent on forest habitat. Our analyses support the need to establish long term monitoring and assess system vital rates over time. A single snapshot in time may lead to erroneous interpretations of a species response to habitat alteration.

      PubDate: 2015-11-14T19:57:04Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2015.10.003
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Protected areas effectiveness in maintaining viable giant anteater
           (Myrmecophaga tridactyla) populations in an agricultural frontier

    • Authors: Milena F. Diniz; Daniel Brito
      Pages: 145 - 151
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 October 2015
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Milena F. Diniz, Daniel Brito
      The protected areas are essential for the conservation of native biota. However, only the protected area establishment does not guarantee the persistence of threatened species. Here, we assessed the efficiency of the Cerrado protected areas in maintaining viable populations of giant anteater and analyzed the impact of roadkills. We used the software VORTEX to model the viability of giant anteater populations in 18 Cerrado protected areas. We evaluated the impact of roadkills through three mortality scenarios (2.5%, 5% and 10% of the initial population). Our results show that in the pessimistic scenario, only three protected areas are able to maintain viable populations of the giant anteater. In the optimistic scenario, 11 protected areas out of the 18 protected areas are capable of maintaining viable giant anteater populations in the next 100 years. Three protected areas are not able to maintain viable populations in any scenario. The roadkills have had a major negative impact on the long-term persistence of giant anteater populations. We suggest that management actions to counteract the negative effects of roadkills are necessary to maintain populations of giant anteater in protected areas affected by this threat.

      PubDate: 2015-10-10T13:56:47Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2015.08.001
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Supporting underrepresented forests in Mesoamerica

    • Authors: Fábio Suzart de Albuquerque; Blas Benito; Paul Beier; Maria José Assunção-Albuquerque; Luis Cayuela
      Pages: 152 - 158
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 March 2015
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Fábio Suzart de Albuquerque , Blas Benito , Paul Beier , Maria Assunção-Albuquerque , Luis Cayuela
      The third largest biodiversity hotspot of the world, Mesoamerican forests are declining due to human pressures. Based on species distribution models calibrated for 1224 native tree species in Mesoamerica, we identified high-value forest conservation areas (FCA) at the resolution of a 10km×10km cells using the Zonation Reserve Selection software, and investigated whether these FCAs cells are well represented by the World Database on Protected Areas (WDPA) network. We had three key findings. First, dry forest is the least protected biome in Mesoamerica (4.5% protected), indicating that further action to safeguard this biome is warranted. Secondly, the poor overlap between protected areas (PAs) and FCAs found herein may provide evidence that the establishment of PAs may not be fully accounting for tree priority rank map. Third, high percentages of forest cover and FCA still need to be represented by the PA network. Because deforestation rates are still increasing in this region, Mesoamerica needs funding and coordinated action by policy makers, national and local governmental and non-governmental organizations, conservationists and other stakeholders.

      PubDate: 2015-05-05T12:44:25Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2015.02.001
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Species extinction risk might increase out of reserves: allowances for
           conservation of threatened butterfly Actinote quadra (Lepidoptera:
           Nymphalidae) under global warming

    • Authors: Thadeu Sobral-Souza; Ronaldo Bastos Francini; Matheus Souza Lima-Ribeiro
      Pages: 159 - 165
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 December 2015
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Thadeu Sobral-Souza, Ronaldo Bastos Francini, Matheus Lima-Ribeiro
      Climate change is an important factor affecting species dispersal and distribution through time and the accelerated global warming has currently concerned decision makers and conservationists. Because protected areas are spatially static, species extinction risk is generally expected to increase under climate change scenarios as a consequence of range shift and decrease. This study aims to understand the current conservation status of Actinote quadra, a neotropical threatened butterfly species, as well as predict how it will be in the future. By coupling ecological niche modeling and climatic simulations, we predicted the species distribution in different future global warming scenarios (2050 and 2070) and estimated the proportion of species range overlapping protected areas through time. Our findings showed a generalized decrease of the potential distribution of A. quadra in the end of 21st century, with the most prominent range loss predicted to occur out of protected areas. Although climate change will potentially drive A. quadra into reserves, the predicted range collapse would be enough to increase its extinction risk from vulnerable, like currently categorized, to the status of critically endangered in accordance to IUCN red list criteria. Taking into account the fragmented and discontinuous landscapes across the Atlantic Forest's hotspot, we propose a conservation strategy for A. quadra based on potential ecological corridors linking climatically suitable areas and discuss the need for amplifying and connecting the current protected areas to maintain this threatened species at longer time under a global warming scenario.

      PubDate: 2015-12-04T22:27:57Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2015.11.009
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Measuring the variability of the drosophilid assemblages associated with
           forests of the Brazilian savanna across temporal and spatial scales

    • Authors: Renata Alves da Mata; Francisco Roque; Rosana Tidon
      Pages: 166 - 170
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 November 2015
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Renata Alves da Mata, Francisco Roque, Rosana Tidon
      The relevant scales over which specific communities vary must be identified to address fundamental ecological questions and to advance the conservation of biological diversity. In this study, the variation among drosophilid assemblages associated with forests was quantified at a large temporal–spatial scale. Our results are based on data collected in four conservation units (CUs) in the Brazilian savanna across four seasons and two years. The primary component of variation occurred at the temporal scale: it was three times greater than that of the spatial scale. Significant variability was also found in the interaction between seasons and CUs. Measuring the temporal and spatial variability of drosophilid diversity in forests contributed to the improvement of the methodological framework supporting such assemblages as bioindicators and provided important insights into the mechanisms behind the dynamic patterns in time and space that ultimately can improve our understanding of Cerrado biodiversity.

      PubDate: 2015-11-29T22:23:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2015.11.005
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Burning management mediates the coexistence of plant species in a
           semi-natural grassland

    • Authors: Takeshi Osawa
      Pages: 171 - 177
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 December 2015
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Takeshi Osawa
      Miscanthus sinensis-dominated semi-natural grassland is one component of a typical Satoyama landscape. M. sinensis most notably forms ring patches as a result of human management, which includes the removal of aboveground stems by burning. In this study, I hypothesized that M. sinensis aids the coexistence of several plant species under managed conditions because of its notable ring patches. To test this hypothesis I monitored the richness of plant species inside and outside M. sinensis ring patches for 5 years, which included one non-managed year, and compared richness between managed and non-managed years. Results showed that species richness was higher inside than outside patches in all cases, but that this effect was more prominent in managed years than in the non-managed year. Consequently, human management is promoting the coexistence of plant species in M. sinensis-dominated semi-natural grassland. Human management will likely play an important role in conserving plant species diversity in semi-natural grasslands by changing relationships among plants.

      PubDate: 2015-12-04T22:27:57Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2015.11.004
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Assessing the importance of riparian zones conservation for leaf
           decomposition in streams

    • Authors: Cinthia G. Casotti; Walace P. Kiffer; Larissa C. Costa; Juliana V. Rangel; Lorena C. Casagrande; Marcelo S. Moretti
      Pages: 178 - 182
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 December 2015
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Cinthia G. Casotti, Walace P. Kiffer, Larissa Corteletti, Juliana V. Rangel, Lorena C. Casagrande, Marcelo S. Moretti
      Because of changes in riparian zones and water properties, human disturbances in terrestrial ecosystems can affect the decomposition of organic matter and invertebrate assemblages in forest streams. The aim of this study was to evaluate how changes in the riparian zones influenced leaf breakdown rates and colonization by invertebrate shredders. Leaves of Miconia chartacea were incubated in four streams of the same watershed that presented different conservation levels in the riparian zones. Leaf breakdown rates were higher in the presence of shredders and in the most preserved stream. In terms of abundance and biomass, shredders differed among streams, and the importance of these organisms on leaf decomposition decreased in altered streams. These results suggest the conservation level in the riparian zones influenced leaf decomposition mediated by shredders, and the observed decrease in breakdown rates was probably due to the high sensitivity of shredders to changes in the availability of food resources and habitat.

      PubDate: 2015-12-04T22:27:57Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2015.11.011
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Illegal hunting and fishing in Brazil: a study based on data provided by
           environmental military police

    • Authors: Aline Torres de Azevedo Chagas; Maisa Aparecida da Costa; Ana Paula Vimieiro Martins; Leonardo Cardoso Resende; Evanguedes Kalapothakis
      Pages: 183 - 189
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 December 2015
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Aline Torres de Azevedo Chagas, Maisa Aparecida da Costa, Ana Paula Vimieiro Martins, Leonardo Cardoso Resende, Evanguedes Kalapothakis
      Illegal hunting and fishing activities are of great relevance to conservation policies. Few studies with regional focus of the impacts of these activities in Brazil are available. The aim of this study was to characterize illegal hunting and fishing on a national level by collecting data from the environmental police. We analyzed reports prepared by 16 states, all of them which contained a variety of information about seized species, and showed a lack of standardization of data collection and presentation. Illegal fish seizures were predominantly of Amazonian species. Illegal hunting seizures showed the most uniform territorial distribution. Armadillos (Dasypodidae family), pacas (Cuniculus paca), and capybaras (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris) were the most frequently seized species, and numerous seizures of Brazilian guinea pig (Cavia aperea) were reported in northeastern Brazil. The reports provided by environmental military police have great informative power for conservation policies, but they must be standardized among states to improve the quality of data provided and analysis.

      PubDate: 2015-12-04T22:27:57Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2015.11.002
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • The Red Queen race in Brazilian Amazon deforestation: the necessity of a
           sustainable economy to zero deforestation

    • Authors: Rodrigo Antônio de Souza; Paulo De Marco
      Pages: 190 - 192
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 November 2015
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Rodrigo Antônio de Souza, Paulo De Marco


      PubDate: 2015-11-29T22:23:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2015.11.007
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Policy reversals do not bode well for conservation in Brazilian Amazonia

    • Authors: João Vitor Campos-Silva; Sinomar Ferreira da Fonseca Junior; Carlos Augusto da Silva Peres
      Pages: 193 - 195
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 November 2015
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): João Vitor Campos-Silva, Sinomar F. Fonseca Junior, Carlos A. Peres


      PubDate: 2015-11-29T22:23:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2015.11.006
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Dams, politics and drought threat: the march of folly in Brazilian
           freshwaters ecosystems

    • Authors: Dilermando Pereira Lima Junior; André Lincoln Barroso Magalhães; Jean Ricardo Simões Vitule
      Pages: 196 - 198
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 November 2015
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Dilermando Pereira Lima Júnior, André Magalhães, Jean Ricardo Simões Vitule


      PubDate: 2015-11-29T22:23:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2015.11.003
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Pulling the plug: strategies to preclude expansion of dams in Brazilian
           rivers with high-priority for conservation

    • Authors: Igor de Paiva Affonso; Robertson Fonseca Azevedo; Natália Lacerda Carneiro dos Santos; Rosa Maria Dias; Angelo Antonio Agostinho; Luiz Carlos Gomes
      Pages: 199 - 203
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 November 2015
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Igor de Paiva Affonso, Robertson Fonseca de Azevedo, Natália Lacerda Carneiro dos Santos, Rosa Maria Dias, Angelo Antonio Agostinho, Luiz Carlos Gomes
      The unrestrained ongoing construction of dams in rivers of high-priority for conservation represents a common threat to environment and surrounding societies. In Brazil, despite several known negative impacts assigned to poorly planned construction of dams, Federal and State Governments maintain the policy of expansion of the hydroelectric matrix. The outcome includes impoundments of remaining rivers that are extremely important for biodiversity conservation. Here, we suggest strategies to prevent dams in remaining rivers proven to be of high priority for conservation or with potential to social disruption. Besides, we report a successful case study in areas of two important remaining tributaries of the Paraná River (the most dammed river in the Neotropics), Brazil, where the enactment of municipal laws protecting areas of the basins, initiatives to indicate features of the rivers as heritages and the creation of protected areas are among the effective measures to prevent new dams. Distinctive features in this effort have been the exchange of information among different stakeholders and the consequent empowerment of local actors. The strategies presented here are indicated to halt projects of new dams and are applicable and encouraged to be adopted throughout Brazil, provided that some aspects found in Paraná State may occur elsewhere.

      PubDate: 2015-12-04T22:27:57Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2015.11.008
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Some trees do not necessarily mean a forest: a criticism to Ramos and
           Anjos (2014)

    • Authors: Marcos Ricardo Bornschein
      Pages: 204 - 206
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 October 2015
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Marcos Ricardo Bornschein
      Ramos and Anjos (2014) worked with birds in two riparian “forests” from the northwest of the state of Paraná, southern Brazil, to evaluate how the width and biotic integrity of the “forests” affected the communities. One of their conclusions was that riparian forest should be expanded to a minimum of 50m of width on each side of a stream. I believe that Ramos and Anjos (2014) compared different environments with different sampling areas: one sampled area was covered by secondary vegetation, which has so far not reached the forest stage, and showed approximately 30% less arboreal vegetation than the second sampled area. This undermines some of the claims made by Ramos and Anjos (2014), for example that the riparian vegetation should be expanded to a minimum of 50m. The minimum width of the riparian forests must be better evaluated comparing samples of vegetation at similar regeneration stages.

      PubDate: 2015-10-30T17:01:20Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2015.10.002
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Water shortage: a glimpse into the future

    • Authors: Rafael Loyola; Luis Mauricio Bini
      Pages: 1 - 2
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 June 2015
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Rafael Loyola , Luis Mauricio Bini


      PubDate: 2015-06-11T22:17:23Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2015.05.004
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • Solving problems involving the distribution of a species of unknown
           distribution via ecological niche modeling

    • Authors: Juliana Hipólito; Érica Hasui; Blandina F. Viana
      Pages: 15 - 23
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 May 2015
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Juliana Hipólito , Érica Hasui , Blandina F. Viana
      Unlike species with widespread distributions, few predictive models have been constructed for species with restricted or unknown distributions. One example of such a poorly studied species is Aristolochia gigantea, for which very conflicting information has been reported regarding its distribution. In this study, we present A. gigantea's distribution and range, the environmental factors responsible for its distribution and comments about the information available in the existing literature. The model of A. gigantea's distribution identified new areas that can be surveyed to potentially find new populations, and our results reinforce the importance of predictive models for studying the distributions of species, suggesting that ecological niche modeling can provide important contributions to the analysis of biogeographic patterns in little-studied plant species.

      PubDate: 2015-05-05T12:44:25Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.ncon.2015.03.001
      Issue No: Vol. 13, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • Synthesis of the first 10 years of long-term ecological research in
           Amazonian Forest ecosystem – implications for conservation and
           management

    • Authors: Fernanda Costa; Capellotto Costa William Magnusson Elizabeth Franklin Jansen Zuanon
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 May 2015
      Source:Natureza & Conservação
      Author(s): Fernanda V. Costa , Flávia R. Capellotto Costa , William E. Magnusson , Elizabeth Franklin , Jansen Zuanon , Renato Cintra , Flávio Luizão , José Luís C. Camargo , Ana Andrade , William Laurance , Fabrício Baccaro , Jorge Souza , Helder Espírito-Santo
      We present a synthesis of the first 10 years of Long Term Ecological Research project in Amazonian Forest. We elucidate the natural dynamics of forest ecosystem processes and associated biota, and its changes caused by distinct pressures of selective timber extraction and forest fragmentation. We found that, for both plants and animals, densities of individuals and distribution of species assemblages are spatially heterogeneous in the mesoscale, even in relatively undisturbed forests, and that associations with topo-edaphic variables allow prediction of a considerable part of this variation. For biological groups whose dynamics were studied in the short-term, levels of change in species composition and densities were relatively high, and these changes were generally in tune with spatial environmental variation. The impact of selective logging on assemblages and ecosystem processes was normally moderate, and around 19 years were needed for recovering forest biomass and tree size distribution. Continued studies are needed to determine the time required for recuperation of timber stocks and pre-logging floristic composition. Selective logging appears to be compatible with the biodiversity conservation, but reduction and better planning of roads access may be more important than planned logging intensities. Habitat loss’ impact on organisms and ecosystem processes is large and long-lasting, once it induces the privation of many taxonomic groups’ species, higher tree mortality and accelerated forest dynamics. There was a negative synergy between the impacts of habitat loss and climatic changes, and a better understanding of these processes can only be obtained through long-term research.

      PubDate: 2015-05-10T15:08:29Z
       
 
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